Category Archives: natural menopause remedies

Relief For Menopause

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what is a Simple, Ayurvedic, or Homeopathic medicine for chronic rhinitis which may be related to menopause?
    My wife (45 yrs) is presently at menopause, suffering from chronic rhinitis which can be relieved by anti-allergic medicines like Citrizine but recurrs immidietely. She has never suffered from chronic rhinitis in past.Experts please advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Her respiratory system is narrowed and conjested with mucus and easy to get relief by bronchodialators (nebulizer) in a hospital for the first time.
      Regular use of inhalers like salbair (sos) is necessary
      Ayurvedic medicine do not give instant relief for long term use it is ok

  2. QUESTION:
    Besides HRT, is there anything I can do to deal with skin changes at menopause?
    I am 50 years old. As I get closer to full menopause, my skin is becoming dry, scaly and itchy (severe at times). My family doctor has prescribed an ointment and then a lotion which did not help. OTC's have not helped. Other than HRT, is there anything that I can do?

    • ANSWER:
      Here I go with the thyroid again but it does play a major role in menopause. It acts like a cranky little thermostat and is the cause of our nuclear hot flashes in the middle of the night...whew!! During menopause it tends to go bonkers on us and cause a myriad of uncomfortable symptoms like dry hair, dry itchy skin, heavy periods, scattered light periods, sudden chills, sudden flashes. Oh, it is a beast of a gland to be so small. Your dry skin could be the beginning of many menopausal symptoms due to spontaneous low or high thyroid activity. Your doc must have prescribed a steroidal ointment? That should have worked but since it didn't try to see an endocrinologist, a gland specialist. A simple blood test should reveal any thyroid problem. As for OTC products, I have many adopted troops in the deserts of Iraq and they ask specifically for "Aveeno" lotion for their cracked dry skin. It's dermatologist recommended and there are several kinds for specific skin problems but for dry, scaly skin the "Stress Relief Moisturizing Lotion" is absolutely wonderful! The plastic pump bottle says, "Calms and relaxes with lavender, chamomile and ylang ylang". "Moisturizes for 24 hours...with colloidal oatmeal". Thanks to my troops I finally have something that works for my dry hands, too and I am hypothyroidal. I know how you are suffering and I hope this helps. Most pharmacies like Walgreens carry it. I think I paid around 9 or 10 dollars for 12 fluid oz. but you really don't have to apply much to get great soothing results.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are some good natural remedies for female AND male menopause.?
    I am beginning menopause and dont really want to do the hormone replacement thing. Are there any good otc natural remedies to help with the many symptoms? also, lucky us, my husband, I believe is going through male menopause, are there any mens' otc help? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of women get relief from Remifemin which continas black cohosh.

      Can't help your husband. Are you sure he's going through menopause? Could he be going out in sympathy? A friend's husband would feel things on her behalf (no joke) and the doctor told her that it was so bad that he would likely feel the labour pains when she gave birth.

  4. QUESTION:
    What do you do if your mom is going through menopause?
    Okay im a teenager with a mom who i think is going through menopause. seriously its hell. she picks on me all the time and doesnt give a break. she has weird moments which i never saw b4. how do you deal with this?

    • ANSWER:
      What you can do is to communicate openly with her about her physical and emotional condition. You may suggest her to talk about her symptoms and how they affect her mood with other women who experience menopause before. Try to establish some mutual rules for resolving family issues and avoiding unnecessary conflicts.

      You also can suggest her to take some herbal menopause treatment like the one mention in our website which will help her to relief menopause symptom.

  5. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if your mom is going through menopause?
    I don't even know if I spelled the word 'menopause' right, but how do you know if your mom is going through it? What are some signs?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom would experience hot flashes, night sweats and chills which are the common menopause symptoms. Such symptoms are extremely uncomfortable where most women definitely looking for a relief to ease the discomfort. Try an all natural health product for such condition just like Hot Flash Freedom.

  6. QUESTION:
    How Much Water Do I Need To Take With Menersa?
    My menopause symptoms for the last 3 months have been really awful (night sweats, angry moods, weight gain, and vaginal dryness) . My doctor recommended Menersa for menopause relief. He said my water intake needed to increase as well because I am a bit dehydrated. I don't like to drink water but prefer soda. My doctor said I needed to cut out the caffeine as well because that is supposedly making my symptoms worse as well. How much water should I drink each day with it?

    • ANSWER:
      My Wife drinks 5-7 glasses of water a day. She also has been on Menersa for 4 months to control her menopause symptoms. She is having great results with Menersa. We are both very pleased.

  7. QUESTION:
    what vegetables are good for menopause?
    I want to know what green leafy vegy's and what kind of nutmeats are good for hot flash relief. I do know kale and spinach is just a few. I'm at the tail end of it and hope it ends soon. Sometimes it depends on what I eat that cause them to happen. I find potatoes and some dairy. Soy ,a little at times helps but too much can cause a problem. Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      chocolate is good. cashews are what my doc recommended. herbally we hear yams, dong quai i used these. and got through without flashes. more energy now.

  8. QUESTION:
    How can I ease my menopausal symptoms naturally?
    I have menopause symptoms and they are full blown. Its driving my crazy trying to deal with it everyday. Also I have a milk allergy which doesn't help. Can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      There are natural and herbal remedies to help deal with the symptoms of menopause.

      Here are a few other suggestions for easing the transition…

      1. Add soy to your nutritional plan.
      2. Eat a diet rich in leafy green vegetables as well as more fruits.
      3. Get adequate amounts of daily exercise including
      both cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.
      (See more under Osteoporosis prevention)
      4. Add vitamins and minerals to your daily diet. Calcium, Vitamin D
      and Magnesium aid in strengthening your bones and
      preventing Osteoporosis.

      Fore more information for natural menopause relief I suggest you visit this site.

      http://bestproducts.awardspace.com/menopauserelief.html

  9. QUESTION:
    What do you do to help relieve hot flashes?
    I'm writing a paper in school about menopause and the experiences of women who have stopped taking hormones. Could you help me out and answer a short survey?

    • ANSWER:
      Hot flashes can be relieved, by placing a cool towel over your stomach, and a cool cloth over your forehead. When I was pregnant, I experienced hot flashes, and this worked for me. Also, a cool eucalyptus bath is nice. If you are on the go, then you can take a bottle of cold water along with you as well as a cloth. When you have a hot flash, wet your cloth, and wipe your face, neck, chest, and also your arm pits.
      This all may seem weird, but hot flashes are no fun, and anything that helps is a relief. It worked for me.

  10. QUESTION:
    Have you had any relief from menopause symptoms WITHOUT any HRT?
    I am interested in learning about treatments without any type of hormones. I do not even want the bioidenticals. Please let me know if you have tried anything else for hot flashes, dry skin, dry mouth, irregular sleep patterns, stiffness, etc. Thank You very much.

    • ANSWER:
      Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  11. QUESTION:
    What is a good vaginal lotion to use A very good friend of mine is having a problem with dryness?
    I think it's menopause and it's causing her to bleed, not good

    • ANSWER:
      I will recommend Replens which is the UK's number one longer-lasting vaginal moisturiser. Replens is hormone-free and provides relief from the symptoms of vaginal atrophy, dryness, irritation, discomfort and painful intercourse for up to three days at a time, from just one application. Regardless of the level of discomfort, vaginal dryness can impact your daily life. Replens offers soothing, immediate relief that lasts for days!

  12. QUESTION:
    What is the the best treatment for pre-menapause symptoms apart from hormone replacement therapy?
    I am a lady, 44 years of age and am going through the pre-menapause symptoms especially headaches, hot flashes, irregular periods and digestive disorders. Ive been to my GP and said he can only prescribe HRT if my symptoms get worse and only gave me some pain killers. I understood clearly the reasons why the GP could not prescribe the HRT and i would like to go through the process without them. I have done some browsing on the internet and im trying a few things which are not giving me an immediate relief i need as i have to work almost daily. If there is someone who knows what i am talking about, can they share their experiences so i can learn from them.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.nutrihealth.org/pages/menopause.html

  13. QUESTION:
    Why does going through the menopause make you put weight on your tummy?
    Im going through the menopause, and coping mostly! But im finding i put on weight so easily around my middle and tummy. Why is this and is there anything I can do? Im not taking any medicines to help with my menopause symptoms, so far. Has anyone found any usual treatments or supplements to take? thanks xx

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know if this the one that my auntie is taking right now. But tried to research about the health supplement MX Menopause Factor. I've read good reviews about this supplement. They said it's the best supplementation that offers relief from night sweats and hot flashes; Balanced moods and sleep support; Support for other body systems and conditions and more. Might you researched for that to know more. Hope this helps you :)

  14. QUESTION:
    I have symptoms of both anxiety panic attacks and premenopause. How can i figure out which one i have?
    my symptoms are: anxiety, not being able to sleep late at night, nausea, wanting to be outside in the fresh air, rational thoughts. Has anybody ever heard lydia pinkham herbal tablets (they say it's good for menstruation and menopause?) By the way I am 37 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      You can talk to your doctor for a proper diagnosis. I had my first panic attack when I was 37. It scared the crap out of me! I didn't know what was happening, but I thought I was dying. Both my general practitioner and ob/gyn diagnosed anxiety attacks. Both said that it is very commom at this age. I found relief in zoloft. It has been over 4 years, and I still take it. The side effects were temporary, and completely tolerable. I work full time, and am able to enjoy a normal life with my husband and children. I have never tried those tablets, but I have tried self help books, tapes, tea, etc. I have found that exercise really helps me. When I feel an onsetof an attack, I will do tasks like clean floors, fold clothes, re-arrange drawers, or anything that doesn't require a lot of concentration until it subsides.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can partial seizures occur once a month regularly and last for the whole day recurring about every hour?
    My friend has been having them since her menopause started. Her EEG and MRI were normal and her doctor says it is depression.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the Ontario Epilepsy website
      http://www.epilepsyontario.org/client/EO/EOWeb.nsf/web/
      which describes as many seizure types as there are(a lot!). I looked up both partial seizures simple and complex. Then I looked at this types. The key here is that these are rooted in emotional issues, there is no EEG abnormality and that medication for epilepsy is ineffective. Since she only gets the seizures once a month, it could well be tied into some kind of menstrual issue surrounding menopause. I hope this helps you out.

      Psychogenic Seizures

      (Pseudo-seizures)

      Psychogenic seizures are not classified as a form of epilepsy. They affect between 5 and 20 percent of people thought to have epilepsy. Psychogenic seizures can occur at any age, but are more common in people under the age of 55. They occur 3 times more frequently in women than men. They may arise from various psychological factors, may be prompted by stress, and may occur in response to suggestion. It has also been found that such disorders may be self-induced. They may be used to get attention, to be excused from work, to collect financial compensation, or merely to escape an intolerable social situation. They seldom occur in the absence of others. Trauma related to physical illness has been found to trigger these seizures in elderly individuals. People with early-onset psychogenic seizures often have a history of sexual abuse.

      Psychogenic seizures can be characterized by features common with epilepsy like writhing and thrashing movements, quivering, screaming or talking sounds, and falling to the floor. Psychogenic attacks differ from epileptic seizures in that out-of-phase movements of the upper and lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, and side-to-side head movements are evident. However, psychogenic seizures vary from one occurrence to another and are not readily stereotyped. Indicators like pupillary dilation, depressed corneal reflexes, the presence of Babinski responses, autonomic cardiorespiratory changes, tongue biting and urinary/fecal incontinence are more probable with epilepsy and are not usually manifested in psychogenic seizures.

      Psychogenic seizures may last a couple of minutes or hours, ending as abruptly as they began. Anxiety may be experienced prior to an attack, followed by relief and relaxation afterwards, leading some to postulate that psychogenic seizures may occur as a direct response to stress in order to relieve tension. Afterwards, patients usually have a vague recollection of the seizure, without the usual postictal symptoms of drowsiness and depression.

      It is difficult to differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures. However, one highly reliable indicator of a psychogenic seizure is eye closure during the seizure; when people with epilepsy have seizures the eyes tend to remain open. Still, statistics indicate that, in 20-30% of cases, epileptologists are incorrect in attempting to distinguish one from the other. Although psychogenic seizures are not caused by electrical discharges in the brain and thus do not register any EEG abnormalities, they are often mistaken for epileptic disorders. It is also possible to have both psychogenic seizures and epilepsy. Most patients with psychogenic seizures are misdiagnosed and consequently treated with epilepsy drugs or other epilepsy therapies, sometimes with severe and fatal side effects.

      Medications are ineffective in the treatment of psychogenic disorders. Patients who are diagnosed with psychogenic seizures are usually referred to a therapist, to learn to control stress and become familiar with coping techniques. Since the vast majority of psychogenic seizures operate on a psychological level, behavioral manipulation methods may be used.

  16. QUESTION:
    Are mild cramps common or normal after Menopause?
    I am 52 and have not had a period for 2 or 3 years. Probably 2 out of 7 days a week I have mild cramping on and off. Never any spotting. Since I still have a roller coaster of emotions and other menopause symptoms, it seems to me it might be normal.
    Thank you in advance for your wisdom!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      Its a normal. Many women faces the same and got worried. So Don't worry. Take a proper diet food include lots of vitamins into it. Do regular exercise. This will help you to take relief from cramps.

  17. QUESTION:
    So what can I expect during menopause?
    I just got my test results today to say I am in my menopause. I am 49. So far I've had no symptoms or discomfort. Is this a sign that I might skip all the uncomfortable side effects, or is it too soon to say? Also what kinds of supplements are best for calcium and what kinds of exercise can I motivate myself to do, as I really hate it?

    • ANSWER:
      During the perimenopausal transition, a woman's estrogen levels decrease, leading to the typical symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, problems with concentration or mood, vaginal dryness...the list goes on. Some options for relief include hormone replacement therapy (HRT), an alternative medical therapy, or herbal remedies

  18. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to take black cohosh for periods if i am a teenager?
    Black Cohosh is supposed to be used for menopause symptoms relief, but can i use it for period pain like cramps, stomach upset, bloating etc? I'm 15 years old, so will this be detrimental to be 'womanly' health? Also i can't find any other pain killers so this is my only option.

    • ANSWER:
      Please stay away from it, you are to young to be taking any herb for "hormonal imbalance", they can cause serious problems in the future.

  19. QUESTION:
    Do any female animals experience menopause?
    If so, at what age do they experience it and what are the signs of menopause in say for example a rabbit.

    If not, how can you tell that an animal is to old to conceive a baby animal.

    I am mostly wondering about rabbits but I also want to know about any animal.

    • ANSWER:
      Humans (female) are a species that experience menopause. Info follows:

      Menopause
      Menopause is quite simply the final pause of menstruation. This phase of a woman's life is part of the natural aging process. It is not a disease or a disaster. Your ovaries slowly reduce the level of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) they produce and child bearing is no longer an option. For many women this is a big relief. Generally speaking, health professionals agree that 52 is the average age when full menopause takes affect. The full age range is between 42 to 56.

      Menopause is preceded by perimenopause and followed by post menopause. All three stages come with their own telltale signs with considerable overlap from one to the other. So, unlike the beginning of your period, which seems to happen in a single moment of time, menopause is very wishy washy. Full menopause is considered to be in effect when you have not had your period for a full year.

      Menopause is not experienced by all women in the same way. Much depends on the individual's diet, lifestyle, genetics and attitudes held by the woman, her family, culture and society about aging. If you come from a world that does not respect older people, and is narrowly focused on youth, your menopause transition period may be more difficult to navigate. However, you may also experience deep personal growth and a strong sense of liberation.

      Be aware that our commercialized society will try to medicalize your symptoms. Be wise. Look for natural alternatives before getting on the pill band wagon. Weigh the risks and benefits carefully. Become your own authority.

      There is a home-use test that you can take to determine if you are perimenopausal or fully menopausal. U.S Food and Drug Administration approved kits measure Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland. FSH levels increase temporarily each month to stimulate your ovaries to produce eggs. When you enter menopause and your ovaries stop working your FSH levels also increase. The test will provide a FSH level reading so that you can determine what stage of "the Pause" you are at.

      As for rabbits, this study may interest you:

      Lack of difference among progestins on the anti-atherogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol: a rabbit study
      Peter Alexandersen1,3, Jens Haarbo1, Pieter Zandberg2, Jørgen Jespersen1, Sven O. Skouby1 and Claus Christiansen1
      1 Center for Clinical & Basic Research, Ballerup Byvej 222, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark and 2 Department of Vascular Pharmacology, N.V.Organon, Molenstraat 110, 5340 BH Oss, The Netherlands

      3 To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: pa@ccbr.dk

      Abstract
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      BACKGROUND: Progestins in combination with estrogen are believed to have different effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different oral contraceptive formulations on the development of experimental atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity. METHODS: A total of 160 sexually mature rabbits were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to equally large groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) ethinyl estradiol (EE 70 µg/day, oral), (iii) desogestrel (DSG 525 µg/day, oral), (iv) gestodene (GSD 262.5 µg/day, oral), (v) levonorgestrel (LNG 525 µg/day, oral), (vi) EE + DSG, (vii) EE + LNG, or (viii) EE + GSD. After 31 weeks of treatment, aortic accumulation of cholesterol and vascular vasoreactivity (in vitro) were determined. RESULTS: Progestins alone did not reduce the accumulation of cholesterol. EE alone or in combination with a progestin reduced the accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (P < 0.0001). Isolated vessels from EE-treated animals relaxed significantly more to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine than did placebo (P < 0.001), whereas vessels treated with EE plus a progestin showed an intermediate response. CONCLUSION: The progestins investigated can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE.

      Key words: atherosclerosis/estrogen/progestins/rabbits/vascular reactivity

      Introduction
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The question of whether oral contraceptive (OC) formulations increase the risk of arterial events (such as myocardial infarction) in younger women remains unsolved. Several recent case–control studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction in women using OC compared with non-users (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Lewis, 1998; Dunn et al., 1999; 2001; Farley et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001; Rosendaal et al., 2002), although other recent data have not confirmed this observation (Sidney et al., 1998). Recent European studies have indicated that OC use is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, in contrast to US studies that found no increased risk among OC users (Lewis 1998; Sidney et al., 1998). Only a few studies have directly compared the effect on myocardial infarction of OC formulations containing a second-generation progestin (levonorgestrel) with those containing third-generation progestins (desogestrel or gestodene) (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Dunn et al., 2001; Tanis et al., 2001), but they were all designed as case–control studies; the reported relative risk in these studies varies (between 0.3 and 1.8), and the numbers are small.

      The relative preponderance in venous events (e.g. deep venous thrombosis) as compared with arterial events (e.g. myocardial infarction) in pre-menopausal women is gradually equalized as the menopause is reached, so that the relative frequency of these events is close to 1:1 in peri-menopausal women. Since OC are prescribed for millions of pre-menopausal (and peri-menopausal) women who use these formulations for many years, it would be of the utmost public health importance to establish even a small increase in the relative risk. Therefore, the issue of OC in relation to arterial disease is highly relevant. It should be borne in mind, however, that it is possible that for both OC and HRT users, there may be prothrombotic mechanisms in relation to arterial as well as venous complications that are not necessarily based on atherosclerosis, but that are reflected in the population-based studies. Primary (Rossouw et al., 2002) and secondary (Grady et al., 2002) prevention studies of HRT have failed to show cardioprotection in post-menopausal women.

      We report here the results from an experimental study in rabbits of atherosclerosis designed to investigate the effect of estrogen (ethinyl estradiol, EE) in combination with levonorgestrel (LNG), desogestrel (DSG), or gestodene (GSD) on vascular reactivity, lipoprotein metabolism, and the aortic accumulation of cholesterol.

      Materials and methods
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Study design
      A total of 160 sexually mature female rabbits of the Danish Country strain (SSC:CPH) were obtained from Statens Serum Institute, Denmark. They were individually housed at room temperature (20 ± 2°C), a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%, and with a 12 h light cycle. The study was conducted in the animal facilities at the Center for Clinical & Basic Research (CCBR), Ledoeje, Denmark. After a 2 week period of acclimatization, the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy to inhibit intrinsic production of sex hormones (Alexandersen et al., 1998). One week after surgery, the rabbits were then randomly assigned to one of the following eight treatment groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) EE (orally, 70 µg/day), (iii) DSG (orally, 525 µg/day), (iv) GSD (orally, 262.5 µg/day), (v) LNG (orally, 525 µg/day), (vi) EE continuously combined with DSG (doses as above) (EE + DSG), (vii) EE continuously combined with LNG (doses as above) (EE + LNG), or (viii) EE continuously combined with GSD (doses as above) (EE + GSD). We did not include a sham-operated group in this study as it was previously shown that sham operation per se in rabbits results in a mean accumulation of cholesterol that was not statistically significant from that of the non-treated control group (Haarbo et al., 1992). Hormone doses used in this study were chosen based on previous experience with these doses (the McPhail test in rabbits; EE, LNG and DSG) (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) or from in-house studies (GSD). The EE dose used was kept constant in all EE groups throughout the study period (31 weeks). We used the rabbit to evaluate the effect of sex steroids on atherogenesis because it is known to be a useful model of experimental atherosclerosis (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Sulistiyani et al., 1995).

      Key effect variables of the study comprised aortic atherosclerosis (i.e. fatty streaks and plaque formation), and vascular reactivity (primary key variables); and body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins, uterus wet weight, hepatic cholesterol content, uterine estrogen receptor content, liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count (secondary key variables).

      The study was approved and overviewed by the Experimental Animals Committee under the Danish Ministry of Justice. All procedures complied with the Danish guidelines for experimental animal studies.

      Rabbit chow
      Each rabbit was fed 100 g of chow per day throughout the entire study. The cholesterol-rich chow was prepared by first dissolving the hormone or the combination of hormones (all provided by N.V. Organon, The Netherlands) in ethanol (96%; 0.50 ml per animal per day), then mixing with maize oil (Unikem, Denmark). Another mixture was prepared by dissolving cholesterol (SIGC-8503; Bie & Berntsen A/S, Denmark) in maize oil by slow heating. The hormone solution and the cholesterol solution containing maize oil (total daily intake of maize oil was 8 ml per animal) were then mixed manually together with the pellets (Altromin 2123, Brogaarden, Denmark), as previously described (Alexandersen et al., 1998). Food consumption was monitored weekly by weighing remaining chow. All animals had free access to water.

      Blood samples
      Blood samples were taken at baseline (week 0) and in weeks 6, 14 and 30. Blood samples were collected from a lateral ear vein on fasting animals (24 h) and analysed at the CCBR laboratory (Ballerup, Denmark) immediately after collection, except for the progestin concentrations that were assessed at Organon.

      Safety variables
      Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, leukocyte count (Sysmex K-1000; Toa Medical Electronics, Inc., USA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) (Cobas Mira Plus; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., F.Hoffmann–La Roche, Switzerland) were determined in weeks 0, 6, 14 and 30.

      Serum lipids and lipoproteins
      Total serum cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured enzymatically by kinetic colorimetric methods (Cobas Mira). Ultracentrifuged lipoproteins were determined regularly throughout the study as described in detail elsewhere (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Alexandersen et al., 1998).

      Serum progestin concentrations
      A kinetic study was performed after 16 weeks of treatment to determine the serum concentrations of the respective progestins. Blood samples were taken before dosing, and then again 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h after dosing, but taking only two samples per animal in each group (providing 40 samples per group), to give an impression of the pharmacokinetic profile of these compounds. These hormone concentrations were determined at Organon’s laboratories.

      Desogestrel
      DSG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng DSG per ml plasma DSG and its internal standard (IS), an analogue of DSG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 325.4 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 147.2 for DSG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.1 for its IS.

      Gestodene
      GSD study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of GSD per ml plasma. GSD and its IS, an analogue of GSD, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Hypersil BDS C18 column. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 311.0 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.1 for GSD and m/z 339.10 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.20 for its IS.

      Levonorgestrel
      LNG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of LNG per ml plasma. LNG and its IS, an analogue of LNG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 313.3 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.2 for LNG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.10 for its IS.

      Aortic accumulation of cholesterol
      Necropsy (week 32) was done with an i.v. injection of 1–2 ml of mebumal (pentobarbital) 20% solution. The thoracic aorta (just above the aortic valves to the level of the diaphragm) was dissected free, and the connective tissue adhering to the adventitia was then carefully removed under running saline. The aorta was cut longitudinally and the luminal surface was rinsed with saline. The vessel was fixed at the corners with pins onto a piece of paper on a corkboard. The tissue was separated in two parts (a proximal and a distal part) at the level of the first intercostal arteries. The proximal part was utilized to strip the luminal layer containing the intima and part of the media from the underlying media/adventitia. The proximal part was weighed and stored at –20°C until analysed. For analysis, the luminal layer of the aortic tissue was minced and the lipids were extracted chemically with chloroform and methanol (2:1, vol/vol) over 24 h. The lipids were separated from the proteins (Haarbo et al., 1991). The total aortic cholesterol content in the tissue specimens was measured enzymatically after the fraction containing cholesterol had been taken to dryness by heating and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of 2-propanol. The amount of protein in the aorta was measured as described by Lowry (1951). The weight of the heart was recorded.

      Morphometric analysis of aortic plaque area
      The aorta (comprising the ascendant part, the arch, and the descendant part, from the aortic valves and to the first intercostal artery) was opened longitudinally and rinsed in 50% ethanol and dyed in Sudan Red for 1 min. Each aortic tissue dyed was projected onto a horizontal surface with a projecting videocamera (JAI 2040 Protec, Japan) and videotaped under microscope (Zeiss Stemi 2000/C, Germany). The images obtained were then digitized (ImagePro Plus, USA) to determine the surface involvement of atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) and the total area occupied by the atheroma plaque (see below). Surface involvement by atherosclerosis in an animal was assessed by tracing the contours of the lumen expressed as percentage of the total aortic area. Summing the degree of surface involvement per animal and dividing by the number of animals in the group, the mean degree of surface involvement by atherosclerosis in a treatment group was calculated. Sudan Red was found not to significantly interfere with chemical determination of aortic accumulation of cholesterol (data not shown).

      Preparation of aortic rings and tension monitoring
      Isolated vascular segments (3–4 mm transverse sections) from the thoracic aorta were prepared from the newly killed rabbit (Furchgott and Zawadzki 1980). Five to ten rabbits randomly selected from each group were used. The rings were immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs’ solution and cleaned under careful protection of the endothelium. The Krebs’ solution consisted of (mmol/l): NaCl 118.0, KCl 4.7, CaCl2 2.6, MgSO4 1.2, KH2PO4 1.2, NaCHO3 24.9, and glucose 11.1. The isolated rings were mounted in the organ bath on two parallel and horizontal stainless steel wires (40 µm in diameter) inserted into the lumen of the vessel. The bath contained Krebs’ solution at 37°C, carbonized with 95%/5% of O2/CO2. One hook was fixed, and the other connected to a force transducer measuring the isometric tension of the ring (Myograph 400; JP Trading A/S, Denmark). Initially, the rings were stretched to a basal tension of 2.0 g and allowed to equilibrate for 45 min. From other experiments, it was found that a basal tension of 2.0 g developed the maximal active tension in the rings (data not shown), and the basal tension was therefore increased to 2.0 g before each experiment and allowed to equilibrate for ≥30 min. The rings were then contracted twice with a 126 mmol/l K+ Krebs’ solution, which is identical to Krebs solution, except that Na+ in the Krebs’ was exchanged with K+ on a molar basis. The experiment began with repeated contraction with phenylephrine to 40% of their maximal contraction with high dose potassium (126 mmol/l). Cumulative dose–response curves to acetylcholine were then obtained in the concentration range of 10–8 to 10–5 mol/l. The rings were washed and allowed to relax. The vessels were then stimulated with phenyleprine again to 50% of the maximal contractile response to 126 mmol/l of K+ , and dose–response curves were subsequently obtained for sodium nitroprusside (4x10–8 to 1.3x10–5 mol/l).

      Liver accumulation of cholesterol
      The amount of cholesterol accumulated during the study was determined after homogenization of a liver biopsy taken at the time of necropsy. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations were assessed after homogenization and adjusted for hepatic protein similarly as described for aortic cholesterol determinations (Haarbo et al., 1991).

      The uterus and endometrial tissue
      The bicornuate uterus was cut at the level of the vagina and beginning of the salpinges, removed and the wet weight determined. A sample of endometrial tissue was excised and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at –85°C until analysis. For analysis, the endometrial tissue was homogenized and centrifuged at 800 g. The supernatant was then further centrifuged at 105 000 g, and the obtained supernatant (cytosol) was used for determination of cytosolic estrogen-binding capacity by steroid-binding assay with dextran-coated charcoal separation (Thorpe, 1987). The estrogen-binding capacity was adjusted for the protein concentration in the cytosol (Bradford, 1976). The 800 g pellet was washed, the nuclear receptors extracted by 0.6 mol/l KCl (Thorpe et al., 1986) and the nuclear estrogen receptor content determined by an enzyme immunoassay (Abott Laboratories). The inter-assay variation of the estrogen-binding capacity and the estrogen receptor (immunoassay) and protein determination were 7, 6 and 5% respectively. All analyses were done without knowledge of the treatment group.

      Statistics
      The mean levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins during the treatment period were calculated as the area under the curve (AUC). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the primary and secondary key variables. If ANOVA indicated statistical significance, Student’s t-test was used to compare groups against the placebo group using Dunnett’s correction for multiple comparisons. The relationship between aortic accumulation of cholesterol and the averaged serum total cholesterol (and lipoprotein) level was determined by correlation analysis. Dose–response curves for acetylcholine were performed for each treatment group (n = 5–10), and ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences among groups at each concentration of acetylcholine. Linear correlation was performed between accumulation of cholesterol and vascular response to acetylcholine. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate the significance of serum lipids and lipoproteins and of other non-lipid-mediated effects of the hormone treatments (independent variables) on the accumulation of cholesterol (dependent variable), and to study the degree of endothelial dysfunction (dependent variable) after correction for aortic accumulation of cholesterol and treatment (independent variables). All statistical analyses were performed with 5% as the level of significance.

      Results
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Table I gives the baseline characteristics for the eight study groups in terms of body weight and serum lipids and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). There was no statistically significant difference among groups for any variable tested. During the study, all groups significantly increased the body weight by 20% (P < 0.05). Treatment with DSG, GSD, or LNG did not significantly affect the average TC concentration (Table II). However, treatment with EE or EE plus a progestin significantly lowered average TC concentrations. Changes in TC were paralleled by modifications in the atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-C, IDL-C, and VLDL-C) (ANOVA: P < 0.001 for all), and all hormone treatments (progestins alone or in combination with EE) significantly increased average HDL-C concentrations (ANOVA: P < 0.001).

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      Table I. Baseline characteristics

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      Table II. Mean (SEM) serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations calculated from the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC)

      Cholesterol feeding per se resulted in an extensive aortic accumulation of cholesterol (nmol/mg wet weight) and this was significantly attenuated by long-term treatment with EE (P < 0.0001) or EE plus a progestin (P 0.5}.

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      Figure 1. Individual values for the aortic accumulation of cholesterol (µmol/mg wet weight) (upper part of the figure) or the morphometric data based on the area of the aortic arch covered by plaque (lower part of the figure) in the eight groups. EE = ethinyl estradiol; DGS = desogestrel; GTD = gestodene; LNG = levonorgestrel. Rabbits treated with EE alone or in combination with a progestin (DSG, GSD or LNG) had significantly lower accumulation of cholesterol and atherosclerotic plaque than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the progestin groups and the placebo group. ***P < 0.0001 (analysis of variance).

      Morphometric analysis of the plaque covering the surface of the thoracic aorta revealed that there were significantly more atheromatous lesions in the placebo group than in the EE and the EE + progestin groups (P < 0.001 for all groups versus placebo) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). This still held true after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P < 0.0001).

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      Figure 2. Representative samples of the aortic arches used for morhometric determination of the area covered by atherosclerotic plaques. Upper panel shows examples from the placebo group (cholesterol feeding alone; placebo), and the ethinyl estradiol (EE) group; whereas the lower panel shows examples from each of the EE + progestin groups. There was significantly less plaque accumulated in the EE group and the EE + progestin groups compared with placebo (P < 0.0001). Numbers indicate animal identifications.

      Figure 3 shows the EC50 to acetylcholine for the various treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with EE and EE plus a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than controls. The response to two physiological doses of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) in precontracted vessels is shown (centre and bottom). Vessels treated with EE relaxed significantly more to acetylcholine than control vessels or vessels with a progestin alone (P < 0.05). Moreover, combining EE with a progestin relaxed the vessels significantly more than control vessels but to a lesser extent than with EE alone. Vasorelaxation to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) correlated significantly and inversely to aortic accumulation of cholesterol (r = –0.39 P = 0.002 and r = –0.37 P = 0.004 respectively). To study the influence of increasing accumulation of cholesterol on the endothelial dysfunction evaluated by vascular reactivity in vitro, ANCOVA was done. We found that treatment with EE significantly and independently of aortic accumulation of cholesterol restored vasorelaxation {for EE: estimate [mean (SEM)] was 49.3 (10.4)%, P = 0.0001}, whereas the other treatments with EE plus a progestin or a progestin alone [DSG, –7.7 (9.2)% (not significant); GSD, –8.5 (9.1)% (not significant); LNG, –3.2 (9.7)% (not significant); EE + DSG, 17.7 (9.4)% (P = 0.065); EE + GSD, 13.2 (10.2)% (not significant); and EE ± LNG, 17.0 (8.8)% (P = 0.058)], or accumulation of cholesterol per se [–0.1 (0.2)%] did not.

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      Figure 3. The EC50 values for acetylcholine of isolated vessels for the treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with ethinyl estradiol (EE) alone or combined with a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than the placebo group. Long-term treatment with EE alone or combined with a progestin relaxed precontracted vessels to two physiological doses of acetylcholine [1.0x10–7 mol/l (centre) and 3.2x10–7 mol/l (bottom) significantly more than control vessels (black bar; P < 0.0001)]. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      The uterine wet weight was significantly higher in EE-treated animals than in controls (P < 0.0001; Figure 4). Progestins had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with any of the progestins significantly increased the wet weight indicating that the progestins with the doses used were not able to completely abolish the stimulatory effect of EE on this target organ (Figure 4). The uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor (ER) concentrations were significantly lowered in the EE group (P < 0.0001) and also in each of the EE plus progestin groups (P < 0.001–0.0001) relative to the placebo group, but also the progestins alone resulted in reduced concentrations compared with controls (P < 0.001) (Table III). For the nuclear ER concentrations there was no significant differences for any of the treatment groups, but all were lower than the control group.

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      Figure 4. Uterine wet weight for the rabbits according to treatment. The wet weight was significantly higher in ethinyl estradiol (EE)-treated animals than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Progestins themselves had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with a progestin all significantly increased the wet weight (P < 0.0001). Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

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      Table III. Hepatic cholesterol content and uterine cytosolic and uterine nuclear estrogen receptor content (fmol/mg protein)

      Safety aspects in relation to the study
      Figure 5 shows that the rabbits receiving EE or EE plus a progestin had concentration peaks for the progestin between 1 and 8 h after administration, as based on the kinetic study. The differences in the area under the curve for LNG versus DSG, and EE + LNG versus EE + DSG respectively, indicate a difference in the serum concentrations of these two progestins and may, in part, reflect difference in protein binding. Nevertheless, the serum concentrations of LNG in rabbits are similar to those reported for women (Kook et al., 2002).

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      Figure 5. Mean concentrations in serum (ng/ml) of the various progestins alone or when combined with ethinyl estradiol. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      During the last 6–8 weeks, the animals and particularly those in the EE group ceased increasing in body weight probably as a result of general health deterioration, and in the EE group a significant number of rabbits (n = 8) did not complete the study. Autopsy of these animals suggested a toxic estrogenic effect of the liver (liver cirrhosis) and of the uterus (probably deciduocarcinoma) by macroscopic examination, as previously reported as a consequence of exogenous estrogens (Janne et al., 2001). Due to decay of the internal organs the precise cause of death could not be determined in most cases. Table IV summarizes the percentage change in ALAT, haemoglobin, and white cell count. In the EE group, eight rabbits died prematurely (mostly after week 20). The temporary increase in ALAT (week 6) in the LNG, EE + DSG, EE + GSD, and EE + LNG groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment, but never fully returned to pretreatment values (Table IV). The general health of the animals in the EE group as determined by the haemoglobin, red blood cell count and haematocrit (not shown), and clinical appearance deteriorated in the last period of the study, probably as a result of a toxic effect of the EE dose used.

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      Table IV. Mean (SEM) percentage changes from baseline in liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count

      Discussion
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The principal results of this experimental study was that EE either alone or in continuous combination with one of the progestins used, i.e. LNG, DSG or GSD, significantly inhibited the aortic accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (cholesterol-feeding alone), whereas treatment with progestin monotherapy had a neutral effect on atherogenesis, irrespective of the progestin used. After adjustment for lipids and lipoproteins, there still was an apparently inhibitory effect of EE on aortic accumulation of cholesterol suggesting a lipid concentration-independent mechanism of action for EE on atherogenesis. A previous study in non-human monkeys also found that animals treated with EE in combination with LNG (as a triphasic OC formulation) had significantly less iliac artery atherosclerosis than control animals (Kaplan et al., 1995). Extrapolating experimental data to the human situation should be done with caution, but only two population-based studies have been specifically designed to investigate the role of second versus third generation OC formulations on the risk of myocardial infarction (Dunn et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001). In the study by Dunn et al., the relative risk was found to be increased with third generation compared with second generation OC formulations [OR, 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7–4.8)], whereas in the study by Tanis et al. the relative risk was found to be decreased with third generation compared with second generation formulations [OR, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2–1.1]. In addition, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking and arterial hypertension) seems to be crucial for development of myocardial infarction in women taking OC (World Health Organization, 1997; Farley et al., 1998; Lewis, 1998; Petitti et al., 2000; Tanis et al., 2001). In fact, the WHO study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in non-smoking women with no other cardiovascular risk factors who also reported blood pressure check before starting use of combined OC. Controlled, randomized studies are therefore clearly needed, although these studies will be of a considerable size taking into account the expected low incidence of myocardial infarction in pre-menopausal women (Crook and Godsland, 1998), and consequently such trials are very expensive to perform. Therefore, until clinical data on vascular endpoints are available, experimental animal studies may provide important clues in terms of the effect of various OC formulations on atherogenesis.
      Data on the direct effect of OC formulations on the human arterial system are lacking (Kuhl, 1996). We found evidence that the OC formulations used in this study had a direct effect on the arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of precontracted aortic rings was increased in the EE plus progestin groups, although less than in the EE group alone as compared with placebo. EE’s significant effect on restoring vasorelaxation was found to be independent of the accumulation of cholesterol in the aortic wall. However, we also found that the addition of the progestins influenced the estrogen-induced vasorelaxation (Figure 3), although by an unknown mechanism of action. Recently, in a study of precontracted rabbit jugular veins, EE, LNG, DSG and GSD were reported to induce relaxations in vessels with intact endothelium (Herkert et al., 2000). However, this area warrants further investigation.

      It is well known that cholesterol-fed rabbits show alterations in their lipoprotein metabolism that differ from the human situation (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992). Combination of EE with a progestin in this study reflected the estrogenic effect. Furthermore, the three combined treatments lowered serum lipids and the atherogenic lipoprotein levels significantly and similarly to EE monotherapy. In contrast, treatment with a progestin alone did not affect these variables differently from the controls, in accordance with earlier findings (Haarbo et al., 1992). In women, OC frequently increases serum triglycerides (Gevers Leuven et al., 1990; Kuhl et al., 1990; Leuven et al., 1990; Lobo et al., 1996; Cheung et al., 1999).

      The dose of EE was selected to reflect serum concentrations of EE in peri-menopausal women taking OC. However, the duration of the present study was longer than in many previous studies (20 weeks). Among the animals receiving EE alone, 40% died after only ≥21 weeks of treatment, whereas animals given combined treatment did not die prematurely. This suggests that the accumulated estrogen dose may have been too high and/or the study too long, as also indicated by the safety variables of the EE-treated animals at week 30 (Table IV), but also that adding a progestin was able to negate this toxic effect. Progestins were used in equipotent doses (i.e. in combination with EE they inhibit endometrial stimulation equally in humans) relative to each other. The selected dose of the progestins (µg per kg body weight) was chosen based on previous experience (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) and in-house studies (in Organon), but may be considered as high doses. All three OC formulations significantly decreased the concentration of the cytosolic ER concentration relative to controls, suggesting that these formulations affect the endometrium through a down-regulation of the cytosolic ER. Addition of a progestin in this study also down-regulated the ER although less than found for EE, and when combining EE with a progestin, the estrogen component dominated the ER regulation. It should, however, be emphasized that the lack of modifying effect of the progestins relative to the EE dose on the endometrium should not be taken as a lack of progestogenic effect, since the primary intention was to investigate the effect of these hormone combinations on atherosclerosis and arterial responsiveness.

      A type II statistical error is not likely to have occurred in our study. However, the accumulation of cholesterol (and amount of fatty streaks) in the EE group was significantly lower than that of the placebo animals. For a type II error to occur, the null hypothesis (that there was no difference in aortic accumulation of cholesterol between the EE and the placebo group) would not be true, and despite this, we would obtain a non-significant result, i.e. a ‘false negative’ result.

      In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits, the progestins investigated (LNG, DSG, or GSD) can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE, partly by decreasing atherogenic lipoproteins, and partly by a direct effect on the endothelium, modulating the aortic vasomotor response in vitro.

      References
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      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

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      Zandberg, P., Peters, J.L.M., Demacker, P.N., de Reeder, E.G., Smit, M.J. and Meuleman, D.G. (2001) Comparison of the antiatherosclerotic effect of tibolone with that of estradiol and ethinyl estradiol in cholesterol-fed, ovariectomized rabbits. Menopause, 8, 96–105.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Submitted on December 13, 2002; resubmitted on February 20, 2003; accepted on March 25, 2003.

      This article has been cited by other articles:

      T. Hayashi, T. Esaki, D. Sumi, T. Mukherjee, A. Iguchi, and G. Chaudhuri
      Modulating role of estradiol on arginase II expression in hyperlipidemic rabbits as an atheroprotective mechanism
      PNAS, July 5, 2006; 103(27): 10485 - 10490.
      [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

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  20. QUESTION:
    Has anyone found a good way of coping with serious hot flushes?
    I get hot flushes about every half hour and they also make me nauseous sometimes. I'm 50 and have had hormone tests which confirm menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel - I'm only 26 but am having hot flushes as a result of hormone injections for endometriosis. I get them about every half hour too and feel nauseous constantly. I've started taking evening primrose oil, but apparently you need to take quite a bit each day for it to make a difference and it can take a few months to notice a change. I've heard that soy isoflavones work well and might give those a go as well. I've found a recipe on the net for a HRT loaf which is supposed to help with hot flushes - I'm going to try it this weekend. It's on a website for cancer relief but is also recommended for menopausal reasons. The address is:

      http://www.cancernet.co.uk/diet-hrt.htm

      At night I sleep with an air conditioning unit next to my bed - my family think I'm crazy some nights when it's already cold and I have it on, but it's the only way I can get a little sleep -

      As for the nausea, the only defence I've found is chewing gum, which works great, but means I get hungry very quickly!

      Good luck and I hope you find some relief soon.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the most natural thing to take to regulate hormones during the first stages of menopause?
    I have some of the early symptoms, a few hot flashes and a couple of missed periods but nothing too bad so far. I just want to find out if there is anything natural that will help balance things so that all my hard workouts and correct eating will not be counteracted by the imbalance of hormones. Thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Also, Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion. It's a blend of natural ingredients that offers soothing relief and can help reduce the often dramatic sensation of skin temperature fluctuations common in women in their late 30's, 40's and beyond. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why do females go off sex when they get older?
    Been married for a number of years now, and the sex has all but dried up. No kissing, no touching, plenty of arguments. Why? I dont understand why, and when I ask the questions, I get "nothing has changed" answer. I have thought of going to a Parlor for "relief", but why should I! I am confused and hurt that this situation has developed, and I dont know how to handle it. Your responses will be read with interest.

    • ANSWER:
      OK, since you promised. 1. We no longer have an imperative to reproduce, so that's one incentive gone. 2. Even peri-menopausal women [BEFORE the actual menopause ] have hormone fluctuations. Wife needs to have a seious talk with her gynecologist if she has any questions or suspicions this may be affecting her. 3. The " nothing has changed " means something HAS changed. May be some old lingering resentment smoldering .Maybe some life goals not achieved.Expectations unfulfilled.Lost dreams. Broken promises. Any of these may be on a subconcious level. 4. Are you still the same young stud , do you still rock her world ? Are you just giving her the same old same old and expecting her to get excited about it ? A little romance ? Plenty of foreplay ?She will shun even affectionate contact if it's going to lead to something that ain't getting it for her.Again, this may be on a subconcious level also.5. When you argue, do you really stick to the subject at hand ? If anybody is saying ,: " You ALWAYS do such and so,or You NEVER do this or that "or dragging up stuff from 12 years ago, this is a dead giveaway to a breakdown in communication.
      We'll assume you both have acceptable personal hygiene.What worries me about you is you use the word " relief " for an orgasm.Like getting rid of a headache.Sex for a long married couple should be an aid to pair bonding and sharing , to keep you two connected at a most basic level.
      What encourages me most is that you have restrained yourself physically, and are not looking for an emotional attachment at all.That tells me you still love her.
      What you do need is counseling. Not that your relationship is so bad, but that your communication skills are so ineffective. You need to be able to identify your feelings , and name them before you can address them.
      JJ , please print his out or save it, and read it WITH your wife.I see every reason to hope you guys can revitalize not only your sex life, but your entire lives and become as one. There is even a right and wrong way to fight fairly and constructively, believe it or not. You will learn that in counseling as well.The main thing is to never fight when you are actually mad, and to stick to the point.It IS possible to have the catharrsis of an argument and actually achieve something.It's a fight where everybody wins. Now how good is THAT !
      I took the time to do this because I believe you are sincere, and that you would be willing to do the work to improve the quality of your life. I am being very specific. This is the Betty Crocker method.Just follow the directions on the back of the box, and you can't go wrong.

  23. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to take black cohosh for periods if i am a teenager? please answer?
    Black Cohosh is supposed to be used for menopause symptoms relief, but can i use it for period pain like cramps, stomach upset, bloating etc? I'm 15 years old, so will this be detrimental to my 'womanly' health? Also i can't find any other pain killers so this is my only option.

    • ANSWER:
      I wouldn't take it. It probably contains some hormones that would not help your system. If you don't have tylenol in your house, why don't you try to get some from a friend or relative. Maybe ask your neighbors for some pain relievers.

  24. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  25. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever tried Black Cohosh for menopause?
    Sleepless nights, fatique, thinning hair, mood swings= Menopause for me. Any advice will be appreciated I thinking about using Black Cohosh, but I need to know if some had used it and what is their opinion. Other options will also be appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      If you are concerned about taking HRT then this article may be of some help to you.
      Use a step ladder approach to your health. Diet: First eat a health diet, limit coffee and alcohol as it can increase hot flashes. Exercise 1/2 hour a day with a walk at min. This helps your well being and increases certain hormones levels. Use vitamins and herbs such as estrogenic like from plants, doug quai, black cohosh, licorice, red clover or wild yam extracts. Any one of them can help, but do not use all at once or combine them. It is a waste of resouces. You can try one and see if it helps and switch to another one if it doesn't. You can add chaste tree berry or vitex, which is the only documented herb that shows in your blood life to increase progesterone. You can blend vitamins and herb's together, but be sure not to use more than one phyto-estrogen. When symptoms change or this is not effective enough, begin using a natural progesterone cream (aka wise women essentials a bio indentical cream) which will help the whole body and systems. If you are like me then you will be thinking 'I don't have the time, ability, resources to round up all these wonderfull natural ingredients. Well you could find the answer in Menozac.

      Menozac is Help from Mother Nature Menozac  is a botanical formulation containing a blend of natural herbal extracts. These are plants from Mother Nature that specifically ease your transition. They provide effective menopause relief, from the onset, and through the duration of typical menopause.
      Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals. These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body’s hormonal balance.
      Your grandmothers and great grandmothers learned how to make this life transition smoothly, by studying the plants. Their long history is being shared with you in the Menozac formula.
      For more information about Menozac then Click Here

  26. QUESTION:
    Women: What menopause symptom remedies do you recommend?
    There is a bewildering array of herbal remedies on the shelves, and they are pretty expensive.
    Can you please tell me which ones you have tried?
    Which ones have relieved which symptoms?
    (I suffer from mood swings, depression, breast tenderness, and overheating.)
    Did you experience ill-effects from any of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Dr. John Lee is an advocate of NATURAL progesterone to treat both peri-menopause and menopause. Go to the health food store and get Life Flo Progesta Care. Here are some other brands that have the amount of progesterone recommended by Dr. Lee: http://www.johnleemd.com/store/resource_progesterone.html

      Hope this brings some relief to you. All the best

  27. QUESTION:
    My Girlfriend is having problem in getting her Menstruation regularly..Can anyone help?
    My girlfriend had regular cycles earlier. For the last 6 months they are not regular and she is having problem in getting it. She also feels a lot of pain . Can anyone tell what are the menopause signs and symptoms and ways to get things better. I wish to help her but I don't have Idea, so I am asking from you people. Please help me.

    • ANSWER:
      first of all... menopause usually doesnt occur before 40 yrs..... tho there are exceptions since people in india are unaware of healthy living life styles....medication and stuff.

      irregular mentruation and immense abdominal pain during mentruation is normal in many females which can easily be taken care of by simple hemeopathy medication which have almost NO side effects and provide wonderful relief.

      P.S. i personally know about this since there are females at my place also who have had simlar problems and reacted wonderfully to homeopathy medicines.

      All the best and wishing you a fast recovery and painless life :)

  28. QUESTION:
    What kind of medication should she take?
    So i know nothing about menopause and shes 55 and wants to know if there are any natural medication or lotion or something she could use, not hormones, and she wants to know what to aviod, like what shouldnt she be taking into her body, please answer

    • ANSWER:
      There are no easy answers nor answers that apply to everyone. GYN doctor is best source for information but even they don't have all the answers. I have found that staying active and eating right (little sugar, salt and the right kinds of fat) have helped me the most. The less medication we take the better off we are. There are some natural supplements that help some women but I haven't found much relief there. Good luck.

  29. QUESTION:
    Can you reverse osteoporosis in old age?
    If an otherwise healthy person (male or female) who
    - has never consumed alcohol,
    - has never smoked, and
    - does not use corticosteroids,
    gets osteoporosis after the age of 60 (ie. menopause - male or female),

    Can osteoporosis be reversed at this age using Calcium, Vitamin D, Vitamin C and weight bearing exercise?

    I am looking for serious knowledgeable responses only.

    • ANSWER:
      I have stabilized my osteopina by taking calcium and Fosamax (after having drunk much, used some
      cortisone.) Check mayo.clinic.com. Then "diseases and conditions" and "Osteoporosis." You will find much information from one of the best hospitals/clinics in the world (maybe the best!).

      Drs. tell me that the new shots, etc. are not any better than Fosamax, just more expensive.
      Here is a preview:
      Hormone therapy
      Hormone therapy (HT) was once the mainstay of treatment for osteoporosis. But because of concerns about its safety and because other treatments are available, the role of hormone therapy in managing osteoporosis is changing. Most problems have been linked to certain oral types of HT, either taken in combination with progestin or alone. If you're interested in hormone therapy, other forms are available, including patches, creams and the vaginal ring.

      Discuss the various options with your doctor to determine which might be best for you.

      Prescription medications
      If HT isn't for you, and lifestyle changes don't help control your osteoporosis, prescription drugs can help slow bone loss and may even increase bone density over time. They include:

      Bisphosphonates. Much like estrogen, this group of drugs can inhibit bone breakdown, preserve bone mass, and even increase bone density in your spine and hip, reducing the risk of fractures.

      Bisphosphonates may be especially beneficial for men, young adults and people with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They're also used to prevent osteoporosis in people who require long-term steroid treatment for a disease such as asthma or arthritis.

      Side effects, which can be severe, include nausea, abdominal pain, and the risk of an inflamed esophagus or esophageal ulcers, especially if you've had acid reflux or ulcers in the past. Bisphosphonates that can be taken once a week or once a month may cause fewer stomach problems. If you can't tolerate oral bisphosphonates, your doctor may recommend periodic intravenous infusions of bisphosphonate preparations.

      In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first once-yearly drug for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The medication, zoledronic acid (Reclast), is given intravenously at your doctor's office. It takes about 15 minutes to get your annual dose. One published study found that zoledronic acid reduces the risk of spine fracture by 70 percent and of hip fracture by 41 percent.

      A small number of cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw have been reported in people taking bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. These cases have primarily occurred after trauma to the jaw, such as a tooth extraction, or cancer treatment. Risk appears to be higher in people who have received bisphosphonates intravenously. While there is currently no clear evidence that you should stop taking bisphosphonates before dental surgery, let your dentist know what medications you're taking and discuss your concerns.

      Raloxifene (Evista). This medication belongs to a class of drugs called selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Raloxifene mimics estrogen's beneficial effects on bone density in postmenopausal women, without some of the risks associated with estrogen, such as increased risk of uterine cancer and, possibly, breast cancer. Hot flashes are a common side effect of raloxifene, and you shouldn't use this drug if you have a history of blood clots. This drug is approved only for women with osteoporosis and is not currently approved for use in men.
      Calcitonin. A hormone produced by your thyroid gland, calcitonin reduces bone resorption and may slow bone loss. It may also prevent spine fractures, and may even provide some pain relief from compression fractures. It's usually administered as a nasal spray and causes nasal irritation in some people who use it, but it's also available as an injection. Because calcitonin isn't as potent as bisphosphonates, it's normally reserved for people who can't take other drugs.
      Teriparatide (Forteo). This powerful drug, an analog of parathyroid hormone, treats osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men who are at high risk of fractures. Unlike other available therapies for osteoporosis, it works by stimulating new bone growth, as opposed to preventing further bone loss. Teriparatide is given once a day by injection under the skin on the thigh or abdomen. Long-term effects are still being studied, so the FDA recommends restricting therapy to two years or less.
      Tamoxifen. This synthetic hormone is used to treat breast cancer and is given to certain high-risk women to help reduce their chances of developing breast cancer. Although tamoxifen blocks estrogen's effect on breast tissue, it has an estrogen-like effect on other cells in your body, including your bone cells. As a result, tamoxifen appears to reduce the risk of fractures, especially in women older than 50. Possible side effects of tamoxifen include hot flashes, stomach upset, and vaginal dryness or discharge.

  30. QUESTION:
    Does anyone get a fever when they are at home all day?
    I find it strange how when I stay home in the house doing nothing all day my body temp peaks... Not a fever but higher than my average. For example it will go from 36.4C to 37.2C and I feel nauseous with a hot flash.... I'm only 21 years old so no it's not menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      this is not the age of menopause but for hot flash i can give you a suggestion .please read it carefully.

      Herbal Menopause Remedy – The China Herbs That Can Help Control Hot Flashes

      Menopause is a very delicate condition and acknowledging that not just one treatment will fix every woman’s condition is the first step in finding the personalized solution to take care of yours. The symptoms of menopause have many factors to take into consideration. It is important to pin point what your individual symptoms are and to try to find out what triggers your symptoms the most. With the help of Chinese menopause herbal antidotes, you can help your kidneys function properly. It is said that the female’s kidney lends a huge hand in the ability to give birth, have a satisfying sex life, and to help keep your reproductive organs healthy. When you went through puberty, an increase in kidney chi happened by a burst of blood flowing to the uterus. During your child bearing years, your kidneys will help keep the right amount of blood flowing to your reproductive organs, however, the flow of blood will decrease as you grow older. The symptoms from menopause come about when this happens and your kidneys lose the right amount of chi. This causes an imbalance in your inner chi.

      There is also another realization for the menopausal symptoms that you experience. Traditional Chinese Medicine states that women put up with a lot of stress, lack of healthy meals, and not enough physical activity. Due to these items, our chi is thrown off and in turn has a hard time passing through the meridians. When our chi is blocked, the body cannot stabilize itself properly. This is Traditional Chinese Medicine’s explanation as to why female’s must suffer through the symptoms of menopause, such as the horrid night sweats and frustrating hot flashes.

      Luckily, blockages and imbalance of our chi can be fixed by adjusting a few things in our lives, such as, eating better, herbal therapy, acupuncture, and qi gong. Traditional or regular Chinese menopausal herbs were not created to take care of hot flashes. They are created to take care of the whole individual. The prescriptions for Chinese herbal remedies will depend upon the individual symptoms that you have but the Chinese herbs I have listed below are the building blocks of Chinese herbal remedies for menopausal symptoms.

      –Menopausal Relief With Using China Root: This root is filled with knobs and irregular joints and is available in two types of China Root and can be bought at all Chinese Herbalist Shops. The first type of China Root is the best kind and looks paler in color and harder in texture than the other one. It derives from the oriental climber plant; Smilax China Linn. It is grown with red berries and has circular prickly stalks. The second type of China Root derives from the oriental plant; Smilax Pfeudo-China Linn. It has a smoother textured stalk and has black berries. Neither has any specific taste or smell, however, this is a very potent herb to heal night sweats, hot flashes, and mood swings. This is usually consumed through chewing or in tea form, but many forms of this remedy is an extract placed into a capsule type pill.

      –Menopausal Relief With Using Chinese Bupleurum Root: The translation of this root from Chinese dialect is “Kindling of the Barbarians”. This root was first talked about in a 2,000 year old Chinese Medicinal Text and is said to be on the most imperative herbs within Traditional Chinese Medicine. This is a very powerful herb as it is known to remove the stagnate chi within the body. It works even better when used in combination with certain other herbs. It really helps your liver. Most of all menopausal remedies will include this root as without it the anti-microbial activities and harmonizing actions are way too important to leave out.

      –Menopausal Relief With Using Chinese Licorice Root: This herb is also a very important one and is known as the “grandfather of all herbs”. Its functions include eliminating the body of toxins and poisons as well as helping other herbs consumed to penetrate and cleanse better. This is essential to get your chi on the right flow. Keep in mind that Chinese Licorice Root differs from Western Licorice Root. The Chinese Licorice Root is used to energize and calm the body while the Western Licorice Root can cause nervousness. It is important to check your herbal remedy to make sure you have the Root that is grown within the northern region of China.

      Please keep in mind that although these are herbs, it is still very important to talk to your doctor or acupuncturist regarding the use of these herbs and all other natural forms of relief.

  31. QUESTION:
    I am in menopause vagina discharge with abnormal bleeding?
    Could this be signs of endometrial cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      No. Sometimes this will happen in Menopause. These are symptoms of menopause. Sometimes you will experience these type of issue in menopause. Don't worry. Try to add more n more vitamins in your diet and do regular exercise this will helps you to get relief from this issues. Even you can go for the herb like Dong Quai this herb will help you to give relief from vaginal discharge and bleeding.
      Take care.

  32. QUESTION:
    Do you get menstrual migraines or headaches?
    Is it caused by hormonal changes? What is the best form of relief?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I do get migraines every time I have my period (even though I'm on the birth control pill).

      Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations are implicated as a significant trigger for women, as three times as many women suffer from migraine headaches as men, this difference being most apparent during the reproductive years.

      Hormonal triggers may be:

      - Climacteric (final menstrual period)
      - Menstruation (50% of women more likely to have migraine around menstruation)
      - Ovulation
      - Oral contraceptives
      - Pregnancy (may worsen for first few months but in two thirds of women improves in latter part)
      - Hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
      - Menopause.

      I usually take two pain killers (endone - very strong, but because it makes me feel drowsy I'm guaranteed to fall asleep mostly and sleeping seems to help the worst part of it). I also apply an ice pack (that is wrapped in a hand towel) to my forehead and over my eyes and close the curtains in my bedroom so that it is dark and quiet.

      Hope this helps answer your questions and that you may find some relief for those terrible migraines.

  33. QUESTION:
    How long does menopause last?
    I have been having hot flashes and night sweats for a little over 6 years. The only suggestion the gyno offered was taking Black Co-hash (no help there) and soy supplements (no help either). Any suggestions (besides hormone therapy)? How long does it last?

    • ANSWER:
      For most women, they can expect all the stages of menopause to last between four and five years. From the first early symptom or sign to the last, hot flashes can actually range from one year to eight years. This is not much relief for women who have been suffering for several years already.

  34. QUESTION:
    I have my period and have been bleeding really heavy and losing lots of clots for 9 days now?
    and I'm in a lot of pain and discomfort. I have a Doctors appointment for Tuesday but I am really worried about what could be the cause of this excessive bleeding. It's most likely to be the onset of the menopause because I'm 46 but have also been told that it could be a cyst or fibroids. Has any one experienced this or do you have any advice on any pain relief that I could take?

    • ANSWER:
      It may well be the peri-menopause (the stage before your periods end)...some women do get much heavier periods during this stage. However 9 days of constantly heavy bleeding puts you at risk of anaemia and you certainly need to see your doctor who hopefully will give you something to stop the bleeding.
      Fibroids are harmless lumps in the uterine wall but they commonly cause heavy and prolonged bleeding. If your doctor examines you he may well be able to feel fibroids, particularly if they are large. If this is the cause of your bleeding you may need a referral to a gynaecologist. Cysts on the ovary don't tend to cause bleeding like this although they can cause pain.
      I would recommend Ibuprofen for the pain (provided you are not asthmatic and no stomach / liver / kidney problems). If necessary you can combine it with paracetamol, just follow the package instructions for the correct dose.
      If you find that the pain is becoming unbearable, you start feeling faint, or you are soaking through a full size tampon or towel within an hour then I would advise you to see the doctor sooner than Tuesday. If necessary contact your out-of-hours service.
      Take care, hope you are soon sorted.

  35. QUESTION:
    What would make a good substitute for anise seed in confectioneries?
    I'm looking for something that doesn't taste like licorice and is preferably a small seed of some sort - the cookies in question are fairly tasteless (egg, flour and sugar) and anise is used to make them delicious. However, several of the potential consumers despise the licorice taste, and while I make the cookies without anise, they would like a little more flavor. Can you think of anything that might work?

    • ANSWER:
      I have shortbread cookie recipes that have lavender in them. They are great.
      Another anise seed substitute is fennel seed. It is an integral part of Indian and Chinese cuisines. It also contain the compound, anethole and that is why its flavor is similar to that of anise seed. However, fennel seed is a bit more aromatic and sweeter than anise seed. The medicinal properties of fennel seed are also similar to those of anise seed, i.e. it too can alleviate digestive problems, and help woman to get relief from premenstrual and menopause symptoms or discomforts.
      Caraway or Meridian fennel plant is a member of the same family, Apiaceae, to which anise plant belongs. So, caraway seeds too has a delicate licorice like flavor, just like the anise seeds. Therefore, along with fennel and star anise, caraway seeds can also be substituted for anise seeds. The important health benefits of caraway seeds are providing relief in cold, cough, sore throat, fever, bronchitis, gingivitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. It can prove quite beneficial for stimulating appetite.
      Hope that helps

  36. QUESTION:
    how is it possible i am going through a premature menopause?
    hi everyone i have this big question i am 32 years old,and my gyno told me that i am going through a
    premature menopause,i had one child but he past away,i would like to get children in the future,and i got prescribe on marvelon28 for 3months,so i am asking help do you think i will be able to have children in the future.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      Yes this is possible. You will be pregnant in menopause also, but with the doctor help. Don't worry. Many women could pregnant in menopause. I am sure you will also. Take a proper diet food. Add lots of vitamins and do regular exercise this will help you to take relief from menopause.

  37. QUESTION:
    What are some natural supplements and foods to help with depression?
    We are what we eat. And I think pharmaceutical fixes are not always the answer. Can anyone suggest natural remedies for combating depression and anxiety?

    • ANSWER:
      Eliminate potential food allergens – If you suspect that there is a link between food sensitivity and your state of mind, try eliminating the allergen foods from your diet to see if this brings relief. The usual suspects are dairy products, wheat (gluten), corn, preservatives, and food additives. Your doctor may also suggest tests for food sensitivities.

      Eat antioxidant rich foods, including fruits (such as blueberries, cherries, oranges and tomatoes), and vegetables (such as squash and bell peppers).

      Vitamin B6 is believed to work in the brain similar to valium-like drugs - hence its importance in your diet as food or as supplement. Mainly, women taking oral contraceptives or with premenstrual tension or going through menopause require good amount of B6.

      Many herbal and homeopathic remedies have been shown to significantly reduce the symptoms of depression without the unwanted side-effects.

      The most commonly used as natural remedies for depression are Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's Wort) which has been called “nature’s Prozac” and Passiflora which is one of nature's best natural tranquilizers.

      Many people around the world have now turned to this more natural approach of regaining the subtle balance of brain chemicals and rejuvenating the body and mind for all round natural health. Natural remedies for depression that include homeopathic remedies can also be of great benefit and are free of side effects as well.

      You may get more info here http://www.healthherbsandnutrition.com/remedies/d/depression.htm

  38. QUESTION:
    What happens to a woman after having a hysterectomy?
    My mother is about to undergo a hysterectomy because of fibroids. What will happen after to her. What should I expect. I mean I will be there for her but are there any psychological effects that might happen, any changes to the body? Please let me know, thanks.
    fadded, my mother isnt a b!tch and watch your mouth. If you're not going to answer the question with a real and sincere answer then beat it.
    Thanks for your real kind answers. I appreciate it.
    The doctor said she has large fibroids and it has to be done. I am worried. but i know she will be ok once they are removed.

    • ANSWER:
      Hysterectomy patients may have a fever during recovery, and some may develop a mild bladder infection or wound infection. If an infection occurs, it can usually be treated with antibiotics. Less often, women may require a blood transfusion before surgery because of anemia or during surgery for blood loss. Complications related to anesthesia might also occur, especially for women who smoke, are obese, or have serious heart or lung disease.

      As with any major abdominal or pelvic operation, serious complications such as blood clots, severe infection, adhesions, postoperative (after surgery) hemorrhage, bowel obstruction or injury to the urinary tract can happen. Rarely, even death can occur.

      In addition to the direct surgical risks, there may be longer-term physical and psychological effects, potentially including depression and loss of sexual pleasure. If the ovaries are removed along with the uterus prior to menopause (change of life), there is an increased risk of osteoporosis and heart disease as well. These will be discussed later along with possible treatments.

      In making a decision, you should also consider that a hysterectomy is not reversible. After a hysterectomy, you will no longer be able to bear children and you will no longer menstruate. You need to think about the impact these changes would have on you.

      Some women report having a strong emotional reaction, or feeling down, after a hysterectomy. Most feel better after a few weeks, but some women do feel depressed for a long time. Other women experience a feeling of relief after a hysterectomy.

      Every person reacts differently, and reactions are a combination of emotional and physical responses. We still have much to learn about the effects of hysterectomy on sexual function
      and a few mood swings which hormone theropy will help with that.

  39. QUESTION:
    has anyone used the macafem supplement to help with hormone production? If so, how did it work?
    Macafem is a vegetable plant with a root like a radish, and is said to help with hormone production.

    • ANSWER:
      Macafem is the herb black cohosh. From...
      http://ezinearticles.com/?All-About-Black-Cohosh-Root&id=493134
      Black Cohosh root may obstruct or hinder with certain types prescription medications such as birth control medicines. Therefore, it is a very good idea to talk to your doctor before deciding on using this herb.

      A popular herbal menopause treatment does almost nothing to help with hot flushes, according to a new US study.

      Researchers found that 351 women given black cohosh got around the same amount of relief as those who took a dummy pill.

      When researchers evaluated them at three, six, and 12 months, they found no significant difference between the numbers of daily hot flushes in any of the herbal supplement groups compared to the placebo group.

      "Black cohosh used alone or as part of a multibotanical supplement shows little potential as an important therapy for relief of hot flushes," the team concluded

  40. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of vaginal pain during intercourse?
    I never had any pain during intercourse until several months ago. I had a bladder infection. It was treated and it cleared up but sex has not been the same since then. The pain that I am experiencing is on penetration. It feels like it's on the front wall of the vagina. After he's been thrusting for a while, the pain turns more into a burning sensation. Can anyone tell me how I can get this pain to stop? Also, I know that I do not have any STD's. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Lady Please try this measures I hope it should help Applying lubricating gels to the outer sexual organs, including the vulva and labia, and in the vagina may be helpful to women and ease pain during intercourse. Sex toys, such as vibrators or dildos, may also be useful. A woman should talk with her health care provider before attempting to use a vaginal dilator. Treatment of pain during intercourse depends on the cause.

      * Entrance pain may be treated when the cause is identified.

      o Atrophy (thinning of the vaginal walls): Entrance pain caused by atrophy is common among postmenopausal women who do not take hormone replacement medication. Blood flow and lubricating capacity respond directly to hormone replacement. The most rapid relief of atrophy comes from applying topical estrogen vaginal cream directly to the vagina and its opening. This cream is available by prescription only.

      o Urethritis and urethral syndrome: With this condition, a woman may urinate frequently with urgency, pain, and difficulty, but a urinalysis can find no identifiable bacteria. These symptoms may be caused by chronic inflammation of the urethra (the tube through which urine exits the body) from muscle spasms, anxiety, low estrogen levels, or a combination of these causes. Using a special instrument, the doctor may dilate the urethra. The doctor may prescribe low-dose antibiotics. At times, antidepressants and antispasmodics may also be prescribed.

      o Inadequate lubrication: Treatment of inadequate lubrication depends on the cause. Options include water-soluble lubricants (for use with condoms ; other types of lubricants may damage condoms) or other substances such as vegetable oils. If arousal does not take place, more extensive foreplay might be needed during sexual relations.

      o Vaginismus: Painful spasms of muscles at the opening of the vagina may be an involuntary but appropriate response to painful stimuli. These spasms may be due to several factors, including painful insertion, previous painful experiences, previous abuse, or an unresolved conflict regarding sexuality. For a woman with vaginismus, her doctor may recommend behavioral therapy, including vaginal relaxation exercises.

      o Vaginal strictures (abnormal narrowing): Doctors commonly see vaginal strictures after pelvic surgery, radiation, or menopause . Estrogen, or special surgical techniques may be used to treat these strictures.

      o Interstitial cystitis: This chronic inflammation of the bladder has no known cause; however, pain with intercourse is a common symptom. A health care provider may perform a cystoscopy (a procedure to look inside the bladder), or a urologist may distend (stretch) the bladder to examine the bladder wall. These procedures often work to clear the condition. Other treatments include amitriptyline, nifedipine, Elmiron, or other prescription therapies. Other options include bladder washings with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or other agents or transcutaneous electric stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture. Surgery is a last resort.

      o Endometriosis: Endometriosis occurs when the lining of the uterus is found outside the uterus. Pain during intercourse caused by endometriosis is not uncommon. Relief of this pain often indicates success in treating endometriosis.

      o Vulvovaginitis (inflammation of the vulva and vagina): Whether recurrent or chronic, this problem is common despite the rise in the number of over-the-counter treatments.

      + If not responsive to self-treatment with lubricating gels or initial treatment by a doctor, a woman may need a more thorough evaluation to identify the cause.

      + A doctor may ask the woman if she uses antibiotic or antifungal medication or if she douches. If so, these practices should be stopped to help determine whether a specific disease-causing organism is present.

      + Treatment is based on the presence of bacteria or other organisms. Often, no single organism is identified. The doctor may talk to the woman about proper hygiene.

      + If recurring symptoms are shared with a sexual partner, both individuals should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

      + A doctor considers the possibility of intermittent urethral infection with chlamydia, an STD, as well as a more obvious urinary tract infection, and then treats with the appropriate antibiotics.
      * Treatment for deep thrust pain includes 2 strategies.

      o Pelvic adhesions (tissue that has become stuck together, sometimes developing after surgery): Pain with intercourse caused by pelvic adhesions can be relieved by removing the adhesions.

      o Uterine retroversion: The health care provider may find physical causes of the pain, including ovarian cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease , endometriosis (mucous tissue out of place), or retroversion of the uterus (uterus is tilted backward instead of forward).

      A doctor should be able to find the cause and to select proper treatment for pain experienced during intercourse. Sometimes, the doctor refers the woman to a specialist.

  41. QUESTION:
    What are the health benefits of taking Omega 3 daily?
    Also, what amount is good to fight depression?

    • ANSWER:
      * Number 8 mentions depression *

      1. Breast cancer protection: Research shows women with a high intake of fish oil fatty acids have up to 50% less chance of getting breast cancer, which is a major concern for most women. DHA is a natural anti-inflammatory that stops cellular transformation and kills off cancer cells.

      2. Relief from menstrual cramps: Unpleasant PMS symptoms are often the result of a fatty acid imbalance. Omega 3 fish oil relieves monthly pain and cramping known as dysmenorrhea.

      3. Improved fertility: Studies show that infertility is directly related to the amount of fish oil you consume. Fish oil balances hormones, improves hormonal levels and increases blood flow to the uterus. The more Omega 3 fatty acids you get the greater your odds of conceiving.

      4. Healthy babies: Fish oil is essential to a healthy pregnancy diet, facilitating healthy placental blood flow and the efficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen between mother and baby.

      5. Preeclampsia prevention: The high blood pressure during pregnancy, which is known as preeclampsia, can be very dangerous. The omega 3 fish oil fatty acids help maintain healthy blood pressure and greatly reduce any health risks for both mother and child.

      6. Full term babies: Fish oil fatty acids also lower the danger of premature birth. This insures during pregnancy stages a baby has fully formed lungs and reaches a healthy birth weight.

      7. Baby's brain development: A child's brain is especially dependent on the fatty acids found in omega 3 fish oil. For example, DHA has been found to ensure proper brain development and to increase a child's intelligence. It also improves eyesight and the development of motor skills.

      8. Less postpartum depression: Studies show women with a higher consumption of fish oil suffer significantly less postpartum depression. This means better times for both mom and baby.

      9. Minimized menopause problems: By greatly improving hormonal balance, fish oil fatty acids can dramatically reduce menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and mood swings.

      10. Protection against osteoporosis: Having high levels of fish oil fatty acids has been shown to lower your risk of osteoporosis, which is an especially high risk for women after menopause.

      11. Reduced risk of heart disease: Heart disease kills more women prematurely than any other disease, including breast cancer. And the danger increases after menopause. Omega 3 with EPA and DPA is your best defense. Fish oil helps lower triglycerides, lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol naturally. And it's an essential part of an all around heart healthy diet.

  42. QUESTION:
    What is the drug they used to give to pregnant women to stop morning sickness that caused birth defects?
    And why does it cause birth defects?
    I was gonna put it in the pregancy section, but I didn't think I'd get the answers I want... But I thought it fit into the "conditions" of diseases and conditions lol.
    Okay, why do people never read the details?! And why do they answer when there's already 10 answers the same?

    • ANSWER:
      Thalidomide

      Thalidomide, which is also known as Thalomid, is a drug used to fight aggressive cancers, particularly those that have metastasized, or spread.

      Purpose

      There are many studies, either in progress or recently completed, that suggest thalidomide can slow or stop the spread of cancer of the brain, breast, colon, and prostate, as well as multiple myeloma (a cancer of the bone marrow). Research studies that consider the benefit of thalidomide in treating other cancers are multiplying rapidly. The use of the drug in cancer therapy is likely to increase.

      Description

      Thalidomide was first introduced in 1957 primarily as a tranquilizer, a medication prescribed particularly for imparting drowsiness and sleep. Then, it was given to pregnant women to provide them with relief from morning sickness. Soon after being prescribed to pregnant women, thalidomide was linked to death or severe disabilities in newborns. Some children who had been exposed to thalidomide while in the womb (in utero) failed to develop limbs or had very short limbs. Others were born blind or deaf or with other physical problems.

      The same action of thalidomide that harms babies may make it useful as a powerful cancer fighter. Thalidomide interferes with the formation of blood vessels. It is called an antiangiogenic drug because angiogenesis refers to the formation of blood vessels. Studies in 2003 reported that thalidomide may use signal repression or have immunosuppression capabilities. This means it can act on the body's natural immune responses.

      Cancers that spread have a lot of blood vessels (are highly vascularized). Thus, when cancer cells are not nourished by a blood supply, they die. One way to stop the spread of cancer is to stop the formation of the blood vessels that carry nourishment to the cancer cells, and that is what thalidomide is thought to do. Researchers also are interested in other activities of thalidomide, particularly the ones that make it capable of eliminating skin eruptions, such as sores, or ulcers, in the mouths of patients with AIDS and leprosy.

      Recommended Dosage

      Dosages being used depend on the type of cancer being attacked. For example, in one study, to treat multiple myeloma, a starting dose of 200 mg per day was increased to 800 mg per day over a two-week period.

      In a colon cancer study, 400 mg per day of thalidomide were given in combination with the anticancer drug irinotecan. The dose of irinotecan was between 300 and 350 mg per day. Used in combination with irinotecan, thalidomide contributed its own cancer-fighting properties and it also seemed to reduce the side effects of irinotecan.

      In a trial using thalidomide to treat prostate cancer, both low doses (as low as 200 mg per day) and high doses (as high as 1200 mg per day) were tried. The patients taking high doses fared somewhat better.

      Precautions

      The serious threat thalidomide poses to fetuses cannot be overstated. No pregnant woman and no woman who has any chance of becoming pregnant should take thalidomide. (Only women who have had a hysterectomy or who are at the age of menopause and have been in a menopausal state, which is no menses, or periods, for 24 consecutive months, can be considered as having no chance of becoming pregnant.)

      Patients taking thalidomide must meet strict criteria for use. Pharmacies that dispense thalidomide must have special registration.

      Side Effects

      Besides the extreme risk thalidomide poses to fetuses, it also produces side effects in the person taking the drug. The side effects of thalidomide are much milder than many other anticancer drugs, and because the drug poses less discomfort than other cancer-fighting drugs, it is particularly attractive to oncologists, or physicians who treat cancer patients.

      Among the side effects are erratic heartbeat, swelling (edema), digestive upsets of all sorts, including both constipation and diarrhea, pain in back and neck muscles, and skin problems.

      Interactions

      Barbiturates, salts, and esters used to encourage sleep, and alcohol increase the effect of thalidomide's power of sedation. They should not be taken with the drug. Food interferes with the absorption of thalidomide; it should be taken when the stomach is empty.

  43. QUESTION:
    Has anyone with endometriosis had a good experience with Lupron?
    I have had two laparoscopies in the past three years and I'm having pain again. The doctor suggested this instead since I don't want to get pregnant right now. Any input would be great! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Lupron is a horrendous drug. The manufacturer reports the following possible side effects, including but certainly not limited to:

      Asthenia, General pain, Headache, Hot flashes/sweats, Nausea/vomiting, GI disturbances, Edema, Weight gain/loss, Acne, Hirsutism, Joint disorder, Myalgia, Decreased libido, Depression/emotional lability, Dizziness, Nervousness, Neuromuscular disorders, Paresthesias, Skin reactions at injection site, Breast changes/tenderness/pain, Vaginitis, Flu-like symptoms, Heart palpitations, Syncope, Tachycardia, Appetite changes, Dry mouth, Thirst, Ecchymosis, Lymphadenopathy, Anxiety, Insomnia/Sleep disorders, Delusions, Memory disorder, Personality disorders, Rhinitis, Alopecia, Hair disorder, Nail disorder, Conjunctivitis, Ophthalmologic disorders, Taste perversion, and Dysuria.

      Typically, users of Lupron also experience what is known as Clinical Flare, which is an exacerbation of side effects and symptoms during the first 2 injections or so. Addback therapy, much touted by prescribing physicians, does little to mitigate these effects.

      It is unfortunate that all the patients suffering the long-term negative effects of this drug are disbelieved by others, including the medical industry. The PR and marketing monster known as Takeda Abbott Pharmaceuticals (the drug's maker) spends billions of dollars advertising and marketing this drug every year, as well as providing enticing incentives to docs to Rx it to their patients (this is a FACT; TAP paid a record 5million fine for just that about 4 years ago). So it's hard for the patient who is suffering from long-term negative effects to be heard.

      That "EndoKnow" site and the "Lupron1" website and all others of a similar nature, which masquerade as helpful communication tools on how to talk to your doc and effectively treat your disease are little more than thinly disguised direct-to-consumer marketing tools paid for by TAP, which take your private contact info and disseminate them to the manufacturer. Beware also editorial materials bought and paid for by TAP, such as those featured through the Endo Association. One has to ask, if it's paid for, what slant does it have to give?? Look for unbiased materials.

      Most docs don't look past the one tiny study put out by PAID ADVISORS to the Lupron manufacturer that indicates Lupron is a "safe, cost-effective" way of treating Endo. I see nothing safe or cost-effective about inducing significantly negative, long lasting side effects in women who are already suffering with an insidious disease. Read both of these papers (even if already diagnosed):

      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/surgery%20vs.%20gnrh.pdf
      Surgery versus the Use of Lupron Depot as Treatment

      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/PreDiagnosisGnRH.pdf
      Use of Lupron Depot Prior to Surgical Diagnosis

      You really need to have your disease excised, which confers the most successful and long-term relief of symptoms. See www.endometriosistreatment.org and www.centerforendo.com for info on excision and why it is superior to vaporization, ablation, medical therapies like Lupron, etc.

      Pregnancy and Lupron are not cures for Endometriosis, nor is pregnancy a "treatment" that can be "prescribed" any more than menopause or hysterectomy can. There is no absolute cure, but physicians specializing in the disease who use modern concepts for treatment instead of old wive's tales and biased literature from the manufacturer have higher and longer-term success rates than those who put their patients on the treatment merry go round over and over.

      Don't take my word for it...I also recommend speaking to people here:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/erc
      http://www.geocities.com/lupronfacts/facts.html
      http://www.redflagsweekly.com/letters/letters5.htm
      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lupron/
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LupronVictims/

      For feedback on actual experiences.

      Good luck and think long and hard about your options. You DO have choices and another doctor who has dedicated their life to treating only Endo can offer you the best resources.

      Good luck!

  44. QUESTION:
    What causes a woman to need a hysterectomy?
    and what do the doctors do and how does it change the body.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of medical problems that can make a hysterectomy necessary. The most common is long term bleeding that doesn't respond to medication, or won't stay resolved unless hormones are taken. Then there are benign tumors of the uterine wall, called fibroids that can cause misery enough to make one necessary. In cases of severe endometriosis, or pelvic adhesions, sometimes it's recommended. They will also do a hysterectomy if you have invasive cervical cancer, uterine cancer, or ovarian cancer. I've also seen it done in elderly women who experience a uterine prolapse when the surgery to repair the support structures isn't sucessful, or if it's done as a means of taking stress off those structures. As far as how it changes the body, removing the uterus itself really only eliminates monthly periods if you are still of age to have a menstrual cycle. If you don't have cervical cancer, they will leave that intact. Even if you have the cervix removed, the vaginal canal is still there, so sex is still possible. In cases where a hysterectomy is necessary, the woman usually has had enough troubles with it not to miss it when it's gone. Most doctors will try to do other things to solve a problem, in an attempt to avoid the need for surgery. Although you may not have periods any more, and it seems somewhat silly to try to save an organ that is no longer working anyway, still- a hysterectomy is a major surgery and the benefits have to outweigh the risks a surgery poses to you. If a problem can be dealt with by medication, by pessary or exercise (in the case of a prolapse), then that's generally what they try first. Although you can live without a uterus, the majority of doctors feel that it's best to be conservative and avoid removal if possible. Fortunately we've come a long ways since the days when doctors were eager to remove the uterus at the least sign of trouble. Then again, women in general aren't as eager to have it done either. But there were days not so long ago when women of a "certain age" or those who had completed their families, considered it a blessed relief to be rid of the "burden". It was so common at one point that a good many women never even experienced menopause in the full sense of the word, because they had had the surgery decades before that happened. Now the pendulum has swung back, and ladies are not quite so eager to part company with their organs unless it's really necessary, and the doctors agree.

  45. QUESTION:
    Is there an OTC to help with menopausal symptoms?
    I'm 48. 4 months with no period and I believe I am heading into menopause. Hot flashes I can handle but the mood swings/emotional imbalance makes me feel like I am going insane. Is there any relief from an OTC?

    • ANSWER:
      I tried Ambien, it's expensive and didn't do anything for me. Now I get Estroven from Walgreens or cheaper, Sams or Costco. It's a yellow box and it's not that much. It helps with the hot flashes and the insane -ness. It's not HRT, don't know anything about it, but it helps me.

  46. QUESTION:
    How does a Progesterone cream work?
    Isn't it tricky that you massage it in your body parts, and it helps your hormones?

    Plz educate me a bit about it. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You rub the cream on you inner thigh or inner arm or tummy (areas where you have a high number of capillaries). You rub it in like lotion.

      Do expect much to get absorbed. The progesterone has trouble passing through our skin especially with the type you find a health food stores/herb shops. Progesterone also breaks down/gets destroyed easily. Even taking it by mouth weakens it due to the digestive system.

      I only suggest taking the cream form when your going through peri-menopause or menopause and what relief of symtpoms. Don't use it for ttc or to maintain a pregnancy if you are low in progesterone. You can tell there's low progesterone if you luteal phase is under 10 days.

      Usually OB/gyn and RE's will prescribe progesterone by suppository (vaginal) or by injection. Injection is the best way for the body to absorb it but it can be painful especially after you get pregnant and have to continue them until the 10+ week of pregnancy.

      I'm on progesterone right now. I take 200 mg daily when I take it (50 mgs if by injection). With the creams, your body only takes in about 10% of what you rub in. Most creams contain 50 mg per 2 quirts. That means for every 2 squirts, you're only getting 5% into your body. Imagine how much you need to get 200 mgs.

      Try taking Maca if you want to increase your progesterone naturally.

      If you suspect low progesterone, ask your doctor for progesterone support. Most will give it when there might be a problems and other will have a progesterone test done around cycle day 21.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to feel tired before getting your period?
    I get different kinds of symptoms before my period starts all the time. I got it when I was 13. When I was 14 or 15 I started getting cramps before it, then when I was 17 I started to get headaches before it too.

    I just started feeling sleepy. Is that because of my period or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Can be, Fatigue is a typical PMS symptom. I sleep really deep right before my cycle and dream really vividly. Go figure. You can also get headaches, as you said, fluid retention, irritability, swollen glands, night sweats-no wait, that's menopause. Wait til your 40's. Best of both worlds, sigh!
      Anyway pick up a box of those menstrual relief products at your local drugstore and read what it says it relieves. That will give you a pretty good list of PMS symptoms.

  48. QUESTION:
    What can I take to increase my libido?
    I am interested in increasing my libido, is there some pills for that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello loptr,

      In today's fast-moving life, there is so much to take care of. Rent, bills, installments, deadlines, etc., and if you are a woman, the responsibility of a family, children, healthy diet, everything becomes so much that you just want to get home in the evening and rest. Of course, sex is the last thing on your mind at such times. So what should you do if you want to change your situation? What can you do to enhance your libido? There are many ways in which you can gain back the lost sex drive, both natural and medicinal.

      Causes of Low Libido
      Loss of libido is a common problem in women. Almost half the women population lose interest in having sex, though they do not have problem reaching orgasm. There can be many causes for this loss, both physical and psychological. Some of them are:

      The Psychological Reasons
      There are many psychological issues like tension, stress, depression and anxiety that lead to loss of interest. Some deeper problems like sexual abuse, rape, latent same-sex attractions are also responsible. Difficult living conditions and childhood trauma are some more psychological causes for the loss of interest.

      The Physical Reasons
      The most common reason that causes loss of sexual interest is drug and alcohol abuse. Diabetes, anemia and use of tranquilizers are also responsible for it. Many women also feel lack of interest in sex after pregnancy and childbirth. Contrary to general belief, menopause does not affect the desire to have sex.

      Natural Libido Enhancers
      Though there are some pills and medicines that can be used as libido enhancers, here are the natural remedies that can be easily used and are very effective. There are many helps that can be used to enhance the sex drive.
      •Ashwagandha is a herb that increases sexual energy. It is equivalent to ginseng and is quite effective.
      •Ginkgo biloba is a vasodilator and helps to increase blood flow to the genitals by increasing the levels of nitric oxide in the blood.
      •Epimedium sagittatum which is commonly known as horny goat weed also produces same effects of sexual simulation.
      •Hops extract is an estrogen enhancer and helps alleviate vaginal dryness. It increases lubrication to the genitals and provides relief from menopause symptoms.
      •Damiana extract helps to relax the body, alleviating stress and tiredness and helps to balance the hormones in females.
      •Ginger is also helpful in keeping the heart healthy and it increases the blood flow.
      Other Remedies
      Apart from the herbs mentioned above, there are other natural ways to increase the sexual urge and desire. It is a known fact that fragrances are good turn-ons for both men and women. For women, citrus, fruity and vanilla fragrances that are subtle and enticing, work best. Other fragrances like rose, sandalwood and cucumber are good mood enhancers as well. Another good way to enhance your sex life is food. Yes, food. The most famous of all aphrodisiac foods is of course the sensuous chocolate. Women are generally not able to resist the temptation of chocolate both dark and milk. Along with it, caviar, red wine, oyster, aromatic fruits like grapes, peaches and strawberry and dry fruits like resins and grapes are all tried and time tested mood enhancers for women.

      Mood enhancers help to induce desire and increase the libido. If you can get all that without any side effects, what more do you want. Conducive atmosphere, a low stress life and peace of mind are some other factors that keep the brain fresh and body rejuvenated during love making. Females who encounter issues related to loss of libido must not rely excessively on medicines but they must include natural ways in their lifestyle to get back their normal sex drive.

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

  49. QUESTION:
    Does a person with estrogen dominance have to stop drinking coffee to balance hormones?
    Does a person with estrogen dominance have to stop drinking coffee to get better?

    • ANSWER:
      During the years leading up to menopause, a woman’s hormone levels may fluctuate, resulting in hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, vaginal dryness and other common premenopausal discomforts. Symptoms of "estrogen dominance"—a term popularized by the late John R. Lee, M.D., a leading researcher and author on the subject of hormonal fluctuations—may respond well to natural remedies and lifestyle changes.

      Progesterone
      Progesterone, like estrogen, is manufactured in the body and during most of a woman’s reproductive years; her body produces both of these hormones in a balanced ratio. When estrogen levels spike, however, she may benefit from a natural source of progesterone to bring her estrogen levels under control.

      Wild yam cream, available in health food stores, is the main source of natural progesterone, replacing its synthetic counterpart, progestin, which is available only by prescription. By extracting the active ingredient, diosgenin, from wild yams, this plant-based formulation may be more readily accepted by a woman’s body. A dosage of 20 to 30 milligrams (mg) per day applied topically to the skin may offer relief of perimenopausal symptoms due to estrogen dominance. Any woman currently under a doctor’s care for her symptoms should consult her physician about starting a natural progesterone replacement regime. At higher dosages, side effects may include drowsiness, temporary water retention and yeast infection.

      Some natural supplements may assist in reducing the symptoms of estrogen dominance, including a daily dose of up to 1,000 mg of grape seed extract, up to 4 grams of taurine or a daily capsule of fish oil (derived from deep-water fish). Adding a calcium supplement may also help protect a woman’s bones.

      Diet and Lifestyle
      A healthy low-fat diet may minimize symptoms. Choose foods high in natural fiber, such as carrots, celery, and whole grain cereals and breads, while reducing or eliminating caffeine and alcohol.
      Embark on a regular exercise routine that includes at least 30 minutes of gentle aerobic exercise daily, such as brisk walking, swimming, aerobics or indoor cycling class. Clear any new exercise program with your doctor before beginning.

  50. QUESTION:
    Menopause: What Have You Done to Increase Libido?
    I have severe endometriosis and take a drug that puts me in "medical menopause." I've tried getting of this medication but without it my quality of life isn't that great due to the pain.

    That being said, I suffer a major lack of libido due to the "menopause." Dry as a bone, no feelings, barely arousable and of course sex is quite painful due to the dryness; what can I do? What do you use to help? I have used Replens, and it has made sex not painful, which is beneficial to my partner, but I want something that will benefit me!

    • ANSWER:
      Take the Homeopathic remedies SEPIA and NATRIUM MUR both in 30X or 30C potency three times a day half an hour before meals to cure the symptoms you have given in your question. 100% relief guaranteed without any side effects or complications of any kind.

      Take Care and God Bless you.


relief for menopause

Natural Hormone Treatment For Women

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How does taking hormones of any gender change a persons voice?
    Its fascinating that all one has to do is take hormones. But scientifically, how does this work?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, you have to understand how gender works. Female is the default gender. It's testerone (triggered by the 'y' chromosome) that signals tissues to become male instead of female.

      When people start taking hormone treatments, they're basically entering puberty again, the vocal cords respond to the testosterone and the tissues start to grow as they would in a male body.

      It's easier for women to transition into men because female tissues is designed to become male when exposed to testosterone, that is, if it's in an area that is designed to change during puberty, like the vocal cords. It's that natural testosterone in teen boys that suddenly makes their voice become deeper.

      It's not as easy for men, because male tissue is not designed to go back to being female once it's come in contact with testosterone. This is why, MtF transgenders have a much easier time transitioning, and have less noticeable masculine traits, if they start hormone treatment in their early teens. This way their body is never subjected to the testosterone that will permanently change their body.

  2. QUESTION:
    Are there any proven alternatives to chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment?
    I have heard about natural therapies like Ayurveda etc. but I want to know about success stories and their reliability. Does anyone have an opinion for/against?

    • ANSWER:
      Breast cancer is treated by surgery, and in some cases radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy, or a combination of one or more of these, is recommended.

      Chemotherapy is not appropriate or necessary in every case of breast cancer. The treatments recommended depend on each individual's cancer.

      So, many people with breast cancer receive treatment that doesn't include chemotherapy.

      Of the women who were in hospital for breast cancer surgery at the same time as I was, two of us were recommended the whole package - chemo, rads, hormone treatment; one was recommended chemo only; one was recommended hormone treatment (daily pill for 5 years) only; and one was recommended no post-surgery treatment other than regular check ups.

      There is not a scrap of evidence that 'alternative' or 'natural' treatments have ever had any effect on cancer. If a treatment has been tested and proven to work, it cannot be called 'alternative medicine'; it becomes simply 'medicine'. Alternative, in this context, is another way of saying 'unproven'.

      And certainly ayurveda has no proven effect against cancer.

      If you are asking for yourself or someone you care about, I recommend that you do a search on this site for information on any alternative treatment you are tempted by before investing money, hope and (most dangerous of all for a cancer patient) time in unproven, ineffective and occasionally dangerous 'treatments':

      http://www.quackwatch.org/

  3. QUESTION:
    Can HGH therapy work for treatment of secondary amenorrhea?
    have had amenorrhea(lack of period) for about a year and a half. I have read that HGH (human growth hormone) treatments can help with a wide variety of health issues ie. high blood pressure, bone density, menstrual cycles, hair skin and nails. I was wondering if anyone new a little more first hand about the possibility of using HGH as a treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      Instead of HGH, I would recommend Amino Acid Balance, B-Vitamin Complex, and a good multi-vitamin to improve over-all health. I like Anabol Naturals Amino Balance, Jarrow B-Right, Twinlab Dr. Greene Prenatal Complex (for those who are malnourished) or Rainbow Light Women's Nutritional System or Liquid Health Products Complete Multiple (tasty liquid multi-vitamin) .To help encourage menstrual cycle I would take an herbal supplement like Chasteberry (Vitex), Red Clover, False Unicorn, or Black Cohosh which are used to balance hormones. Good herbal supplement brands are Nature's Answer and Nature's Way. I like to order my supplements online to save money.

      Caution:
      Do not take if pregnant or lactating. May interfere with hormone medication.
      Chasteberry can cause rash with prolonged use in some people.

  4. QUESTION:
    Why do they treat some woman with breast cancer with a drug called herceptin?
    How does this drug work?

    And how come they treat other women that have the same cancer with a drug called Tamoxifin, and both drugs work?

    Why can't they treat all patients with the same cancer with the same drug?

    • ANSWER:
      There are various targets in the cancer cells that these innovative drugs attack in the effort to kill the cancer cells or stop the cancer cells from growing further and hence allowing the body natural mechanism to eliminate old cells(apoptosis).

      One such target is called a Hormone Receptor in the breast cancer cells,To be exact its the Estrogen Receptor(ER). The natural role of this ER is for the Estrogen to fit into it nicely and stimulate(switch on) the breast cells to grow and function. In breast cancer cells, the normal Estrogen in the blood would be attached to the ER and stimulate the cancer cells to grow more and hence the enlargement and spread of cancer cells. Tamoxifen is a drug that fit into the ER but instead of switching it on like Estrogen, it switches off the ER, thereby reducing the cells ability to function and grow. As a result, the cells can be attacked the body defence which result in cell death and hence cancer control.

      The other target of attack on the breast cancer cells is the Antibody Receptor(Antigen). The well known antigen in the breast cancer cell is known as cERB2 receptor. By certain chemical and biological processing called DNA Engineering, an antibody has been created to attack this antigen and switch off the function of the breast cancer cells. Herceptin is the propreitory name of this antibody.

      Patients are not all the same. Some breast cancer patient has ER positive but cERB2 negative on their cells-this patient would be given Tamoxifen but not Herceptin.
      A patient with cERB2 positive but ER negative would be given Herceptin but not Tamoxifen.
      If both are positives, the patient will get both treatment of Tamoxifen and Herceptin.
      If both are negatives, then the patient will get neither.

  5. QUESTION:
    What causes a woman to have facial hair?
    Is it normal? What is an easy inexpensive way for a woman to get rid of it, if they can? If it is normal (which I heard), then why do so few woman have a problem with it? I guess I can ask the same thing for chest and back hair?

    • ANSWER:
      Some women are more prone to increased facial hair than others usually contributing to hormonal balance. With age, change in hormonal balance can increase the appearance of darker or coarser facial hair compared to when one was younger with finer and lighter hair coloring.

      Hormone levels are the biggest contributing factors to any body hair overall. The simplest way for women to remove facial hair is through an over the counter facial hair wax removal kit.

      American women are more likely to "perceive" a greater annoyance with facial hair and most likely will deal with it as it is our society's standards to be smooth body and little or no hair ALL over. American men seem to be of the same vanity with body hair as well. Especially, if they are fitness buffs who want to accentuate the clean lines of their defined muscle build.

      http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/women/9911/29/excess.facial.hair.wmd/

      What's abnormal

      The disorder in which excessive hair growth is stimulated by androgenesis is called hirsutism. Hirsutism can be accompanied by other changes, such as balding, deepening of the voice and cessation of menstruation. In other words, excessive hair growth is usually not the only symptom of a true medical disorder.

      Most hirsutism is caused by overproduction of androgens from one of the two natural sources of androgens in women: the ovary or the adrenal gland.

      The most common condition associated with excessive androgen production is called polycystic ovarian disease

      Treatments

      With PCO, or when the cause is elusive, birth control pills can be used to limit hair growth. The birth control pill works by rendering some of the circulating androgen inactive. Adrenal hyperplasia is treated with a different hormonal antidote.

      For women with minimal facial hair, there are a number of options, but all have drawbacks. Temporary solutions such as shaving and depilatories can irritate skin. Electrolysis is costly and uncomfortable, but it does yield results. Laser therapy is similarly costly, and it should be used with caution by women with dark skin, since permanent skin blotching can occur.

      The most encouraging development is a cream called Vaniqu

  6. QUESTION:
    When do women start getting those crease lines around the lips? I mean, an average range?
    So I'm about to be 30, and only b/c of the commercials talking about them,
    I'm noticing those creases around my lips?
    Is this normal?
    What to do?
    PS I have this Burt's Bees natural lip balm with oils and eucalyptus... I htink that's supposed to draw more blood to them and plumpthem naturally.
    Does this backfire after a while?

    • ANSWER:
      Post menopausal women get those creases! So it really depends the age you are, when your hormones decide to abandon you. When they leave you they leave lots of things behind to remind you that you are now officially 'over the hill' and no longer need to be attractive to men. You will wake up one morning and suddenly notice those attractive mouth creases you mentioned..also a lovely saggy jowl and droopy eyelids. Your bottom will shift forward and become a nice big stomach - so you'll have to start wearing all your pants backwards....and you'll develop these delightful little flabby bits of skin that hang on the inside of your upper arm.
      I have been using good quality and expensive creams, balms and lotions on my face since I was 13 years old and they do not seem to have slowed down my aging process...but then again, what the hell might I I look like today, had I not been using those products.!!?? You're still young...and any nice treatment to your face will not go to waste. Enjoy your youth while you have it.

  7. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried and concieved using natural or holistic treatments?
    I have heard that taking licorice daily can help stabilize hormones and boost ovulation and conception.
    Also acupuncture and reflexology.
    Has it worked for you?
    I am taking clomid but to be honest I am very into Natural medicines and alternative treatments
    I am also open to any suggestions! I am going to stick with the clomid so maybe something else will give it a boost?
    TTC # 1 for 18 months! Been on clomid 3 months.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I've tried several natural remedies but none of them have worked thus far. I am going to keep trying until I find something whether it be scientific or holistic that will work! I've tried pre-natal teas,Royal Bee Jelly and Chakra cleansing....to be honest I never finished the Chakra cleansing but oh Well. Best of luck and i hear alot of Women have success using Vitex!

  8. QUESTION:
    What are other methods of assisted reproductive technology?
    My husband and I want children.

    I am now seeing a reproductive specialist who is encouraging me to have IVF. I just read that IVF is a major treatment in infertility when other methods of assisted reproductive technology have failed.

    MY OB/GYN hasn´t even tried any other methods. I´m new to all of this, so please tell me other methods before we do something major to become pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      You are asking good questions - do some research, find out why your specialist want to jump into big guns liek IVF so soon - maybe there are good reasons

      A lot depends on reasons for the infertily

      Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) is the umbrella term for a variety of medical procedures used to bring eggs and sperm together without sexual intercourse. The objective of ART is to create an embryo by bypassing the factor(s) causing the fertility problem.

      There are meds, sperm enhancement procedures, intra-uterine insemination (IUS) etc
      I had it Clomid and IUS and now have 3 children - only needed help the first time

      I strongly advise getting involved in Resolve - a support organization for people with fertility problems
      http://www.resolve.org/site/PageServer

      http://www.fertilitylifelines.com/advancedtreatments/art/index.jsp

      Typically, ART will use therapies such as Gonal–f® (follitropin alfa for injection) for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) as part of the protocol. These medications either supplement or replace a woman's natural supply of hormones to stimulate development of multiple follicles and to control the timing of the reproductive cycle. A woman's eggs and a man's sperm are then collected and brought together to create an embryo in a laboratory. Perhaps the most familiar ART procedure is in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  9. QUESTION:
    Natural ways of shrinking uterine fibroids and ovarian cysts?
    Today I was diagnosed with three uterine fibroids (3 cm each) and a small ovarian cyst. I don't want to get surgery as it could be dangerous for other organs. Are there any natural ways of shrinking them?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids are benign uterine growths. Many women have no symptoms while others experience bleeding, increased urination, bladder displacement, urine retention, constipation, infertility, miscarriage, pain during intercourse and anemia. Ovarian cysts are enlarged follicles that fail to rupture and release an egg. Women may experience general pain, disrupted periods, pain in the back and abdomen and painful intercourse. Both of these conditions are caused by imbalances in estrogen production. There are many natural treatments to deal with both of these conditions. Talk to your doctor about any natural supplements you are using.

      Herbal Treatments for Fibroids

      Herbal treatments that address bleeding often work quite quickly, but supplements that control hormone levels take about three months of use before bringing about noticeable results.

      Black cohosh controls bleeding and relieves pain; take 500 milligrams daily. Cinnamon oil has a long history of use in traditional American medicine to control bleeding fibroids. Use 10-to-15 drops every 15 minutes until the bleeding stops. Dan shen, which should only be used under professional supervision, treats congealed blood, dark red clots during menstruation, and relieves pelvic congestion. Reishi tincture alleviates pelvic inflammation. Take one tablespoon in ¼ cup of water three times daily.

      There are three traditional Chinese formulas that are commonly used to treat uterine fibroids. Take as directed on the product label.

      Augmented Rambling powder lowers estrogen levels and is most useful for women who are also suffering from painful or difficult urination. Cinnamon Twig and Poria Pill lowers estrogen levels without interfering with the menstrual cycle or causing weight gain. Four Substance Decoction treats fibroids and is especially useful for women who eat a poor diet.
      Herbal Treatments for Ovarian Cysts

      Dioscorea tincture, also known as wild yam, alleviates cramping caused by ovarian cysts. Take as directed on the label. Dong quai relieves pain resulting from this condition. Take 1,000 milligrams daily during the two-week period after menstruation and then discontinue for two weeks.

      There are several Chinese formulas used to treat ovarian cysts. Use as directed on the product label.

      Dong Quai and Peony Powder reduces estrogen levels and the formation of inflammatory substances in the tissues that line the uterus. Two Cured Decoction reduces estrogen levels. Augmented Rambling Powder and Cinnamon Twig and Poria pill, which are listed above, can also be used for ovarian cysts

      Estrogen is produced from body fat. Excess weight increases the amount of estrogen in the body, so make an effort to maintain a normal weight. Do your best to exercise regularly and reduce stress levels. Avoid the following herbs that stimulate estrogen production: Coleus, Cordyceps, fennel seed, licorice, and moutan.
      What Are Uterine Fibroid Cysts?
      Uterine fibroid cysts are noncancerous tumors that grow in or around the uterus. Uterine fibroids are a common medical complaint, occurring in up to 80 percent of ...
      Uterine Cysts
      Uterine cysts are tumors that can vary in size from less than 1 inch to as large as a melon. Also referred to as uterine fibroids, or simply fibroids, these growths ...
      Dong Quai Benefits

      Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is a plant found at high altitudes in the mountain regions of China, Korea and Japan. It has been used for thousands of years to treat a ...
      How to Cure Ovarian Cysts & Uterine Fibroids

      Ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids are two problems that commonly affect women. In many cases, they go away on their own, without requiring treatment. However, they ...
      Uterine Fibroid Laser Treatment

      Uterine fibroids are quite common, and usually go away on their own. Even when this does not occur, these fibroids are usually benign. However, when they result in ...
      How to Treat Uterine Fibroids With Natural Medicine

      Uterine fibroids are hard growths that occur in the muscle tissue of the uterus, particularly in women between the ages of 35 and 45. Often fibroids cause little or ...
      Herbs to Take for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder of the ovaries that causes multiple follicles to develop and form into clumps. Rather than disintegrate during menstruation ...
      Ovarian Fibroid Procedures

      According to the University of Pennsylvania, fibroids are a common abnormal growth within the uterus and are the No. 1 reason U.S. women have a hysterectomy. Fibroids ...
      Homeopathic Treatment Help for Shrinking a Uterus Fibroid

      In some cases, homeopathic medicine can be extremely helpful in shrinking uterine fibroids. A fibroid is a muscle tumor that can produce heavy menstrual bleeding ...

  10. QUESTION:
    What are the natural remedies for getting my hormones back into balance after a miscarriage? ?
    I had a miscarriage at the end of May. I have only had one period since then and I'm anxious. I don't feel right. My body feels "inactive" or at a stand-still. I was wondering if anyone knew of natural herbs/supplements that help a woman regain her cycle and renew health at the same time.

    • ANSWER:
      A woman's vitamin will help you be get you proper nutrients. But don't forget a miscarriage is the same for your body as giving birth. You could be displaying symptoms of Post Pardum Depression. (PPD). Your Ob/Gyn can diagnose you accurately with treatment, but if your against pills. Serotonin may help.

  11. QUESTION:
    Can hormone levels effect hair growth or loss in woman?
    I've been experiencing hair loss and think it may have to do with my hormone levels. I've been taking prenatal vitamins so that i know im getting a high dose of iron and other nutrients to help but it does'nt seem to be doing anything.
    Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Women Can Lose Hair from From hormones but in most cases its heriditary. The best resolution would be treatment. The human body is a complex organism and each individual responds differently to drugs and medications. What works for some may not work for others. Provillus contains the clinically tested ingredient Minoxidil 2% approved by the FDA to help re-grow your hair. Minoxidil 2% is FDA approved topical ingredient clinically shown to help re-grow your own natural hair. It is a blood vessel dilator and has anti-androgen properties. Women Me sure you take the 2%. For more information check out This site..

      http://bit.ly/8ZZ2E3

  12. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for a urine pregnancy test to be positive?
    Started having unprotected sex 3 months ago and had it a few times in the last month.
    I have several of the pregnancy symptoms.
    I took 2 tests last week and 1 today, and all came out negative.
    Do I just not have enough pregnancy hormone in me, or is something else going on?
    okay...Just so everyone knows, i dont have a period unless I am on birth control pills.
    yes, i dont EVER have periods.
    im no longer on the pill. so im always gonna be late.

    • ANSWER:
      This is tricky because usually a pregnancy test will give a positive reading just about 11 days after fertilisation of the ovum, but in your case, if you never get periods, you need to get checked out to see if you are actually ovulating at all.

      Birth control pills don't give you real periods ( i.e. based on a normal hormonal cycle of ovulation, and then shedding of a non-pregnant uterine lining). With birth control pills your body is conned into thinking it is pregnant so that you don't get pregnant! You then get a 'bleed' when you stop taking it. Natural hormones of all kinds are the 'messengers' used by your body to control all kinds of functions. The sex hormones are the messengers that tell your ovaries and your uterus when to do what they are supposed to do. Birth control pills are artificial messengers which cause artificial symptoms. Women are sometimes prescribed birth control pills to reduce their menstrual flow if their periods are particularly troublesome, heavy and painful.

      If your own hormones are out of balance to the degree that you don't get periods at all, I think it is highly unlikely that you would be ovulating, and therefore the chances that you could become pregnant are virtually nil. Even girls with irregular periods sometimes have difficulty getting pregnant. Having said that, it only takes one egg and one sperm to make a baby!

      Please go back to whoever prescribes your birth control pills and tell them what is happening with your body. I'm surprised that you were prescribed birth control pills when you don't have periods. Don't leave these things to chance. It may be that you need altogether different treatment and that these pills are causing you symptoms you shouldn't be having. It sounds like your body is confused and needs some help.

      Artificial hormones are very powerful - they can make men grow breasts and women grow beards!

  13. QUESTION:
    Since feminists claim superiority because women can have children, what do they think of post-menopausal women?
    Feminists, when confronted with the demonstrable facts that men are smarter, more accomplished and physically stronger than women, inevitably fall back on a woman's childbearing capability as evidence of their superiority. But what about those women that are barren because of age or even medical condition? Do feminists see these women as inferior to men?
    Jade196: Virtually every metric shows greater male accomplishment. For example, even though more women now go to college, men receive 5 times as many patents as women.

    • ANSWER:
      Freedom from "Gods divine punishment" for outstanding service in the Estrogen and Progesterone department is what I think of Post Menopausal women. It's like retirement with a huge 401k full of emotional plateaus (after it kicks in fully).

      Whether you can successfully bear a child or you cant bear a child its just about as painful. Either physically, emotionally or both. I miscarried at 8 weeks and emotionally- it ripped me apart. My sister had early onset menopause when she was 20. She cant have a child either and I might have a condition that will prevent me from carrying a pregnancy to term and the medical treatment was painful and emotionally traumatizing.

      Now, some women do persecute other women about childbearing. There is anger, jealousy, depression and raging hormones. I've been on the bump.com and looked at those message boards and those women are vicious. Are they feminists? No. A feminist will not discount a woman because of a natural disability. If they do, then they're not a feminist- they're a persecutor and they are intolerant of the gender they claim to support.

      The grass is always greener on the other side. It's just as hard being unable to do what you were born to do and sometimes harder than just 9 months of being pregnant. It's the same as a man being infertile or his manhood isn't large enough to successfully reach the cervix making conception harder (not sure if it's true, but John Gosslin had Kate + 8 because of rumors of his small penis size being unable to fertilize her egg which is how John and Kate wound up with 8. He had the swimmers but not the conduit- it's just as hard for a man and makes him feel emasculated just like women that cant conceive feel like they're not a "real" woman).

      Either way. Women face a lot of pain and because we have a lot of emotions and they tend to control us and sometimes make us feel bad is all the reason why I think we're not superior to men, but we're emotional warriors. Men tend to be afraid of their emotions- we aren't. We battle them. Men hide them. Men are physical warriors and protectors.

      I think feminism has a lot to do with lashing out about oppression and rights and not who is better than who. Just like Martin Luther King, a true civil rights leader does not persecute the people who persecute them. Martin Luther King was a peaceful man and did not show disrespect to Whites he reasonably showed disagreement and protested in an orderly fashion. He was so successful because of his compassion and objectivity and peace. Not because he told White people that his race was more superior. You attract more flies with honey and not vinegar as the saying goes...

      Of course this is just my opinion, I don't want to offend anyone else if they think differently. I respect everyones opinion on an issue. There's more than one way to look at things. I think thats why I like Yahoo Answers so much.

  14. QUESTION:
    What are some ways to lower your testosterone level?
    Most women have a small amount of the testosterone hormone however the amount in my body is abnormal. What are some natural ways to lower my testosterone level? What are some non-natural ways? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Taking an anti-androgen medicine will reduce the effects that testosterone has on you. I would strongly suggest getting regular blood tests though if you take this route.

      All the drugs listed can have damaging & unwanted side effects. If you fail to get checked on a regular basis, you could permanently damage your body.

      If you are diagnosed as having PCOS, there are plenty of useful places on the web where you can find a lot more useful information than I have placed here.

      I would also recommend that you find out why your body is producing high levels of testosterone if you do not have PCOS. There are several conditions that I can think of. Some are related to chromosome issues and will require careful diagnosis & specialist treatment.

      I've listed some popular drugs used to suppress the androgen levels (including testosterone) below.

      Androcur (Cyproterone acetate) was banned in the USA because it was used to chemically sterilise men, but will do this job effectively.

      Casodex (Bicalutamide) prevents testosterone from binding to any receptors in the body but again is not recommended for women.

      Proscar (Finasteride) is very effective for reducing one particular for of an androgen that affects hair-loss in men. There are some other side effects too and it is not recommended for women.

      Spironolactone creates a lot of work for the liver and does require an increase in fluid intake.

      Prostap & Zoladex will also reduce your estrogen levels so should not be used in your case.

      I suspect that you will require only small doses of these drugs. Each comes with some side effects and thorough research is required before you embark on taking any of them. I have listed some useful sites below to help with researching the side effects of the drugs that I have mentioned above.

      I am not a medical professional. My personal life has caused me to become interested in the above medications.

      Edit: Alcohol can actually increase the levels of testosterone in your body whilst you are drinking & getting drunk.

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I am going through Early Onset Menopause?
    The only real symptom I have is a screwed up menstrual cycle. I work with menopausal women that say I am about to go through the change. I am only 42. No night sweats, in fact I am always cold.

    • ANSWER:
      You should talk to your doctor but here's some information.
      http://www.epigee.org/menopause/early.html

      Early and Premature Menopause

      When we hear the word menopause, we usually think of older women above the age of 60. Very rarely do we ever think of ourselves. However, menopause is not a stage necessarily relegated to elderly women. Early or premature menopause is more common than most women realize - it affects about 1% of women between the ages of 15 and 45. Early or premature menopause can occur for a variety of reasons, but in the end it leaves an imprint on the lives of all of the women it affects.

      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      Because doctors are finally beginning to recognize the symptoms of menopause in younger women, more and more women are being diagnosed with early or premature menopause. As a result, women who are experiencing infertility or are dealing with menopause symptoms at a young age no longer have to wonder why.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that aren’t functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers’ footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Surgical Menopause
      Surgical menopause involves the conscious decision of forcing women into menopause for specific health reasons. Women who suffer from endometriosis, polyps, or ovarian cancer may have to undergo an oopherectomy (removal of the ovaries) or a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and sometimes ovaries). These surgeries dramatically cut off ovarian function causing estrogen levels to drop suddenly and forcing the woman into menopause.

      Menopause Caused by Cancer Treatment
      Menopause can be caused by chemotherapy or radiation cancer treatments. Chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells but, unfortunately, they also kills healthy cells. Hair cells, digestive cells, and ovarian cells are particularly at risk. Some women who have undergone cancer treatment temporarily enter menopause, while others permanently enter menopause.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the body’s functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen (known as "estrogen crash") in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isn’t so bad – in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

  16. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of any good herbal remedies for hirstuism?
    I have polycystic ovarian syndrome which unfortunately causes excess facial hair growth. I am disgusted and frustrated with this problem. I've tried the pill(side effects didn't agree with me) and I can't affort the pricey hair removal treatments. Can anyone out there offer me any advice for this problem? I wonder if anyone has tried any supplements or herbal remedies that have worked?

    • ANSWER:
      Hirsutism is caused by excess of androgens in the body of the woman. It can be caused by exposure to androgens in diet and environment. It can also be caused by excess stress which really affects the whole body not just your mind. It can also be caused by hypothyroidism which causes a host of other problems in the body. It can be accompanied by tumors or not.

      Hirsutism can cause social anxiety and mental distress because of how women, women's body and "beauty" are viewed in society.

      I have had hirsutism for the last 5-6 years. I am 31 at the moment so it's definitely not a menapause or age related thing. At first it was minimal, and so I attributed it genetics. but about a couple of years ago, my hair started growing so profusely and rapidly that it scared the crap out of me. I did some research and took some herbs that literally slowed down and sometimes even stopped the growth. I also discovered that I had hypothyroidism which is part of the cause of the hirsutism. Also, intense mental stress, which had a lot to with my social and family environment and with traumatic experiences of childhood, caused my body to react the way it did.

      I still take the herbs because it takes time for the herbs to effect the system and heal it. I believe that the right medication, lifestyle, diet, environment, mindset, can all help to heal the disease.

      I use Saw Palmetto quite a bit. A tea or decoction of the following herbs is quite helpful.

      Vitex Chaste Berry
      Saw Palmetto
      Black Cohosh
      Fenugreek
      Goat's Rue
      Stinging Nettle
      Pygeum Africans
      Schizandra Berry

      I also take other herbs that all affect the sexual hormones of the female body. For example, the following herbs really help with my painful menstrual cycle and general overall hormonal health... which in turn helps the issues of hirsutism amd hypothyroidism.

      Dong Quai
      Schizandra Berry
      Shilajit
      Shatavari etc.

      I take things that help with hypothyroidism which can be a cause of hirsutism.

      Seaweed especially Bladderwack
      helps a lot.

      I also take things that help to de-stress the system.

      Kava-kava
      Gotu Kola
      Chamomile
      Lavender
      St. John's Wort
      Valerian
      Flax seeds
      almonds or almond oil etc.

      Raw foods help a lot. I absolutely do not use non-organic dairy. I am even picky with the organic dairy that I buy for not all organic companies allow a healthy diet and lifestyle for the cows. I would recommend, if you can do it, getting off dairy completely for a while. It helps slow down the hair growth. Only do organic foods and cut out sugar. If you want to do sugar than I have found maple syrup, honey, agave to be better substitutes. I also found Rapunzel Rapadura to be an excellent and more nutritious substitute for regular sugar.

      Don't forget exercise especially Yoga helps a lot. And so does meditation. Creating a soothing sacred environment in you home and work place if possible really helps to heal the mind and body. We are really unaware of how our environment and the people we are around affects our bodies and minds.

      I would also recommend staying away from regular cleansers, bleaches, detergents and switching to more natural products that don't hurt the body. We may not realize it but they do end up in our system and affect the organs of hormone secretions. Minimizing use of plastic, styrofoam and other such volatile materials that break down easily and get into our food, water and body directly affect our hormonal health. I no longer use plastic bottles or eat in or with plastic materials. I no longer use the microwave to heat food. I filter my water with a reverse osmosis filter which is very important.

      By the way, a lot of the hormones injected into the cows get defecated and urinated out of the their system and end up in our water supply. It takes months for them to break down and they don't get filtered out before they come through our tap.

      Also, doing liver, kidney and colon cleanses helps quite a bit. Liver health and balance is really important for metabolizing all the hormones and what not in our system.

      These are some ways that have helped and are still helping me to heal from hypothyroidism and hirsutism. It takes time but it works.

  17. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  18. QUESTION:
    Does Progesterone help regulate the menstrual cycle or is it considered a fertility drug or both?
    This situation involves a woman with amenhorrea (no menstrual cycle). It is my understanding that some drugs, like Provera, are merely to help the menstrual cycle, while other drugs, like Clomid, are actually intended to help fertility (i.e., help the patient get pregnant)? Where does Progesterone fall? Is it merely something that can help the menstrual cycle or is it intended to help patients get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Progesterone does not help patients conceive and it is not considered a fertility drug (like Clomid) but it is sometimes used in fertility treatment.

      Progesterone is just another hormone in the complex equation of hormones that govern a woman's menstrual cycle. Progesterone plays its most important role after ovulation when it helps to nourish and maintain a nutrient-rich lining in the uterus for possible pregnancy. If no pregnancy is achieved, the progesterone level crashes which triggers the uterine lining to shed (your period). Provera, a synthetic progesterone, is given to women to try to induce a period. Provera/progesterone is taken for several days (usually 10 days) then it is stopped, which mimics the body's natural progesterone crash that triggers the lining to shed.

      If pregnancy is achieved, progesterone levels remain high to support the pregnancy. It is sometimes used in fertility treatments during the two week wait to help support a possible pregnancy if the woman does not produce enough progesterone on her own. Some women take progesterone supplementation for the entire first trimester - it depends on their diagnosis and treatment.

      Progesterone does not increase your chances of conception because conception occurs before progesterone factors into the pregnancy equation. It will help your chances of carrying a pregnancy through the early stages if it is shown that your body does not produce adequate levels of progesterone on its own.

      Hope that makes sense.

  19. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of uterine fibroid without surgery?
    I want to kow if there is any natural method of getting rid of a fibroid. I have a very huge fundal fibroid outside my uterus, though it is not creating any discomfort, I am only 28 and this may cause complications in my pregnancy.

    Can anyone suggest any natural methods for treating this

    • ANSWER:
      It is perfectly possible to learn how to get rid of uterine fibroids naturally but first and foremost you must understand that this is not a quick fix approach and will require a committed and systematic approach from yourself.

      Your fibroids did not grow overnight and although common, not every woman will have fibroids. There are various causes of uterine fibroids and most of these are caused by lifestyle and dietary issues. Certain conditions need to exist for uterine fibroids to grow-there is never any single cause of this condition, but it happens due to the subtle interaction of various factors which cause an environment which triggers off growth.

      By neutralising the conditions which caused fibroid growth in the first place, this will cause the fibroids to shrink naturally and once the conditions cease to exist, fibroids cannot grow any more. There is certainly a strong connection between the Western lifestyle fibroid growth. This does not just apply to our Western diet, but also factors such as stress, lack of exercise and poor sleep patterns all come into play.

      To get rid of uterine fibroids naturally, you will need to use a tried and tested plan. Implementing ad-hoc treatments may help give symptomatic relief, but will not provide a proper solution.

      The components of a successful plan will include:-

      * A robust detox to help eliminate toxins

      * Systems to rebalance hormone levels

      * The correct diet for fibroid sufferers

      * How to control stress levels

      * The role of herbs

      * The link between yeast and fibroids

      Combining these elements makes for an extremely powerful method to rid you of your uterine fibroids.

  20. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  21. QUESTION:
    what can i do to control acne during pregnancy?
    I know your hormones are out of control, but is there anything that will help acne breakouts?

    • ANSWER:
      I can't see why you can't use "tea tree oil" i use Thursday Plantation 100% pure Tea Tree Oil..and i use redwin hand wash on my face to cleanse...it's soap free/ph balanced/no perfume..costs for 750ml..and a pure witch hazel toner. I moisturise with neutrogena oil free moistuizer for sensitive skin...i find this combo works for me as i have monthly breakouts.
      Just note what not to use below "sacylic acid is one of them" so im thinking stay away from harsh chemicals that absorb into the skin.
      Here's the article i found--
      The changes that a woman’s body goes through during pregnancy are numerous, and often frustrating. Acne is one of those problems. Breaking out in acne during pregnancy is a fairly common occurrence. This is especially the case for the woman who is naturally prone to having acne breakouts. Changes in hormones and hormone levels during pregnancy result in the skin producing more oils, and thus more acne. This increased oils production is probably also responsible for the “glow” that many pregnant women seem to have. During pregnancy, acne can break out not only on the face, but also on the body. Fortunately, there are some things that you can try to use to deal with breaking out in acne during your pregnancy.

      One of the most obvious but also the most effective ways to deal with breaking out in acne during pregnancy is to keep your skin clean. After you clean your skin, rinse thoroughly with lukewarm water to remove any soap residue that might be left over. Use an oil-free facial cleanser, and avoid soaps that contain oils or other irritating substances.

      Another important part about dealing with acne during pregnancy has to do with prevention. Specifically, it is important to keep your hands off. Here, it is important to keep in mind that touching your acne will only make it worse. Keep your hands off those pimples. As tempting as it is to pop them or pick at them, this can cause the bacteria to spread. Picking at them can create acne scars.

      During pregnancy, stress management is extremely important, not only in terms of your overall health, but in terms of your acne breakouts. Controlling stress may help to control your acne. Along with stress, keeping an healthy diet and regularly exercising can help control acne. Regular daily exercise can help to increase blood flow to the skin, and will help it to be more tone and stay more healthy.

      Finally, you should take caution when using acne medications during pregnancy. Over-the-counter Acne treatments that include benzoyl peroxide have been tested as safe to use while pregnant. A prescription treatment called Oral erythromycin is an alternative to tetracycline that is safe for use in pregnant women and young children. There are also many natural skin-care products that may be safe for both you and baby. Stay away from any acne medications that contain Tetracycline, Salicyclic Acid (a common ingredient in over-the-counter acne treatments), Tretinon (sold under the brand name Retin-A), and Isotrentinoin (sold under the brand name Accutane).

      With some extra care and a little patience, you may find that you can avoid or reduce breaking out in acne during pregnancy

  22. QUESTION:
    Are there any treatments for hormonally influenced acne in men?
    Something like what birth control does for women, but for men.

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn't matter that your acne is caused by hormones--most acne is which is why it becomes common in puberty.

      If you are looking for a low cost, effective way of getting rid of acne I suggest that you try red clover acne tea. It's actually and blend of serveral natural ingredients and good for a variery of inflamatory skin conditions, acne being one of them. I personally endorse this product because I use it and began using it without telling my familiy about it, drinking it one to two times a day.

      Shortly after beginning to use it--about 2 weeks--I was helping my mother do something on the computer. She kept looking looking at me. Finally, she just stopped and said "What did you do to you skin?" Confused, I said "Nothing. Why?" She said "It looks so much better and so healthy!" Thinking rapidly I responded "Oh, that. I started to drink this special tea to help me with my acne. I suppose it's working!"

      I've now been using red clover tea for a few month and my skin is healthier than ever. The bumps on my face have gone down, my skin is smoother than ever and my skin is less oily. The bumps on my back have also gone down. I still have a few but compared to before they're nothing about which to complain. The best part is that it only costs me every 6 weeks to 2 months to maintain my acne fighting routine which is significantly less than other acne fighting systems like Proactiv or Klear and my skin is not left feeling dry and tight, as is a common side effect with those systems.

      I do continue to clean my face a few times a week with a facial cleanser and I do use a drying agent every now and again as they do have their benefits but I do not rely on them anymore.

      Red Clover Acne Tea has been the most effective acne fighting product I've ever tried and will continue to us it.

      If you'd like to try it go here:

      http://www.jewelry-city-and-more.com/product/red-clover-acne-tea

  23. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for your body to reset after an abortion?
    I am scheduled to have an abortion this Wednesday. It is a valid medical reason and the health of my unborn child would be at risk due to the treatment for my condition. I am not looking for any snappy answers or comments that I am killing anyone.

    I was wondering how long it takes for the hormone levels to drop and for your body to "reset" itself so to speak.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on you and how pregnant you are. The hormones in your system can last up to 8 weeks after but it can take a few months to heal after the end of an pregnancy (no matter how it ended). I would say give it 3 months/12 weeks to 'reset'. Afterwards your uterus always has a wound in it, this is where the pregnancy was attached (when it's a live birth, this is where the placenta detaches). The faster this wound heals, the more stable your hormones will be and the faster you will 'reset' - midwifery taught me this tidbit.

      This is something I tried after getting of off birth control, my miscarriages and my abortion and the birth of my daughter; it really helped balance my hormones out, better than if I had been without it, in my opinion.

      Chaste Tree Berry (Vitex)
      Chasteberry has the effect of stimulating and normalizing pituitary gland functions, especially its progesterone function. The greatest use of Vitex Agnus Castus - or Chasteberry - lies in normalizing the activity of female sex hormones and it is thus indicated for dysmenorrhoea, premenstrual stress and other disorders related to hormone function.
      It is especially beneficial during menopausal changes. In a similar way it may be used to aid the body to regain a natural balance after the use of the birth control pill. Because it can increase progesterone and extend the luteal phase, some women begin taking it when they ovulate, though regular daily use is indicated in the promotion of fertility.
      As vitex is safe, it may be used by women seeking to become pregnant to increase chances of conception. More specifically, it can be used by women with irregular ovulatory function and by women with shorter luteal phases. Vitex may also be used after discontinuing use of birth control pills to restore normal ovulation.
      http://gaiaherbs.com/product.php?id=268
      This is what I take. It's just a suggestion to balance your hormones out and help speed healing. It would also be suggested that you up your intake of vitamins especially iron and calcium for faster healing. More herbal suggestions for faster healing, if you are interested - http://www.sisterzeus.com/post_ca.htm

      Any other questions, my email is always open.

      ~Pro-Choice Momma; Have had an abortion and I have a 12 month old daughter . I believe in protecting my daughter's choice.

      Abortion: There is a Consensus
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsSQiazUv

      Ps - As for others who would judge you, this is your business and their opinion don't have to mean anything to you. They are strangers after all, who don't know you or your situation. I hope you heal well.

  24. QUESTION:
    How does a female increase her libido?
    Is there certain food or natural herbs that can be included in the diet to accomplish this?

    • ANSWER:
      Some natural herbal aphrodisiacs can be potent in terms of increasing female libido

      The natural herbs listed below can increase the pleasure of sex naturally and work on the physiological state of the body making it more active and energized making sex a more enjoyable experience.

      The most popular natural herbs for increasing female libido and desire are listed below

      Gingko

      Gingko for sexual function was first investigated after an older man who decided to take ginkgo to improve his memory. His sexual function improved so dramatically that it caught the attention of researchers. Subsequent investigation found that it also has a positive effect on female libido

      A test using Ginkgo biloba extract with 63 patients was found to be effective in 84% of patients with antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction.

      In the study, all areas of sexual libido saw improvement, including desire, excitement, and orgasm.

      Arginine

      Arginine is an amino acid, also referred to as L-arginine.

      It is one of the more popular supplements for sexual dysfunction for both men and women and is referred to us natures Viagra.

      Arginine is needed by the body to make nitric oxide, a compound that works to relax blood vessels and allow more blood to flow through arteries and this of course includes to the sexual organs.

      In a clinical study 77 women with decreased libido were given either a combination product or placebo.

      Women taking arginine showed greater improvement such as increased reported sexual desire in 71% compared to 42%

      They also reported other improvements such as they were happier with their sex lives, improved the frequency of orgasms, and experienced better clitoral sensation.

      DHEA

      DHEA is a hormone produced naturally by the adrenal glands.

      It is converted in the body to both the female hormone estrogen and the male hormone testosterone. Levels of DHEA decline naturally with age and this can lead to decreased libido

      Because older people with a natural decline in sex drive, several studies have examined whether supplemental DHEA can improve libido in these groups.

      Research so far suggests that it can help improve sexual function in both men and women.

      Physician supervision is strongly advised when using DHEA.

      You need to consult an experienced professional before using it and make sure you have the correct dosage and are in good health.

      Ginseng

      Ginseng may improve sexual dysfunction in both men and women and has been used for thousands of years in China for this purpose.

      The active ingredients, ginsenosides, are again believed to facilitate the release of nitric oxide in blood vessels which increases blood flow to the clitoris resulting better orgasms.

      Ginseng is known to possess phytoestrogen activity and is believed to help the body adapt to stress, which again helps female libido

      Dong Quai

      Dong quai is an aromatic herb that grows in China, Korea, and Japan and is used by herbalists as a treatment for a variety of gynecological complaints from regulating the menstrual cycle to treating menopausal problems and is known as:

      “The women’s herb”

      It is used as a general blood tonic and contains vitamins E, A and B12 and rich in tannins.

      Researchers have identified six coumarin derivatives that exert antispasmodic and vasodilatory effects.

      The essential oil in dong quai contains Ligustilide, butylphthalide, Ferulic acid and various polysaccharides are also present.

      These elements can help reduce blood clotting and relax peripheral blood vessels.

      Although not used specifically to increase libido its affect on the overall body can help women feel more virile as again it has an effect on blood vessels which carry blood to the sexual organs

      Female Libido is complex and may result from both medical and psychological conditions.

      For female libido women a combination of all the herbs above can help women feel better and increase desire by improving mood, reducing stress, increasing nitric acid and improving blood flow generally.

      As with any herbs only use under the supervision of a experienced physician.

      Hope this helps......

  25. QUESTION:
    What can I do naturally to treat secondary amenorhea?
    I took cycloprogynova and my period, but when i stopped it my period stopped. I need something natural.

    • ANSWER:
      The main causes of amenorrhea are generally emotional stress,
      weight loss, and excessive physical exercise.

      Do you know the cause of your amenorrhea? There are several other causes but they are not common and DO require medical treatment. After menarche did you suffer from anovulation?

      As always, check with your doctor. You may be allergic to some of the herbal remedies.

      There was an over the counter progesterone creme made from yams. I don't know if it is still on the marked. It was made by AllVia and was called Progensa. You applied it for 25 days, stopped for 5 days then repeated.

      There is also an herb called Blue Cohosh that supposedly brings on menstruation.

      DO NOT confuse this with Black Cohosh which is supposedly for hot flashes and menopausal women. Women who are thinking about any form of hormone-replacement therapy should consult their doctor before taking black cohosh!

      Here is a site to read up on Blue Cohosh: http://www.viable-herbal.com/herbdesc/1bluecoh.htm

      Have you checked in with a homeopathic physician? Sometimes they can help.

      As always check with your Doctor, I can't repeat this often enough.

      Good Luck I hope this helps.

  26. QUESTION:
    What's a good product for eliminating blackheads on my face?
    I had a baby a few months ago, maybe my hormones are playing a role in it. I never had perfect skin, but it's getting worse. It seems like my pores are getting bigger or something like that. My face is covered with few pimples and lots of blackheads. I wash my face every morning and night. I use a foaming cleanser - not soap - and I exfoliate once a week. Is there something out there to help fix my skin? I've tried a lot of stuff, but nothing works. Would ProActive work? ...Or is that for acne only? Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      THIS WORKS FAST & CHEAP!!!
      I used Tetracyclin, Proactive, Retina A and had many expensive facials with less than good results.
      This has worked for me and many many other happy people.

      Go to pharm.,Drug store, or Walmart, buy "PURPOSE" bar of soap - Blue box - Made by Johnson & Johnson - wash your face with this
      2-3x's per day. Also pick up a LOW strength Benzoyl-peroxide cream, apply the cream by dabbing
      to the individual blemishes.... DONT rub it in works using a oxidation/reduction reaction..It will unclog
      dry it out and bring it to a head...DONT over use this or put anywhere else on your face. It will cause drying and make you look worse.

      Salicylates such as found in regular asprin among other products work very similar but also remove layers of skin...
      other over the counter creams with this product will dry out pimples but maybe too hash and cause surrounding skin trauma..
      I have seen many people recommending crushing asprin and making a paste which probably will dry out the blemish but again
      pretty strong and probably will cause more tissue damage and bigger scars as an anti inflammatory
      probably would take the reddness out... again pretty harsh for sensative skin.

      Also, If need which probably will for moisture ASK FOR "NUTRADERM lotion" - the orginal not the new stuff, this works
      great and wont clog pores or leave a residue on your skin...Any lotion that is completely oil free and hypoallergic should
      work but again I recommend Nutraderm. I have heard from people online that "Purpose" also makes a lotion that is good, Nutragena, and Nivea
      make good products also. I recommend Nutraderm from experience and my dematologist.

      "Purpose Bar" & "Nutraderm" are oil free and hypoallergic they contain no perfumes and are great for both men and women.
      I have also heard great reports of this soap helping improve skin tone. Some people recommend the "Purpose luqid soap" saying
      that the bar did dry out their skin some. The rational behind using the bar is that there are no ingredients in it that will clog pores, and
      according to dermatologists they recommend the Bar. I have also heard good responses from "cetaphil soap". These products are safe for all skin colors and tones. I highly discourage use
      of Proactive and other harsh chemicals for people with some natural color in their face due to the bleaching and drying effect it has
      shown in many many people.

      Additonal TIPS: acne, pimples, etc are frequently cause by a bacteria or hormone issues that cause clogging of pores.
      DONT PICK POP POKE (your hands are the dirtiest part of your body) and will cause: infections, spreading of germs, more breakouts and scarring
      DONT EVER listen to people online who tell you to scrub your sensative skin or use harsh chemicals
      such as: Lemon juice, vinagar, alcohol, etc... DONT EVER use that APRICOT CRAP!!! DONT USE
      PROACTIVE- this is expensive and harsh it may kill the bacteria cause also Benzoyl based wash but
      will irritate skin and cause bleaching of face and neck.... Other similar treatments may work.. also
      things such as Accutane but have SERIOUS side effects such as Major Depression, & birth defects in unborn children, among others
      If you wear make up make sure it is oil free, & hypoallergic...Eating healthy...Drinking plenty of water.. changing pillow cases freq.
      etc ...avoiding dirty sports equp. such as helmets...can not hurt...Acne/pimples again are caused by pores/hair follicles becoming plugged
      up, this plugging then causes an inflammatory reaction - reddness and infection (pimple)..black head is dirt trapped in pore, while a white
      head is the same thing you just dont see the dirt instead you see white pus (lymphocytes that accumulate in the area to fight the infection)
      It has been shown in many studies this most often not caused by what you eat (chocolate etc... or how clean you are) but most often by either excess oils plugging pores or a bacteria
      on the skins surface. - Proactive works in some people because it is a strong Benzoyl peroxide based washed but is most freq. to strong
      for people with sensative skin - this is why alot of people get excessive drying and flaking, rashes, bleaching or breakouts from the product.
      Retina-A does decrease the bacterial growth on your face but also removes dead/living skin, this can work well in some individuals and
      has been shown to reduce wrinkles and scars but again I feel this is pretty harsh on sensative skin prone to breakouts. If you choose
      Retina-A never use this product during the day only at night due to the sensativity it will give you to the sun. You must also get a perscription
      for this product and I really don't believe it is worth the damage it does to your skin. In some rare cases for very deep/large boils and cyst types
      of pimples oral antibiotics maybe needed but I would first recommend trying "purpose" and a low dose "benzoyl-peroxide cream" along with a good
      oil free moisturizer "Nutraderm... etc" this does work well.

      THIS WORKS FAST AND CHEAP!!! I no longer get expensive facials, take oral antibiotics, or even NEED makeup... I am very happy - Have
      very good skin... and have many many other happy friends... THANKS again to my WONDERFUL
      DERMATOLOGIST... TRY THIS!! GOOD LUCK.... PS. "PURPOSE" costs about ---------------------------------------------
      ----PSSS---sorry I have to keep adding more information to this to address common questions that always being asked....

  27. QUESTION:
    What are your experiences with depot lupron?
    I have had horrible side effects from the Depot Lupron shot (3-months doasage), now I am not talking about depot provera, this is a stronger shot to treat endometriosis. It has helped with the pain and lessened the growths, but I have bad hot flashes, weight gain, dryness, the list goes on. Anyone have better experience with it? Can anyone suggest an alternative treatment?? BCPs don't work, i tried them already.

    • ANSWER:
      Stay FAR away from Lupron!!!!!

      Endo is an estrogen dominance disease. You need to replace the progesterone that your body is missing with a NATURAL PROGESTERONE CREAM! Email me and I can tell you more.

      This is some very nasty stuff. :(
      Here is an article I found....

      Be Careful of Lupron for Endometriosis, It Could Be the Kiss of Death
      By Nicholas Regush

      This particular saga began a decade ago with an injection of a powerful prescription drug called Lupron. Lynne Millican took the shot for endometriosis, a condition in which pieces of the lining of the uterus are found in other parts of the body, especially in the pelvic cavity.

      Ten years later, Millican believes she is still suffering from the effects of that injection. Her many symptoms have included the development of a noncancerous tumor, breast cysts, cardiac arrythmias, dizziness, swelling and fatigue.

      Millican is a registered nurse (and paralegal) living in the Boston area who has become deeply involved in a grass-roots movement to force the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Members of Congress to take a close look at Lupron.

      The FDA first approved Lupron in 1985 for treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer, and then approved it for treatment of endometriosis in 1990 and uterine fibroids in 1995.

      "There are thousands in the United States who say they have been victimized by this drug," Millican said, emphasizing that symptoms can be severe, such as tremors, seizures and memory loss.

      "Many women I know say their symptoms didn't stop when they stopped taking the drug."

      The FDA has received a wide range of reports of serious side-effects, including death, suspected to be associated with the use of Lupron, but the agency, which holds that the drug's benefits outweigh the risks, does not believe there is sufficient proof to blame Lupron.

      TAP Pharmaceuticals Inc., jointly owned by Abbott Laboratories and Takeda Chemical Industries of Japan, has steadfastly maintained that Lupron is safe.

      Millican, who feels that the FDA has been very slow on the draw with Lupron, is also frustrated by the lack of response from almost all of the many senators and representatives in Congress to whom she has written. She has even submitted written testimony to various committee hearings - but to no avail.

      "It seems that no one but the people who suffer from Lupron are interested in looking into this drug," she said.

      Millican cannot even recall anyone with an MD degree who has voiced strong concern about Lupron.

      At the very least, she feels Lupron's safety should be an issue because doctors use it for purposes that were never approved by the FDA. While legal under federal law - once approved for an indication, a drug can be used for other purposes - unapproved use often occurs without the benefit of appropriate safety and efficacy studies.

      One of Millican's main concerns is Lupron's unapproved use in fertility clinics. The drug is essentially used to suppress female hormones which produce a mature egg. This allows fertility doctors to then induce "controlled" stimulation of multiple eggs.

      "I am concerned that women who undergo these procedures are not being sufficiently informed about Lupron's side-effects," Millican said.

      There is even much more at stake, according to Millican. On September 5, she provided testimony to congressional committee hearings on stem cell research, pointing out that the use of Lupron in the process of creating embryos may cause "the very diseases that are being claimed as those
      diseases necessitating embryonic stem cell research for a cure."

      Millican finds it hard to swallow that the debate over stem cell research has totally ignored Lupron.

      Redflagsweekly January 25, 2002

      Dr. Mercola's Comment:

      Folks, Lupron is a disaster drug that in no way shape or form treats the cause of the problem.

      I have seen it absolutely devastate many women's lives. It is one of the few drugs that I actually cringe when patients tell me that they have taken it.

      It is my experience and belief that this drug causes permanent neurological damage.

      This drug needs to be avoided at all costs.

      It is usually used for endometriosis, which is an estrogen dominance problem and is typically treated quite nicely with natural progesterone, a dietary program, and addressing the emotional stresses which cause the adrenal glands to become impaired

      Since the adrenals is the main biological of estrogen and progesterone, it is important to restore the proper functioning of this gland.

      One could take adrenal glandulars, or DHEA and pregnenolone, but those tend to be natural band-aids that don't address the reasons the adrenal became impaired.

  28. QUESTION:
    Whats the quickest way to relieve a migraine without medication?
    I suffer from frequent migraines, i have been to my doctor and they suggested taking mersyndols, which are strong pain medication. I am sick of taking all these pills, as i hate to think what this is doing to my liver.
    I have a very healthy diet, i dont not smoke, drink or do drugs. I do regular exercise.

    Does anyone know of any natural ways to relieve migraine!! the pain is 10 outta 10!!
    Just wanted to say thankyou to the first answer, im not sure how to give the 10 points iv just recently got onto level 2. I found it helpfull and wrote down all the things i had eaten during the day. I havent drank caffeine in ages, and i think that was big factor and also dehydration!!

    Thankyou!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I suffered with migraines for years and finally got free.
      I asked someone to pray for my healing, instead the woman prayed what seemed to be an unusual prayer, but it turned out to be a wise healing prayer.
      She prayed I know the reason for my migraines.
      I learned after the prayer, my triggers were allergies, including cigarette smoke.
      Hormones, especially around cycle time.
      And a neck and shoulder injury, whcih I treated with a chiropractor with and finally got some relief.
      For cig smoke, allergies such as cat, avoid.
      For hormones someone mentioned motrin precycle will lower pain triggering hormone, forget if estrogen or pregesterone,
      could try, and maybe just get one lesser migraine, this is something that should lessen as you get older. Over the counter motrin might help. I used to drink liquor those days instead of meds, hormones harder to control.
      I got best relief with chiropractic treatments, but neck IS very tricky to treat and you need a really good chiropractor. Then needs time to hold adjustment in place, strengethen weak muscles, used to holding out of place, or stretched out muslce from being out of alignment.

      DO NOT SLEEP ON YOUR STOMACH, really bad for neck. Took me a while to switch to side. Try ortho or chiro pillow, cervical pillow, I just bought one with memory foam from Macy's, OK.
      Sleep and positions major trigger of pains.
      I am using over the counter, OTC naprosyn, aleve, Walgreen generic, daily, gets inflamation down.
      I have gone from literally, kill yourself to get out of pain, 24 hours, 7 days a week, crawl on the ground so don't pass out and fall over, vomiting migraine pain, to 1 to zero migraine hits a month. Big change. God bless the woman I met preaching on the streets who prayed a most effective prayer for me.
      I was fired for complaining about cigarette smoking from other coworkers in the booth job I had. Was violation of Federal law, because company received federal funds.
      Had to put health first. So biggest change and reduction of migraine triggers was avoiding cigarette smoke.
      Other triggers, champagne, wine, skipping coffee dose if you drink coffee, sleep patterns.
      I use coffee for relief, opens blood vessels, chocolate and sometimes sugar.
      Sometimes you just need to eat. Important not to trigger headaches if you suffer from migraines, because most headaches will trigger a migraine.
      Sometimes pasta, carb can relieve, helps with brain chemicals. I now don't eat pasta, no wheat or gluten and wonder if that also triggered migraines. I haven't had a migraine for a few months now.
      Meds, Imitrex, if you have a healthy heart is good. Combined with darvocet helped, although I had to double dose with Darvocet at times.

      Naprosyn, Motrin, and Tylenol higher , double dose when I am desperate to get out of pain, and off prescription meds.

      Vitamins, take multi's.

      Foricet milder med for migraines. But when have full trigger, imitrex best relief. Expect migraine pain, even into relief , to take it's toll on the body, expect to sleep more than usual.
      Good luck, hormone hardest to control, worse case scenario 3 days migraine a month, use Imitrex, plus tylenol.

      First reader reminded me, don't let your head lean forward, when walking, stting. Ears should be at shoulders. Forward incline of 1 inch approximates additional 10 pounds of head weight on shoulder, neck structure. That will trigger neck shoulder, up into head migraine pain.
      I eventually used botox with a pain management doctor, for areas of pain, from my injury which were untreatable regardless how many meds I took. It paralyzed it, for a deep muscle relax and healing. Prior I used muscle relaxers in my RX cocktail mix, and that helped with a large area shoulder, up neck into head migraine, one of three migraine triggers. When all three triggers hit at once, forget it, disabled. When I figured the triggers, was able to separate them, and lessen miraine, then I could figure best solution for me.
      To vote best answer I think a certain amount of time has to past first.

  29. QUESTION:
    Why don't they use the hormone treatments used on male to female transexuals for "normal" breast augmentation?
    I believe that the hormone injections male to female transexuals receive are estrogen injections. I have heard that these injections induce growth in breast tissue. I'm not sure. It would strike me that breast augmentation for a non transexual female via this route would have a more natural appearance.

    • ANSWER:
      Because it wouldn't work.

      An XX woman who has completed puberty has all the breast development that oestrogen is going to provide.
      The oestrogen that transsexual women take (incidentally, it's usually taken orally or transdermally, not by injection) is effectively the ONLY oestrogen we have in our bodies. It causes breast growth in exactly the same way (and at the same rate) as it does in XX girls at menarche; once pubertal breast development has completed, breast tissue is no longer sensitive enough to oestrogen to continue, other than the small fluctuations that occur with the menstrual cycle.

      But if it makes you feel any better; most transwomen develop small breasts, due to the pre-emptive effects of testosterone on the oestrogen receptors.
      For most of us, a 'B' cup is the best we can do; which is why (particularly in the US) many transwomen also have breast implants.

  30. QUESTION:
    What is the best non-hormonal form of birth control?
    I am tired of being on the pill. It makes my desire for sex go way down and changes my mood a bit. I want to get on a birth control that has no hormones or maybe very low hormones. Any suggestions?
    I only have sex with one partner so STD protection doesnt concern me.

    • ANSWER:
      My wife and I faced this question a number of years ago, and what we finally decided was for me to take a much more active role in understanding exactly when we could f*ck and not risk pregnancy (without using condoms). Absolutely best book I read was Toni Weschler's "Taking Charge of your fertility". We've used the methods in this book for 7 years... completely successful. And my wife has appreciated my involvement in this process (I became the record keeper for her temperature and other indicators during her menstrual cycle). Toni continues to update this book, and she has the broadest perspective on natural birth control of any author that I've read. Here is an excellent summary from Amazon...

      This comprehensive book explains in lucid, assured terms how to practice the fertility awareness method (FAM), a natural, scientifically proven but little-known form of birth control (which is not to be confused with the woefully ineffective "rhythm" method). Author Toni Weschler has been teaching fertility awareness for almost 20 years, and it's only just now gaining in popularity. As the book explains, by using simple fertility signs including peaks in morning body temperature and changes in cervical position and cervical mucus, it's possible to determine when ovulation is taking place. Fertility awareness is therefore useful for not only couples who are trying to conceive, but for those who are aiming to avoid pregnancy without the use of chemical contraceptives. It will be of special interest to those women who have suffered from infertility; many FAM practitioners have told the author that by filling in the detailed charts in the book, they've realized that they were chronically miscarrying, even when their doctors told them they weren't conceiving at all. As the book explains, by charting body temperature, it's simple to tell when pregnancy has occurred--and when there's danger of miscarriage. Taking Charge of Your Fertility also explains how to choose the sex of your baby by timing intercourse according to certain fertility signs. It also features thorough, easy-to-understand explanations of hormones, the menstrual cycle, and menopause, along with fertility tests and treatments and their long- and short-term side effects, plus a topnotch resource section. Recommended for any woman who wants to better understand her body.

  31. QUESTION:
    After a hysterectomy, is it necessary to have hormone replacement therapy? If so how long for?
    Im 46 and have to have a hysterectomy. If the ovaries are taken out, will i still produce any hormones? If not, how will this effect me? If I had to go on hormione replacement therapy how long would I have to do it for?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,, and generally yes, if you have a complete hysterectomy your doctor will want to put you on hormone treatments. But at your age you shouldn't have to take them for more than a few years. Most women are thru menapause by 55. And yes your body will still put out some estrogen but not enough. If your 46, you've probably already started going thru menapause so you know about hot flashes and night sweats. They may become worse after the operation. But, actually,, no you don't have to have hormone therapy if you don't want it. There are natural ways to get the hormones you need. I have had a heart condition since I was 37 and was advised not to take hormones by my obgyn, as they can cause heart attacks in women who have heart trouble. So I've never taken hormones. I do use natural hormones tho. I take flaxseed oil capsules and eat flaxseed on my cereal,, soy is great for hot flashes,, you can get this in many different forms. I really like Soymilk,, the brand I use is Soy Silk. There are many different brands of natural hormones. I've attached a link that tells you about natural hormones. It also tells you about synthetic hormones. Did you know that one of the hormones doctors give you for estrogen comes from horse urine?? It's something most women don't know and should. Anyway,, hope this link helps. And good luck with your surgery

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to reverse polycystic ovarian syndrome?
    I've been diagnosed with PCOS (I get my period every month, although on 'unexpected' days). The side effects I dislike are hairiness and weight gain. Being on the Pill makes me gain weight, which worsens the symptoms. Is there a natural way to reduce or totally reverse PCOS?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in reproductive age women. This disorder characterized by the absence of menstruation or irregular and abnormal menstruation, excessive amounts of body hair, excessive body weight, and infertility. Women with PCOS often have multiple ovarian cysts, high levels of androgen hormones, and insulin resistance.

      Estimates suggest that polycystic ovarian syndrome is seen in 4-10% of women of reproductive age.

      Because the cause is not really understood, conventional treatment of PCOS is directed at treating the symptoms of the disorder.

      Weight reduction
      Medroxyprogesterone (Provera) for 10-14 days per month
      Low dose oral contraceptive pills
      Antiandrogens (spironolactone, flutamine, cyproterone)
      Metformin (Glucophage) to regulate blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity
      Other medications may be used such as GnRH agonists and induction of ovulation
      Surgical treatment includes ovarian wedge resection, ovarian laser ablation, or ovarian electrocautery.

      Natrual or Alternative Treatment for PCOS

      Natural treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome is multifactorial.

      Lifestyle. Exercise and weight reduction have been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment of PCOS and its symptoms. Exercise can helps reduce weight, regulate menstrual cycles, and reduce risk factors for diabetes and heart disease which are associated with PCOS.

      PCOS Diet. Women with PCOS respond well to a low glycemic index, low simple carbohydrate, low animal product, high fiber diet which helps reduce weight, regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and reduce inflammatory prostaglandins.

      Nutritional Therapy. Depending on your specific presentation of PCOS, there are a variety of nutritional therapies which will be considered. Nutritional therapies can help to regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, reduce circulating androgens, improve ovarian function, improve fertility, reduce risk of heart disease, and support liver detoxification of estrogens.

      Herbal Therapy. Depending on your symptoms of PCOS, a variety of herbal therapies may be considered. The goal of herbal medicine might include: reducing circulating androgens, optimizing ovarian function, and supporting optimal endocrine function.
      ***

  33. QUESTION:
    When you get cramps what does it feel like girls?
    And I mean menstral types of cramps or ovulation cramps where your hormones are causing the cramp. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You can feel menstrual cramps in a lot of different places sometimes... in your lower belly, across the front of your hips, in your lower back and even in your buttocks or down your legs.

      Your uterus is squeezing and sometimes sort of twisting, and that can be uncomfortable all by itself... but when it does that it can sometimes pull on the suspensory ligaments that hold it in position. Those ligaments are attached to several other ligaments and muscles where they meet your pelvis, and a tug on any uterine ligament can sometimes make all the other tissues attached to the same area of the pelvis react as if *they've* been tugged at.

      That can cause pain that rates *really* high on the scale... but it doesn't happen to all women, and most have only some discomfort or minor to moderate pain.

      Avoid caffeine... get extra potassium (bananas, ginger). Seriously.

      One simple and cheap way to help with cramps (it's also by *far* the quickest and the most convenient and natural way) is having an orgasm by masturbating. It doesn't work for *all* women, but it does help many... and for some, it can get rid of cramps entirely for several hours.

      It makes no profits for anyone's company or its stocks, and it involves something to do with "sex and masturbation" taboos, which is why you won't ever read about it in the newspapers (although Cosmo and mags like that do bring it up now and again): but the truth is that orgasm is absolutely *the* single most effective relief ever known for uncomplicated menstrual cramping.

      http://www.epigee.org/menstruation/sex.html

      "... an orgasm can cause your uterus to contract, enabling it to use up excess prostaglandins in the process. Prostagladins are hormones produced by your uterine lining. They help to stimulate contractions that move menstrual blood out of the uterus, and are also responsible for those cramps that occur throughout your period."

      http://www.kadir-buxton.com/page8.htm

      "Primary Menstrual Cramps can be a debilitating problem for some 10% of women. Conventional treatment can even be as drastic as exploratory surgery whilst looking for a cure. A less intrusive solution is available. Orgasm from masturbation has been found to relieve the painful symptoms of menstrual cramps. Whilst it is not always convenient to masturbate for the necessary five minutes until the pain subsides, hands free masturbation is still possible. In order to do this one simply has to clench and then relax the vagina repeatedly for five minutes. With this method no one need know of the discomfort being suffered, and the pain soon goes. "

      http://organizedwisdom.com/Masturbation_and_Menstrual_Cramps

      "The flexing and contracting of an orgasm basically relieves the cramp. Reduces the intensity of the cramps. Also eases some of the other symptoms of premenstrual syndrome."

      -

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the alternative treatments available in India on Breast cancer?
    I am treating my wife with the help of an experienced Naturopath with mainly 'wheat grass' juce as main ingradient for last three months since she had been dignosed for the cancer. Though it has not spread anywhere in the body, it is quite under controll. I want to know is there other remedy which will add to fast recovery. We are working on the way shown by Ann Wigmore. Will anybody from this group will suggest any thing else from Wheat Grass therepy?

    • ANSWER:
      Alternatives treatments take time, they are slow and cure to the grassroot level.

      Here is a natural cure for Cancer,

      CANCER

      The word ‘cancer ‘ comes from the latin "carcinoma" meaning crab. It is the most dreaded disease and refers to all malignant tumors caused by the abnormal growth of a body cell or a group of cells. It is today the second largest killer in the world, next only to heart ailments. The term covers more than 200 diseases.

      The majority of cancers occur in the age group 50-60. Sex does not affect the incidence of the disease. It, however, affects the site of growth. In men, cancer is usually found in the intestines, the prostate and the lungs. In women, it occurs mostly in the breast tissues, uterus, gall bladder, and thyroid.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of cancer vary according to the site of the growth. The American Cancer Society has prescribed seven signs or danger signals in general which may indicate the presence of cancer. These are: a sore that does not heal; change in bowel or bladder habits; unusual bleeding or discharge; thickening or lump in breast or elsewhere; indigestion or difficulty in swallowing; obvious change in a wart or a mole, and a persistent and nagging cough or hoarseness. Other symptoms may include unexplained loss of weight, particularly in older people, a change in skin color, and changes in the menstrual periods, especially bleeding between periods.

      Causes
      The prime cause of cancer is not known. Certain cancer- causing substances, known as carcinogens, however, increase the chances of getting the disease. About 80% of cancers are caused by environmental factors, 40% of male cancers in India are linked with tobacco, a known cancer-causing agent. The consumption of pan, bettlenut, tobacco, and slaked lime has been linked with lung and throat cancers. Heavy consumption of alcoholic drinks can cause esophageal, stomach, and liver cancers. Occupational exposure to industrial pollutants such as asbestos, nickel, tar, soot, and high doses of x-rays can lead to skin and lung cancers and leukemia. Other factors contributing to cancer are vital infections, trauma, hormone imbalance, and malnutrition. Many well-known biologists and naturopaths, however, believe that a faulty diet is the root cause of cancer. Investigations indicate that the cancer incidence is in direct proportion to the amount of animal protein, particularly meat, in the diet. Dr. Willard J. Visek, a renowned research scientist explained recently a link between excessive meat eating and cancer. According to him, the villain is ammonia, the carcinogenic by-product of meat digestion.

      Treatment
      The effective treatment of cancer consists of a complete change in diet, besides total elimination of all environmental sources of carcinogens, such as smoking and carcinogenic chemicals in air, water and food. There has recently been a surge of popular interest in the concept that diet is not just a minor, but rather a major factor in both the development and the prevention of cancer. The disease can be prevented and even treated by dietary programs that include ‘natural foods ‘ and the use of megavitamin supplements.

      As a first step, the patient should cleanse the system by thoroughly relieving constipation and making all the organs of elimination - the skin, lungs, liver, kidneys and bowels - active. Enemas should be used to cleanse the colon. For the first four or five days, the patient should take only juicy fruits like oranges, grapefruits, lemons, apples, peaches, pears, pineapples and tomatoes. Vegetable juices are also useful, especially carrot juice.

      After a few days of an exclusive fruit diet, the patient may be given a nourishing alkaline-based diet. It should consist of 100 per cent natural foods, with emphasis on raw fruits and vegetables, particularly carrots, green leafy vegetables, cabbage, onion, garlic , cucumber, asparagus, beets, and tomatoes. A minimum requirement of high quality protein, mostly from vegetable sources such as almonds, millet, sesame seeds, sprouted seeds and grains, may be added to the diet.

      Dr. Ann Wigmore of Boston, U.S.A., the well-known naturopath and a pioneer in the field of living food nutrition, has been testing the effect of a drink made of fresh wheatgrass in the treatment of leukemia. She claims to have cured several cases of this disease by this method. Dr. Wigmore points out that by furnishing the body with live minerals, vitamins, trace elements, and chlorophyll through wheatgrass juice, it may be able to repair itself.

      Johanna Brandt, the author of the book ‘The Grape Cure‘ has advocated an exclusive grape diet for the treatment of cancer. She discovered this mode of cure in 1925, while experimenting on herself by fasting and dieting alternately in the course of her nine-year battle with cancer. She claimed to have cured herself by this mode of treatment. She recommends a fast for two or three days so as to prepare the system for the change of diet.

      After the short fast, the patient should have a grape meat every two hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. This should be followed for a week or two even a month or two, in chronic cases of long standing. The patient should begin the grape cure with a small quantity of 30, 60, to 90 grams per meal, gradually increasing this to double the quantity. In course of time, about 250 grams may safely be taken as a meal.

      Recent researches have shown that certain vitamins can be successfully employed in the fight against cancer and that they can increase the life expectancy of some terminal cancer patients. According to recent Swedish studies vitamin C in large doses can be an effective prophylactic agent against cancer. Noted Japanese scientist, Dr. Fukunir Morishige, and his colleagues who have been examining the healing potential of vitamin C for the last 30 years, have recently found that a mixture of vitamin C and copper compound has lethal effects on cancer.

      According to several studies, vitamin A exerts an inhibiting effect on carcinogenesis. It is one of the most important aids to the body’s defense system to fight and prevent cancer. Dr. Leonida Santamaria and his colleagues at the University of Pavia in Italy have uncovered preliminary evidence suggesting that beta-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A may actually inhibit skin cancer by helping the body thwart the cancer-causing process known as oxidation.

      Recent studies from all over the world suggest that a liberal use of green and yellow vegetables and fruits can prevent cancer. The 20-years old, ongoing Japanese study found that people who ate green and yellow vegetables every day had a decreased risk of developing lung, stomach, and other cancers. A Harvard University study of more than 1,200 elderly Massachusetts residents found that those who reported the highest consumption of carrots, squash, tomatoes, salads, or leafy green vegetables, dried fruits, fresh strawberries or melon had a decreased risk of cancer.

      The other useful measures are plenty of rest, complete freedom from worries and mental stress and plenty of fresh pure air.

  35. QUESTION:
    Are there options to treat my Hypothyroid without taking prescription medications?
    I am drowning in medical debt, and to get either Synthroid or Armour Thyroid I have to go through hoops of lab work which I can not afford. Not to mention having to meet with the doctor to read the results and prescribe the medicine. I dont have medical insurance and dont qualify for assistance. I really believe there has to be a more natural method for treating this.

    • ANSWER:
      Below are some supplements that might help improve your thyroid health. Always remember to also include a good multivitamin supplement to make sure you are not deficient in any vitamins.

      Iodine -- You can increase your iodine intake through diet and kelp supplementation. Kelp is rich in iodine and is very affordable. I buy it in tablet form with 225 mcg. of iodine per tablet. I had low levels of iodine because I didn't like to salt my food. Now I use natural sea salt that doesn't have iodine in it and so I supplement with kelp tablets. There used to be plenty of iodine in vegetables and fruits but the soil is very iodine depleted in most areas today. Foods that contain iodine are yogurt, eggs, meat, fish and other seafood, radish, parsley, potatoes, oatmeal and bananas.

      Selenium -- Many people diagnosed with hypothyroidism were found to be selenium deficient. Selenium is required to convert the T4 thyroid hormone to the active T3 form. As an example, the selenium containing enzyme type-I-iodothyronine-deiodinase is important for the conversion of T4 to T3. So selenium deficiency can reduce the activity of the thyroid hormones.

      Tyrosine -- Tyrosine is an amino acid needed by the body to manufacture thyroid hormones from iodine. And so the use of tyrosine as a dietary supplement increases production of thyroid hormones.

      Thyroid Glandular -- Thyroid glandular supplements have been used since the beginning of thyroid treatment. Usually it is only sold through your practitioner or by prescription (like Armour) but there are some over-the-counter thyroid glandular supplements available.

      Bladderwrack -- Bladderwrack is a seaweed that is a rich source of iodine. Traditionally it has been used for weight loss and hypothyroidism. The low incidence of goiter in maritime people has been attributed to the iodine in bladderwrack. It also contains the minerals potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, etc. Bladderwrack is thought to stimulate the thyroid gland increasing metabolism.

      Dulse: A reddish and chewy seaweed that grows on rocks in the North Atlantic and Northwest Pacific oceans. It’s a plant rich in protein and is a great natural source of iodine. Dulse is a sea plant that helps support thyroid function naturally by providing the essential trace mineral, iodine. It also contains vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C and calcium potassium, magnesium, iron, manganese, copper, chromium and zinc.

      Avena sativa: It comes from the wild oat plant and is used as a nerve tonic. It’s used in herbal remedies for anxiety, eczema, hypothyroidism and high cholesterol.

      Coleus forskohlii: Studies conducted in laboratories show that coleus stimulates metabolism. In a recent study, six women took 25 mg of coleus forskohlii twice a day for two months and at the end of the eight-week trial they had lost an average of ten pounds and reduced their percentage of body fat by almost 8 percent. What’s more, coleus has proven to increase thyroid hormone production and the release thereof.

  36. QUESTION:
    How do I get my hair curly again?
    I have naturally curly hair but about a year back I started using Sauve Keratine shampoo and conditioner so that I could let my hair air dry straight. Now I want my naturally curly hair back. Is Keratine permanent? I changed my shampoo and conditioner to Sauve Curls but how long will it take for my natural curls to come back?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends, how you've 'tampered' your hair. Heat & chemicals are hair's worst enemies and heating tools can tamper your hair. Hormones changes the texture of your hair too!

      FYI:
      Hair-straightening products are allowed to contain small concentrations of formaldehyde (0.2 percent). But several hair-straightening solutions have been found to contain well above the allowable limit. For example, one popular hair-straightening product that advertised itself as “formaldehyde-free” actually contained 6.8 percent to 11.8 percent formaldehyde.
      Another example: Fourteen women, including two from North Texas and one from Houston, are suing Unilever, the maker of a product they claim caused permanent damage to their hair.
      "It transforms frizzy, unmanageable hair into hair that's sleeker and easier to style," said the commercial for the Suave Professionals Keratin Infusion 30-Day Smoothing Kit, which is no longer being sold
      When she began looking online for more information about the product, she said she found some people who said it worked, but more who said it damaged their hair.
      She discovered a Facebook page devoted to angry consumers, and there are multiple postings on YouTube. I've been warning people about relaxers since 2009 and people are giving me thumbs down!
      BTW: A variety of hair-straightening products used in professional salons can expose both hairdressers and their customers to formaldehyde. The results show that three professional hair-smoothing treatments labeled "formaldehyde free" can produce the cancer-causing chemical at concentrations above the occupational exposure limits set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. They tested four products: Coppola Keratin Complex Blonde Formula, Global Keratin Juvexin Optimized Functional Keratin, La Brasiliana Escluso Keratin Treatment with Collagen, and Brazilian Blowout Acai Professional Smoothing Solution. While ChemRisk tested four popular brands of hair straighteners, THERE ARE HUNDREDS on the market. Nov. 11-11

      By contrast, beauty salon owners and stylists generally lack a scientific background and don't have a keen awareness of the danger of working with products that contain formaldehyde, experts say.

      Watch: Good Hair a documentary by Chris Rock 2009 on BET or HBO. According to Tyra Banks, 80% of the black population are part of the billion dollar hair industry. Clips on youtube videos, also.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  37. QUESTION:
    Are there any good alternative therapies for endometriosis?
    Im having a lap soon but wondered after it are there any natural ways to help endo?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes- hormonal changes. Most hormonal treatments would be considered birth control, however pregnancy can change your hormone levels and stop endometriosis for the lucky. It's not 100% effective but many women have reduced or eliminate endometriosis symptoms after delivering a healthy baby

      As for other alternatives. You can try herbal remedies and such, however most just relieve cramping, pain, swelling. Most do not stop endo tissue from developing unless you are using herbal treatments to alter your hormone levels.

      I belong to a support group and chat w many women who have endometriosis. I have known many women who have tried a 100% natural approach. After spending a lot of money on herbal remedies, teas, ect... most found it led to a build up of endo and had to have surgery again. You need to find a good gynecologist who can monitor you and your symptoms whether you decide to follow a holistic approach or not.

      One more thing, having laparscopic surgery (or as the person above put it laser burning it off) can bring you relief in the long term. However keep in mind there is almost a month of recovery time after surgery. It is not an instant sensation of being healed. Once surgery is performed there is no way to prevent new endo from being formed unless you do follow up with a gynocologist and have a plan for treatment and prevention.

  38. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a natural alternative to spironolactone for pcos?
    I have elevated androgens, acne, mild hair loss, excess body hair. My weight is perfect though. I also have mild hypoglycemia due to insulin issues.

    I HATE DRUGS. Has anyone found an alternative to spiro? One of my holistic docs (the endocrinolist one) is suggesting spiro and metformin.

    Yes, drugs have plants in them. But they also have toxic man made ingredients.

    • ANSWER:
      You are very, very wise to try to avoid pharmaceutical drugs if at all possible. Yes, there are alternatives to spironolactone and metformin in the treatment of PCOS. Natural treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome is multifactorial. You should see a qualified naturopath for specific herbal remedies and diet recommendations, but the basics are below.

      Lifestyle. Exercise and weight reduction have been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment of PCOS and its symptoms. Exercise can helps reduce weight, regulate menstrual cycles, and reduce risk factors for diabetes and heart disease which are associated with PCOS.

      PCOS Diet. Women with PCOS respond well to a low glycemic index, low simple carbohydrate, low animal product, high fiber diet which helps reduce weight, regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and reduce inflammatory prostaglandins.

      Nutritional Therapy. Depending on your specific presentation of PCOS, there are a variety of nutritional therapies which will be considered. Nutritional therapies can help to regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, reduce circulating androgens, improve ovarian function, improve fertility, reduce risk of heart disease, and support liver detoxification of estrogens.

      Herbal Therapy. Depending on your symptoms of PCOS, a variety of herbal therapies may be considered. The goal of herbal medicine might include: reducing circulating androgens, optimizing ovarian function, and supporting optimal endocrine function.

      By the way, just to let you know why you are so wise to avoid spirolactone: Even though the drug that your endicrinoligist is suggesting has been shown to be effective in hormone-induced acne it has various unpleasant side effects. Spironolactone is a diuretic [it causes you to pee a lot]. The side effects in low-dose spirolactone are:

      irregular menstrual cycle [most common]
      breast tenderness [most common]
      thirst, dry mouth
      stomach cramps, vomiting, and/or diarrhea
      headache
      dizziness
      increased blood potassium levels
      low blood pressure

      Both blood potassium levels and blood pressure should be checked periodically while you're taking this medication. Also, you shouldn't get pregnant while using spironolactone. And spironolactone isn't a good choice for you if you have kidney problems, or a history (or family history) of breast cancer, uterine cancer, or ovarian cancer. According to the National Institutes of Health, spironolactone is known to have caused tumors in lab animals.

      Metformin is also much less desirable than the low Glycemic Index diet that is recommended for PCOS patients. Its side effects include:

      MALAISE.
      GI DISTURBANCE.
      VITAMIN B12 MALABSORPTION.
      ELEVATED HOMOCYSTEINE
      PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS.
      ANEMIA.LIVER OR KIDNEY PROBLEMS.
      MULTIPLE MEDICATIONS. You may be at risk for health problems or symptoms if you take metformin in addition to other medications.
      HAIR LOSS.
      LACTIC ACIDOSIS.
      BILE ABNORMALITIES.

  39. QUESTION:
    What are the natural ways to increase sperm count?
    My neighbor is 44 years old, married, both are normal, no children.

    • ANSWER:
      There is now a great deal of scientific knowledge about the use of nutritional supplements and their beneficial effects on both male and female fertility. These supplements can be very effective in re-balancing hormones, as well as improving overall health, which is so vital for successful conception. Supplements are necessary because even the best diet in the world will not contain all the nutrients you need to give you the best chance of conceiving.

      Folic Acid

      Research has shown that giving B6 to women who have trouble conceiving increases fertility and vitamin B12 has been found to improve low sperm counts

      Zinc

      Zinc is found in high concentrations in the sperm. Zinc is needed to make the outer layer and tail of the sperm and is, therefore, essential for the health of your sperm and, subsequently, your baby. Interestingly, several studies have also shown that reducing zinc in a man's diet will also reduce his sperm count.

      Selenium

      Good levels of selenium are essential to maximise sperm formation. Blood selenium levels have been found to be lower in men with low sperm counts.

      Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs)

      These essential fats have a profound effect on every system of the body, including the reproductive system and they are crucial for healthy hormone functioning. For men essential fatty acid supplementation is crucial because the semen is rich in prostaglandins which are produced from these fats. Men with poor sperm quality, abnormal sperm, poor motility or low count, have inadequate levels of these beneficial prostaglandins.

      Vitamin E

      Vitamin E is another powerful antioxidant and has been shown to increase fertility when given to both men and women. Men going for IVF treatment with their partners have been given vitamin E, and fertilisation rates have, as a result, increased from 19 to 29 percent. It has been suggested that the antioxidant activity of vitamin E might make the sperm more fertile.

      Vitamin C

      Vitamin C is also an antioxidant, and studies show that vitamin C enhances sperm quality. Some research has indicated that certain types of DNA damage in the sperm can make it difficult to conceive in the first place. Vitamin C also appears to keep the sperm from clumping together, making them more motile.

      L-Arginine

      This is an amino acid found in many foods and the head of the sperm contains an exceptional amount of this nutrient, which is essential for sperm production. Supplementing with L-arginine can help to increase both the sperm count and quality.

      L-Carnitine

      This amino acid is essential for normal functioning of sperm cells. According to research, it appears that the higher the levels of L-Carnitine in the sperm cells, the better the sperm count and motility.

  40. QUESTION:
    Anyone fighting breast cancer been thru treatment and prepparing for hormone therapy?
    I have read articles on hormone threrapy and find myself being very nieve about this treatment. My doctors have left me with so many open questions I am not sure what to do. So my real question is " what do you feel about hormone therapy or is there a natural remedy to equal the hormone drug therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I'm sorry that you are going through this as I know personally how difficult it can be. I am approaching my 4th year of Tamoxifen therapy and am very grateful to have this option for treatment (I am 4 years in remission so it appears that the Tamoxifen is working for me!) The side effects are pretty tolerable and it's in a daily pill form which is easy to manage. Depending on your age, you may be considering Arimidex which I have also heard positive things about. I know how hard it is to make these kind of decisions and my heart goes out to you. I personally make my choices based on what I can live with long term. For example, will hormone therapy give you peace of mind long term or will the potential side effects be a bigger issue for you? Your Dr. likely explained to you the positive results of hormone therapy in reducing a recurrence. That is a very important factor to consider when making your decision. There are many women who do not have hormone sensitive cancer and so the opportunity to use this therapy should not be taken lightly. I know a lot of women who have had breast cancer in all different stages and my best advice to you is to do everything you can to protect your health and your life. It is a precious gift. Good luck and god bless!!

  41. QUESTION:
    What causes me to not ovulate and possible fixes?
    I am 22 and have only ovulated once in the past 6 months. My doctor doesn't believe me because my cycles fall 20 - 38 days apart, but varies greatly all the time. I take my bbt every morning and have not gotten above 97.5 (norm is 96.8-97.2).
    We are trying to conceive a child and obviously not ovulating is really hindering our attempts. I am a little overweight but not obese. We walk our two toy dogs about an hour a day, not too strenuos.
    What are some reasons I may not be ovulating and what are some remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Is this a regular doctor, or an infertility doc?

      Do some research on natural progesterone. It is used in IVF treatments. Increasingly in the area of fertility therapy, medical doctors are concentrating on prescribing more natural substances for women. It would be wise to try to locate one in your area who will work with you and understand your needs when it comes to natural hormone replacement therapy.

      Natural Progesterone treatment can also be used to induce fertility when there appears to be ovulatory dysfunction. A study was performed involving fifty women who had lived with infertility for a minimum of one-and-a-half years. Seventy percent of the women conceived within six months while exclusively using natural progesterone therapy.

      Additional reports indicate that without natural progesterone treatment, women with luteal phase defect are at very high risk for spontaneous abortion. Natural Progesterone has been found to be important in maintaining a pregnancy during the early months.

      Although the data are not entirely clear, it appears that progesterone may also have an effect on transport time of the ovum in the fallopian tube, and it may make the ovum more susceptible to sperm penetration.

      Jerome Check, M.D., an infertility specialist and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Thomas Jefferson University and Hahnemann University, says that "too often physicians will treat the infertility problem with strong medication or even surgery without checking progesterone levels first... But for many women, natural progesterone therapy has been very effective in helping them to become pregnant and to carry the child to term. Only after this treatment is tried should more drastic procedures be considered."

      When used topically, benefits of progesterone supplementation are quite significant in helping regulate periods and bring the body back into synchronisation, and in some cases, triggering ovulation.

      Often the introduction of progesterone back into the body can 'crank up' the ovaries, particularly where there has been a considerable shortfall of this hormone in the body. Fertility may follow. If, however, your follicles are depleted, progesterone cannot restore fertility. Appropriate tests can establish your state of fertility.

      I hope this helps. Get yourself some natural progesterone and have fun!

  42. QUESTION:
    Why is hormone therapy important to women with Von Willebrands?

    • ANSWER:
      Von Willebrand disease is an inherited disorder of the blood which leads to abnormal bleeding. Unlike other bleeding disorders, such as haemophilia, Von Willebrand disease can affect both men and women. In fact it's the most common bleeding disorder and about one in 100 women have it.

      It's not actually one condition but a group of similar diseases all caused by a problem with one particular protein in the blood (known as Von Willebrand factor or VWF) which plays an essential part in clotting by helping tiny cells called platelets to stick to the walls of a damaged blood vessel. VWF also has another important job, carrying another clotting chemical called Factor VIII around in the blood.

      So if levels of VWF are low or it doesn't work properly, there's abnormal bleeding.

      Symptoms of Von Willebrand disease

      easy bruising
      frequent nose bleeds
      bleeding from wounds which takes a little longer than normal to stop
      excessive bleeding when teeth fall out
      heavy or prolonged periods
      bleeding from the gut or bowel
      bleeding into muscles and joints in more severe cases
      often people don't realise they have a problem with bleeding until they have an accident or operation

      Three types

      There are three types of Von Willebrand disease. In type 1, which about 75 per cent of affected women have, there are low levels of VWF. In type 2, the VWF doesn't work properly, and in type 3 (the most seriously but fortunately the rarest form) levels of VWF are almost undetectable and so Factor VIII levels are very low too. As low levels of Factor VIII are also the problem in the main type of haemophilia, so symptoms of type 3 Von Willebrand disease are similar to those of haemophilia.

      Treatment depends on severity of disease

      Treatment for Von Willebrand disease depends on the severity of the condition, and the nature and location of the bleeding. Most people can be treated very easily. In less severe disease, particularly Type 1, no special treatment is needed, although women may need to be particularly careful to watch out for anaemia as blood loss during periods can be greater than usual.

      However, sometimes medical treatment is necessary. These include:

      Desmopressin: a synthetic version of a natural hormone which releases VWF from the lining of blood vessels.
      Tranexamic acid and similar drugs: these drugs help to clots being broken down once they've formed.
      Thrombin: a natural clotting agent.
      Concentrate of VWF and Factor VIII: these compounds, derived from blood, are used in more serious Von Willebrands.

      This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Trisha Macnair in January 2007.
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/ask_the_doctor/vonwillebrand.shtml

      http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ate/heartandblood/203147.html

  43. QUESTION:
    What are the most likely causes of excessive hair loss in a young adult?
    I am 18 years old and i have noticed throughout the years since middle school my hair is thining and getting shorter but i have no bald spots and my hair line hasnt changed. I have had about 2 perms in the last 5 years but I frequently use the flat iron. I do npt have any known deficiencies. Very worried any help on how to get it back and strengthen it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There are many factors for why someone (man or woman) experiences hair loss, ranging from diet, medications, natural hormones, pregnancy and childbirth, improper hair care and certain diseases. Each of these factors affects each individual differently. Additionally, while chemical treatments, pollution, hair-styling products and blow-drying have not been found to directly cause hair loss, they can dry and weaken hair, increasing breakage and perpetuating hair loss. Straightening and curling your hair does not directly lead to hair loss but it does damage and weaken your hair so that temporary hair loss may occur. The heat from these and similar products dry out even the oiliest hair with too much use

      Alopecia areata is a form of temporary hair loss that can occur on the scalp, in facial hair, or even in hair on other areas of the body. It can be caused by genetic factors or it can occur as a result of autoimmune disorders like thyroid disease.

      Telogen effluvium results in sudden and drastic, although temporary, hair loss. Patients with telogen effluvium usually experience overall thinning, and they are known to lose handfuls of hair while washing or using a hairbrush. It is caused by a shock to the system, such as an illness, intense psychological stress over a life incident, sudden weight loss, or nutritional deficiencies. Once the experience is over, however, natural hair cycles should return to normal.

      Traction alopecia is another type of temporary hair loss that creates bald patches due to unnecessary pulling of the hair or constant use of tight hairstyles that can strain or damage hair follicles. Hair growth should return to normal once the strain on follicles is eliminated.

      Based on your description, it seems like you are experiencing temporary hair loss, which is good because with the proper tools your hair will be back to normal. If hair loss persists or hair breakage is unprompted by chemical treatments or styling, it may be a symptom of a medical problem in which case Bosley professionals suggest that you contact a doctor or a Bosley clinic.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know any good acne treatments?
    I have moderately bad acne. My mom sells Mary Kay and she thinks its the best and doesnt want me to use anything else. The problem is, ITS NOT WORKING! I still have acne and it like doesnt go away.

    Does anyone know any good acne treatments and/or a way i could get my mom to let me use other products?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a range of treatment options to help treat acne. As acne can't be cured, treatments aim to control the symptoms by:

      preventing new spots forming
      improving those already present
      preventing scarring
      Your GP will usually assess your treatment after six weeks and, if beneficial, treatment will continue for four to six months.

      Self-help
      It's important to keep spot-prone areas clean, so wash the affected area twice a day with an unperfumed cleanser. The skin needs a certain amount of oil to maintain its natural condition, so it's best to use gentle soaps and not to scrub your skin too hard when washing.

      Medicines
      There are a number of over-the-counter remedies available from pharmacies to treat mild acne. These usually contain antibacterial agents such as benzoyl peroxide (eg Oxy and Clearasil Max).

      As well as its antibacterial effects, benzoyl peroxide can dry out the skin and encourage it to shed the surface layer of dead skin. Together, these effects make it harder for pores to become blocked and for infection to develop.

      Benzoyl peroxide can cause redness and peeling, especially to start with. This tends to settle down if you reduce the number of times you use it. You can then build up your use gradually.

      Home treatments for acne won't work immediately. It can take weeks, sometimes months, for significant effects to be noticeable. If home treatments haven't worked after two months, or you have severe acne, you should visit your GP.

      Your GP may start your treatment by prescribing a preparation containing benzoyl peroxide. If this doesn't work, or if you have more severe acne, there are a range of other treatment options. These come as creams or lotions that your can rub on to your skin, or as tablets.

      Creams and lotions
      There are several creams and lotions you may be prescribed, including those listed below.

      Azelaic acid (Skinoren) is an alternative to benzoyl peroxide and may not make your skin as sore as benzoyl peroxide.
      Retinoids (eg Adapalene) are medicines based on vitamin A, which you can rub into your skin daily. They work by encouraging the outer layer of skin to flake off.
      An antibiotic lotion, such as clindamycin (eg Dalacin T) or erythromycin (eg Stiemycin), applied to your skin can be used to control the P. acnes bacteria. You will need to continue this treatment for at least six months.
      Creams and lotions that combine an antimicrobial with other acne medication are also available (eg Quinoderm).
      Creams and lotions are only effective where and when they are applied so you should apply these daily to all areas of your skin that are prone to acne.

      Tablets
      There are several oral treatments you may be prescribed.

      Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, can be prescribed for inflammatory acne. You should take these daily for around three months, although it might take four to six months for you to see the benefits. The success of this treatment can be limited because the strains of bacteria are often resistant to the common antibiotics. Antibiotics don't prevent pores from becoming blocked so treatment to prevent blackheads, such as benzoyl peroxide, is often also prescribed at the same time.

      Some types of oral contraceptive tablets help women who have acne. A combination of the usual contraceptive pill hormone called ethinylestradiol with cyproterone acetate (eg Dianette) suppresses male hormone activity. This drug has been shown to reduce sebum production so is often used in women with acne.

      Isotretinoin (eg Roaccutane) is a medicine known as an oral retinoid, which is also available as a cream (see Creams and lotions). Isotretinoin works by drying up oily secretions. It tends to be prescribed to people with severe forms of acne that have proved resistant to other treatments. There are a number of serious side-effects of this drug, such as liver disorders and depression. You shouldn't take isotretinoin if you're pregnant, as it's very dangerous to an unborn baby. For safety reasons, isotretinoin is only prescribed under the supervision of a dermatologist (a doctor specialising in skin conditions).

  45. QUESTION:
    Any recommended alternative treatments for PCOS?
    I have PCOS and my hormones are just kind of out of whack, so to speak. Any recommended herbal remedies or other holistic and natural remedies that might help regulate my hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      1.Lifestyle. Exercise and weight reduction have been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment of PCOS and its symptoms. Exercise can helps reduce weight, regulate menstrual cycles, and reduce risk factors for diabetes and heart disease which are associated with PCOS.

      2.Diet. Women with PCOS respond well to a low glycemic index, low simple carbohydrate, low animal product, high fiber diet which helps reduce weight, regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and reduce inflammatory prostaglandins. Dietary changes, including reducing animal products and fats, while increasing foods that nourish the liver such as carrots, dark green vegetables, lemons, and beets, can be beneficial.

      3.Bentonite Clay. You would use this to bathe in. It has a drawing agent that acts like a sponge. It literally pulls toxins out through the skin. This would also help to balance your hormones, while also pulling any other toxins out of the way.

      4.Dietary Supplements -There is a wide range of supplemental nutrients that may help you alleviate the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and reduce the incidence of ovarian cysts. Not all of them are appropriate or necessary for every woman.

      5.Alternative treatments - PCOS can be addressed using many types of alternative treatment. The rebalancing of hormones is a primary focus of all these therapies. Acupuncture works on the body's energy flow according to the meridian system. Chinese herbs, such as gui zhi fu ling wan, can be effective. In naturopathic medicine, treatment focuses on helping the liver function more optimally in the horomonal balancing process.

      Essential fatty acids, including flax oil, evening primrose oil (Oenothera biennis), and black currant oil, act as anti-inflammatories and hormonal regulators. Western herbal medicine uses phytoestrogen and phytoprogesteronic herbs, such as blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) and false unicorn root (Chamaelirium luteum), as well as liver herbs, like dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum), to work toward hormonal balance.

      Supplementation with antioxidants, including zinc, and vitamins A, E, and C, is also recommended. Constitutional homeopathy can bring about a deep level of healing with the correct remedies.

      I recommend that you consult with a licensed healthcare professional regarding the best supplements and treatment for you.

  46. QUESTION:
    Conservatives, what is this "traditional marriage" you are fighting for?
    If traditional marriage means heterosexual, is a heterosexual marriage between a very butch woman and a feminine man a "traditional marriage"? How about one where the man is a house husband and the woman brings home half a million dollars a year? "Traditional marriage"?

    So when you are fighting to keep marriage "heterosexual only" is heterosexuality all you are asking for, or is there a much longer unspoken list?

    • ANSWER:
      Its because we don't have a weird perversion in our genes to like the same gender as you homosexuals. Why should the nation bend for 1.7% perversion. I guess you homosexuals would also support incest, polygamy and animal/ inanimate object marriage too since both/ multiple are willing too. We would like to keep the marriage as its supposed to be.

      Marriage: Union between a man and woman.

      Not even the president or congress can change the definition. It would have to be accepted internationally, which its not.

      "love" as you claim doesn't exist. Its just unnatural hormones for homosexuals. So you claim "love on this one is busted too. For Heterosexuals its natural hormones.

      Define "natural" you ask me: Look at mammals, they reproduce sexually, thus causing the irregular gene of homosexuality possible. We are not sure which one as the body is made of multiple genomes, its literally trying to find a needle in a hay stack hidden in a random NY city shed.

      When you put a homosexual mammal near a heterosexual mammal it will be shunned. If you put a homosexual animal in a heterosexual pack, it will be shunned. Its natural instinct. Even animals know it is wrong.

      Instead of asking why is irregular marriage illegal, what can I do to fix my sexuality. I bet the gay community would also get support from the left and the far right community instead of opposing the right. Its not a physiological so the old treatment for gayness wouldn't work. It embedded in your hormones so it would be next to impossible. Modern technology can alter the gene in the pituitary gland and other parts of the brain that release hormones. Its just a question of which gene.

      Notice I didn't bash gays using the bibles or other irrational claims. I used modern science and animal behavior that its unnatural so it must be kept illegal. Liberals not everything different is good.

      If you thumbs down you are just as irrational as those who quote from the bible.

  47. QUESTION:
    What causes miscarriage besides those natural things that can't be prevented?
    Please help thanks !

    • ANSWER:
      Hormones
      When we talk about a hormone problem, you have likely miscarried in less than 10 weeks. After that, the placenta has taken over hormone production and any normal deficiency you have is not a factor. Low progesterone, the most common problem, is not as easy to treat as you might hope.

      Chromosome Defects
      There are many factors that come in to play when the egg and sperm unite and form that first cell. Even if both the egg and sperm come with perfect chromosomes, the first few cell divisions can see an abnormality crop up that would certainly be devastating. Chromosome defects that cause a newly fertilized egg to die can account for as much as 60 percent of early miscarriages.

      Physical Problem with the Uterus or Cervix
      Some women have a uterus that does not have the usual shape. Others have a cervix that may be weakened by a number of causes, including multiple D&C procedures or their mother taking DES when she was pregnant (although note that DES was discontinued in 1971 and most DES daughters are leaving their childbirth years behind.) Both of these problems can cause early labor, usually during a critical period from 12-24 weeks. This cause is responsible for 12 percent of miscarriages during this time period. As the baby grows, especially during the very rapid growth spurt during this time frame, the irregularly shaped uterus may not be able to expand or the weak cervix may start to open up and let the baby out. There are treatments for both of these that are quite effective—corrective surgery on the uterus and a cervical stitch that holds the cervix closed. This problem WILL REOCCUR if not treated.

      Immune Disorders
      While many experienced and well respected reproductive endocrinologists specialize in this field now, many "regular" ob/gyn doctors are quite resistant to the idea of this type of miscarriage cause and its treatment. Specialists in immune disorders claim up to an 80% success rate with women who have had three or more miscarriages, but there is still much skepticism even among infertility and reproductive specialists.

      Premature Rupture of Membranes and Early Labor
      Many miscarriages begin with cramping and labor-like symptoms, but true PROM and Early Labor are usually associated with babies that are in the second or third trimester. Early labor can often be treated with drugs that relax the uterus and women are placed on bed rest either at home or in the hospital.

      Others -- Infections, Age, Chronic Disease
      Many infections can cause miscarriage, but they are the big ones like syphilis, mycoplasma, toxoplasmosis, and malaria. An upper respiratory infection is NOT going to cause a miscarriage, even though it may worry you to death. Viruses are the same. Normal illnesses like the common cold will not cause a problem, but AIDS and German Measles can. Infections that directly affect the uterus are bigger risk. This does NOT include yeast infections, which are extremely common in pregnancy. See the section on Premature Rupture of Membranes for more information on these infections.

  48. QUESTION:
    How can a woman lose thigh fat without bulking / toning up her thighs?
    Hello, and thank you for reading my question.

    I have heard that LUNGES help in getting leaner thighs.

    However, in one article I also read that doing lunges can develop muscle and bulk you up.

    Now, I would HATE bulky, toned muscles.

    Is there any exercise by which I can do to lose fat from my thighs without bulking up ?

    I do cycle 30 min, treadmill 30min, elliptical 30 min. What else can I do ?

    Thank you for your answer.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Read my answer here ---> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AvljUrt4pe2HHh8dnZ51bpXsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20130222095350AAniRxU

      Any exercise will burn calories but no exercise will burn fat unless your diet allows it. You can burn fat in your sleep or you can run all day and never burn any fat. It all depends on your diet.

      Fat loss is determined by calorie control, not by exercise. Good exercises for burning calories are speed walking, biking, swimming, dancing, etc. and ANY other physical activity which makes you move a lot of weight for a long time. But NO exercise is good for burning fat if you eat too many calories because you can always eat more calories than you can burn.

      Too many people waste energy and time because they do not understand this one simple point. The result is too often giving up in frustration, abandoning gym memberships they continue to pay for, and many other unnecessary problems not the least of which is a lack of success.

      An average person must walk about five miles every day for a week to burn the calories equivalent to a pound of body fat. So, unless you think walking about five miles a day (or doing an equivalent amount of exercise) with no guarantee of fat loss makes sense, focus your fat loss program on diet.

      Diet for fat loss. Exercise for fitness.

      Lunges without weights (bodyweight only) will not add but a tiny amount of bulk to your thighs. Most women don't need to worry about bulk because they have so little of the hormones that build muscle. However, exercise is not the solution to your problem. It's diet. All you can do is lose fat and wait for it to leave your thighs while hoping to maintain your cup size or booty or whatever fat deposits you consider positive attributes.

      When you are in a fat loss mode and burning body fat, it is your body (based on your genetics) and only your body that determines where that fat loss will happen. You have absolutely no control over where your body loses fat first, last, and in between no matter what you do.

      It is not possible to lose fat only from a specific part of your body of your choosing. Where your body stores and removes fat is determined by your genetics and there is nothing you can do to change that short of radical procedures such as liposuction. And, in general, where it stores fat first is where it will lose it last and visa versa. The world of health and fitness has an unfortunate abundance of myths and spot reduction is one of them. There is no exercise, no pill, no supplements, no spa treatment, and no natural way to spot reduce. Your only choice is to create a caloric deficit with diet and exercise, burn fat, and wait for it to leave the desired body parts.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spot_reduction
      http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Myths.html
      http://www.fitnesstipsforlife.com/the-spot-reduction-myth.html

      If you need to learn how to lose fat, read my answer about how to lose fat --> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=As615QJM4X_3ID9_05qmmlXty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20111028185603AAVcP4D

      Good luck and good health!!

      PS: Here are some good websites you may find useful.
      • A MUST FOR DIETERS http://www.freedieting.com/
      • BEST DIET TOOL ON THE WEB http://www.myfitnesspal.com/
      • BEST FOODS FOR YOU http://www.choosemyplate.gov/index.html
      • NUTRITION DOT GOV http://www.nal.usda.gov/food-and-nutrition

  49. QUESTION:
    what size does the Ovarian follicle should be? how many does a women release each month? ?
    whats the correct size so a women can pregnant???

    i had one of 21 the other one 18
    and the other too were 15 and 13???

    do i have a chance to get pregnant this month???

    i did 4 this month cause im in clomid and shots to get pregnant and increase my chances

    but a normal women that dosent get pregnant through treatment how many does she produce?

    • ANSWER:
      You begin with many follicular (regardless if you are fertility meds or not) each containing an egg and competing for dominating position and hormones. Around cycle day 8, one becomes the dominating follicular and will be the one that ovulates. Most of the other follicular have dies or are too small in size to have a chance to ovulate. These remaining small follicular stay around to support the dominating follie by producing hormones for it and the lining.
      An dominating follicular sends signals to the brain (when its around 18-22 mm) to lh surge. The lh surge finishes the egg maturity and causes the follicular sac to burst and the egg released. The follicular sac can measure around 20 to 29 mm at ovulation. Natural cycles (without fertility meds) tend to release eggs at a smaller size (22-24 mm). RE's try to mimic that with their IVF patients. Clomid causes follicular to grow and release at a larger size (25-29 mm). Follicular grow about 2mm a day. Final size depends on the eggs response to fsh (and other hormones) and it's rate of growth and development. The egg inside the follicular sac it always the same. It's the fluid and cells surrounding it that cause the enlarging size of the sac.

      Fertility meds work by giving your body the extra fsh it needs to get the other follicular a chance. So instead of just having one dominating and the others die, you get several of them to keep growing into eggs. Human's have the most wasteful reproductive systems. Baby girls are born with about 1 million eggs, which drops to about 300,000 in adolescence and near zero at menopause. We only ovulate 1 egg a month on average.

      The 21 has a good chance. The 18mm might have a chance but the other two are way to small.

  50. QUESTION:
    Who to see for hair loss and growth?
    I have been experiencing for a long time now hair fall. My hair used to be super thick and straight, now it is curly and thinned way out. When I am stressed, hair falls more than when I am not. So, what I want to know is if a dermatologist is the right doctor to see for these issues. If anyone has any suggestions for products I can use at home or some sort of home treatment please feel free to suggest some.

    • ANSWER:
      PROVILLUS: A PREVENTIVE CURE FOR HAIR LOSS

      To prevent hair loss from occurring Provillus, an all natural supplement has a positive outcome. Provillus is a supplement built to block the DHT(Dihydrotestoterone) in the body. Provillus contains compound ingredients such as, biotin, gotu kola, magnesium stearatern Muria Puania, pumpkin extract, Saw Palmetto, silicon dioxide, vitamin B6, and zinc.

      These compound ingredients help prevent thinning hair follicles form becoming thinner-leading to baldness. The nourishing blend of nutrients in Provillus helps the hair become thick. Provillus hair loss treatment is FDA-approved. No prescription is needed because it is stored as a supplement; therefore, it can be bought from over-the-counter from a local drug store.Provillus was created by the Ultra Herbal Company. It is a natural treatment for men and women suffering from hair loss, also known as Androgenetic alopecia. With men hair loss is caused by hormone testosterone.

      When DHT(Dihydrotestoterone) enters the body the hair follicles thins and cuts off the blood flow in the body. The more DHT in the body the more the man is at risk of experiencing baldness. In the United Stated two out of eight women experience hair loss. There is no pattern for hair loss in women. Few women experience hair loss at a young age, but it mostly occurs in older women. Unbalanced hormones, thyroid disease, and menopause are common risk factors of hair loss in women.

      Child birth is also a common risk factor for hair loss in women. However, hair loss in women is far more harder to deal with than for men experiencing hair loss.An effective cure for men and women who experience hair loss is Provillus. Not only will Provillus prevent hair loss from happening-it will also regrow the hair. With only being on the market for less than five years, Provillus has been rated the number #1 treatment for hair loss prevention. The topical ingredients in Provillus are FDA-approved and guaranteed to get hair back to being strong and healthy. No side effects have been reported from users of Provillus. Before using Provillus you should read the information provided carefully. You should also consult a doctor if any problems occur after usage.


natural hormone treatment for women

Hrt Patches

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    iam 38 going through the change because i had a hystorectomy ha dmy overies and womb removemoved?
    the name of my hrt patches i s called esdradot an dit is 100mg i was on the 50mg ffrom march 08 can any one help?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to talk to your GYN or nurse practitioner about any changes in your medicine. If its making you feel sick, irritating your skin you need to call and get that prescription changed.

  2. QUESTION:
    How long before HRT patch starts working?
    I've has just started Estraderm TTS 25mg patches, but can't seem to find it on leaflet or anywhere how long it will take before they start working, any ideas please? (Using my husbands login - Carole)

    • ANSWER:
      Patches are neither the most effective or efficient form of HRT as their absorption is very variable.I always described them as women's magazine medication more hype than substance.

      I very much hope that you are either being prescribed an oral sequential progestogen unless you have had a hysterectomy, as unopposed oestrogen CANNOT be used otherwise due to the risk of doubling ovarian cancer risk and also endometrial cancer.

      Assuming one or other of these is the case and your patch is 'safe', (ignoring the inherent risks of all HRT,) then your 25 patch is the lowest dose and is seldom sufficient to abolish symptoms.

  3. QUESTION:
    I've tried everything going to help with hot flushes due to the menopause, & nothing has worked?
    6 and a half years of awful hot flushes, unbearable. Have tried health tab's, blood pressure tab's, anti-depressants, HRT patches (from Dr's), deep breathing exercises (did a course via Kings College Hospital for helping the menopause), I have a magnet attached to underwear. There is nothing left to try. I even had a 24hr urine test to see if it was anything medical.

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to use a BIRTH CONTROL PATCH prior to losing virginity?
    Hi, I am a 22 year old virgin who's planning to lose it to my boyfriend soon. Do you think it's a smart move to start on the patch already before actually doing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  5. QUESTION:
    does any older woman get heart palps with menopause? i get them alot any ideas?
    im taking low dosage hrt patch, it seemed to help at first, i dont take caffine, & havent in 11 years, although i eat candy some ( not much ) im taking over the counter estroven to for menopause, nothing seems to help, i had ekgs, no heart trouble, but fast heart beat, i know i dont drink enough water, but i drink gatorade more. only ones going threw menopause answer, please???? thanks soooooo much.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh I feel for you, I had the same problem, I do not take any HRT but my doctor has given me low doses of Gabapentin, I don't have any problems with hot flashes or palpitations while taking this.Menopause really threw me into a tail spin, weight gain, dry skin,sleep problems...the list goes on and on...the gabapentin helped with 90 percent of my problems and I don't have to worry about the side effects of HRT drugs. talk to your doctor about maybe trying it. Good luck

  6. QUESTION:
    How long did it take for you to notice your HRT working?
    I was diagnosed with premature ovarian failure in 2003. Just last week, I was officially diagnosed was postmenopausal - at the age of 34.

    I've started the Vivelle patch and Prometrium. I'm wondering for those of you who are on HRT, how long did it take to see an improvement in your symptoms?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Its very individual but it might take 2-4 weeks depending
      on your system. Its a slow or gradual process and if you suffer from hot flashes you will notice how they get weaker and less frequent until they stop. If after a month it has not stopped or improved you might need to go back to your doctor to consider changing the HRT.

  7. QUESTION:
    HRT Patch for Migraine Sufferer?
    I recently had a Total Hysterectomy and have started on HRT Patches. I feel great but they cause daily migraines. It's only been 2 weeks - does anybody know if the headaches are going to wear off? At the moment, I have to take migraine medication daily to control the symptoms. Taking HRT tablets is not an option. Just wondering if any migraine sufferer has come across a patch that does not cause headaches?

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    M2F Transsexuals. Could you please tell me what type of Hormones you are taking and how they are going?
    I am 21 and have been seeing a Psychiatrist for about a month now. I have had my blood tests and this week I will be giving the Doctor the letter to say I am fit to start HRT. I have many friends who are doing HRT but seem to be taking different types of Hormones. Some are taking Premarin where others are taking Progynova. I am wandering which would be the best and most effective for me.

    • ANSWER:
      The best is whatever you and the doctor decide.

      There are several routes of administration:

      Pills
      Patches
      Gels
      Implants
      Injectables

      Pills and injectables tend to be the cheapest. But injectables are also very convenient as you only have to inject once every 2 weeks. If you do opt for injectables they are cheaper through a compounding pharmacy. If you opt for pills, Premarin is available on Walmart's program.

      I won't tell you what I use as it's totally irrelevant. As I said it's whatever you and your doctor decide. Follow the doctors orders and do have follow-up lab tests so your doctor can monitor your hormone levels and make adjustments if necessary.

      Good Luck.

  9. QUESTION:
    Hot flushes and night sweats - natural remedies?
    I've come off HRT patches but the hot flushes and night sweats have returned. If I keep on having disturbed sleep, I'm going to revert to the mad axewoman I was years ago before I got HRT! HELP! I restrict myself to one cup of tea upon awakening, one cup of good coffee mid-morning, and a maximum of 2 glasses of red wine in the evening. I don't use sugar and seldom eat anything using refined flour. I've heard Rose Hip and St John's Wort can help. I'm prepared to do almost anything to get through this and out the other end with my sanity intact! Only, when will it all end? Please, someone out there, tell me it won't last forever!

    • ANSWER:
      Sage leaf tablets from Boots worked for me, almost instantly. Theyre a life saver. Good luck

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the best natural monopause supplements?
    I am on the combi-patch and am taking extra estrogen (because of a bleeding problem). I really feel bad and am gaining weight in my middle, which is depressing me bad. cant wear any of my pants. I understand natural HRT doesn't cause the side affects. Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Oldtimekid gave you the internal supplements. Vitex is the best. I would add licorice and ginseng. (You can buy these in combinations. One of them is Herbs Etc.'s Menopautonic.) Make sure the herbs are EXTRACTS and not just powdered herbs. Black Cohosh is practically worthless if it is not an extract.

      For the "bleeding problem" get a progesterone cream (FemCreme by Pure Essence is one). Make sure the label says "USP progesterone" and the dose is 24mg. Use it 21 days out of every 28. If the break-through bleeding is really heavy, you can stop it with Shepherd's Purse extract.

      Be patient. First your body has to get rid of the stuff you've been taking. You should feel better in about 30 days.

      If you still have trouble with mood swings, try taking extra Boron. This mineral does wonders for hormone balance.

      Join an exercise group. The thickening middle can happen with hormone fluctuation even if you don't use HRT.

  11. QUESTION:
    How long do you think HRT is safe to take?
    I'm 32 years old and had a (full) hysterectomy in 2001. The Doctors seem to want to keep me on Premarian forever, but everything I read says thats a bad idea. HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      That's a big question is how long hormone replacement therapy can be used safely. It was once thought that using it for five years or less to relieve menopausal symptoms had no risks. But the WHI study seemed to show that was not the case.

      There are still a lot of unknowns. Many women now take doses of hormones that are lower than the ones used in the WHI trial. Hormones are also delivered not just through pills, but in other forms, like skin patches. We don't know yet whether these lower concentrations and different forms might decrease the risks.

      For now, the FDA recommends that women who take hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms take the lowest effective dose and for the shortest time period to alleviate symptoms.

      If you take HRT, keep in mind that the absolute risks are low. But you should still regularly check in with your doctor about your concerns...

  12. QUESTION:
    How much is male to female hormone therapy?
    How much does it usually cost lets say for a full year of hormone therapy? Where can this process be done? What else is required, or is there a page with all this info?

    • ANSWER:
      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minmize the risks of HRT.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.Susans.org/forums click "transsexual talk"

      That should get you started.

  13. QUESTION:
    How much do hormones to transition cost?
    How much do hormones to transition cost? Mtf?..... I've heard it's a long process to get them which is why people self medicate, do u get the same effects self medicating ?

    • ANSWER:
      How much does HRT cost?

      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minimize the risks of HRT. Without a doctor it is impossible to know if you're taking too much or not enough estrogen.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.
      In general they put younger people on pills.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.lauras-playground.com/forums/index.php?showforum=12

      Hope this helps.
      .

  14. QUESTION:
    How dangerous is using Hormone Replacement to stop abnormal menopausal bleeding? ?
    My girlfriend is 47, and is probably going through menopause, but I understand using Hormones can cause a person to have to take blood thinners possibly the rest of their life, among other side effects.

    • ANSWER:
      Not very dangerous, frankly. HRT has gotten a bad rap because it's slightly risky. But it also has benefits. So it's a cost/benefit analysis. It's often quite worth it for some women who are having a lot of menopause problems. I've not heard of women using HRT going on blood thinners. If the person has a clotting problem, they shouldn't be on HRT. But here's something important: oral estrogen does raise your risk of blood clots. But non-oral estrogen does NOT raise risk, so if blood clotting is a concern, then the person taking the HRT should think about using an estrogen patch instead.

  15. QUESTION:
    If I start a new pack of birth control pills instead of having my period, am I still protected?
    My period is coming at a terrible time I have taken my pills correctly since I've started them and I just want to delay my period for a little bit. Am i still as protected as the rest of the month?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a couple of links if you'd like to learn more about the big announcement about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causing breast cancer. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control also began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain estrogen and progestin, hormones that are the most widely used in HRT. This is true for The Pill, The mini-pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, and Nuva Ring, Shots, and Rods under the skin. Levels in HRT, which have already been shown to cause breast cancer, are actually lower than that in hormonal birth control methods, on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with naturally occurring hormones in already normal levels. How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974 when BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress the natural processes of the female body.

      Just like menopause, the female bodily functions of ovulation and pregnancy ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks.

      If you must practice birth control, a condom with plenty of spermicide, when used correctly is STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to this, at least stop using hormonal birth control for the sake of your health!

      A + B = C

      How many more "news flash: drug causes bad side effects" announcements before we realize that the body does NOT need drugs, except in dire circumstances. Let's leave our bodies alone and live healthy lifestyles, and our bodies will take care of the rest!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  16. QUESTION:
    Why is Sutil looking forward to join Williams when Force India is a better team?

    Looks like he wants to plant his foots on two different boats. He wants to join Williams as well as secure a seat in Force India.

    • ANSWER:
      Because Force India probably aren't keeping him next season. They're likely to go for Hulkenberg, leaving him without a seat. And since most other seats have been taken except for maybe one at Renault beside Kimi (likely to be kept by Petrov or perhaps Grosjean) and HRT (doubt he'll want to go there), Williams is his only option other than leaving F1. and Williams isn't that bad, they might be going through a rough patch recently but they've still got the potential to be a competitive team if they've got the right attitude, and maybe Sutil can help lift their spirits up.

  17. QUESTION:
    is estrogen present in vaginal secretions? would oral sex expose a lover to any estrogen?
    I want to know if vaginal secretions of a healthy female contain actual estrogen compounds and if those compounds are increased if the woman is on HRT.
    If so is the estrogen an effective HRT compound in its own right?

    • ANSWER:
      No. Unless a woman is using vaginal HRT--that is, a cream or capsule IN the vagina. Then, some of her secretions could contain estrogen. But if she is using a pill or a patch, then estrogen in the vaginal secretions is neglible. That is, there are minute quantities of estrogen in it, just as there are minute quantities of estrogen in every person's saliva (men and women), but too small amounts to do anything.

  18. QUESTION:
    How can I stop pulling my hair and eye brows out?
    I need help,for the last 44 years or so I have been pulling my hair and my eye brows out what can I do to stop this? When I was younger and did this my mother and step-father would slam me well it sure didn't stop me. I am a nail biter as well.What should I do about this? Most of my family tells me that this is because I have low self-esteem,and that it is a mental problem. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      your problem is Trichotillomania (TTM, also known as "Trichotillosis"[1]), or "trich" as it is commonly known, is an impulse control disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pull out scalp hair, eyelashes, facial hair, nose hair, pubic hair, eyebrows or other body hair, sometimes resulting in noticeable bald patches.[2]:645 Trichotillomania is classified in the DSM-IV as an impulse control disorder, but there are still questions about how it should be classified. It may seem, at times, to resemble a habit, an addiction, a tic disorder or an obsessive-compulsive disorder. Trichotillomania often begins during the individual's teenage years. Depression or stress can trigger the trich. Due to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to predict accurately prevalence of trichotillomania; 2.5 million in the U.S. may have TTM, with a 1% prevalence rate.

      The name derives from Greek: tricho- (hair), till(en) (to pull), and mania.
      Contents

      Individuals with trichotillomania live relatively normal lives; however, they may have bald spots on their head, among their eyelashes, pubic hair, or brows. An additional psychological effect can be low self-esteem, often associated with being shunned by peers and the fear of socializing due to appearance and negative attention they may receive. Some people with TTM wear hats, wigs, wear false eyelashes, eyebrow pencil, or style their hair in an effort to avoid such attention. There seems to be a strong stress-related component. In low-stress environments, some exhibit no symptoms (known as 'pulling') whatsoever. This 'pulling' often resumes upon leaving this environment.

      Many clinicians classify TTM as a habit behavior, in the same family as nail biting (onychophagia) or compulsive skin picking (dermatillomania). These disorders are a cross between mental disorders, such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and physical disorders such as stereotypic movement disorder because the person performs repetitive movements without being bothered by or completely aware of them. Some say that pimples on the scalp is all it takes to trigger the pulling in some of those who suffer from TTM. Supposedly, areas that are sore intensify the feeling of pulling. The more the area becomes agitated by pulling, the feeling intensifies, only causing the puller to become obsessed with pulling more. It is also widely believed that individuals with TTM pull because of the sight or feel of a certain area of hair. This theory varies by the individual, as some TTM sufferers say the disorder is not an obsession with looks but rather a habit or an addiction. The current classification of trich as an impulse disorder with pyromania, pathological gambling and kleptomania, has been called into question as inadequate and in need of revision. One study showed that individuals with TTM have decreased cerebellar volume.[Anxiety, depression and OCD are more frequently encountered in people with TTM.[7] People with TTM may also eat/chew the hair that they pull, referred to as trichophagia. In extreme cases this can lead to Rapunzel syndrome, and even death.[ Some individuals with TTM may feel they are the only person with this problem due to low rates of reporting.

      Habit Reversal Training or HRT, has been shown to be a successful adjunct to medication as a way to treat TTM.With Habit Reversal Training, doctors train the individual to learn to recognize their impulse to pull and also teach them to redirect this impulse. As a part of the behavioral record-keeping component of HRT, patients are often instructed to keep a journal of their hair-pulling episodes. They may be asked to record the date, time, location, and number of hairs pulled, as well as what they are thinking or feeling at the time. This can help the patient learn to identify situations where they commonly pull out their hair and develop strategies for avoiding episodes.

      Treatment with clomipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, was shown in a small double-blind study to significantly improve symptoms.

      Fluoxetine (Prozac) and other similar SSRI drugs have limited usefulness in treating TTM, and can often have significant side effects.According to F. Penzel, antidepressants can even increase the severity of the TTM.

      A recent study has shown positive results using a treatment of acetylcysteine

      Hypnotherapy has been used to treat it with some success by addressing the symptoms using hypnosis.

      Epidemiology

      TTM is diagnosed in all age groups; it is more common during the first two decades of life, with mean age of onset usually reported between 9 and 14 years of age. Among preschool children the genders are equally represented; there appears to be a female predominance among preadolescents to young adults, with between 70% and 93% of patients being female.Evidence now points to a genetic predisposition.

      The number of reported trichotillomania cases has increased throughout the yea

  19. QUESTION:
    As of January 5, 2009 I have no ovaries, which means no hormones, how long after surgery would I get ?
    symptoms from menopause. I did not have cancer, I lost one ovary in 1991 due to a dermoid cyst and this ovary was removed due to infection in the tube and enlarged ovary and adhesions. I'm 38 years old and any advice on HRT would be great. I would really like answers from women who had surgical induced menopause or personal knowledge of hrt to answer. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I had a hysterectomy at the age of 46 and was already having hot flashes, which increased immediately. I used estrogen patches for a year and decided to use nothing. About 10 months later started using premarin and stayed on it for 7 years, but stopped due to the breast cancer scare from hrt. My advise would be to wait and see what kind of reaction you have and then decide with your doctor the best solution based on your particular problems. I have been totally off of medicine for some time now and sometimes still have an occasional hot flash but nothing I can't live with.

      hope this helps..

  20. QUESTION:
    I am an engineer about to sit for my first grade steam engineering oral competency test.?
    how to repair a bulge on a HRT steam boiler?

    • ANSWER:
      All repairs must be acceptable to the governing code jurisdiction (such as NBIC), therefore all methods of repair must have written approval from the Chief Inspector or Authorized Inspector. The guideline to flush patch can be obtained from RD-2060a Flush Patches of NBIC.

      Carry out hardness test (DT) on the bulge area to determine extent of defect. Mark out the boundary line of the defective section to be cut out based on acceptable tensile strength obtained. Use Vickers Hardness test (HV) to test for the metal strength of carbon steel. The method of repair is called "flush patch", which means the shell is cutout around the failure in elliptical or rectangular, and a piece of new boilerplate rolled to correct curvature is inserted with the edge of original shell and patch butt-welded. For rectangular shape, provide accurate radius as square corners shall be avoided.

      Refer the manufacturer's blueprint on the material specifications of the shell and the patches shall be made from the material that is equal in quality and thickness to the original material. The edge shall align without overlap. Weld preparation to be double "vee" with an included angle of 60o to 70o. The gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) shall be used for the initial pass joining the patch to shell. The balance of the weld shall be manual shielded metallic arc welding using low hydrogen electrodes confirmed to ASME Code Sect IX.

      Weld the inside first, then back gouge on the outside. Grind the sound metal before continuing the welding on the outside. Grind flush the accessible surface, and after completion of welding, visually check for weld undercut and repair if necessary. Refer the manufacturer's blueprint on the NDT used during construction, and normally the weld on flush patch of shell is 100% radiographed. Acceptance of weld is in accordance with ASME Code or BS 2970 code. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is to be done to relieve the residual stress on the heat affected zone (HAZ). Carryout hydrostatic test on the boiler. Test pressure shall be 1.5 times the design pressure. The holding time is 10 minutes.

      Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3409835

      Good luck,
      AJ

  21. QUESTION:
    Reaction between sunlight and hormone replacement therapy?
    Will anyone who has been on hormone replacement therapy please share with me any adverse reactions you may have had with exposure to real sunlight and or tanning beds.

    I have always been able to tan nicely. However, after recently beginning HRT my skin is not reacting as usual to extended exposure.

    • ANSWER:
      I know that tanning if using the patch type HRT is contraindicated because it affects the way the medication is absorbed.

      As far as oral HRT is concerned, the only contraindication I know of (and this is a biggie) is that your chances of developing malignant melanoma are increased if you tan, either naturally or via a tanning bed. Same with the patch.

  22. QUESTION:
    What effects will I have stopping the birth control pill?
    I just stopped the birth control today after taking them for over a year, the pills got rid of the acne I had, will it come back? Though I noticed on the pill I was kinda moody, so I hope that goes away.

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few of links if you'd like to learn more about the big announcement about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causing breast cancer. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control also began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain estrogen and progestin, hormones that are the most widely used in HRT. This is true for The Pill, The mini-pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, and Nuva Ring, Shots, and Rods under the skin. Levels in HRT, which have already been shown to cause breast cancer, are actually lower than that in hormonal birth control methods, on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with naturally occurring hormones in already normal levels. How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974 when BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress the natural processes of the female body.

      Just like menopause, the female bodily functions of ovulation and pregnancy ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks.

      If you must practice birth control, abstinence or a condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, with plenty of spermicide, when used correctly is STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to this, at least stop using hormonal birth control for the sake of your health!

      A + B = C

      How many more "news flash: drug causes bad side effects" announcements before we realize that the body does NOT need drugs, except in dire circumstances. Let's leave our bodies alone and live healthy lifestyles, and our bodies will take care of the rest!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  23. QUESTION:
    Will I go through early menopause if I get one ovary removed?
    I recently found out that I have a huge ovarian cyst on my left side and that I am going to need surgery ASAP! My gynecologist wants to remove the whole ovary because there is a very small chance that it could be malignant. Is there any possibility that it would cause me to go into early menopause if I keep the right ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Jesus_is.., So sorry for your Medical condition and hope you will feel better soon. that said as to your question Your doctor may conduct an ovary removal, or oophorectomy, as part of a hysterectomy or if you have an abnormal growth. This surgery is often performed by laparoscopy so you can go home the same day or the following day.An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both your ovaries (female reproductive structure responsible for producing eggs and generating hormones). When one ovary is removed, the procedure is called a unilateral oophorectomy, and when both ovaries...Surgical menopause is the removal of a woman's ovaries during surgery. Only the ovaries may be removed, or the woman may have a partial or total hysterectomy. Removing the uterus and fallopian tubes will not cause surgical menopause, only the...If only one ovary is removed, the woman will not go through surgical menopause because there is still another ovary producing hormones.Know Who Needs Surgical Menopause, Women who have ovarian cancer may have their ovaries removed during surgery. Women who suffer from painful fibroid tumors may also opt to have the ovaries surgically removed. Some women who are genetically predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer opt to have their ovaries removed, especially if their sisters or mother have developed breast or ovarian cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a high risk for breast or ovarian cancer. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, get genetic testing to find out if you have the mutation.All surgeries have risks that are serious considerations for you. Excessive blood loss, infection and complications from anesthesia are just some of the risks of all surgery. Other complications for removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy) include unintentional injury to other internal organs during surgery and intestinal blockages.Predicting Hot Flashes, Yes! You will have all the symptoms of natural menopause after surgery to remove the ovaries. You may experience one or all of these symptoms immediately after surgery including hot flashes, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, night sweats, vaginal dryness, diminished sex drive and fatigue, unless you start on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) right away. HRT can be in the form of a pill, gel or a patch prescribed in the lowest possible dosage,Understand Hormone Replacement Therapy ,Estrogen Therapy alone does increase the risk of uterine cancer, so most women are given a combination of estrogen and progestin, called Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or Hormone Therapy. If you've had a total hysterectomy and the uterus has been removed, you no longer have to worry about uterine cancer. Progestin protects the uterus from cancer, which is why it's combined with estrogen to provide protection against cancer in HRT. Most doctors agree that women should remain on HRT for no more than 5 years. Side effects of HRT can include headaches and breast pain. Some women temporarily gain water weight. More serious side effects of HRT include bleeding, cancer, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Go for regular check ups while you're on HRT, and contact your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects. I hope all these information helped you with more knowledge which will take you from Zero to hero. Good luck best wishes hope you get better soon. Sorry for your problems but you will get better dear hope for the best.

  24. QUESTION:
    Are there any known cases of female to male transitions where the individual only took a small amount of T?
    Most FTM cases that i've heard of only consisted of a constant injection of testosterone. I was curious about the effects, if it would even be physically stable for someone, how much of the effects would revert back if the injections just stopped. For my example I would say about after a few weeks to a month or two's time.
    Have any transgendered people actually tried this/had to stop taking testosterone for whatever reason?

    • ANSWER:
      The reason for consistency is because without testosterone in your system, the estrogen production will return. One of the neat tricks of testosterone injections (or pills or patches) is that it tells your pituitary gland that your hormone levels are alright, so your pituitary gland never tells your body to produce estrogen. Once you stop testosterone, your pituitary gland tells your body to make estrogen.

      If you've only been on T for a few weeks, you've barely begun to even shut down the estrogen production so it would be probably days before everything bounced back to the way it was before. This has two consequences. Physically you'll be stressing your body in ways you can't imagine, and mentally you'll be sending yourself on a hormonal roller coaster going from shutting down estrogen production (menopause) and booting up testosterone levels (male puberty) to starting estrogen production (female puberty) and killing of your testosterone levels (male hypogonadism).

      I didn't TRY this, but it happened to me during my first year of HRT, all of a sudden my body freaked out and was suddenly not processing my testosterone as it should and my pituitary gland freaked out and couldn't decide if it should be producing hormones from one day to the next. It is not something any rational person would try to induce in themselves, it's a serious misuse of prescribed medications if you do try.

      This is of course, my own brief description. Even with the time and research I have done before and after starting HRT I barely know anything next to an endocrinologist. If you are thinking of trying this, talk to your endo first.

  25. QUESTION:
    How does hormone replacement therapy work? How do they determine what should have?
    I am a guy having difficulty with my girlfriend. She had to have a hysterectomy and for the past three years I have suffered because she said the first time she had hormone replacement it made her sick. So she gave up. She shut out the world and on Valentines day she couldn't tell me she loved me. I blew up and told her she needed help because she has been ignoring my needs and I have tried everything to get her interested again. And her bad habits have made her physically incompatible to me. I am frustrated beyond belief. She hates herself calling herself ugly and fat. And I told one of her girlfriends and she got mad at me saying her parts are her own business and I told her she needs to get over it. If I can have 100 people looking at mr happy for my kidney stones, ONE of her friends can know about her issues and give her some help because guys don't know what to do. I also told her if she wanted something she could ignore she should have went to the humane society and bought a cat! Can hormone replacement help her with being frigid? Can it help her feel the world is a bit more likable? Can it help her lose weight? How do they figure out what hormone mixture she needs?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone replacement CAN help with all of those things, if done right, and if her body is responsive. Hormones are the body's fuel. They're supposed to have them, and without them, there are all kinds of problems. The body produces hormones in amounts and types and at times that are very complex. There are hundreds of different hormones. But when you take hormone replacement, you're taking perhaps 2 hormones. Which you take once per day, rather than having it 24/7, in small, highly responsive amounts. Most doctors don't give a shit. That's why taking HRT can often make you sick. Complicating matters is that the most commonly prescribed hormone replacement is Premarin (horse estrogen from the urine of pregnant mares). It's not the same as human estrogen, plus it overloads you with a large dose when you take it orally, then plummets to nothing throughout the day. It's as if you were told you could eat as much as you want, except that you can only have ice cream, and you can only eat on Tuesdays. It's not natural nor is it how the body works. There are ways to work around this: tell your girlfriend to try estrogen patches. It's the closest you can get to the slow, natural, 24/7 administration of small amounts of estrogen that your ovaries produce. Have her at least try that. Then, encourage her to try testosterone. In Europe, it's standard to give hysterectomized women testosterone. In the US, they almost never do it. But without it, it's like you're castrated. Also, FYI: estrogen plays an important role as a neurotransmitter in the brain. Without it, you can become depressed and angry.

  26. QUESTION:
    After having a baby, what is the best birth control to take and how soon?
    Im now 29 weeks, almost 30 with my son. My fiance and I are excited more than ever but one for right now is enough. Lol. So im just wondering what would be the ideal birth control to start taking after the baby born and how soon would I start taking it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a copper IUD that I've heard some women like and some women hate. I don't like hormonal ones. This is why. All the hormonal birth control options contain a fake hormone called Progestrin. The reason the drug companies didn't put the real hormone (called Progesterone) in their pills, shots, and patches was so they can patent it and call it their own. Real Progesterone can act as a birth control and is good for your body. Fake stuff (Progestrin) can cause heart attack, stroke, and other worrisome side effects.

      You can find real Progesterone in a cream form (kind of like lotion). And just like the pill you have to be very faithful in putting it on every day around the same time. I would however recommend using condoms as a back up when using the cream.

      I don't know if I explained the dangers of using synthetic hormonal birth control very well. If you're interested I really liked these sites :http://hiwaay.net/~eueda/progesterone/how2use.htm ; http://www.johnleemd.com/store/hrt_research.html

      You're probably planning on nursing. I've heard that both progestin and progesterone can sabotage your milk supply. If you're planning on nursing. Condoms are probably the best option.

  27. QUESTION:
    Anyone had a hysterectomy at a young age?
    Hi I'm having a hysterectomy in 2 weeks and I'm only 33. Fortunately, I have a son. I just wondered if anyone could share their experience if they too were in their 30's or younger, ie their emotions, experience with HRT/medication and any physical implications.

    Thank you everyone X

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I was 36 when I had mine it was totally my choice to have it done, I was fed up with all the hormone issues and heavy painful periods. The operation was fairly straightforward and I was a bit sore for about 4 weeks but was back at work after 6 weeks (I was working as a chef at the time in a school), my surgeon did say that girls who have it done young recover quicker, they also took my ovaries as there was little point in leaving them and I am now on patches which supply all my hormone needs, I did ask my surgeon if I could stop using the HRT but he said I will need to be on it for at least another 15 years (I am 40 soon) but also that I didn't need to ever stop using it if I didn't want to. The best thing about it for me was just before i signed the consent form he said I would have no more PMT no more periods and no more smears (as my cervix was removed as well) hope that is helpful to you and good luck
      P.S there is an excellent site www.hystersisters.com that offers a fantastic support network as it is all women who are going or have gone through what you are about to, check it out it really helped me

  28. QUESTION:
    What is causing these spots on my head and what can get rid of them! I'm 24!?
    For the last two months i've been getting spots deep under the surface on my forehead. I have not changed any cosmetic products lately nor has my diet changed. They are like pimples but never get a head and leave a scar for ages. How can i get rid of them, I've tried steaming my face and good old toothpaste but they make no difference! I never had spots as a teenager so its really weird that I am getting them now...

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure but it sounds like hormones.

      What is Melasma/Chloasma?

      A patchy brown or dark brown skin discoloration that usually occurs on face and may result from hormonal changes, as in pregnancy and during the administration of estrogen containing oral contraceptives.

      It is generally found on sun-exposed areas of the face. Melasma often fades over several months after stopping oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy(HRT) or after delivering a child. It may return with additional pregnancies or use of these medications. The patches gradually fade over many months. In some people, the discoloration never entirely disappears. However, this condition develops spontaneously in some women who are neither pregnant, taking oral contraceptives, nor HRT medications.

      OR

      Age spots or liver spots are flat, light or reddish-brown areas of skin that appear most often on the face and throat, the backs of hands and wrists, or other areas that are often exposed to sunlight.

      They develop more often on light-skinned people over the age of about 55, but begin to be noticeable in some people around the age of 30. They can be as small as a freckle while others spread to several centimeters in diameter.

      Age spots result from overexposure to the sun: the ultraviolet light over-stimulates the pigment cells in the skin, which clump together to produce irregular blotches of dark color.

      nfd♥

  29. QUESTION:
    what are the pros and cons of taking estrogen replacement drugs?
    I had a complete hystorectomy two weeks ago and this put me straight into menopause. I have experienced hot flashes and night sweats...im 44 so the doc put me on premarin
    also do u grow hair like a man would when u are in menopause? how long does menopause last?

    • ANSWER:
      You are going to find alot of pros and cons of HRT(Hormone Replacement Therapy) I had a complete hysterectomy at 38 and I'm 46 now. Boy, I have been experimenting alot of HRT. My point of view, the best for me, is estrogen patches. I have tried it all, believe me. I even went to compounded hormones and that was okay. The best for me is the patches. I'm trying to spare you alot of disappointment and weight gain. So this is a suggestion that I'm sharing with you. I hope that I have helped you with your question and you take my advice.

  30. QUESTION:
    40 yr old woman looking for something to increase my sex drive?
    I enjoy sex when I decide to have it but I dont have the drive I need or want...Is there a pill or something that can help me ?

    • ANSWER:
      loadedgun,

      Actually, there is, but it's a bit problematic. Speak to your doctor about testosterone.

      Eh?

      Well, maybe. Sex drive in women is a fairly complex thing, involving a balance of both estrogen and testosterone. While there is some evidence that raising a woman's testosterone level can increase her libido,

      http://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/news/20030626/testosterone-increases-libido-in-women

      it is not quite as simple as we might want to think it.

      Testosterone apparently works well for women with sufficient estrogen levels, and it might work well for women on HRT, it might not be as effective for postmenopausal women not on HRT (which has its own risks).

      That's why I recommend talking with your doctor and seeing if you are a good candidate for a testosterone patch or pill.

  31. QUESTION:
    LGBT: Can HRT git rid of a transsexual woman's leg hair?
    I restarted HRT a few months ago.

    I haven't shaved in weeks and it's mostly just stubble and a few hairs like half a centimeter long. The hair is so fine that it's impossible to see unless you look at my legs close. I have bald patches on my legs.

    Is this normal? I don't remember experiencing it when I was on HRT the first time, but back then I shaved my legs almost daily. I experienced it getting thinner but not like this.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the woman really. Cis women can have quite hairy legs if they don't shave.

  32. QUESTION:
    Menopause... When should I expect it to start and what will be the symptoms, and for how long?
    When I get it, what are the normal symptoms and what do women do to control it? Thank you to anyone with helpful advice.

    • ANSWER:
      In my mid-30s I went 38 days without a period. I think I was pre-menstrual. A doctor can check you hormone levels and tell you if you are menopausal or not. Symptoms include hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, insomnia...not a whole lot different than PMS. The best thing though, no more PERIOD.

      I went into early menopause as the result of a hysterectomy in 1998. I was in my 40s. My doctor prescribed PremPhase which is a hormone replacement pill. He then switched me to Alora, which is a HRT patch, changed twice weekly. Currently, I use FemRing. It is inserted in the vagina once every 90 days. They all controlled my symptoms, but have not completely eliminated them. There are also herbal remedies such as Black Cohosh. This should not be used if you have high blood pressure.

      Hope this information is helpful

  33. QUESTION:
    What are the chances of getting pregnant while taking birth control pill called Diane 35?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few of links if you'd like to learn more about the big announcement about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causing breast cancer. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control also began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain estrogen and progestin, hormones that are the most widely used in HRT. This is true for The Pill, The mini-pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, and Nuva Ring, Shots, and Rods under the skin. Levels in HRT, which have already been shown to cause breast cancer, are actually lower than that in hormonal birth control methods, on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with naturally occurring hormones in already normal levels. How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974 when BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress the natural processes of the female body.

      Just like menopause, the female bodily functions of ovulation and pregnancy ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks.

      If you must practice birth control, abstinence or a condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, with plenty of spermicide, when used correctly is STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to this, at least stop using hormonal birth control for the sake of your health!

      A + B = C

      How many more "news flash: drug causes bad side effects" announcements before we realize that the body does NOT need drugs, except in dire circumstances. Let's leave our bodies alone and live healthy lifestyles, and our bodies will take care of the rest!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  34. QUESTION:
    Curious about transgender. How many of you go through the hidden period, the I'll try 'normal' period, then?
    Have it all to come back to haunt you that you were right all along? I think it's harder for transgendered people to come to complete grips with who they are because of societal pressures and expectations than it is for gay people. How many of you have given it up only to come back to it. Or am I wrong, that you dealt with it early and stuck with it. Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      well, reef, for me there was never any of that. i know there is lots of very understandable denial, but for me...it just never was. i knew i was a girl when i was three. i didn't think it, or wish it...i didn't suspect it or think it possible....i absolutely knew it.

      my earliest memories are of wondering what could be going on in people's heads when they kept insisting that i was a boy. to me, that was the dysphoria....how in the world could everybody i knew...everyone i loved and trusted and looked up to be so incredibly wrong. it just never occurred to me that i could be wrong. that's like thinking i was wrong about being me...of course i'm me. even if the whole world thought i was somebody else, i can't believe that...i know for a fact that i'm really me.

      that being said....i did learn very early on that i'd better pretend that i understood and agreed with them....it was the only way to avoid the beatings. yes, in those days the accepted treatment for perverts like me was beating. there was no such thing as transsexual, or transition, hrt...grs.....those things didn't come along until much later. yes, there was christine jorgensen...but nobody in my world ever heard of her and if they did they wouldn't believe in her...just another circus freak. i adapted. i learned my lines and, while i wasn't good at it, i delivered them.

      i wasn't a transsexual...i was a sissy, a queer and later a foggott. the only stable identification i had was pervert. i knew what that was, it was me....the boy who thought he was a girl.

      so...no, i never even attempted the "normal" thing. i played the part but it was a part...i never believed it for a minute and i never wanted any more to do with it then what was necessary for survival. i adapted to the cards i was dealt and played them always under the gambler's prayer..."Lord, please let me break even....i need the money." i lied. yes, the parrot posse will take that and scream about what a lousy person i am...a liar....but, i'm a liar stuck on truth. i tell the truth as i know it. i don't blow my own horn, i don't pretend i know a bunch of stuff i've only read about, or wished for....i tell it like it is. old liars get that way. i lied and that's how i survived.

      one thing has been consistent throughout my whole conscious life, that i knew i was a girl. i might not have understood it, i was as baffled as all the rest at how a penis got between my legs, but reality was reality...it defied all convention.

      so...that's a bit of my background. i guess that's allot of why i am not ashamed of being transsexual...it doesn't frighten me, it's what i've always been and there have always been many worse names for it. a transsexual is a person who was born with the wrong genitalia. we can have surgery to have our genitalia reconfigured but we were still born with the wrong genitalia. we can present ourselves in our correct gender to perfection...but we were still born with the wrong genitalia. we are still transsexuals, we are because we were born with the wrong genitalia and until someone figures out how to have us be reborn...not metaphorically, but physically, with the correct genitalia, we are transsexual.

      old liars can develop a deep respect for the truth. playing with words doesn't alter reality. a rose by any other name will still smell as sweet. transsexual smells sweet to me...it's real and as fresh as the morning dew, as real as that little patch of crocus' that appeared in my front yard the other day. as real as that four year old out in the back yard with her pants down being beaten senseless for being a girl and liking it. as remarkable as the clouds in the sky, as sacred as the grazing indian cow. as blessed as a babe born in a barn to an unwed mom. as beautiful as a rainbow...and it's my true colors.

      transsexual....that's not something bad, it's just an explanation...it explains why i was born with a penis between my legs.

      much love and hope. pj

      edit: and as you can see, the mindless parrot posse is out thumbs downing my story...simply because it is MY story. they are just eat up with jealousy that a REAL transsexual has found a successful life in the real world and doesn't have to live her fantasy life in the muck and filthy mire of their lives. they are so transphobic that seeing a successful transsexual scares the bejesus out of them. so sick is this one particular transvesite that he took it upon himself to post my personal information on the web....including address and phone number. of course he got it wrong...but the effort tells the tale. if a person can sink any lower than that....i haven't met them. there is a bottom to how low human beings can sink, and this particular bottom feeder will be waiting when anyone gets there. he will break out all his fake accounts now and start reporting....

      a rose is a rose is a rose.

      a worm is a worm is a worm.

  35. QUESTION:
    Can I Sit on a Transdermal Estrogen Patch?
    Hello, I have recently begun HRT, and am wondering if I can sit on my transdermal estrogen patch.

    I'm recommended to put it on my buttock, but I don't think I should sit on it. Is it OK if I do? Or is there another, less pressured area of my buttocks?

    • ANSWER:
      In addition to what Court said you can put patches on your lower abdomen as well. But then the waist band of pants may cause trouble. That's the things about patches... worrying about them staying on. I gave up on patches after about 5 months.

  36. QUESTION:
    Does the birth control pill Loestrinfe cause weight gain?
    Anyone with that experience? Please share any thoughts you may have on the pill and whether you have had a negative or positive experience. I received a prescription from my doctor to try it but want to receive more feedback from people that are actually on it or took it before. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few of links if you'd like to learn more about the big announcement about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causing breast cancer. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control also began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain estrogen and progestin, hormones that are the most widely used in HRT. This is true for The Pill, The mini-pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, and Nuva Ring, Shots, and Rods under the skin. Levels in HRT, which have already been shown to cause breast cancer, are actually lower than that in hormonal birth control methods, on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with naturally occurring hormones in already normal levels. How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974 when BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress the natural processes of the female body.

      Just like menopause, the female bodily functions of ovulation and pregnancy ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks.

      If you must practice birth control, abstinence or a condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, with plenty of spermicide, when used correctly is STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to this, at least stop using hormonal birth control for the sake of your health!

      A + B = C

      How many more "news flash: drug causes bad side effects" announcements before we realize that the body does NOT need drugs, except in dire circumstances. Let's leave our bodies alone and live healthy lifestyles, and our bodies will take care of the rest!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  37. QUESTION:
    whats a typical day for someone with turner syndrome?
    is there specific medicine you have to take? just whats it like.

    • ANSWER:
      for my daughter it's a lot like her younger sisters day, except. When she gets up she has to put on her specially made support socks which takes longer than putting on "normal" socks, she has lymphodema in her feet and lower legs. On a nigh-time before bed she does her injection of growth hormones, twice per week changes her HRT patch, takes a steroid tablet. 11 days of the month she has a progesterone tablet to make sure her monthly bleeds are regular, otherwise she could have a "period" at any time ranging from every 10 days to every 6/7 weeks. Also before bed she applies aqueous cream to her feet and legs to make sure her skin stays soft, which is needed because IF she got dry skin or a cut on her feet legs it could be made worse because of the lymphodema. Sometimes i also give her a foot and leg massage if she has a lot of swelling.
      She is shorter than most of her friends but that does not really cause her any problems, her predicted final height is between 4ft 11" and 5ft 2", so on the lower side of an expected height for a woman

  38. QUESTION:
    head and facial sweating every 10 to 15 minutes the dr. has put it down to menopause but im not convinced coul?
    i am on hrt patches but they do not seem to be helping and i have not felt well for over 6 months now and i am losing faith in my doctor as they do not seem to listen it is taking over my life at present

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    What herbal medicines can change your gender from male to female without SRS?

    • ANSWER:
      The psychological changes are harder to define, because HRT is usually the first physical action that takes place when transitioning. Thus, the act itself of beginning HRT has a significant psychological effect, which is hard to distinguish from hormonally induced changes[citation needed].
      Contraindications

      Absolute: history of estrogen sensitive cancer (for example breast cancer), history of thromboembolic disease (unless provided with concurrent anti-coagulation therapy), or history of macroprolactinoma.
      Relative: Liver, kidney, or heart disease and stroke (or any of the risk factors for heart disease: high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, smoking); Strong family history of breast cancer or thromboembolic disease; Gallbladder disease; circulation or clotting conditions such as peripheral vascular disease, polycythemia vera, sickle cell anaemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, hyperlipidemia/hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipoproteinaemia, hypertension, factor V leiden, prothrombin mutation, antiphospholipid antibodies, anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulants, plasminogen or fibrinolysis disorders, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, or antithrombin III deficiency.

      [ Types of therapy
      [ Estrogens

      Doses are often higher than replacement doses for women. Usually the dosage is reduced after an orchiectomy (the removal of the testes) or sex reassignment surgery. However, the practice of lowering estrogen doses after such operations has been carried over from the days when very high doses of estrogen were required to decrease testosterone since anti-androgens were not used. In fact, high doses (though using a less potent estrogen, estradiol, that is endogenous to the human body rather than the risky ethinyl estradiol and conjugated estrogens used in the past) are recommended during the first ten or so years of HRT to fully develop, with or without having had an orchiectomy or sex reassignment. After usually ten years or so the dosages can be reduced.
      Many different variations of estradiol exist as well as other types of estrogens although the ones most commonly used are either micronized estradiol, estradiol acetate, estradiol valerate, estradiol cypionate, estradiol enanthate, conjugated estrogens, esterified estrogens, and ethinyl estradiol.
      Injectable, implanted, nasal, oral, sub lingual, gel, spray, and transdermal patch formulations are available.
      As dosage increases, risks increase as well. Therefore, those with relative contraindications should start at lower doses and increase dosage more gradually.

      [Progestogens

      Progestogens include progesterone and progestins (synthetic analogs of progesterone or 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone). There are oral, sublingual, suppository, gel, and injectable formulations available.
      Progestogens are involved in the full maturation of the breasts, particularly the mammary structures lobules, acini, and alveoli
      Progestogens also help fat distribution, increase female libidinal feelings, increase appetite, slight increase in skin oil, increases blood flow to the skin, increases the ability to sweat and lose extra heat, increase in body temperature enabling one to better tolerate the cold, healthier nails, produce a sense of calm and promote sleep, and increase energy. However, progestogens may increase skin oil and libido too much for some and there may be acne breakouts due to the increase in skin oil.
      Progesterone in particular is essential for bone health and seems to have a role in skin elasticity, and nerve tissue] Other effects that have been seen with progesterone in particular (not the synthetics) include reducing spasms and relaxing smooth muscle tone, gallbladder activity is reduced, bronchi are widened (helps respiration), an anti-inflammatory agent and reduces the immune response, normalizing blood clotting and vascular tone, zinc and copper levels, cell oxygen levels, and use of fat stores for energy. Progesterone also assists in thyroid function and bone building by osteoblasts.
      Progestins (synthetic progestogens) are associated with an increased risk in breast cancer, which is not seen with micronised (natural) progesterone.

      ] Anti-androgens

      Spironolactone is the most frequently used anti-androgen in the United States because it is relatively safe and inexpensive. Cyproterone acetate is more commonly used outside of the US.

  40. QUESTION:
    How long before HRT starts to work...?
    I have been using patches for just over a week and a half. For the last two days I have not had the overwhealming hot flushes! Does it really work this quick?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it does. Patches are great. Even if you forget to put a patch nothing happens for a few days.
      Enjoy.

  41. QUESTION:
    how much does it cost to get your hair stripped in uk hairdressers?
    ok so my natural colour is blonde, but i have died my hair alot of times and its xxl live real red at the moment, (has faded to a coppery colour with bright red roots). was just wondering how much would it cost to get my hair stripped and died blonde at the hairdressers approx. thanks! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Call Customer Service @ a salon nearest you and inquire.

      "have died my hair alot of times" that tells me your hair is damaged adding more chemicals of top of all that? I do not recommend it. But here's an example what hair stripping will do to your hair.
      It is worst than hair dyes. "I accidentally dyed my hair this awful black, stripped it, and now it is this crunchy crispy mess!"

      Hair strippers are chemical treatments which are intended to strip out artificial color pigment with less risk or damage to the hair. The chemicals used are called reducing agents.
      Certain 'metal' strippers containing sodium sulphoites are sold for reducing hair dyed with metallic dyes, as these dyes react violently with tint stripper containing hydrogen peroxide-the subsequent reaction may cause so much heat that the hair gets dissolved.
      Example: So i just put Colour B4 on my hair to try and remove my black dye so my hair it's natural colour which is dark blonde. so i've just dried my hair and there's still dark patches on it. and in some places it's gone ginger. i have garnier pre lightener. should i use it? there's no way my hair could look worse than it is now lol.

      You can do one of two things, to remove most of that dye. Links have been moved, might have to type them out.

      1. By using Tide detergent with shampoo
      Google "How to Remove Dye from Hair"

      or

      2. By shampooing you hair mix with a bit of Dawn.
      Google "How to Use Dawn Dishwashing Liquid for Lightening Hair."

      Before bottled shampoo & hair products were invented, mid 60's, all we've ever used was a bar of soap for body, hair & laundry. Just make sure you rinse well. Try that if that works better!

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  42. QUESTION:
    why can i not wear a magnet therapy elbow wrap whilst using estrogen patches?
    i have torn a ligament in my arm and was told that i need an elbow wrap so i got one with magnets and a gel pack to have either hot or cold but whilst reading the instructions noticed it said not to be used when using skin patches, but i am on HRT after having a full hysterectomy, why can i not do both ?

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps the manufacturers are concerned that the increased blood circulation due to the magnet will caused problems with the skin patch and it's delivery of it's specific drug dose.

      If this is the case then they are either seriously deluded or total frauds - therapy magnets do NOTHING for blood circulation. They are a placebo only.

  43. QUESTION:
    I had a hysterectomy, haven't taken HRT, just started on premarin .09 mg tonight. When will it start to work?
    I haven't slept in a week due to night sweats and hot flashes, as well as rapid heart beat. I just finally started the premarin tonight because I didn't want to take anything at all. However, since I am only 30 I just decided I couldn't deal with all that menopause brings. It's been worse the past week or two. Should it help me sleep better soon?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it should start working quickly. I suggest you check out: http://surmeno.blogspot.com/2006/07/table-of-contents-by-topic.html

      It has a lot of good information for women going through surgical menopause and the issues you are facing. May I suggest that you try at some point the estrogen patch instead of Premarin?

  44. QUESTION:
    what can i use to remove the sticky stuff that stays on your skin after you take of a plaster?
    I have used something before but can't remember the name of what it is! No i don't mean soap and water either! :-)

    • ANSWER:
      There are some adhesive wipes called Zoff that are especially for this - they are quite pricey but are available from pharmacies.

      My mum uses them for her HRT patches and they are brill

  45. QUESTION:
    Transgender: How much did your hormone replacement cost in the end?
    yes, so how much did just your hormone therapy cost in total at the end? Preferably male to female lol

    • ANSWER:
      In the end? Hormone replacement therapy is a lifetime commitment, there is no end.

      How much does HRT cost?

      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minimize the risks of HRT.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.
      In general they put younger people on pills.

      Another factor is whether you are pre-op or post-op. I finished transition several years ago, so my costs are lower because I don't need an anti-androgen and need less estrogen than before. As a result my costs (I use injectables) are only about 5/year.
      .

  46. QUESTION:
    HRT patches - how long will it take?
    I've just gone back to using HRT patches after being off them for 5 years. All the symptoms of the menopause came back very quickly after stopping the patches and I have been feeling worse and worse, particularly the hot flushes and night sweats which make me feel really ill and sometimes can last over an hour. I went back to the doctor and asked her to put me back onto HRT which she has done. I can't remember how long it took for me to feel the benefit I just wondered if anyone knows. I am feeling really bad at the moment getting sweats every hour or so, does anyone know when it will start to improve.

    • ANSWER:
      I stopped HRT after the last scare, after 3 months of hell I went back on the tablets, it took nearly a week before I had enough in my system to stop the symptoms.
      Good Luck. (when will we ever be able to get off this stuff), I've been taking it for 20 years.

  47. QUESTION:
    MTF Transgender - I want to start on hormones, how do I start?
    I know a few steps, but I'm unclear of.

    (It's possible to start on hormones without a therapist's letter, I choose this route)

    1. Where do I meet a physician? How do I contact them?
    2. How much usually do prescribed hormones cost?
    3. How much does it cost to have me monitored? And how often do they monitor me?
    Oh yeah, and I believe I don't have health insurance, and I'm 19 and a half.

    • ANSWER:
      If you're in the USA the first step is always seeing a gender therapist. A list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Don't think you can skip this step because and endocrinologist will want a letter of referral from a gender therapist before they'll take you on as a patient.

      A gender therapist will evaluate you and diagnose you as being transsexual. Then at some point, hopefully rather quickly, they will refer you to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

      2. Costs involve with HRT depend on a number of variables:

      Method of administration (pills, patches, shots, gel, implant)
      Dosage
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Insurance or not
      Retail big box pharmacy or compounding pharmacy (injectables)

      Shop around to find the best deal. My injectable estrogen and supplies (syringes, alcohol pads, band-aids) cost about 5/year. I pay for my injectable out of pocket because it was actually MORE expensive using insurance!

      3. Again, costs vary a lot. Just seeing my endo is approximately 5. If they do lab work that adds a couple hundred dollars to the cost of the visit. Whether insurance pays or not depends on how the doctors office codes the visit. If they code it as GID/transsexualism many will refuse to pay, whereas if it's coded as a hormone imbalance or some such they will. YMMV (your mileage may vary).
      .

  48. QUESTION:
    How expensive are female hormones?
    Gan somebody give me an average as to how much it costs a transwoman to pay for female hormones for, lets say, a month?

    • ANSWER:
      Why do you have to know?

      First, she would have to be evaluated and diagnosed as transsexual by a gender therapist. A list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, at some point she would be referred to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

      Next, the endo will evaluate her health, do some lab tests, discuss options with her and when they're satisfied prescribe HRT.

      So lots of costs even before she can start HRT.

      How much it costs varies widely depending on:

      Route of administration (pills patches, injectable etc)

      Dosage

      How many meds involved (usually two)

      Insurance involved?

      And the biggest factor: Where the meds are purchased from:
      Big box pharmacy
      Compounding pharmacy
      Online pharmacy
      Domestic or foreign pharmacy

      Lots of variables.
      .

  49. QUESTION:
    Can using HRT patches cause mood/personality changes in women?
    Hi - Can you tell me if using HRT patches can cause mood/personality changes in women. My wife has been using them for over a year but over the last 6 months or so has had them changed and increased and is currently on 75mg of Estraderm. She has completely changed and is alomost unrecognisable as the person I have been with for 33 years. This is not just my opinion but also of our 3 children, her mother and some friends. She has become obsessed with looking young, looking slim, playing loud rock music (from 30 years ago), spending hours on facebook, talking to old friends she hasn't seen for 40 years. She is highly critical of people who aren't "perfect". She seems to have a very high opinion of herself and a low opinion of everyone else. She has now left me.

    • ANSWER:
      That's a midlife crisis not HRT!

  50. QUESTION:
    Can a man live and survive with a low testosterone?
    I had some recent problems, and as a result I have a very low testosterone, my body also doesnt respond well to medicine so I am not sure if I can take testosterone therapy, is it possible to live and somehow be happy with a low testosterone, I have never been so depressed in my life, it is like my body is telling me to die or something
    so are you saying I basically should kill myself or accept my fate

    • ANSWER:
      Yes a man can live and survive with a low and even without testosterone at all, but he would be like in a state of vegetable.

      Moreover, it is impossible to live 'happily' without it. The sex hormones, are more than hormones that just govern our sex drive. Actually we need them to feel normal, vigour and drive to do all other things in life, in short to live a normal life. Men who go sex change, are deprived from all testosterone but they are given oestrogen, that acts in the same way. If you remove the 'sex bit' from oestrogen, it does all the other things testosterone does, like stamina and drive to live etc.

      The reason why you are so depressed is because you are so low on testosterone. The fact that you do not respond well to medicine, is quite unlikely to hinder your testosterone therapy. Different forms of HRT (hormonal replacement therapy) are available. It could be through injection or patch. I would suggest that you see a urologist as soon as possible as you seem suicidal to me.

      There's no need to give up like that as there's remedy to your problem. Check on this link, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Orchiectomy/

      Here, you'd meet men who have lost either one or both of their testicles and are leading a normal life with HRT. You are still better off as you still have your balls unlike them.


hrt patches

What Is Hormone Therapy For Women

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can hormone therapy be an alternative to breast augmentation?
    Can hormone therapy be an alternative to breast augmentation? I've heard that transgender men use the therapy to change their bodys-including breast growth.Would that work for women too?

    • ANSWER:
      no or they would be doing it

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get on Hormone Replacement Therapy?
    I'm a 19 year old transgender woman who wants to get started on her hormones. As a college student, I'm not financially well off nor do I want to tell my parents about this until a later time. So I was wondering how I can start hormone therapy without having to pay for doctor visits.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey! Welcome to my world of a decade ago! ;) I started at 19, too, in college, and likewise too afraid to tell my parents yet.

      My solution at the time? DIY. First, you need information. And these people know bloody everything about doing DIY (including all the latest research; I've had three doctors since I did DIY, and not a one of them knew half what the average person on that list did about how to treat transsexuals).

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TsDoItYourselfHormones

      Want a general guide to get started?

      http://www.tsroadmap.com/early/transsexual-hormones.html

      My recommendations? Get on 200mg/d spironolactone (one pill in the morning, one in the evening), a non-oral estrogen (I currently use climara -- you'd use two patches), and a progestin (such as progesterone) to help with breast duct development. Avoid oral estrogens, as they increase the risk of pulmonary embolism and other clotting disorders (although it's mainly a problem for older TSs). With spiro, the main side effect to be aware of is that you retain potassium and lose sodium, so avoid salt substitutes and potassium supplements (you don't want to OD on potassium... although even on spiro, if you're young and have no kidney disease, that's hard to do)

      The spiro will cost you about 70 cents a day. The cost of the estrogen and progestin depends on what form you choose. If you have to cut one thing out, cut out the progestin. If you have to cut out two things, IMHO, also cut the estrogen. The spiro is the most important thing to stay on, as it blocks all further testosterone damage, buying you time until you can afford the estrogen.

      Email me if you have any Qs; I'd be glad to help you with whatever I can. :) I've been there. You're about to start an amazing journey, so fasten your seatbelt.

  3. QUESTION:
    How do women really view someone like me?
    I am a transgender woman. I am living full-time as a woman and have begun hormone therapy. I am fairly passable except for my voice, which I am working on. I am just curious as to how women feel about someone like me? Please feel free to say whatever.

    • ANSWER:
      You sound hot, Ron, err . . . Veronica!

  4. QUESTION:
    Why would a woman marry another woman who wants to be a man?
    In the whole pregnant man story, there is a lesbian couple. One of them is turning into a man with hormone therapy, the other is not. My question is why would she want a woman who looks like a man, why woudnt she just marry a man?

    • ANSWER:
      THAT man woman guy or whatever is the biggest fruitloop known to man, and the media is just as stupid for saying that " a man is pregnant" everyone knows that a man cant get preg/

  5. QUESTION:
    What are done to the hips when a man becomes a woman?
    When a man becomes a woman can anything be done to his hips to make them a little more curvy, like a woman's? Do they just do hormone therapy, or are there more drastic options like breaking/resetting of the hips?

    • ANSWER:
      hormones do add a bit more fat to the hips,but bone structure remains unchanged

  6. QUESTION:
    What happens if someone takes vitamins for a woman and is a man?
    ( i had no clue what to put this in what category)
    will it kill them or cause them damage.. Also what does hormone pills really do like when you are going through hormone therapy for transgendered and transsexuals, does it make it to where u can use ur parts or what... just curious...

    • ANSWER:
      A man taking vitamins for a woman wouldn't even notice the difference.
      Vitamins are vitamins. The only difference between vitamin formulations for women, and those for men, are the combination of vitamins, and (sometimes) the dosage.

      Hormone therapy does for transsexual people the same thing that hormones do for non-trans people at puberty; it causes the development of secondary sexual characteristics appropriate to that person's gender. In other words, it causes facial and body hair to grow or diminish depending on gender, causes some changes to the body shape, and causes the genitalia to stop functioning. It also creates a profound sense of well-being in the transsexual person (who will have been 'at war' with his or her hormones up until beginning therapy).

  7. QUESTION:
    Anyone fighting breast cancer been thru treatment and prepparing for hormone therapy?
    I have read articles on hormone threrapy and find myself being very nieve about this treatment. My doctors have left me with so many open questions I am not sure what to do. So my real question is " what do you feel about hormone therapy or is there a natural remedy to equal the hormone drug therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I'm sorry that you are going through this as I know personally how difficult it can be. I am approaching my 4th year of Tamoxifen therapy and am very grateful to have this option for treatment (I am 4 years in remission so it appears that the Tamoxifen is working for me!) The side effects are pretty tolerable and it's in a daily pill form which is easy to manage. Depending on your age, you may be considering Arimidex which I have also heard positive things about. I know how hard it is to make these kind of decisions and my heart goes out to you. I personally make my choices based on what I can live with long term. For example, will hormone therapy give you peace of mind long term or will the potential side effects be a bigger issue for you? Your Dr. likely explained to you the positive results of hormone therapy in reducing a recurrence. That is a very important factor to consider when making your decision. There are many women who do not have hormone sensitive cancer and so the opportunity to use this therapy should not be taken lightly. I know a lot of women who have had breast cancer in all different stages and my best advice to you is to do everything you can to protect your health and your life. It is a precious gift. Good luck and god bless!!

  8. QUESTION:
    How do you go about getting gender reasignment surgery?
    I'm a man who wants to go through gender reasignment surgery to become a woman. How do you go about this? Is there any kind of hormone therapy you need to start on?

    • ANSWER:
      Men don't "become" women. Transsexual women get medical treatment for their birth condition (transsexualism).

      How to obtain treatment depends on which country to live in. In the USA you need to see a GENDER therapist. The therapist will evaluate you and MAY diagnose you as being transsexual.

      Beyond that there is a million and one details to the process we call TRANSITION. Sex reassignment surgery (SRS) is but the last physical step in this long, expensive, medically monitored process. If you are not transsexual don't even bother because you will be rooted out. That's why the internationally recognized Standards of Care (SOC) exist:

      http://www.wpath.org/documents2/socv6.pdf

      You can also find lots of information in regards to gender identity, transsexualism and transition here:

      http://www.LynnConway.com

      Now if you're still interested after reading all that... see a gender therapist.
      .

  9. QUESTION:
    On menopause, Why you think the concept of hormone replacement therapy is greatly debated?
    Do you believe that women with menopause could actually benefit from hormone replacement therapy? Why or why not?

    • ANSWER:
      Alot of women do seem to benefit from it, however I think that because there are some women who have adverse reactions to hormones or there are studies that link hormones to cancer or other issues many women are skeptical to try them.
      I think it's very similar to women who use birth control in order to aid with issues during their cycle. It works for some and causes more problems for other women. I personally will not use oral contraceptives for this reason, but I do not fault others for using them. I think it really boils down to what is most effective for your body.

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women?
    8)Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to be one way to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, however recent clinical trials have indicated there are dangerous increased risks of heart disease, stroke and various cancers associated with HRT. What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women and when do women need to start being concerned about this?

    • ANSWER:
      I think the best method to help prevent osteoporosis is exercise. Exercise strengthens the bones in men and women.

      Also there are good medications on the market to help prevent this condition:

      If the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is the only issue under consideration, then bisphosphonates such as alendronate, ibandronate, or risedronate are more effective than menopausal hormone therapy in preventing osteoporotic fractures, and less likely to be associated with substantial adverse effects. So far, bisphosphonates are the most effective category or prescription medications for treating postmenopausal osteoporosis.

      hope this helps..

  11. QUESTION:
    What happens when a woman takes the transvestite therapy?
    What happens when a woman starts hormone replacement therapy like men trying to be women do,wouldn't she just become more womanly and look more feminine?
    and btw i mean transgendered sorry!!
    and yes i know menopausal women take it thank you,but u still did not answer my question.

    • ANSWER:
      You will turn into a freak. Avoid it.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are alternatives to horomone therapy after hystorectomy?
    I just underwent a complete hystorecomy. Due to illness, everything was taken, including my ovaries. I am looking for alternatives to hormone therapy because of the risks involved with this therapy, such as bloodclots and stroke. What are the alternatives available to me, besides hormone replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      You should see a Homeopathic Doctor......but I know FOR A FACT that the herbal supplement combo of Soy and Black Cohash works. I work at an OBGYN office and the doc prescribes that all the time. Its why you never see many Asian women with hairy faces or excessive wrinkles after menopause - soy is a heavy part of their diet.
      Plus the progestin in Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is know to cause blood clots in some women.

  13. QUESTION:
    How do women really feel about this?
    I am a male to female transsexual. I have always felt like a girl inside since I was little. I am now seeing a gender therapist and have begun living full-time as a woman. I am also going to begin hormone therapy shortly. I pass decently well, some people can tell if they get up close. My voice is coming along too, but it still needs help. Anyway, how do women feel about someone like me? Honest answers, please. I am just curious. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I would see you as a woman and would not be offended by your situation in any way. I have never understood why some people cannot accept that some people are different, and that you should not judge them as you have not walked in their shoes. I hope everything goes well for you, Good Luck! =P

  14. QUESTION:
    Are women threatened by male breast feeding?
    I seem to get a lot of flak about my hormone therapy to enable me to share in breast feeding chores.

    Most of the sarcasm comes from women. Why is this?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey now you and your girl can have "water" fights!

      They do Sly...but it's really unsual. there are two types, those produced by drugs either by accident or on purpose and some cases of the mother passing away violently some how creates the hormones in the father of a young child.

  15. QUESTION:
    Will Transexual MTF Hormones alter your body weight significantly?
    For example, if a woman and a man are the same height (6 feet) and the man is 180 pounds and the woman is 150. If a man who is 6 feet wants to be a woman and he starts taking hormones, will he be somewhere around 150 pounds?

    Basically what I'm asking is if hormone therapy will change the bodies weight significantly.

    • ANSWER:
      As Beyond stated, you'll never know specifically what hormones will do until you're on them. In my experience, they don't make you "lose" weight, but you will lose muscle, and gain fat. The net result may be that you'll end up the same, slightly lighter (fat is lighter than muscle) or slightly heavier.

      What WILL affect your weight during cross-hormone therapy is diet and exercise.

      Personally, I was blessed with a naturally high metabolism. Before Transition, I could eat pretty much anything I wanted in any quantity, and I'd never gain weight. At 6'1", the most I ever weighed in my life was about 180 lbs, but it was ALL muscle. I was in extremely good physical condition (think swimmers body.) About 7 years before I Transitioned, I became a vegetarian, but I still consumed dairy. I lost about 5 lbs, but it was hardly noticeable. About a year and a half before I started hormones, I stopped eating. I mean, I really stopped. I was probably eating less than 1000 calories a day. Within a year, I had lost almost 35 lbs of muscle. I looked pretty gaunt & unhealthy at 140 lbs, but I did this intentionally, because I wanted whatever weight the hormones put back on to be mostly fat. Everyone told me I'd gain weight easier once I was on estrogen. Not me. I hovered between 140 and 145 for about 6 months, and after 10 months on HRT, I'm staying around 150 lbs, but I can't seem to get much higher. I look thin, but not unhealthy because hormones sort of add fat to you face. I'd like to be 155-160. I've been eating a LOT (though not as much as before Transition because my stomach has shrunk a lot) and it makes no difference.

      So as you can see, there's really no way to predict what hormones are going to do. I read posts by people who claim they can't keep from gaining weight now that they're on HRT. They have to watch every single thing they eat.

      (I should point out that the entire time I was dieting up through today I've been under a doctors care, and I've always been physiologically healthy.)

  16. QUESTION:
    Can anyone recommend a good product for the face of dry post menopausal women?
    I am 47. My skin is really taking a beating from this menopause.
    I am not taking hormone therapy.
    My face is dry and getting like leathery. I am fair skin.
    Any suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      I buy the Vit.C/E caps. I squeeze it out and apply it my face. Works better than all the expensive stuff I purchaced so far. And I take Fish oil twice a week and Flaxseed caps. My skin doesn't seem to have created anymore cracks and crevices over the last year. I'm 49. And for awhile there, I thought my only hope was a tube of Bondo or Spackle! ha!

  17. QUESTION:
    What enviromental hazards could be present in my house that would cause my testosterone to be fouled up?
    In the last year myself (19) and my mother (55) have gone to seperate doctors and both been prescribed hormone therapy. Is this a coincidence or is there something chemical, enviromentally wrong with our house that could cause this? I tested the house for radon it was low but not exceptionally low.
    Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      If your mother also needs hormone therapy, could be hereditary.

      If this is something new for your mom: Women around her age begin to stop their menstrual cycles....this means the ovaries begin to shut down. This can cause very uncomfortable symptoms for her. This could be the reason she is on treatment. It is very common in women.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the implications of this for trans women?
    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/01/01/womb-transplant-woman-cou_n_2391934.html

    Plumbed in right and with appropriate hormone therapy to boot the thing up, it's crazy enough that it might just about work. But you know there are going to be objections form the right-wing / religious types -- especially as the ironing-out-wrinkles stage is going to end up with a few miscarriages. Also, it may create a situation where those who have "fully functional" lower-body surgery look down on those who have "decorative only" surgery, leading to even greater oppression for some trans women.

    On the one hand, there are plenty of trans women who want to have babies, and "women born without a womb" certainly includes trans women. On the other hand, we already have a problem with overpopulation, and the debate over whether reproduction is a right or a privilege rages on.

    Thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      I just don't see this becoming a practical reality.

      First, where do you get the organs for transplant?

      Second, the huge cost involved.

      Third, the anti-rejection medicines are toxic to the fetus.

      The future is advanced stem cell research. Using own our stem cells we will be able to grow our own gender appropriate reproductive organs. However, I don't see this becoming practical for about 20 years. Translation: Not going to happen for anyone over the age of 15.

      It is what it is.
      .

  19. QUESTION:
    What can you do for thinning hair in women?
    I am a post menopausal woman who does not take hormone replacement therapy, and have had a total hysterectomy. My hair seems to be getting thin. Is there anything that can be done to make my hair thicker?

    • ANSWER:
      There is Rogaine for women now. It works good, you can get it at Wal-Mart

  20. QUESTION:
    Why is trans-gender surgery free, but people suffering from curable diseases have to pay?
    If a guy wants to become a woman he gets a free surgery, which requires hormone therapy and intense surgical procedures, but a poor person that all he needs is some medicine to stay alive and to live without pain has to either pay or just suffer? I don't want to live on this planet anymore.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure where you got your information, but it has to do with the medical corporations making fortunes off of sick people who keep sucking them dry like mosquitoes. Chances are due to that surgery not being nothing as great as all the sick people in the world who need healthcare to live and sustain their existence. That's where the money is

  21. QUESTION:
    Does mtf hormone therapy make you infertile ?
    I want to go on male-to-female hormone replacement therapy (just to soften my face and have more of a feminine shape) - however I didnt go through with it as I heard it makes you infertile - I've come across some transgender woman who, however stop hormones for a short period and then conceive a child normally (without sperm banking) is this true ?

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Shane with one further caution: Some people don't get any facial change from hormones at all.

      So you want to "soften your face" at the risk of:

      Possibly permanent sterility

      Loss of normal male sexual function

      Shrinkage of your penis and testicles

      Difficulty getting an erection or maybe even loss of the ability to do so.

      Loss of upper body strength

      Increased risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (which can kill you)

      You must be very desperate to think this is wise.

  22. QUESTION:
    What is a good name for this business?
    The business provides hormone replacement therapy for women, but it is all natural, not synthetic. Any suggestions out there? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      1. Since it's natural I'd say go with "Organic". We assimilate organic with natural in today's world.
      2. Since it's therapy I'd leave it at "therapy" so that people know what you actually do.
      3. For women, I think it would be wise to use something like "her" or "for her".
      4. How to explain that it's "hormone replacement" therapy is a good question... But make sure it's in real people language instead of doctor.

      A few suggestions:
      Her Organic Hormone Therapy;
      Organic Menopause Therapy; (If I understand correctly :))
      etc...

  23. QUESTION:
    Poll: How do you feel about male breast feeding?
    My hormone therapy allows me to help my partner with breast feeding duty.

    Some women seem threatened by this. How do you feel?
    What if I shave around the nipple area? Would that help?

    • ANSWER:
      to be honest, I would be very disturbed by that image

      EDIT: LOL, no that would make it worse. hahahaha

  24. QUESTION:
    I want a girl to feminize me all the way including hormones will anyone help please?
    Because I want to grow breasts and wear a bra to fill it out. And I want to wear women's cloths after a year of hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      i would love tp help you!

      senior_cheer2009@yahoo.com

      just email me :) maybe we can figure something out :)

      as long as your serious ill help you out with all that i can :)

  25. QUESTION:
    I'm thinking about donating eggs. What are the risks and when would be a good time to do it?
    I think egg donation seems like a really great thing to do for a couple. I'm pregnant right now, due in about a month. I read that you have to undergo hormone therapy and I was wondering if there's anything painful in the process of donating eggs (either during the hormone therapy or the actual extraction of the eggs). I figure it isn't something I should do anytime immediately after I have my baby, but when would be a good time? Also, on average, how much does an infertility clinic pay for this? Do they take more than one egg out? Does it effect your chances of getting pregnant in the future? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      After having a baby it's going to take your body a while to get back to normal as far as hormones go and since donating eggs requires hormone treatments, I would give it a while. I would wait at least a year.

      Donating eggs requires lots of time on the donors part between the physical and psychological testing, the hormone treatments and doctor visits, and the egg aspiration procedure. Having your eggs extracted may involve moderate cramping and nausea. They will have medications handy to help with the symptoms. Also, they will send you home with antibiotics as a precaution. In about two weeks, you will go back for a follow up to make sure all is well.

      They take out several eggs at once, and no, it shouldn't effect future pregnancies. Women are born with hundreds of thousands of eggs, so donating a few dozen (assuming you donate more than once) will not impede fertility.

      Ideally, egg donation places are looking for young women. Preferably 19-23 years of age. These women, especially those with ethnicities in high demand, are paid a premium for their eggs (actually, it's illegal to pay for body parts, so they label it as paying for their "time") which can be several thousand dollars and up. Not so premium age (women in mid to late 20s and not of an ethnic demand) are paid a standard of about 00 a cycle. And if you manage to get pregnant during a session, you get nothing. I don't think they consider donors outside of their 20s.

      You should research this further to decide if it something that you want to do. Make sure you work with a reputable company, as I'm sure there's fraud in this business too.

      Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    What are some good hormone replacement therapies/supplements for women?
    I know every woman's pretty much different in their needs but I'm looking for suggestions/recommendations to try. I'm also on a tight budget so I can't try too many at one time.

    I'm particularly looking for supplements for post menopausal women.

    • ANSWER:
      What I found helpful was a cobination of black cohosh, dong quai, and soy. I've heard from other women that it did reduce the hot flashes. I didn't have hot flashes but I suffered headaches to the point of fainting---and it did help. However, if you are on heart medication then you need to talk to your doctor.

      I cannot remember the exact name of the product I took--but you can find them everywhere--including Walmart. Just ask the pharmarcist there and they will find it for you. It's also not very expensive--I paid around 10 dollars for 120 tablets....

  27. QUESTION:
    What kinds of vitamin supplements should I be taking after my total abdominal hysterectomy?
    i had a total abdominal hyst. on Sep. 30th 2008. I know my body has to be missing valuable vitamins now. i am taking estradiol bio-identicals for the hormone therapy and herbs for hot flashes but what about iron? or other valuable needed vitamins...can anyone point me in the correct direction?

    • ANSWER:
      Post menopausal women actually require less iron than they did before, so you should be fine. If you like to take a multivitimin/mineral supplement for now, you certainly can and it won't hurt a thing. You shouldn't have lost that much blood in the surgery, and should have recouperated just fine- iron wise, anyway, by now. A regular supermarket brand, generic label, should do well for you. Get a chewable if you can, and if you like you can even take the children's chewables as they provide the majority of what you will need. Since you are taking an estradiol bioidentical, you shouldn't really be having much trouble with the hot flashes. The only other thing you will need to be concerned with taking as a supplement would be calcium, because you will now be depleting those calcium stores at a slightly higher rate than before. You probably should discuss the options for calcium with your doctor. There are those tablets and chews at the grocery store, but those are not always as easily absorbed by the body. There are also prescription medications that can help you avoid osteoporesis. But first you should discuss it with your doctor, and then decide which is best for you.

  28. QUESTION:
    What is your opinion on Transgendered people?
    I also think that transgendered people should have a right to be the gender they want to be. Some people have Gender Identity Disorder and they feel confused about their gender. People should have a right to express how they feel on the outside and inside. Some people do this in different ways by cross-dressing, transitioning, hormone therapy and Sex reassignment surgery. My opinion is that when people begin their gender transition, their gender is the one they are transitioning into and how they are on the outside matches their feelings on the inside. Acceptance is the key to human society.

    • ANSWER:
      One of my best friends came out to me a around a year ago and moved away (Before this happened I was very ignorant and homophobic). He said he felt like he was born a girl and had already started his gender transition, moved away about a month after that. Now a year later (I'm 19 now) a week ago I had an incident where I made out with a very attractive pre-OP transsexual knowing what she was and it was the best thing I've ever done and it did way more for me then being with a girl could, I'm not attracted to guys tho (And I'm still a virgin, I wouldn't have sex with anyone unless I was in a relationship, which I don't think is possible for me to do with a straight women)... so in my opinion I think people should be themselves and try to be as happy as possible and considerate of others feelings. I think that I'm just not emotionally compatible with straight women so I hope one day people just lose the labels. I don't consider myself gay and I still personally have a lot to figure out but I agree... Acceptance is key.

  29. QUESTION:
    Turner Syndrome, What happens when they reach the age of 25?
    I have a 17 year old sister that have turner syndrome. She went through hormone therapy for about 4 years. When she reached her teenage years , she started having problems with her kidneys and she is now prone to diabetes. What happens to girls to have TS when they reach the age of 25? Is it true that they will also experience pre-mature aging?

    • ANSWER:
      No, I'm not aware of any correlation between premature aging as such and Turner's. There are medical issues she needs to be aware of, though, like cardiac issues and the propensity to diabetes you mentioned. When you say she "went through hormone therapy," do you mean estrogen or growth hormone? If she's 17, she's probably old enough that she's stopped growth hormone, but she still needs to be on estrogen/progesterone replacement therapy. Adequate HRT throughout adulthood is *very important* in women with TS, and the current thinking is that women with TS should remain on HRT until 50 or so, the age at which menopause would naturally be beginning. It will do a lot to combat osteoporosis and other issues. I don't know why you picked 25, but there's nothing in particular that "happens" to women with TS at that age or any age, they just need to be aware throughout their adulthood of the medical issues that can arise with TS and be sure they are getting good medical care from a doctor who is knowledgeable about the condition. The Turner's Syndrome Society of the United States is a great resource for keeping up with the latest medical research on TS - http://www.turnersyndrome.org.

  30. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to still have children with a partial hysterectomy?
    I had a partial Hysterectomy 18 years ago. They left one ovary. Is it possible that that ovary is still producing eggs or is it dormant? I am not on any kind of hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends upon what was done. A hysterectomy is the removal of your uterus, which must be in place to carry a child. A partial hysterectomy usually involves removing the uterus but leaving the cervix. An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both ovaries. If you had a partial oophorectomy and your uterus, fallopian tubes and one ovary are still intact it is possible-- not all ovaries go dormant after this kind of procedure. If you had a partial hysterectomy it would be unlikely and inadvisable, although still possible if enough of the uterus was left intact.

      Hormone therapy is usually just prescribed for women experiencing symptoms of menopause. Not all women have the 'normal' night sweats, hot flashes and other associated symptoms of menopause (surgical or otherwise) and they would not be placed on hormone therapy if it was not needed.

      I would talk to your Dr. he or she would be able to give you a realistic picture. You can always seek a second opinion as well. Best of luck.

  31. QUESTION:
    How do men like to be treated?
    I'm a male to female transsexual and I've just begun hormone therapy in hopes of living full time as a woman soon. Now that I'll be living full time as a woman how do I react to men differently?

    1. How do men like to be flirted with?
    2. How do men prefer to talk to women casually or in business? is it different from the way they talk with men?

    • ANSWER:
      If you've just started hormone therapy, you might want to wait a while for the hormones to have some effect on you before you start living full time.

      How you react to men is entirely up to you. There is no "rulebook" on how to behave. Have you always been attracted to men, because hormones aren't going to magically change your sexual preference. Of course men and women communicate differently, and they flirt differently. Even if someone told you how to do this, you wouldn't be able to just follow the instructions, because it won't seem natural. The way you learn how to socialize as a female is TO socialize as a female. You just go out and live your life as a woman, and you learn as you go, the way all girls do as they grow up. It's a little more awkward for you, but you'll figure it out. Make friends with genetic females and spend time with them. Things will rub off on you, and you can observe first-hand how they behave. It just takes time, and more than a few embarrassing moments, but you'll survive.

  32. QUESTION:
    Is there a better alternative to uterine ablation?
    My doctor is starting to talk about uterine ablation for me because of my prolonged period, and hormone therapy has not helped. I just did some research and learned that it's contraindicated for a woman like myself who still wants to have children. Is there an alternative that will allow me to have children in the future?

    • ANSWER:
      i would ask him if there's something else you can do. i think there must be. sometimes doctor refuse to give you other options, like my old dermatologist who wouldn't give me the medication i needed to cure my acne. if they won't answer seek another opinion, and if another answer can't be found, you may have to reconsider that there isn't another option, but there are other ways to put children in your life.

  33. QUESTION:
    How does one deal with the night sweats due to menopause?
    I refuse to go on hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Alice, until now they found no real alternative to HRT.
      I read that Yoga decreases the frequency of hot flashes for many women and also that ispflavone (soy) is helping. But
      to entirely get rid of hot flashes I am afraid its just the HRT (I am suing it for many years, couldn't stand the hot flashes night and day).

  34. QUESTION:
    Why do men need need testosterone shots if they lose their testicles?
    Explain something to me.

    When a man loses his testicles, he is given hormone replacement therapy so that he can become aroused.

    But women have no testicles (obviously) and very little testosterone and we still have plenty of sexual urges.

    So is it really necessary for men to receive the hormones? Or can a man still become aroused without them?

    • ANSWER:
      Women have testosterone in their system as well, and it helps with their arousal. The various hormones work differently in male and female systems. A man can become aroused and function sexually even without testosterone. Notice all the hard-ons little boys can get, and all the mischief they sometimes get up to? Testosterone has other functions in the male body besides strengthening sexual arousal. Men get testosterone therapy to allow their body to function correctly.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to differentiate between a shemale and a true women?
    One of my friends working in Thailand 6 years ago as a manager. While he was working there he meets a girl that is beautiful and meets his requirement. The girl is from Thailand. After 2 years in a relationship they decided to get married. So they took a blood test to test for any diseases such as (STD) sexual transmitted diseases, HIV, or Hepatitis. When the result were out it turn out to be that the women is actually a man that has gone a surgery to hormone replacement therapy and/or through breast augmentation , Sex reassignment surgery male-to-female, Hair removal, Facial Feminization Surgery and other surgical procedure . Have you or your friends ever encountered such crisis

    • ANSWER:
      Ewww god. "Crisis" is the right way to put it. What a bunch of gross shit - and even worse - the former woman didn't say anything about it.

  36. QUESTION:
    why is it acceptable for woman to have Doctor administered hormone therapy but not acceptable for men to?
    It seems like society is allowing discrimination towards men by not accepting that men too can benefit from being treated for hormone levels that drop off with age, steroids are used to treat these problems in both men and women but it seems society needs to be educated that Doctor prescribed medicine is 100% acceptable for BOTH genders!
    As soon as someone knows your prescribed testosterone (steroids) they automatically think your on drugs and a potential risk.

    • ANSWER:
      Both the previous posters are correct.

      You might also want to educate yourself about that hormone therapy for women that you refer to. Turns out it may not have been as great an idea as it was originally thought. Google 'Women's Health Initiative' and read a few things. The jury is still out on the overall answer, but it does seem clear at this point that the benefits, if any, of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women are not balanced by the risks in many or most cases.

  37. QUESTION:
    Would low estrogen cause this in a woman?
    You're a woman. You don't feel like doing anything but sit around, even sitting around you get tired of. You are on hormone therapy(you have normal testosterone and petuitary gland) because your body can't produce estrogen(very low dose of it). Can low estrogen be the cause of laziness?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it can, but not always.

      A low functioning thyroid can do it too. Have it checked.

  38. QUESTION:
    How safe is hormone replacement therapy?
    Just how safe is it for a woman over 53 to take Hormone Replacement Therapy, have heard two GP give different opinions on this

    • ANSWER:
      I am sure there are a lot of dangers like most drugs.

      a search should turn up these

      here is one article..the institute of health did a study and said the risk of taking it outweigh the benefits as is correlated with increased breast cancer, strokes, Alzheimer's etc..also can be made of horse urine which also increases the risk

      http://www.ehow.com/about_5467345_dangers-hormonereplacement-therapy.html

      why not try a natural product..

      My sister had a lot of problems with hot flashes and was NOT a believer in natural treatments at all being in the health field but in desperation she tried this cream below I recommend and she told me all of them went away after she began using ti and was very happy and surprised that it worked so well

      It looks like this and may be found at some health food stores or online

      http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDoTCil0RPJnkAfdGJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dnatural%2Bprogesterone%2Bcream%26ei%3DUTF-8%26fr%3Dytff1-tyc%26fr2%3Dtab-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D2&w=300&h=320&imgurl=www.raysahelian.com%2Fimages%2Fprogesterone.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.raysahelian.com%2Fprogesterone.html&size=21.1+KB&name=Natural+Progesterone+Cream+by+Source+Naturals&p=natural+progesterone+cream&oid=5ced1e16b6ba7a381811faabf2d007d7&fr2=tab-web&fr=ytff1-tyc&tt=Natural%2BProgesterone%2BCream%2Bby%2BSource%2BNaturals&b=0&ni=32&no=2&tab=organic&ts=&sigr=11c5i2fme&sigb=13s3hj9c1&sigi=11bee8lui&.crumb=SjKDKKhlzhI

      another super great product is Dr Schulze's female formulas and his products are I feel are the best on the market

      https://www.herbdoc.com/index.php/Our-Products?cid=15

      click on product info for each and find the one.s you feel best apply ..be sure to click on each of the tags at the top of the popup..how it works why you need it and so forth to be sure you read all the info on it (you would want either female formula or female shot not female plus which is more for pms than menopause)

      and more info on these are found here

      http://curezone.com/schulze/handbook/female.asp

      I never took anything and other than some hot flashes in peri- menopause that I did not realize what they were as AI was so young I have had no symptom,s at all and never took drugs or natural treatments and have been 12 years since menopause.So putting all these women on this for years and harming them is so not necessary not with these natural treatments.

      why take a risk..if you are the one who winds up with breast cancer which I have had and it is not fun or strokes yikes it will prove to be a costly mistake more than buying these products would be

  39. QUESTION:
    What is the normal mesurement of the edometrium for post menopausal women?
    I'm a student who needs help. A 70 y/o female patient came in complaning of LLQ pain. A TV ultrasound was performed to better evaluate the edometrium and the adnexa. The uterus is found to be the normal size of 6.5x3.5 cm. While, the endometrium was seen heterogeneous, abnormal in echogenicty and was thickened to 7mm. There are some hyper attenuated focus found centrally and some free fluid within the endometrium, and in the cul-de-sack. The andexa seemed to be grossly normal. She is not on hormone replacment therapy. This exam is a follow-up from previous, and since then, the focus found within the endometrium have enlarged.

    • ANSWER:
      I am apparently post-menopausal, have to be ultrasounded at least once a year for reasons I won't go into now, they tell me I should be concerned if the endometrium is thicker than 5 mm. Apparently there is no lower limit, have had as little as 1 mm and no one raised any red flags.

  40. QUESTION:
    How much does hormone thereapy cost?
    My girlfriend/boyfriend has lived full time as a woman for years and she's been talking about going on hormone therapy. basically my question is how much will this cost? She is currently a male model so once she starts hormones her income will basically stop. So how much money do we need to save in order to be able to afford the whole procedure. She plans on going back into modeling after she has transitioned fully. Basically any advice would be appreciated. And yes she is consulting with a doctor we just haven't heard any real numbers as of yet

    • ANSWER:
      allot of money ,I honestly do not know because i have not transitioned or gone on hrt .

  41. QUESTION:
    What will happen if a transsexual stops taking their hormones for an extended period of time?
    What will happen after 1 weak without hormone therapy?
    What about 3 months?
    1 year?
    I was told that the regression is fast. Is that true?

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Kathryn.

      It also depends on what kind of HRT you're on. For example I'm on injectable and go 2 weeks between shots with no problem :) But yeah if you're on pills being off for more than a couple days will probably start messing with your head, especially once the birth sex hormones kick in (you didn't say if you were a transsexual woman or a transsexual man).

      The more time you're off the more your body will regress.

  42. QUESTION:
    Will my marriage still be valid after I transition in the eyes of the church?
    I was born a man, I am Married to my wife and have a child. I am a woman on the inside though, and am going through hormone therapy. What I want to know is will my marriage still be valid in the eyes of the Baptist and Lutheran church after I finish my transition? The reason I ask is because my father is a baptist and I am a Lutheran and I wanted to know if his religion might effect our relationship when I come out to him.

    • ANSWER:
      This is actually an issue currently being talked about in the news. It depends on what state you live in, and what you're church's beliefs are on this issue. You could ask your priest (Father? Minister?) in a confessional what your religion's beliefs are.
      Best of luck to you.

  43. QUESTION:
    Why are my emotions so out of control?
    I am a male to female transsexual just starting hormone therapy. My emotions have really escalated since I started treatment and I now find that I cry at the silliest of things, or laugh hysterically at things that may not be that funny. I am loving the physical changes, but I did not expect to be on such a hormonal roller coaster ride. Do women experience this on a regular basis, or will things level off?

    • ANSWER:
      Well if you are just starting off it may take some time but you will probably level off some. Women are more emotional then men in general so don't expect it to dissapear all together! You can and probably will learn to control your emotions better with time.Until then enjoy the changes... Welcome to womanhood,hope you enjoy it!

  44. QUESTION:
    What do you guys think about taking hormone replacement therapy?
    I am asking this for my mother. Her doctor wants her to stay on hormone pills for the rest of her life, but she is worried about breast cancer, and only wants to take the lowest dose for a short amount of time (couple years). Should she stand up to her doctor? PS She is NOT in a high breast cancer risk group

    • ANSWER:
      If your mother feels uncomfortable with "traditional" hormone replacement therapy, she should ask her doctor about bio identical hormones. They are developed with products from plants. If her doctor is unfamiliar with them, she can call a compounding pharmacy and ask the pharmacist to recommend a doctor in your area. A compounding pharmacy will "tailor" your mother's hormones to suit her needs.

      A couple of words or warning about bio identical hormones. They may not be fully covered by your mother's health insurance and can be expensive. And, since they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, there is no way to know if they are actually "safer" than traditional hormone replacement therapy.

      Hormone replacement therapy is essential for women. As long as your mother has periodic examinations, and since she is not at high-risk for breast cancer, I would suggest she consider hormone replacement therapy.

  45. QUESTION:
    Could male to female hormone replacement therapy cause breasts to grow in natural women?
    They make breasts grow in males, couldn't they also encourage breast growth in young women with minimal breast tissue? I understand there would be health risks, I'm just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      In theory Yes because it contains the necessary hormones for breast production.

  46. QUESTION:
    What do you guys think of that *man* who had a child recently?
    I am aware *he* was born a *she* but underwent hormone therapy, but decided to keep female parts. I was wondering if the hormone therapy was still active during pregnancy and if so how it effected the baby? Apparently the baby was delivered the other day via natural birth.

    • ANSWER:
      "He" stopped hormone therapy when he decided he wanted the baby so he could start his period and get all his womanly functions back. I'm not against sexual reassignment or anything, but this is going to be so weird for that kid. Well, maybe not, I'm not sure if they're planning on telling the baby who the true mother is. The guy is married to a woman so the baby will grow up in a (reasonably) standard household thinking the dad is really the dad.

  47. QUESTION:
    How long does menopause last?
    I have been having hot flashes and night sweats for a little over 6 years. The only suggestion the gyno offered was taking Black Co-hash (no help there) and soy supplements (no help either). Any suggestions (besides hormone therapy)? How long does it last?

    • ANSWER:
      For most women, they can expect all the stages of menopause to last between four and five years. From the first early symptom or sign to the last, hot flashes can actually range from one year to eight years. This is not much relief for women who have been suffering for several years already.

  48. QUESTION:
    Do hormones have any effect on the skeleton?
    I read somewhere that the index finger tends to be shorter than the ring finger for guys, and vice versa for girls. Should a guy start hormone replacement therapy and start receiving estrogen, would the index finger grow slightly to be just as long (or longer) than the ring finger?

    If not, than what part of the body determines how the bones should be? If a bone is broken, it'll heal. If whatever causes bones to heal were to change, would the skeletal system try to "correct" itself by removing parts of the bones and growing other parts?

    • ANSWER:
      Bones stop extending in your teens or very early twenties. The Epiphyses unite with the bone and the join ossifies. The mechanism of control is still beinf sorted out in detail.
      Once the bones have finished growing they may become denser or less dense - a woman past the menopause tends to lose bone density - hence littlw old ladies being more fragile.

  49. QUESTION:
    Hormone Replacement Therapy in young woman?
    My best friend is at a loss right now and is looking for support from other women dealing with the same issues she is regarding needing hormone replacement therapy, but she is in her early 30's and is not in or nearing menopause. She is not having much luck with doctors and is starting to get very down. Does anyone have any suggestions of a chat room, message board or online community where she could find other women to connect with, share stories and tips.
    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      One place she may be able to find support is thru the Women's health messageboard at WebMD.com

      Also, check through Yahoo Groups because you can find a group for just about every subject so there may be something there as well to help her find resources.

      A 3rd site that may help you find information for her is at: http://forums.obgyn.net/womens-health

  50. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for an MTF transsexual to enlarge her penis?
    I'm planning on getting hormone replacement therapy and I want a nice big penis to go with my feminine appearance. If it is, how do I do it?
    I want to be a shemale porn actress.

    • ANSWER:
      Not even a funny troll.
      A real MTF transsexual woman does not want, need, desire, or use as pre-op a penis. That is for a transgender shemale type.


what is hormone therapy for women

Postmenopausal Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is combined Tamoxifen plus hormonal therapy better for breast cancer in pre or postmenopausal women and why?
    I'm getting a massive mental block and can't remember or figure out which is the answer:

    Is combined Tamoxifen plus hormonal therapy better for treating breast cancer in premopausal women or better for treating postmenopausal women? Why?

    • ANSWER:
      You might have a mental block, but dozens of your questions have been answered by contributors with, to my knowledge, not the courtesy of a thankyou from you let alone a best answer.

      They are not used together.

      Types of hormone therapy
      There are several types of hormone drugs used for primary breast cancer including
      * Aromatase inhibitors * Tamoxifen
      * Pituitary downregulators

      Aromatase inhibitors
      Although women who have had their menopause do not produce oestrogen from their ovaries, a small amount is produced by the adrenal glands (small glands above the kidneys). Aromatase inhibitors block this oestrogen from being made. So these drugs are used for women who've had their menopause. You take them as tablets once a day. There is information below about
      * Aromatase inhibitors for early breastcancer * Aromatase inhibitors to prevent breast cancer

      Aromatase inhibitors for early breast cancer

      The aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, exemestane and letrozole can be used to treat women with early breast cancer, who have had their menopause. They are given after surgery and other treatment and aim to reduce the chance of the cancer coming back.
      Tamoxifen
      The type of hormone treatment which can be used for premenopausal women is to stop the ovaries from working with particular drugs or to remove the ovaries, so that they do not produce oestrogen. This is called 'ovarian ablation'. If you have not yet had your menopause, and you have ER positive breast cancer, you will usually be offered tamoxifen hormone therapy, and possibly chemotherapy. The chemotherapy will often stop your ovaries working, but not always.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the most effective treatment for thinning hair in women?
    I am 48 years old, and have very thin hair on the top of scalp. I have tried a popular hair application Rogaine, and it seemed to have helped but only very very slightly. I would like to try something more effective.

    • ANSWER:
      Women rarely lose their hair due to genetic predisposition. However hair loss in women is reaching new high levels. Thinning hair loss in women may be caused by many problems:
      - Hormonal imbalance
      - Hair loss related to pregnancy postmenopausal trauma
      - Effects of medications including birth control pills
      - Nervous conditions including tension and stress
      - Medical treatments such as chemo therapy
      - Harsh chemicals such as commercial shampoos, perms, hair color, and bleach
      - Iron, vitamin and mineral imbalance
      - Severely poor diet including dehydration
      - Poor circulation can cut off the nutrients that blood flow delivers to the scalp

      The average person loses about 100 strands per day (while the average hair grows only 1/2 inch per month). So the more days you live, the more hairs you lose. While you can't stop time or heredity, you can do something about the way your hair appears, even if it's thinning.

      Commercial conditioners do a good job of making hair look fuller, as long as you don't overuse them. Don't use more than a teaspoonful each time you wash, that's just a dab in the palm of your hand. Anything more is wasted and can actually make your hair look worse.

      Crack an egg over your hair before shampooing, and toss away the shell. Massage it in for five minutes and then rinse it out. Since egg is basically animal protein, it has the same effect as the specially formulated shampoos.

  3. QUESTION:
    Can you develop cancer from chemotherapy?
    I'm writing a story about this so I was just wondering;
    Can you develop leukemia from chemo of breast cancer? Or vice versa?
    What's the youngest age you can develop breast cancer and leukemia?
    What's the difference between the two chronic leukemias? (CLL & CML)
    How long can the treatment of breast cancer, CLL and CML last?
    Which are more deadly?
    Thanks for the help!

    • ANSWER:
      Can you develop leukemia from chemo of breast cancer?Yes.

      Or vice versa?No.

      What's the youngest age you can develop breast cancer and leukemia?Breast – 85% are postmenopausal, rare under 40 & there are different types of breast cancer.. Leukemia – any age.

      What's the difference between the two chronic leukemias? CLL is usually indolent.CML is not. There are more than 2 chronic leukemias.

      How long can the treatment of breast cancer, CLL and CML last? Surgery to years.

      Which are more deadly?It depends on several things.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of hormone treatments?
    My wife needs them after she is done with chemo from breast cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      Tamoxifen (Tam) and the aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the primary drugs used in this situation- Tam for premenopausal (or intolerant postmenopausal) patients, and AIs for postmenopausal patients.

      Tam has two serious but very uncommon side effects: uterine cancer (primarily sarcoma) and blood clots. Both risks are only a few in a thousand range, and uterine cancer is basically not seen in premenopausal patients, presumably due to protective effect of menstrual cycle. These are important to be aware of but ARE NOT reasons to not take the drug, as the benefits are many-fold greater than the risks (put another way, the risk of recurrent breast cancer dwarfs the risk of these problems). Much more common side effects are estrogen-deprivation symptoms, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, mood changes.

      AIs have no increased risk for uterine cancer; they have minimal increased risk for blood clots compared with placebo. They cause less hot flashes; estrogen deprivation symptoms are the most common symptoms too. They also cause joint and sometimes muscle aches in folks- I find these to be the most irritating symptoms for my patients. These drugs are more effective than Tam but again have to be postmenopausal to use. Or, one can have the ovaries removed chemically/surgically/radiation and then use AIs if one is premenopausal.

      In any case, for patients eligible to take hormonal therapy, they usually provide as much if not more benefit than the chemotherapy, so are an extremely important part of overall therapeutic plan.

      God bless, best wishes

  5. QUESTION:
    When Hormone Replacement Therapy is thought as a treatment to reduce postmenopausal symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) is highly recommended since it is effective in proving the quality of life of women who suffers acute symptoms of menopause.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women?
    8)Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to be one way to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, however recent clinical trials have indicated there are dangerous increased risks of heart disease, stroke and various cancers associated with HRT. What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women and when do women need to start being concerned about this?

    • ANSWER:
      I think the best method to help prevent osteoporosis is exercise. Exercise strengthens the bones in men and women.

      Also there are good medications on the market to help prevent this condition:

      If the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is the only issue under consideration, then bisphosphonates such as alendronate, ibandronate, or risedronate are more effective than menopausal hormone therapy in preventing osteoporotic fractures, and less likely to be associated with substantial adverse effects. So far, bisphosphonates are the most effective category or prescription medications for treating postmenopausal osteoporosis.

      hope this helps..

  7. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of vaginal pain during intercourse?
    I never had any pain during intercourse until several months ago. I had a bladder infection. It was treated and it cleared up but sex has not been the same since then. The pain that I am experiencing is on penetration. It feels like it's on the front wall of the vagina. After he's been thrusting for a while, the pain turns more into a burning sensation. Can anyone tell me how I can get this pain to stop? Also, I know that I do not have any STD's. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Lady Please try this measures I hope it should help Applying lubricating gels to the outer sexual organs, including the vulva and labia, and in the vagina may be helpful to women and ease pain during intercourse. Sex toys, such as vibrators or dildos, may also be useful. A woman should talk with her health care provider before attempting to use a vaginal dilator. Treatment of pain during intercourse depends on the cause.

      * Entrance pain may be treated when the cause is identified.

      o Atrophy (thinning of the vaginal walls): Entrance pain caused by atrophy is common among postmenopausal women who do not take hormone replacement medication. Blood flow and lubricating capacity respond directly to hormone replacement. The most rapid relief of atrophy comes from applying topical estrogen vaginal cream directly to the vagina and its opening. This cream is available by prescription only.

      o Urethritis and urethral syndrome: With this condition, a woman may urinate frequently with urgency, pain, and difficulty, but a urinalysis can find no identifiable bacteria. These symptoms may be caused by chronic inflammation of the urethra (the tube through which urine exits the body) from muscle spasms, anxiety, low estrogen levels, or a combination of these causes. Using a special instrument, the doctor may dilate the urethra. The doctor may prescribe low-dose antibiotics. At times, antidepressants and antispasmodics may also be prescribed.

      o Inadequate lubrication: Treatment of inadequate lubrication depends on the cause. Options include water-soluble lubricants (for use with condoms ; other types of lubricants may damage condoms) or other substances such as vegetable oils. If arousal does not take place, more extensive foreplay might be needed during sexual relations.

      o Vaginismus: Painful spasms of muscles at the opening of the vagina may be an involuntary but appropriate response to painful stimuli. These spasms may be due to several factors, including painful insertion, previous painful experiences, previous abuse, or an unresolved conflict regarding sexuality. For a woman with vaginismus, her doctor may recommend behavioral therapy, including vaginal relaxation exercises.

      o Vaginal strictures (abnormal narrowing): Doctors commonly see vaginal strictures after pelvic surgery, radiation, or menopause . Estrogen, or special surgical techniques may be used to treat these strictures.

      o Interstitial cystitis: This chronic inflammation of the bladder has no known cause; however, pain with intercourse is a common symptom. A health care provider may perform a cystoscopy (a procedure to look inside the bladder), or a urologist may distend (stretch) the bladder to examine the bladder wall. These procedures often work to clear the condition. Other treatments include amitriptyline, nifedipine, Elmiron, or other prescription therapies. Other options include bladder washings with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or other agents or transcutaneous electric stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture. Surgery is a last resort.

      o Endometriosis: Endometriosis occurs when the lining of the uterus is found outside the uterus. Pain during intercourse caused by endometriosis is not uncommon. Relief of this pain often indicates success in treating endometriosis.

      o Vulvovaginitis (inflammation of the vulva and vagina): Whether recurrent or chronic, this problem is common despite the rise in the number of over-the-counter treatments.

      + If not responsive to self-treatment with lubricating gels or initial treatment by a doctor, a woman may need a more thorough evaluation to identify the cause.

      + A doctor may ask the woman if she uses antibiotic or antifungal medication or if she douches. If so, these practices should be stopped to help determine whether a specific disease-causing organism is present.

      + Treatment is based on the presence of bacteria or other organisms. Often, no single organism is identified. The doctor may talk to the woman about proper hygiene.

      + If recurring symptoms are shared with a sexual partner, both individuals should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

      + A doctor considers the possibility of intermittent urethral infection with chlamydia, an STD, as well as a more obvious urinary tract infection, and then treats with the appropriate antibiotics.
      * Treatment for deep thrust pain includes 2 strategies.

      o Pelvic adhesions (tissue that has become stuck together, sometimes developing after surgery): Pain with intercourse caused by pelvic adhesions can be relieved by removing the adhesions.

      o Uterine retroversion: The health care provider may find physical causes of the pain, including ovarian cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease , endometriosis (mucous tissue out of place), or retroversion of the uterus (uterus is tilted backward instead of forward).

      A doctor should be able to find the cause and to select proper treatment for pain experienced during intercourse. Sometimes, the doctor refers the woman to a specialist.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is it advisable to stop taking contraceptive pill now that I developed spider veins on my leg?
    I am taking Yasmin contraceptive pill for three years now. It has been a year since I noticed a spider vein develop on my inner left leg. It has not given me any pain or discomfort. Only when I see it, I don't think it's a nice sight especially when I'm wearing short pants or skirts. Do you think I should stop taking contraceptive pill? Will it make any difference if I stop now? Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills are one of the things that may cause spider veins. What causes them is not totally understood but some factors that predispose a person to have them include heredity; occupations that involve a lot of standing, such as nurses, beauticians, teachers, and factory workers; obesity; hormonal influences during pregnancy, puberty, and menopause; the use of birth control pills; postmenopausal hormonal replacement; a history of blood clots; conditions that cause increased pressure in the abdomen including tumors, constipation, and externally worn garments like girdles; trauma or injury to the skin; previous vein surgery; and exposure to ultraviolet rays.

      They are most common in women of child bearing age and older. Some surgical and laser treatments are available for them, but they cannot really be cured. These links may help.

      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/guide/cosmetic-procedures-spider-veins
      http://www.medicinenet.com/varicose_veins/article.htm

  9. QUESTION:
    what are the statistics to surviving cancer to to the uterus?
    My friend recently was re-diagnosed with cancer to the uterus.I hope she survives. She has two young kids whom she loves very much. She is getting chemotherapy and everything but I have no idea if she can pull through again. What are the statistics to re-beating cancer to the uterus and the statistics to being cancer to the uterus the first time? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There is no way to answer you based on the information provided. Survival is based primarily on stage, but we also need to know her age, the type of cancer, the grade, the hormone receptor status and what treatment she has had. This cancer rarely occurs in women young enough to have young children. Most uterine cancers occur in postmenopausal women which often aids in early diagnosis, overall 75% are diagnosed at stage 1-1C with a 5 year survival rate of 95-70%.

  10. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of a UTI without antibiotics?
    This is my third UTI. I used antibiotics for my first two, but I have no insurance right now, so I don't want to pay for an appointment or for the antibiotics. Is there anything I can do to get rid of it fast, and for a low price?

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry, but antibiotics are the necessary treatment for a urinary tract infection.

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      If your symptoms are typical of a urinary tract infection and you're generally in good health, antibiotics are the first line of treatment. Which drugs are prescribed and for how long depends on your health condition and the type of bacteria found in your urine.

      Simple infection
      Drugs commonly recommended for simple urinary tract infections include:

      Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox)
      Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrodantin)
      Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
      Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
      Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim)
      Usually, symptoms clear up within a few days of treatment. But you may need to continue antibiotics for a week or more. Take the entire course of antibiotics recommended by your doctor to ensure that the infection is completely eradicated.

      For an uncomplicated urinary tract infection that occurs when you're otherwise healthy, your doctor may recommend a shorter course of treatment, such as taking an antibiotic for three days. But whether this short course of treatment is adequate to treat your infection depends on your particular symptoms and medical history.

      Your doctor may also prescribe a pain medication (analgesic) that numbs your bladder and urethra to relieve burning while urinating. One common side effect of urinary tract analgesics is discolored urine — bright blue or orange.

      Recurrent infection
      If you have recurrent urinary tract infections, your doctor may recommend a longer course of antibiotic treatment or a self-treatment program with short courses of antibiotics at the outset of your urinary symptoms. Home urine tests, in which you dip a test stick into a urine sample, are now available that are highly sensitive and may be helpful if you experience recurring infections.

      For infections related to sexual activity, your doctor may recommend taking a single dose of antibiotic after sexual intercourse.

      If you're postmenopausal, your doctor may recommend vaginal estrogen therapy to minimize your chance of recurrent urinary tract infections.

      Severe infection
      For severe urinary tract infections, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics may be necessary.

      Urinary tract infections can be painful, but you can take steps to ease your discomfort until antibiotics clear the infection. Follow these tips:

      Drink plenty of water to dilute your urine and help flush out bacteria. Avoid coffee, alcohol, and soft drinks containing citrus juices and caffeine until your infection has cleared. They can irritate your bladder and tend to aggravate your frequent or urgent need to urinate.
      Use a heating pad on your abdomen to minimize bladder pressure or discomfort.

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you classify a transsexual from real women?
    If she has done her opperation in her early age, how can you tell?
    They look so women, talk so women, you can't tell.

    • ANSWER:
      Laloo, let me enlighten you a little.

      Definitions:
      Transsexual - someone who identifies as the gender opposite to their born sexual phenotype.
      Real - that which is objectifiable independent of personal bias and persistent within the material world we inhabit.
      Women - plural of woman, the female of the species homo sapiens.

      Now lets try a sociological exercise, how do you classify the people you meet? Do you meet them on a genetic level, thereby identifying them as XX, XY or something else regardless of their body; or as their phenotype regardless of their karyotype?

      Certainly biological elements of the transsexual are unchangeable, but is that contrary to defining them as women, because they certainly ARE for real my dear!

      No, of course not. Otherwise androgen insensitivity syndrome suffers would all be forced to live gender roles inappropriate to them (ie XY karyotypes whose insensitivity to androgens has led them to develop a female phenotye).

      Indeed, if you classify a person on their original anatomical construction, how can you be confident they don't have an anatomically hardwired female brain? There is certainly neuroanatomical evidence that transsexuals have characteristics of the brain of their identified rather than their birth sex. Are they so different to the androgen insensitivity sufferers then?

      And is your definition dependent on reproductive function?
      In that case, would all infertilfe females (which includes an awful lot of the population when those who are postmenopausal are counted) constitute "not-real" women?

      Your answer should be, you do not classify transsexuals (male-to-females to be more specific about the group you are describing) as any different from real females. They are people, they are WOMEN; they feel and they hurt and by god do they hurt for the cruelty of biology of their birth and societal prejudice that results from that.

      Do not judge that which you clearly do not understand. Respect is the only, universal rule for all social interaction. respect the people you meet, learn to like them as people and as individuals, not as demographic cohorts. Treat them like people and who knows, maybe you will come to appreciate them. If you never know, then what difference is there? If you're willing to have a relationship with an infertile woman, how does that differ to a relationship with a completely passable transsexual?

      Grow up, realise this is not about the history of someone's birth biology, they are no more accountable for that than someone with downs is for having trisomy 21, or a cancer patient for having neoplastic mutation allowing unwelcome and uncontrolled proliferation of cells. each wants to be normal, each wants their right to a life, each deserves respect, especially where there are modern treatment modalities that may in effect "cure" them. Indeed, the nearest a transsexual can get to being cured is to transition completely, biologically and socially. To be comfortable in who they are.

      Respect people, do not pigeon hole them.

  12. QUESTION:
    How would you feel physically if you have low iron level?
    How would you feel physically if you have a low iron level? What does it mean? How could it hurt my unborn baby (7months). What does iron do for your body? please help me out here. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Having iron deficiency anemia may cause you to feel tired and often look pale. It's a common type of anemia — a condition in which blood lacks adequate healthy red blood cells, which carry oxygen to tissues. Oxygenated blood gives your body energy and your skin a healthy color.

      As the name implies, iron deficiency anemia is due to insufficient iron. Your body needs the element iron to make hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enables them to carry oxygen.

      Iron deficiency anemia is common, especially in women. One in five women and half of all pregnant women are iron deficient. Lack of iron in your diet is one cause of iron deficiency anemia, but there are other causes as well.

      You can usually correct iron deficiency anemia with iron supplementation. Sometimes, additional treatments are necessary, especially if you're bleeding internally.
      These factors may increase the risk of iron deficiency anemia:

      Heavy menstrual periods
      Pregnancy
      A diet consistently low in iron
      A known or hidden source of bleeding within your body, such as an ulcer, a bleeding tumor, a uterine fibroid, a colon polyp, colorectal cancer or gastrointestinal bleeding.
      These groups of people may be at higher risk:

      Women. Because their bodies store less iron and because they lose blood during menstruation, women in general are at greater risk of iron deficiency anemia.
      Infants and children. Infants who don't get enough iron in their milk or formula may risk deficiency. Children need extra iron during growth spurts, because iron is also important for muscle development. If your child isn't eating a healthy, varied diet, he or she may be at risk of anemia.
      Vegetarians. Because vegetarians don't eat meat, they're at greater risk of iron deficiency anemia. Iron that comes from grains and vegetables isn't absorbed by the body as well as is iron that comes from meat.
      In healthy men and postmenopausal women, iron deficiency usually points to bleeding somewhere in the gastrointestinal tract.

      Donating blood — a source of blood loss — usually isn't a common risk factor for iron deficiency anemia. However, some people first learn their hemoglobin is low, which indicates anemia, when they go to donate blood. Low hemoglobin may be a temporary problem remedied by eating more iron-rich foods. It may also be a warning sign of blood loss in your body. If you're told that you can't donate blood because of low hemoglobin, ask your doctor whether you should be concerned.
      Prevention
      You can help prevent iron deficiency anemia by eating foods rich in iron, as part of a balanced diet. Eating plenty of iron-containing foods is particularly important for people who have higher iron requirements, such as children and menstruating or pregnant women.

      Foods rich in iron include red meat, seafood, poultry and eggs. Meat sources of iron are easily absorbed by your body.

      Plant-based foods also are good sources of iron, although they're less easily absorbed. Among the best are iron-fortified cereals, breads and pastas. Beans and peas, dark green leafy vegetables — such as spinach — and raisins, nuts, and seeds also contain iron.

      You can enhance your body's absorption of iron by drinking citrus juice when you eat an iron-containing food. Vitamin C in citrus juices, like orange juice, helps your body better absorb dietary iron from animals and plants.

  13. QUESTION:
    what medicine can i get over the counter for cystitis or an urinary tract infection?
    i just found out i got an infection and i am wondering what medicines are there to help me get cured. and what medicines i can get over the counter since i cant afford going to the doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry, but you need a physician to ensure that your condition is brought on by a UTI and you need him/her to prescribe the appropriate treatment.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/urinary-tract-infection/DS00286/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

      If your doctor suspects you have a urinary tract infection, he or she may ask you to turn in a urine sample to determine if pus, red blood cells or bacteria are present in your urine. To avoid potential contamination of the sample, you may be instructed to cleanse your genital area with an antiseptic pad and to collect the urine midstream.

      Laboratory analysis of the urine (urinalysis), sometimes followed by a urine culture, can reveal whether you have an infection. Although no simple test can differentiate between an upper and lower urinary tract infection, the presence of fever and flank pain indicate that the infection likely involves your kidneys.

      If your symptoms are typical of a urinary tract infection and you're generally in good health, antibiotics are the first line of treatment. Which drugs are prescribed and for how long depends on your health condition and the type of bacteria found in your urine.

      Simple infection
      Drugs commonly recommended for simple urinary tract infections include:

      * Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox)
      * Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrodantin)
      * Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
      * Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
      * Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim)

      Usually, symptoms clear up within a few days of treatment. But you may need to continue antibiotics for a week or more. Take the entire course of antibiotics recommended by your doctor to ensure that the infection is completely eradicated.

      For an uncomplicated urinary tract infection that occurs when you're otherwise healthy, your doctor may recommend a shorter course of treatment, such as taking an antibiotic for three days. But whether this short course of treatment is adequate to treat your infection depends on your particular symptoms and medical history.

      Your doctor may also prescribe a pain medication (analgesic) that numbs your bladder and urethra to relieve burning while urinating. One common side effect of urinary tract analgesics is discolored urine — bright blue or orange.

      Recurrent infection
      If you have recurrent urinary tract infections, your doctor may recommend a longer course of antibiotic treatment or a self-treatment program with short courses of antibiotics at the outset of your urinary symptoms. Home urine tests, in which you dip a test stick into a urine sample, are now available that are highly sensitive and may be helpful if you experience recurring infections.

      For infections related to sexual activity, your doctor may recommend taking a single dose of antibiotic after sexual intercourse.

      If you're postmenopausal, your doctor may recommend vaginal estrogen therapy to minimize your chance of recurrent urinary tract infections.

      Severe infection
      For severe urinary tract infections, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics may be necessary.

  14. QUESTION:
    Has anyone heard of the granulosa cell tumor that causes ovarian cancer?
    It's a rare form of ovarian cancer that doctors don't really know how to treat. Anyone diagnoised with it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had not heard about this until I read your question so I did a little bit of research. This is a hormone based cancer that almost always occurs in the ovaries. Depending on when detected and size, etc. there is actually a very good prognosis so doctors are able to treat it. What is a major problem with this type of cancer is that it has the ability to reappear 20 to 30 years later, this occurrence is very common. That is the area that they are really having a problem treating. Here are a few links regarding studies and pathology reports on this.
      http://www.thedoctorsdoctor.com/diseases/ovary_granulosacelltumor.htm
      Here are some statistics on prognosis and survival with this disease.
      PROGNOSIS AND TREATMENT CHARACTERIZATION
      Prognostic Factors

      All tumors have malignant potential

      90% are stage I, limited to the ovary

      Size of the tumor, mitotic figures, and nuclear atypia important in overall survival

      5 Year Survival
      With no atypia-survival 92%
      With moderate atypia-survival 30%

      10 Year Survival

      Tumors <5 cm-survival 100%
      Tumors 6-15 cm-survival 57%

      3 MF-survival 37%
      Metastasis

      Recurence can occur in the pelvis and lower abdomen

      Distant metastases are rare but tumors may recure 2-3 decades after initial diagnosis
      Treatment

      Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for postmenopausal woman

      Salpingo-oophorectomy may be acceptable in younger woman wishing to preserve fertility

      Hope this helps you a little.

  15. QUESTION:
    What vaginal exercises can you do if you have an overractive bladder?
    Lately, I realized that I have to go to the bathroom.. ALOT. Even when I don't drink anything, or drink a little... This may be due to the fact that when I was younger, I held it in everyday in school because I thought the school bathrooms were gross... I'm only 13.. Help? First answer gets 10 points!! Thanks so much :)

    • ANSWER:
      The treatment for overactive bladder depends on the capabilities of the patient. Here are commonly recommended treatments:

      Pelvic muscle rehabilitation to improve pelvic muscle tone and prevent leakage

      Kegel exercises: Regular, daily exercising of pelvic muscles can improve, and even prevent, urinary incontinence. This is particularly helpful for younger women. These exercises should be performed 30-80 times daily for at least eight weeks.

      Biofeedback: Used in conjunction with Kegel exercises, biofeedback helps people gain awareness and control of their pelvic muscles.

      Vaginal weight training: Small weights are held within the vagina by tightening the vaginal muscles. These exercises should be performed for 15 minutes, twice daily, for four to six weeks.

      Pelvic-floor electrical stimulation: Mild electrical pulses stimulate muscle contractions. This should be done in conjunction with Kegel exercises.
      Behavioral therapies to help people regain control of their bladder

      Bladder training teaches people to resist the urge to void and gradually expand the intervals between voiding.

      Toileting assistance uses routine or scheduled toileting, habit-training schedules, and prompted voiding to empty the bladder regularly to prevent leaking.
      Medications for overactive bladder to improve incontinence medically

      Oxybutynin (Ditropan) prevents urge incontinence by relaxing sphincter muscles.

      Tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA) is indicated for the treatment of an overactive bladder with symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, or urge incontinence.

      Estrogen, either oral or vaginal, may be helpful in conjunction with other treatments for postmenopausal women with urinary incontinence.

      Please let me know if you any more detail.

      Thanks,
      Maandeep

  16. QUESTION:
    what causes breast cancer and what are the measures needed to prevent it?
    I just want somebody to tell me everything I need to know about breast cancer.What causes it,is it generic,are there foods or other things we use in our daily lives that actually cause it like perfumes?How about chemicals found in the preservatives used in packed or canned foods things like MSG .I would appreciate it if someone clarified this for me

    • ANSWER:
      Breast cancer is a common form of cancer among women in the United States, Canada and Europe. However, in Africa and Asia, the prevalence is much lower, indicating the possibility of environmental triggers as well as a genetic predisposition. While the number one risk factor is simply being female, other risk factors include:

      -Age - Breast cancer occurs more often in women over 50 and is less common in pre-menopausal women. American Cancer Society (ACS).
      -Family History - Women with family history of breast cancer have a greater risk of developing the disease.
      -Genetic factors - Inheriting mutations or alterations of certain genes called BRCA-1 and BRCAS-2 increases the risk of developing breast cancer. The ACS estimates that 5 to 10 percent of breast cancer cases result from inherited mutations of these genes. A woman with these genes has an 80 percent chance of developing breast cancer in her lifetime, according to the ACS. Women with a family history of breast cancer may be tested for the mutated gene. However, interpretation of the test results and decisions about treatment are complicated. Recent studies have identified other genes and gene mutations that may be associated with breast cancer. Several studies have shown nearly 200 gene mutations that are associated with some breast tumors.
      -Previous history of breast cancer or of Benign breast Tumors - This includes being diagnosed with breast cancer as well as non-cancerous tumors. Research has demonstrated the risk of developing breast cancer varies with the actual type of benign breast disease found in a woman.
      -Race - Breast cancer is more common in white women than in those of other races, including Hispanic, Asian or black American. .
      -Hormone factors - Hormones may increase the risk of breast cancer. Hormonal influences that are believed to raise the risk include:
      -Early menstruation - Women who started their period before 12 years of age.
      -Late menopause - Women who go through menopause after age 55.
      -Pregnancy history - Women who have their first child after the age of 30 or who have had fewer pregnancies or no pregnancies.
      -Hormone drugs - The use of oral contraceptives has been linked to a slight increase in breast cancer risk.
      -Breast density - Women with less fatty, denser breasts, which are normally older women, have an increased chance of breast cancer.
      -Obesity after menopause - In postmenopausal women, estrogen is primarily produced by fat tissue. If a woman is significantly overweight, she has more fat tissue and more estrogen is being produced in their body.
      -Radiation to the chest area - For women treated for Hodgkins Lymphoma with radiation to the chest before age 30, the chances of developing breast cancer are higher than the general population.
      -Sedentary lifestyle - Women who are physically inactive have a higher rate of breast cancer, possibly due to a sedentary lifestyle.
      -Use of Alcohol - Several studies have concluded that the more alcohol consumed by a woman, the higher her risk of breast cancer becomes.

      For prevention of Breast Cancer, if at all we can do anything, it starts with our own Lifestyle choices and healthy habits - such as staying physically active, limiting alcohol and eating right. Among the easiest things to control are what you eat and drink and how active you are. Here are some strategies that may help you decrease your risk of breast cancer:

      • LIMIT ALCOHOL
      • MAINTAIN A HELTHY WEIGHT
      • STAY ACTIVE
      • CONSIDER LIMITING FAT IN YOUR DIET
      • Avoid HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY (HRT) –
      • CHECK YOUR BREASTS EVERY MONTH
      • DO NOT FORGETTO GET
      • Consider BREASTFEEDING instead of formula feeding
      • HAVE CILDRENT EARLIER in life
      • Avoid taking unnecessary ANTIBIOTICS.
      • Be CAUTIOUS about PESTICIDES
      • Nothing you can guarantee your life will be free from Cancer. But if you practice healthy habits and consult your doctor about extra measures you can take, you may at least reduce your risk of this potentially fatal disease.-

  17. QUESTION:
    what's the difference between Clomid and Femara?
    i know one difference is tht Femara is much more expensive! Dr. just prescribed to me earlier. going to be my first time on Femara. Been on Clomid for 3 last cycles. obviously., i am still trying to conceive! .. i envy those ppl who can conceive naturally.

    • ANSWER:
      Clomid is often a first line treatment to induce regular ovulation. Clomid works at the level of the hypothalamus where it competes for estrogen binding sites. When these "sites are occupied" by Clomid, the hypothalamus responds by producing more GnRH which then stimulates the pituitary to produce FSH. Remember, in a normal cycle healthy follicles produce estrogen, which signals the hypothalamus to reduce production of FSH. Clomiphene is marketed in the United States by Aventis Laboratories as Clomid and by Serono Laboratories as Serophene.

      The goal of clomiphene therapy in treating infertility is to establish normal ovulation rather than cause the development of numerous eggs. Once ovulation is established, there is no benefit to increasing the dosage further . Numerous studies show that pregnancy usually occurs during the first three months of infertility therapy and treatment beyond six months is not recommended. Clomiphene can cause side effects such as ovarian hyperstimulation (rare), visual disturbances, nausea, diminished "quality" of the cervical mucus, multiple births, and others.

      Femara® (letrozole tablets) is approved for the adjuvant (following surgery) treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive early stage breast cancer. The benefits of Femara in clinical trials are based on 24 months of treatment. Further follow-up will be needed to determine long-term results, safety and efficacy.
      Femara is also approved for the extended adjuvant treatment of early stage breast cancer in postmenopausal women who are within three months of completion of five years of tamoxifen therapy. The benefits of Femara in clinical trials are based on 24 months of treatment. Further follow-up will be needed to determine long-term results, including side effects.

      In addition, Femara is approved for the treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor–positive or estrogen receptor–unknown breast cancer that has spread to another part of the body (metastatic cancer).

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the pros and cons of taking hormone replacement when menopause begins?

    • ANSWER:
      The use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been shown to have some benefits, including decreasing women's risk of developing osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. But the treatment is also known to increase risks for breast and endometrial cancers.

      Now, a new study shows that how long women take hormones may affect their risk levels for these diseases.

      Dr. Francine Grodstein of Brigham and Women's Hospital, and colleagues there and at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, gave questionnaires to women biennially from 1976 to 1992 to track their health while taking hormone replacement therapy.

      The researchers report in the June 19 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine that "current hormone users had a lower risk of death... than subjects who had never taken hormones; however, the apparent benefit decreased with long-term use... because of an increase in mortality from breast cancer among long-term hormone users."

      Women who had the lowest risk for developing coronary disease had the lowest risks associated with taking hormone therapy. But for women who took hormone therapy for more than 10 years, their chance of dying from breast cancer increased 43%.

      Women's individual health backgrounds and family histories play an important role in whether or not women should take hormones and for how long they should take them, say the researchers.

      "Based on these results, and results from other studies which have weighed the risks and benefits or hormone replacement therapy, the benefits may not outweigh the risks for women who are at particularly high risk for breast cancer and particularly low risk of cardiovascular disease," says Dr. Catherine Schairer of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.

      Schairer and her colleague, Dr. Louise A. Brinton, wrote an editorial accompanying the hormone therapy article in the journal. They noted that a white woman who dies between the ages of 50 and 94 has a 31% risk of dying from coronary heart disease and a 2.8% risk of dying from breast cancer. This means hormone therapy, which protects against coronary heart disease, may be beneficial for women who are not at high risk for breast cancer.

      But, Schairer and Brinton add, "for many women, the benefits of hormone use may not compensate for the fear of acquiring breast cancer and living with its repercussions."

  19. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you have sharp pains in your chest?
    I was driving and i started feeling them this is my third time getting them I would get them when I was pregnant of my son but they when away. And it happen today im very scared what could it be.. I'm 26 years old and i have two kids, weight about 230, height 5.6 I been this wait almost for a long time i don't have any health problem. I don't know if this would help but i was also getting very dizzy

    • ANSWER:
      There are 3 types of breast pain: pain related to the menstrual cycle, pain not affected by the menstrual cycle, and pain originating in the chest that feels as though it is in the breast.

      Breast pain related to the menstrual cycle: This pattern of pain seems to be related to changes in hormone levels. Women usually feel increased breast pain before their menstrual period and a reduction in pain afterwards. Pain can be present with or without accompanying lumpiness of the breast due to a fibrocystic condition. Because stress can also affect hormone levels, this may influence breast pain.

      Breast pain not affected by the menstrual cycle: This type of breast pain can show up in either premenopausal or postmenopausal women. It may be felt in one specific area of the breast and is sometimes called "target zone" breast pain. It may occur in one or both breasts. In some women it lasts for as long as one or 2 years, then disappears.

      Sometimes this pain is caused by trauma to the breast, or it will center on the site of a previous breast biopsy. In most cases, doctors don't know the cause of this continuous type of pain. Although breast cancer is very rare in women with this form of pain, it still must be ruled out with tests.

      Breast pain originating in the chest: This category is not really a form of breast pain, but is actually a type of chest pain that feels as though it is coming from the breast. This type of arthritic pain originates in the middle of the chest and is called costochondritis. It occurs where the ribs and breastbone connect. Poor posture and the aging process can contribute to increased stress on these joints, resulting in pain. This pain does not change with the menstrual cycle.

      Evaluating breast pain
      Physicians evaluate breast pain by identifying its location and assessing its pattern, including its strength and how long the pain lasts. It is also important to know how much the pain interferes with your daily activities. A doctor's assessment will include your medical history, physical exam, and, in some cases, a mammogram (X-ray of the breast) if you're over 50 years old (or younger if you have an increased risk of breast cancer) or an ultrasound exam. Surgical biopsy is not usually recommended. For most women with breast pain, the most important reason for a careful evaluation is to gain reassurance that the pain is not due to breast cancer.

      Treating breast pain
      Treatment can include medication, lifestyle changes, and diet changes.

      Medication: Medication for pain relief is generally needed only in cases of severe, disabling pain. If you have costochondritis, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or anti-inflammatory medications may be prescribed. Since pain relief medication can have unwanted side effects, it's a good idea to incorporate various lifestyle changes that can help reduce or eliminate the pain experienced by many women.

      Lifestyle changes: Wearing a good, supportive bra reduces excess movement of the breasts, which can contribute to the pain. Also, learning how to relax the body fully can reduce stress-related hormones, which may affect the breasts. Many women have found meditation and visualization helpful in quieting the mind. An exercise program may be beneficial, as well.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is Strontium Citrate and what are its uses?
    My doctor, a Preventative Medicine Specialist put me on Strontium for my osteoporosis. I want to understand why.

    • ANSWER:
      Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and increased susceptibility to fracture. Recent in vitro studies showed that strontium citrate, a novel agent containing two strontium atoms, acts as an effective anti-osteoporotic drug by inhibiting bone resorption by osteoclasts and promoting osteoblast replication and bone formation. Basically, it promotes bone build-up and strengthening.

      Studies in animals demonstrated that strontium ranelate increases bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in intact rodents and prevents bone loss in osteopenic animals.

      Clinical studies show that strontium citrate reduces the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Together, these recent advances point to unique effects of strontium citrate on bone cells and show that strontium citrate has significant clinical benefits in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  21. QUESTION:
    I need some help choosing a topic for an argumentative essay?
    I wanted to do something relating to animals such as animal testing/cruelty, but I'm not sure if I can meet the 8 page minimum requirement. I am very passionate about the topic, however I'm not sure I can write 8 pages.
    Also I was thinking birth control, but again. Not sure if I can meet the requirement.
    Can someone please throw out any suggestions. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      All of the following topics could be formatted into a persuasive essay topic:

      1.) --Biodiversity: Many scientists believe we are entering an age of mass extinction of species that may have serious ecological and social ramifications. Examine several facets concerning the world's biological diversity including: Is Declining Biodiversity a Serious Ecological Problem? What Are the Leading Threats to Biodiversity? Are Commercial Farming Practices Harming Agricultural Biodiversity? How Can the World's Biological Diversity Best Be Preserved?

      2.)--Genetic Engineering: From genetically modified foods to human cloning, aspects of genetic engineering (modifying genes of living things in the laboratory) stir up strong feelings and lively debate. Present overviews and pro and con viewpoints on such subjects as genetic engineering in agriculture, engineering of human genes, and regulation of genetic engineering.

      3.) --Reproductive Technologies: Science has enabled many infertile couples to experience parenthood. But efforts to facilitate reproduction have raised concerns about the ethics of controlling the creation of life. Topics to explore: Are Reproductive Technologies Beneficial or Harmful? Should Postmenopausal Women Become Pregnant? Is Surrogate Motherhood Beneficial or Harmful? Do Reproductive Technologies Result in Unethical Treatment of Embryos? What Would Be the Effect of Regulating Reproductive Technologies?

      4.) --Many people have a close relationship with their pets. These people treat their dogs, birds, cats, or other animals as members of their family. In your opinion, are such relationships healthy? Why or why not? Persuade your audience to accept your viewpoint.

      5.) --Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? A zoo has no useful purpose. What is your opinion? Persuade your audience to accept your viewpoint.

  22. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have pain during intercourse?
    My first year of sex was great but lately everytime it hurts. Is it okay? What is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Dyspareunia can be caused by a number of factors, including vaginal dryness, atrophic vaginitis (thinning of the vaginal lining in some women, usually postmenopausal or those on certain drug therapies, including antihistamines and GnRH agonists), an allergic reaction such as to clothing, spermicides, douches or condoms, Endometriosis, Vulvodynia, Vulvar vestibulitis, Interstitial Cystitis, Lichen planus/Lichen sclerosis, urinary tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, sexually transmitted diseases and psychological or physical trauma. Dyspareunia is diagnosed based on specific symptoms and your medical history, and is treated through a number of different means depending on the cause, including use of lubrication during sexual activity, antifungals, antibiotics or other medications, recommending Sitz baths, use of topical estrogen cream or steroid cream, pain medications, surgery where appropriate (such as in the case of Endometriosis; see www.endocenter.org for a self-test to determine if this is your problem) and sometimes physical therapy with biofeedback. In order to determine the cause of your specific dyspareunia (and thereby enable you to choose a proper treatment), talk with you OBGYN.

  23. QUESTION:
    what are protaxos for and what the side effects?
    my mum is 68 years old. Recently i took her to a physician for pain in a abdomen. Upon checking we were told that the pain actually comes from her spine and he prescribe this protaxos 2g half the sachet to be mixed with warm water in alternative day for a period of 7 days.

    • ANSWER:
      Protaxos is strontium ranelate used for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis to reduce risk of vertebral and hip fracture. Side effects include: nausea, vomiting,diarrheoa, headache, eczema, blood clots, fainting, memory loss, seizures, sore mouth, abdominal pain, and allergies.

  24. QUESTION:
    Hormone replacement therapy in breast cancer survivors?
    Estrogen supposedly increases their risk so they can't take the usual meds. What are some alternative treatments for their postmenopausal symptoms, anyone know?

    • ANSWER:
      non hormonal meds such as clonidine prozac ans efexor

  25. QUESTION:
    what is the medicine climara side effects?
    How long can it be use for.what are the side effects.

    • ANSWER:
      It can be used for: vasomotor menopausal symptoms, female hypogonadism, female castration, primary ovarian failure, postmenopausal urogenital symptoms, atrophic vaginitis, palliative treatment of advanced inoperable prostate cancer, prevention of post menopausal osteoperosis.

      Side effects: increased risk of CVA, headache, dizziness, depression, seizures, thrombophlebitis, hypertension, edema, pulmonary embolism, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, bloating, increased appitite, pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, breakthrough bleeding, altered menstral flow, weight changes, hair loss, breast tenderness or inlargement.

      Depending on the treatment it is being used for will determine the amount of time it can be used.

  26. QUESTION:
    How to you get bladder infections?
    I need to pee ALOT and it hurts abit when i do, i think ive got a bladder infection ive had one before, but i don't know how i got it? could it be anything else? More symptoms? Remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bladder-infection/AN01683

      Information about bladder infections in Women - hope this helps!

      There can be several causes of chronic bladder infections, such as:

      ■Kidney or bladder stones
      ■Bacteria entering the urethra during sexual intercourse
      ■Altered estrogen levels during menopause
      ■Abnormal urinary tract shape or function
      ■Genetic predisposition
      In general, women who have two or more culture-documented bladder infections in a six-month period should be evaluated by a urologist to determine the underlying cause. The evaluation may include:

      ■Urine culture of a sample obtained with a catheter
      ■Cystoscopy — looking into the bladder with a lighted scope
      ■Computerized tomography (CT) scan
      Treatment is directed at the underlying cause, when possible. If no source of infection is found, lifestyle modifications combined with vaginal estrogen replacement is all you may need. Lifestyle modifications that may reduce your risk of bladder infection include:

      ■Drinking plenty of liquids, especially water
      ■Drinking cranberry juice, though studies with promising results had limitations
      ■Urinating frequently
      ■Wiping from front to back after a bowel movement
      ■Taking showers rather than tub baths
      ■Gently washing the skin around your vagina and anus daily using a mild soap and plenty of water
      ■Using forms of birth control other than a diaphragm and spermicides
      ■Emptying your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse
      ■Avoiding deodorant sprays or scented feminine products in the genital area
      Otherwise, long-term, low-dose, preventive antibiotics is the only treatment option. In such cases, you may need to take antibiotics for as long as six months to two years.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/urinary-tract-infection/DS00286/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      If your symptoms are typical of a urinary tract infection and you're generally in good health, antibiotics are the first line of treatment. Which drugs are prescribed and for how long depends on your health condition and the type of bacteria found in your urine.

      Simple infection
      Drugs commonly recommended for simple urinary tract infections include:

      ■Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox)
      ■Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrodantin)
      ■Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
      ■Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
      ■Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim)
      Usually, symptoms clear up within a few days of treatment. But you may need to continue antibiotics for a week or more. Take the entire course of antibiotics recommended by your doctor to ensure that the infection is completely eradicated.

      For an uncomplicated urinary tract infection that occurs when you're otherwise healthy, your doctor may recommend a shorter course of treatment, such as taking an antibiotic for three days. But whether this short course of treatment is adequate to treat your infection depends on your particular symptoms and medical history.

      Your doctor may also prescribe a pain medication (analgesic) that numbs your bladder and urethra to relieve burning while urinating. One common side effect of urinary tract analgesics is discolored urine — bright blue or orange.

      Recurrent infection
      If you have recurrent urinary tract infections, your doctor may recommend a longer course of antibiotic treatment or a self-treatment program with short courses of antibiotics at the outset of your urinary symptoms. Home urine tests, in which you dip a test stick into a urine sample, are now available that are highly sensitive and may be helpful if you experience recurring infections.

      For infections related to sexual activity, your doctor may recommend taking a single dose of antibiotic after sexual intercourse.

      If you're postmenopausal, your doctor may recommend vaginal estrogen therapy to minimize your chance of recurrent urinary tract infections.

      Severe infection
      For severe urinary tract infections, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics may be necessary.

  27. QUESTION:
    What are the advantages and disadvantages of useing nandrolone decanoate iin trying to build muscle ?

    • ANSWER:
      OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of the androgenic anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate on uterine endometrium and myometrium and on the mammary gland of female cynomolgus macaques by using morphologic, histomorphometric, and histopathologic determinations. DESIGN: Histologic and histomorphometric measurements were performed on uteri and mammary glands that were collected at necropsy from animals that had been used in a long-term experiment to examine the effects of nandrolone decanoate on bone and coronary arteries. The animals were surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques randomized into four treatment groups: (a) intact sham ovariectomized (sham; n = 12), (b) ovariectomized (OVX; n = 15), (c) ovariectomized + nandrolone decanoate for 2 years (OVX + ND; n = 14), and (d) ovariectomized + nandrolone decanoate for 1 year, beginning 1 year after ovariectomy (OVX + NDdelay; n = 11). Intramuscular injections of nandrolone decanoate (25 mg every 3 weeks) were given to the two nandrolone-treated groups of animals (OVX + ND and OVX + NDdelay): one starting 3 w

  28. QUESTION:
    How to you get bladder infections?
    I need to pee ALOT and it hurts abit when i do, i think ive got a bladder infection ive had one before, but i don't know how i got it? could it be anything else? More symptoms? Remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bladder-infection/AN01683

      Information about bladder infections in Women - hope this helps!

      There can be several causes of chronic bladder infections, such as:

      ■Kidney or bladder stones
      ■Bacteria entering the urethra during sexual intercourse
      ■Altered estrogen levels during menopause
      ■Abnormal urinary tract shape or function
      ■Genetic predisposition
      In general, women who have two or more culture-documented bladder infections in a six-month period should be evaluated by a urologist to determine the underlying cause. The evaluation may include:

      ■Urine culture of a sample obtained with a catheter
      ■Cystoscopy — looking into the bladder with a lighted scope
      ■Computerized tomography (CT) scan
      Treatment is directed at the underlying cause, when possible. If no source of infection is found, lifestyle modifications combined with vaginal estrogen replacement is all you may need. Lifestyle modifications that may reduce your risk of bladder infection include:

      ■Drinking plenty of liquids, especially water
      ■Drinking cranberry juice, though studies with promising results had limitations
      ■Urinating frequently
      ■Wiping from front to back after a bowel movement
      ■Taking showers rather than tub baths
      ■Gently washing the skin around your vagina and anus daily using a mild soap and plenty of water
      ■Using forms of birth control other than a diaphragm and spermicides
      ■Emptying your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse
      ■Avoiding deodorant sprays or scented feminine products in the genital area
      Otherwise, long-term, low-dose, preventive antibiotics is the only treatment option. In such cases, you may need to take antibiotics for as long as six months to two years.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/urinary-tract-infection/DS00286/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      If your symptoms are typical of a urinary tract infection and you're generally in good health, antibiotics are the first line of treatment. Which drugs are prescribed and for how long depends on your health condition and the type of bacteria found in your urine.

      Simple infection
      Drugs commonly recommended for simple urinary tract infections include:

      ■Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox)
      ■Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrodantin)
      ■Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
      ■Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
      ■Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim)
      Usually, symptoms clear up within a few days of treatment. But you may need to continue antibiotics for a week or more. Take the entire course of antibiotics recommended by your doctor to ensure that the infection is completely eradicated.

      For an uncomplicated urinary tract infection that occurs when you're otherwise healthy, your doctor may recommend a shorter course of treatment, such as taking an antibiotic for three days. But whether this short course of treatment is adequate to treat your infection depends on your particular symptoms and medical history.

      Your doctor may also prescribe a pain medication (analgesic) that numbs your bladder and urethra to relieve burning while urinating. One common side effect of urinary tract analgesics is discolored urine — bright blue or orange.

      Recurrent infection
      If you have recurrent urinary tract infections, your doctor may recommend a longer course of antibiotic treatment or a self-treatment program with short courses of antibiotics at the outset of your urinary symptoms. Home urine tests, in which you dip a test stick into a urine sample, are now available that are highly sensitive and may be helpful if you experience recurring infections.

      For infections related to sexual activity, your doctor may recommend taking a single dose of antibiotic after sexual intercourse.

      If you're postmenopausal, your doctor may recommend vaginal estrogen therapy to minimize your chance of recurrent urinary tract infections.

      Severe infection
      For severe urinary tract infections, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics may be necessary.

  29. QUESTION:
    what cause hot flashes and excess sweating in a ninety yr woman?
    my mother is ninety yr older and at times she gets hot flashes and sweating and she gets this two to four times a month. I have taken her to doctors and none of them can seem to tell me whats wrong can you help

    • ANSWER:
      Older Women Still Suffer from Hot Flashes and Night Sweats Years After Menopause, Study Finds

      ScienceDaily (Oct. 20, 2011) — Women still have hot flushes (hot flashes) and night sweats years after menopause, finds a new study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

      Hot flushes and night sweats (HF/NS) are the main physical signs of the menopause, however their prevalence, frequency, severity and duration vary considerably.

      The average age of the menopause in US and European women is 50-51 years and it is generally assumed that HF/NS last between 2 to 5 years. This study looked at 10,418 postmenopausal women (defined as more than 12 months amenorrhea or hormone replacement therapy commenced for menopausal symptoms) aged between 54 and 65.

      The average age of the participating women was 59 and the majority were white, living in urban localities and of slightly above average socioeconomic status.

      The study looked at the impact of age, BMI, hysterectomy, hormone therapy use, lifestyle and mood on women's experience of HF/NS.

      The participating women completed a questionnaire, which included sociodemographics, weight and height, and medical history. Three and a half years later, they were sent a follow up questionnaire asking them about lifestyle factors, skirt size at age 20, current skirt size, hot flushes and night sweats and current hormone therapy (HT) use.

      The majority (89.6%) of women had experienced HF/NS at some time, more women having had hot flushes (86%) than night sweats (78%). However, over half (54%) of the women were currently having HF/NS and the prevalence was fairly even across the age range. The frequency of HF/NS was 33.5 per week and this remained broadly at this level across the age range.

      The study also found that factors such as previous hysterectomy, having been a smoker and higher alcohol intake helped predict women who had ever had HF/NS. Moreover, anxiety, hysterectomy, depressed mood, years since last menstrual period and (less) education helped predict current HF/NS prevalence.

      Women who were currently taking HT (12%) were less likely to report current HF/NS, while past users who had discontinued HT were more likely to have HF/NS across the age range.

      Professor Myra Hunter, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London and co-author said: "Our study looked at a large number of older postmenopausal women and we were surprised to find that menopausal symptoms persisted in over half of the women. They were still having hot flushes on average ten years after their last period.

      "Age didn't seem to affect the prevalence or frequency of the symptoms. Health professionals need to be aware that women can still have hot flushes and night sweats in their late 50s and 60s. There is a need for effective non-hormonal treatments for women with problematic hot flushes and night sweats, and for women who have a recurrence of hot flushes after they stop taking hormone therapy."

      Professor Philip Steer, BJOG editor-in-chief added: "This paper highlights how many older women continue to experience menopausal symptoms and these may vary in severity and how they affect a woman's quality of life. Interestingly age appears to be less of a significant factor in predicting these symptoms.

      "There needs to be increased awareness of this amongst women and health professionals and more research into future treatments."

  30. QUESTION:
    What in Your Opinions are the best MEDICINES for a Cold?
    I am working for a advertising agency and they would like to know what medicines you tend to use when you have a cold. If you could list the most effective medicines I would be very grateful

    Thanks in advance for any answers and your answers could affect a tv commercial

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin D. Not only does low vitamin D levels cause an increased risk of cold and flu, but i personally found taking vitamin D lessened my symptoms and duration (i have vitamin D deficiency btw). For the first time, my local pharmacy in Australia, Malouf Group, advertised vitamin D as an immune defense for cold and flu in their cold and flu catalogue.

      Prevention

      The risk of the common cold and influenza was studied in postmenopausal African-American women living in New York. Women taking 2000 international units (IU) (50 mcg)/day of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) had a 90% reduction in either disorder. Those taking 800 IU (20 mcg)/day had a 60% reduction. Vitamin D3 is a form of vitamin D produced in the skin. It is likely that vitamin D had similar effects on both viral infections.

      Treatment

      There are no reported studies of treating the common cold with vitamin D.

      However, taking large doses of vitamin D at the beginning of infection, say 10,000 to 50,000 IU (250 to 1250 mcg)/day for 1 to 3 days, would increase vitamin D blood levels dramatically. Cathelicidin and defensin levels would also increase. Possibly these increases would reduce the severity and length of the common cold.

      http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/infections-and-autoimmunity/common-cold/

  31. QUESTION:
    can uterine sarcoma occur without any vaginal bleeding in premenapausal women?
    I am a 47 premenopausal woman diagnosed with 5 fibroids (largest being 35*41) three years ago. I only experience occasional pelvic pain.

    • ANSWER:
      To look at your fibroids, I will quote from the Merk manual.

      "Uterine fibroids are benign uterine tumors of smooth muscle origin. Fibroids frequently cause abnormal vaginal bleeding (eg, menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia), pelvic pain and pressure, urinary and intestinal symptoms, and pregnancy complications. Diagnosis is by pelvic examination and imaging. Treatment of symptomatic patients depends on the patient's desire for fertility and desire to keep her uterus and may include oral contraceptives, brief presurgical gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy to shrink fibroids, and more definitive surgical procedures (eg, myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometrial ablation). "

      Then to look at what the Merk says on endometrial cancer.
      "Symptoms and Signs. Most (> 90%) women have abnormal uterine bleeding (eg, postmenopausal bleeding, premenopausal recurrent metrorrhagia); 1⁄3 of women with postmenopausal bleeding have endometrial cancer. A vaginal discharge may occur weeks or months before postmenopausal bleeding."

      So, I would say that there are approximately 10% of endometrial cancers that do not present with vaginal bleeding or discharge to begin with. I think you are needlessly worrying about something. Continue to have your fibroids checked, especially if you have any change in discharge or bleeding!

  32. QUESTION:
    Can you reverse osteoporosis in old age?
    If an otherwise healthy person (male or female) who
    - has never consumed alcohol,
    - has never smoked, and
    - does not use corticosteroids,
    gets osteoporosis after the age of 60 (ie. menopause - male or female),

    Can osteoporosis be reversed at this age using Calcium, Vitamin D, Vitamin C and weight bearing exercise?

    I am looking for serious knowledgeable responses only.

    • ANSWER:
      I have stabilized my osteopina by taking calcium and Fosamax (after having drunk much, used some
      cortisone.) Check mayo.clinic.com. Then "diseases and conditions" and "Osteoporosis." You will find much information from one of the best hospitals/clinics in the world (maybe the best!).

      Drs. tell me that the new shots, etc. are not any better than Fosamax, just more expensive.
      Here is a preview:
      Hormone therapy
      Hormone therapy (HT) was once the mainstay of treatment for osteoporosis. But because of concerns about its safety and because other treatments are available, the role of hormone therapy in managing osteoporosis is changing. Most problems have been linked to certain oral types of HT, either taken in combination with progestin or alone. If you're interested in hormone therapy, other forms are available, including patches, creams and the vaginal ring.

      Discuss the various options with your doctor to determine which might be best for you.

      Prescription medications
      If HT isn't for you, and lifestyle changes don't help control your osteoporosis, prescription drugs can help slow bone loss and may even increase bone density over time. They include:

      Bisphosphonates. Much like estrogen, this group of drugs can inhibit bone breakdown, preserve bone mass, and even increase bone density in your spine and hip, reducing the risk of fractures.

      Bisphosphonates may be especially beneficial for men, young adults and people with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They're also used to prevent osteoporosis in people who require long-term steroid treatment for a disease such as asthma or arthritis.

      Side effects, which can be severe, include nausea, abdominal pain, and the risk of an inflamed esophagus or esophageal ulcers, especially if you've had acid reflux or ulcers in the past. Bisphosphonates that can be taken once a week or once a month may cause fewer stomach problems. If you can't tolerate oral bisphosphonates, your doctor may recommend periodic intravenous infusions of bisphosphonate preparations.

      In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first once-yearly drug for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The medication, zoledronic acid (Reclast), is given intravenously at your doctor's office. It takes about 15 minutes to get your annual dose. One published study found that zoledronic acid reduces the risk of spine fracture by 70 percent and of hip fracture by 41 percent.

      A small number of cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw have been reported in people taking bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. These cases have primarily occurred after trauma to the jaw, such as a tooth extraction, or cancer treatment. Risk appears to be higher in people who have received bisphosphonates intravenously. While there is currently no clear evidence that you should stop taking bisphosphonates before dental surgery, let your dentist know what medications you're taking and discuss your concerns.

      Raloxifene (Evista). This medication belongs to a class of drugs called selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Raloxifene mimics estrogen's beneficial effects on bone density in postmenopausal women, without some of the risks associated with estrogen, such as increased risk of uterine cancer and, possibly, breast cancer. Hot flashes are a common side effect of raloxifene, and you shouldn't use this drug if you have a history of blood clots. This drug is approved only for women with osteoporosis and is not currently approved for use in men.
      Calcitonin. A hormone produced by your thyroid gland, calcitonin reduces bone resorption and may slow bone loss. It may also prevent spine fractures, and may even provide some pain relief from compression fractures. It's usually administered as a nasal spray and causes nasal irritation in some people who use it, but it's also available as an injection. Because calcitonin isn't as potent as bisphosphonates, it's normally reserved for people who can't take other drugs.
      Teriparatide (Forteo). This powerful drug, an analog of parathyroid hormone, treats osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men who are at high risk of fractures. Unlike other available therapies for osteoporosis, it works by stimulating new bone growth, as opposed to preventing further bone loss. Teriparatide is given once a day by injection under the skin on the thigh or abdomen. Long-term effects are still being studied, so the FDA recommends restricting therapy to two years or less.
      Tamoxifen. This synthetic hormone is used to treat breast cancer and is given to certain high-risk women to help reduce their chances of developing breast cancer. Although tamoxifen blocks estrogen's effect on breast tissue, it has an estrogen-like effect on other cells in your body, including your bone cells. As a result, tamoxifen appears to reduce the risk of fractures, especially in women older than 50. Possible side effects of tamoxifen include hot flashes, stomach upset, and vaginal dryness or discharge.

  33. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I've already been in pain for two weeks. I can't take anymore. What's gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      ■Menstrual irregularities
      ■Pelvic pain — a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      ■Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      ■Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      ■Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      ■Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      ■Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      ■Pressure on your rectum or bladder — difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      ■Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      ■Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms — or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness — indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      ■Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      ■Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer — the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      ■Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  34. QUESTION:
    How do anti-depressants and hormones affect a woman's behavior?

    • ANSWER:
      .Estrogen And Depression
      According to researchers, the level of estrogen in the body can increase cases of depression and women or help to treat it. Estrogen can be increased or reduced in the body by controlling the amount of sex that women have. This technique mostly works with women who are in their postmenopausal stage of life. In fact, researchers say that cases of depression and women are not being treated by medication should try adjusting their estrogen levels. The reproductive cycle of a woman is also affected after the process of abortion. In this case, reproductive hormones in the woman are rapidly decreased and therefore causing the woman to have mood disturbances. In addition, they may also contract thyroid infections and therefore seek treatment for the same. This increases cases of depression and women. Contraceptives are also known to alter a woman’s reproductive hormones and therefore cause a shift in the cycle. This is mostly associated with oral pills that contain much progestin. Many cases of depression and women involve the discontinued use of oral contraceptives and monitor any changes in their mood disturbance. The reason for this is because oral pills contain an ingredient that slows down the movement of a hormone called serotonin to the brain. With the reduced levels, cases of depression and women are on the rise. It also causes impulsive behaviors and suicidal signs. However, other oral contraceptives contain vitamin B6, which reduces estrogen levels in the blood. They are safer to use especially to women at higher risk of getting depressed.
      the more severe depressions, and bipolar depression, medication is usually an option, rather than a necessity. Antidepressant medication does not cure depression, it only helps you to feel better by controlling certain symptoms. If you are depressed because of life problems, such as relationship conflicts, divorce, loss of a loved one, job pressures, financial crises, serious medical problems in yourself or a family member, legal problems, or problems with your children, taking a pill will not make those problems go away. The medications used to treat depression include tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), and bupropion. Each acts on different chemical pathways of the human brain related to moods. Antidepressant medications are not habit-forming. To be effective, medications must be taken for about 4-6 months (in a first episode), carefully following the doctor's instructions. Medications must be monitored to ensure the most effective dosage and to minimize side effects. Your prescribing doctor will provide information about possible side-effects and/or dietary restrictions. Always remember that all prescription drugs have potential side effects. In addition, other medically prescribed medications being used should be reviewed because some can interact negatively with antidepressant medication. Pregnant, Nursing, or Childbearing-Age Women In general, during pregnancy, all medications (including psychotherapeutic medications) should be avoided where possible, and other methods of treatment should be tried. A woman who is taking a psychotherapeutic medication and plans to become pregnant should discuss her plans with her doctor; if she discovers that she is pregnant, she should contact her doctor immediately. During early pregnancy, there is a possible risk of birth defects with some of these medications, and for this reason: Lithium is not recommended during the first 3 months of pregnancy. ) Benzodiazepines are not recommended during the first 3 months of pregnancy.
      The decision to use a psychotherapeutic medication should be made only after a careful discussion with the doctor concerning the risks and benefits to the woman and her baby. Small amounts of medication pass into the breast milk; this is a consideration for mothers who are planning to breast-feed. A woman who is taking birth-control pills should be sure that her doctor is aware of thisWomen at Greater Risk for Depression than Men
      Major depression and dysthymia affect twice as many women as men. a greater number of women have the rapid cycling form of bipolar disorder, which may be more resistant to standard treatments. Many factors unique to women are suspected to play a role in developing depression. Research is focused on understanding these factors, including: reproductive, hormonal, genetic or other biological factors; abuse and oppression; interpersonal factors; and certain psychological and personality characteristics. But,the specific causes of depression in women remain unclear. Many women exposed to these stress factors do not develop depression. Remember, depression is a treatable psychological problem, and treatment is effective for most women

  35. QUESTION:
    What should i do my Senior project on?
    topics? issues that i could write alot about?
    anything would do probably. THanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      If your are looking for a topic that is closely related to students, here are a few examples:

      __1. -Cyberbullying: you could make an argument about whose responsibility it is, either the parents, teens, internet police, etc., to protect young on-line users from cyberbullying.
      __2. -The Pursuit of Perfection: you could make an argument about the amount of pressure parents, schools, the media, and peers put on teens to be "perfect," successful, etc.
      __3. -School Burn-Out: you could make an argument about the amount of school-related activities and requirements teens face now in high school & how that often leads to "school burn-out."
      __4. -To Work or Not To Work: you could address the topic of high school employment and make an argument on why you think it is either acceptable or not acceptable for teens to have jobs during their high school years.
      Whatever you decide, I wish you the best of luck with your paper!

      If you are looking for popular controversial issues, here are some topics that currently receive a lot of attention:

      __1. Assisted Suicide
      -Explore the social, medical, and ethical dilemma of assisted suicide and include international as well as domestic viewpoints. The federal government's continued challenges to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, the disabled community's response to assisted suicide, and the "slippery slope" argument are all topics that can be included.
      __2. Biodiversity
      -Many scientists believe we are entering an age of mass extinction of species that may have serious ecological and social ramifications. Examine several facets concerning the world's biological diversity including: Is Declining Biodiversity a Serious Ecological Problem? What Are the Leading Threats to Biodiversity? Are Commercial Farming Practices Harming Agricultural Biodiversity? How Can the World's Biological Diversity Best Be Preserved?
      __3. Controversies in food and nutrition
      -Explore these topics: Food additives -- Food irradiation -- Vegetarian/vegan diets -- Animal growth hormones -- Imported food -- Life-enhancing/life-threatening foods -- Food labeling -- Hidden ingredients in food -- Large doses of vitamins -- Fast foods -- Antioxidants -- Organic foods -- High-protein diets -- Popular diets -- Genetically modified foods.
      __4. Controversies in the Practice of Medicine
      -Explore these topics: Beginning of life issues -- National health insurance -- Medical marijuana -- Healing prayers -- Mind-body connection -- Human cloning, genetic engineering -- Condom distribution in schools -- Organ donation -- Childhood vaccinations -- Animal testing/experimentation.
      __5. Espionage and Intelligence Gathering
      -Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States has reevaluated its intelligence-gathering agencies and implemented new national security measures. Examine the methods of intelligence gathering and their effectiveness, debate the threat to civil liberties, and explore the future of espionage and intelligence gathering.
      __6. Genetic Engineering
      -From genetically modified foods to human cloning, aspects of genetic engineering (modifying genes of living things in the laboratory) stir up strong feelings and lively debate. Present overviews and pro and con viewpoints on such subjects as genetic engineering in agriculture, engineering of human genes, and regulation of genetic engineering.
      __7. Reproductive Technologies
      -Science has enabled many infertile couples to experience parenthood. But efforts to facilitate reproduction have raised concerns about the ethics of controlling the creation of life. Topics to explore: Are Reproductive Technologies Beneficial or Harmful? Should Postmenopausal Women Become Pregnant? Is Surrogate Motherhood Beneficial or Harmful? Do Reproductive Technologies Result in Unethical Treatment of Embryos? What Would Be the Effect of Regulating Reproductive Technologies?
      __8. Smoking
      -Concerns about the health effects of tobacco have led to increased public support for restricting and reducing smoking. Smokers protest these limitations while the tobacco industry defends its products. Topics to explore: Are the Health Risks of Smoking Exaggerated? Is the Tobacco Industry to Blame for Leading People to Smoke? How Can Smoking Be Reduced? Are Increased Measures Needed to Combat Teen Smoking? Should Government Regulations of Smoking Be Increased?
      __9. Violence in the Media
      -Many parents, lawmakers, and researchers believe that violent movies, television programs, music, and video games contribute to the high rates of violence in American society. Debate the issue with the following topics: How Serious Is the Problem of Violence in the Media? Does Violence in the Media Make Children and Teenages More Violent?

  36. QUESTION:
    Why does it hurt during sex and afterwords?
    Could anyone help me? everytime that iam havin sex in afterwords it hurts. Is this normall?
    Thanks for the great answers,but to tell ya iam lubricated at all times. It just hurts during and afterwords.

    • ANSWER:
      Dyspareunia [painful intercourse with or without bleeding] can be caused by a number of factors, including vaginal dryness, atrophic vaginitis (thinning of the vaginal lining in some women, usually postmenopausal or those on certain drug therapies, including antihistamines and GnRH agonists), an allergic reaction such as to clothing, spermicides, douches or condoms, Endometriosis, Vulvodynia, Vulvar vestibulitis, Interstitial Cystitis, Lichen planus/Lichen sclerosis, urinary tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, sexually transmitted diseases and psychological or physical trauma. Dyspareunia is diagnosed based on specific symptoms and your medical history, and is treated through a number of different means depending on the cause, including use of lubrication during sexual activity, antifungals, antibiotics or other medications, recommending Sitz baths, use of topical estrogen cream or steroid cream, pain medications, surgery where appropriate (such as in the case of Endometriosis; see www.endocenter.org for a self-test to determine if this is your problem) and sometimes physical therapy with biofeedback. In order to determine the cause of your specific dyspareunia (and thereby enable you to choose a proper treatment), talk with your OBGYN.

  37. QUESTION:
    Are multiple masses (not cysts) in the breast an indication of cancer?
    My mother went in for a biopsy today in belief that there was 1 mass (maybe 2) in her breast. During the biopsy, the doctors found that there were 3 masses and they took samples from each mass. Does having multiple masses necessarily indicate that it is cancer? Or can multiple masses be benign?

    As a side note, she has yearly exams and was recently having pain. She's 47.

    • ANSWER:
      April A,
      Many conditions can mimic breast cancer by producing breast lumps, nipple discharges, or inflammation. Very few instances of these symptoms are due to cancer. In fact, more than half of all women will develop a breast problem in their lifetime. When these are biopsied (a surgical procedure to determine whether a lump is cancerous), 75% of lumps and other problems turn out to be benign (non-cancerous). [There is now a blood test that will accurately detect early cancer of all types. The test is called AMAS. AMAS stands for "anti-malignin antibody in serum." The test is extremely sensitive; blood levels of this antibody rise early in the course of the vast majority of cancers of all types, regardless of location in the body. The test is especially useful when cancer is suspected but has not been confirmed by a biopsy. So why are all of the expensive, dangerous biopsies carried out to 'detect' cancerous growths? One can only assume that Medicare/Medical Insurers pay doctors a larger fee for biopsies than pregnancy tests]. Fibrocystic Change - Lumpy Breast - is a condition which is by far the most frequently occurring breast disease. It is most often seen in women between 35 and 50. Fibroadenomas are the most common benign solid tumours of the breast tissue. They may be seen at any time after puberty, but occur most frequently in women in their third decade and represent the most common breast tumours in women younger than 25 years of age. These tumours may also be seen in postmenopausal patients, but it is most likely that the fibroadenomas in these patients developed prior to menopause and become clinically apparent with involution of the surrounding breast tissue. The fact that multiple masses have been discovered does not rule out the possibility of malignancy. However, breast cancer has few warning signs, and pain is rarely a symptom of the disease. (Mastalgia, the medical term for breast pain, has not been that well studied, I presume, partly because even to this day most scientists are men and don’t have a problem with breast pain!)

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  38. QUESTION:
    What do you know about fibrods?
    What are the consequences? Symptoms? Treatment? Is there any way to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids

      Fibroids, or myomas, are growths or benign tumours that form inside the uterus (womb). Around four in 10 women over the age of 40 will have fibroids. No one knows why fibroids develop, but it is suspected that the sex hormones – oestrogen and progesterone – play significant roles. This is because fibroids rarely grow in prepubescent girls and postmenopausal women. Pre-existing fibroids stop growing, and may even shrink, once a woman passes the menopause.

      Symptoms
      Most women with fibroids have no symptoms. When present, symptoms may include:

      Heavy periods
      Lengthy periods
      Period pain
      Spotting between periods
      Painful intercourse
      A sensation of heaviness or pressure in the back, bowel and bladder
      Frequent urination
      A lump or swelling in the lower abdomen.

      Fibroids often cause no problems, but may occasionally be associated with infertility, miscarriage and premature labour. Other possible problems include heavy, lengthy and painful periods. Treatment depends on the size, number and location of the fibroids, but may include drugs, procedures performed under local anaesthetic and surgery. Fibroids rarely turn cancerous.

      Treatment
      Treatment depends on the location, size and number of the fibroids, but may include:
      Monitoring – if the fibroids are causing no symptoms and are not large, a ‘wait and see’ approach is usually adopted.
      Drugs – such as hormones, used in combination to shrink the fibroids prior to surgery.
      Arterial embolisation – under local anaesthetic, a fine tube is passed via an artery in the arm or leg into the main artery supplying the fibroid with blood. The whole process is monitored by x-ray. Fine particles (like sand) are then injected into the artery to block the blood supply to the fibroid. The fibroid slowly dies and symptoms should settle over a few months.
      Hysteroscopy – the fibroids are removed via the cervix, using a hysteroscope.
      Laparoscopy – or ‘keyhole surgery’, where a thin tube is inserted through the abdomen to remove the fibroids.
      Open surgery – larger fibroids need to be removed via an abdominal incision. This procedure weakens the uterine wall and makes Caesarean sections for subsequent pregnancies more likely.
      Hysterectomy – the surgical removal of some, or all, of the uterus. Pregnancy is no longer possible after a hysterectomy.

  39. QUESTION:
    Who is the inventor of the bone scan?
    I need help finding the inventor or teh historical perspective of teh bone scan. In other words I need to ind out about the first version of the machine and how the tehnology has changed over the years

    • ANSWER:
      the late John R. Cameron from 2002, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison,

      Meet the Inventor of the Machine. "There are now over 50,000 bone densitometers in the world. I doubt if more than 50 radiologists in the world know who invented the instrument." These are the words of the late John R. Cameron from 2002, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the inventor of the bone densitometer.

      In 1959, Cameron discovered that there was no way to detect early osteoporosis, even though many older women were breaking their hips and, in some cases, dying. He invented the densitometer in 1960, but it was not often utilized because there was no known treatment for the problem. Yet, on its 25th anniversary, Investigative Radiology listed one of Cameron's early bone densitometry publications (Invest. Radio. 3:141; 1968) as its single most cited article.

      Today, the densitometer is an important diagnostic tool that is used to measure the amount of matter in a given bone, or bone mineral density (BMD). Cameron died in 2005, believing that he received little recognition for his invention. He did, however, believe that his contribution led to many useful clinical applications in accurately measuring bone densitometry. Lunar Radiation (now GE-Lunar) arose directly from early work done in Cameron's laboratory.

      The Need For Bone Densitometers Grows
      As life expectancy increases, so does the occasion of certain chronic disabilities, including osteoporosis, among the elderly. Osteoporosis is also a risk factor in postmenopausal women because of estrogen deficiency and other factors. Osteoporosis and osteopenia (BMD that is lower than normal peak BMD but not low enough to be classified as osteoporosis) affect as many as 44 million people age 50 and older in the United States alone.

      Bone mass usually peaks between the third and fourth decades of life. After this time, there is a natural decline that is more prominent in elderly and postmenopausal women. In these groups, it has been observed that the higher the peak bone mass achieved, the less likely bone fractures will occur. Factors such as lifestyle and genetic makeup also affect bone density.

      It is therefore essential to have an understanding of bone acquisition and bone loss so that physicians can plan more effective preventive and treatment protocols. There are several different methods of determining BMD, including some that utilize CT and ultrasound technologies, though the most prevalent is Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). DEXA uses two X-rays at different energy levels to measure BMD through the rate of absorption. With processes like these, researchers are finding new ways to treat the effects of aging, injury and disease.

      A densitometer measures bone mineral density, assessing the strength of the bones and the probability of a fracture. It is a noninvasive procedure and, unlike a bone scan, a densitometer does not inject a radioactive contrast material into the bloodstream. Some bone densitometry machines are made for scanning extremities, and can be found in small practices; others are made for full-body scans and are usually based in a hospital, medical office, or clinic.

      Companies that Provide Sales And Service
      For this report, we interviewed several of the leading sales and service companies who sell bone densitometers manufactured by leading companies like GE Lunar, Hologi, Norland, Schick Technologies, DMS, and Osteometer Meditech. The equipment ranges from smaller, less expensive peripheral diagnosis units to larger DEXA tables that provide the gold standard in BMD.

      TRITECH SERVICES out of Louisville, Kentucky specializes in Hologic and Lunar densitometers. Vice President John Cline revealed that the company's main engineer was a field engineer for Hologic and has been working on these systems for over 10 years. "He was also cross-trained on the Lunar products, and he can service Norlands," says Cline. Like some other companies we spoke with, TRITECH sells and services all of its refurbished equipment. Cline said that the company also stocks Hologic parts. Cline finds opportunity in the fact that those who are in the market to purchase a densitometer do not have to spend up to 0,000 on a new system when they can purchase a system with the exact same technology for 35 to 40 percent less.

      Integrity Medical Systems of Fort Meyers, Florida has one of the largest medical equipment inventories in the country, including 70 to 80 bone densitometers in stock at any given time. CEO David Denholtz believes that when someone buys equipment from Integrity Medical Systems, they aren't just buying the equipment - they are buying into the company. Says Denholtz, "we sell from stock and have our own parts inventory and a dedicated factory-trained, bonded service team that specializes in refurbished and new bone densitometry equipment and parts. We have over 150 systems installed worldwide, 70-plus systems in stock and over 10,000 parts ready to ship. We treat our business like a science - offering the highest level of service and commitment to our customers." This CEO knows that servicing healthcare professionals, dealers, hospitals, OEMs and a host of international clients is a huge responsibility, but his company does it and does it well.

      One of Denholtz's main concerns is the DRA (Deficit Reduction Act) and how it will affect Medicare reimbursement rates. He is worried that Medicare will pay less than the estimated cost of performing the procedure in physician offices, and that independent reimbursement for the bone densitometry tests necessary for the diagnosis of women at risk for osteoporosis (a recently enacted Medicare screening benefit) will be reduced by over 40%. "It will force many doctors and centers that offer bone density tests to discontinue the service, and that will definitely affect companies who sell densitometers and medical equipment," said Denholtz.

      Metropolis International of Long Island City, New York buys, sells and rents quality pre-owned medical equipment. President Leon Gugel believes that when it comes to densitometers, "any system that a hospital or clinic purchases should be purchased from a trusted and reputable company. The end user has to find a comfort level with a particular company or person and then move on to pricing and manufacturer preference." Gugel adds, "if a hospital is dealing with a reputable company like Metropolis International, they will always get a great price and great service." When asked what he felt the biggest challenges were facing bone densitometer ISOs (independent service organizations), he said, "Having the right experienced people to perform the work that may be required. Some people fix things without really knowing what they are doing." He said that the most common problems with bone densitometers are the drive belts or a missing positioner, but over the past 10 to 12 years, the bone density systems are "good robust" systems that are pretty much "break free."

      "When the technicians at Metropolis International refurbish a bone densitometer, they test the unit first to see what needs to be done. They replace all belts, boards, and peripherals and test the system. The panels are stripped, primed and repainted. The units are rebuilt and tested to make sure they are up to OEM specifications," explained Gugel.

      Michael D. Lies, owner of Medical Advantages Inc., began in the medical field fourteen years ago. His business and clinical background and knowledge as a licensed radiologic technologist gives him an understanding of his clients' need to succeed in the highly competitive medical services field. Lies sells all diagnostic imaging systems, including densitometers, and uses dedicated contractors in every modality. "We provide turnkey deals, i.e. our trained engineers will install, calibrate and provide applications training, logistical and operational support for any late model bone densitometry system(s) that a customer purchases," explains Lies. He feels that all OEMS are friendly to third parties -- when the ISOs come looking for parts, that is -- and he is also concerned about the DRA proposed cutbacks. When asked what he felt was the most common problems that need repair in a bone densitometer, Lies said, "When we refurbish a densitometer, we look at the detectors that frequently need to be replaced, as well as replace all wiring, tubes and any worn parts."

      Absolute Medical Equipment specializes in new and used equipment from top manufacturers that includes bone densitometers, and other equipment.

      Abe Sokol, marketing director, said that sales and service of the machines are accomplished by using a network of affiliated bone densitometer technicians nationwide. He believes that problems can arise when a piece of equipment is installed or removed. "Installations and deinstallations must be done professionally to avoid damaging valuable equipment. We have come across equipment that was not deinstalled properly and have seen problems ranging from missing parts to damaged tubes," explained Sokol.

  40. QUESTION:
    how can vitamen E prevent coronary heart disease?
    How can Vitamen E prevent the risk of heart disease?

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn't. For several years, it was THE supplement to help prevent heart disease.
      Newest research showed that it was not effective:

      Coronary heart disease
      Evidence that vitamin E could help prevent or delay coronary heart disease (CHD) comes from several sources. In vitro studies have found that the nutrient inhibits oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, thought to be a crucial initiating step for atherosclerosis [6]. Vitamin E might also help prevent the formation of blood clots that could lead to a heart attack or venous thromboembolism [15].

      Several observational studies have associated lower rates of heart disease with higher vitamin E intakes. One study of approximately 90,000 nurses found that the incidence of heart disease was 30% to 40% lower in those with the highest intakes of vitamin E, primarily from supplements [16]. Among a group of 5,133 Finnish men and women followed for a mean of 14 years, higher vitamin E intakes from food were associated with decreased mortality from CHD [17].

      However, randomized clinical trials cast doubt on the efficacy of vitamin E supplements to prevent CHD [18]. For example, the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, which followed almost 10,000 patients at high risk of heart attack or stroke for 4.5 years [19], found that participants taking 400 IU/day of natural vitamin E experienced no fewer cardiovascular events or hospitalizations for heart failure or chest pain than participants taking a placebo. In the HOPE-TOO followup study, almost 4,000 of the original participants continued to take vitamin E or placebo for an additional 2.5 years [20]. HOPE-TOO found that vitamin E provided no significant protection against heart attacks, strokes, unstable angina, or deaths from cardiovascular disease or other causes after 7 years of treatment. Participants taking vitamin E, however, were 13% more likely to experience, and 21% more likely to be hospitalized for, heart failure, a statistically significant but unexpected finding not reported in other large studies.

      The HOPE and HOPE-TOO trials provide compelling evidence that moderately high doses of vitamin E supplements do not reduce the risk of serious cardiovascular events among men and women >50 years of age with established heart disease or diabetes [21]. These findings are supported by evidence from the Women's Angiographic Vitamin and Estrogen study, in which 423 postmenopausal women with some degree of coronary stenosis took supplements with 400 IU vitamin E (type not specified) and 500 mg vitamin C twice a day or placebo for >4 years [22]. Not only did the supplements provide no cardiovascular benefits, but all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the women taking the supplements.

      The latest published clinical trial of vitamin E's effects on the heart and blood vessels of women included almost 40,000 healthy women ≥45 years of age who were randomly assigned to receive either 600 IU of natural vitamin E on alternate days or placebo and who were followed for an average of 10 years [23]. The investigators found no significant differences in rates of overall cardiovascular events (combined nonfatal heart attacks, strokes, and cardiovascular deaths) or all-cause mortality between the groups. However, the study did find two positive and significant results for women taking vitamin E: they had a 24% reduction in cardiovascular death rates, and those ≥65 years of age had a 26% decrease in nonfatal heart attack and a 49% decrease in cardiovascular death rates.

      The most recent published clinical trial of vitamin E and men's cardiovascular health included almost 15,000 healthy physicians ≥50 years of age who were randomly assigned to receive 400 IU synthetic alpha-tocopherol every other day, 500 mg vitamin C daily, both vitamins, or placebo [24]. During a mean followup period of 8 years, intake of vitamin E (and/or vitamin C) had no effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular morality. Furthermore, use of vitamin E was associated with a significantly increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke.

  41. QUESTION:
    What organs are effected by adenosarcoma and why?

    • ANSWER:
      It is a complex tumor containing both glandular and connective tissues. (uterus, ovaries, etc.)

      also see:

      Malignant mixed mullerian tumour, uterine

      (also called carcinosarcoma, or mixed mesodermal tumour), a subtype of uterine sarcoma that consists of both endometrial carcinoma and stromal sarcoma. The sarcomatous component may consist of malignant forms of tissue normally found in the uterus (homologous) or consist of malignant forms of tissue not normally found in the uterus (heterologous). Carcinosarcoma accounts for about 40% of uterine sarcomas. Most patients are postmenopausal, and there is an increased risk in patients with a history of pelvic irradiation or Tamoxifen use. At the time of diagnosis, there is usually myometrial invasion, local spread, and peritoneal metastases. Lymphatic and haematogenous dissemination also occurs, and lung metastases are relatively common. Most patients present with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding or discharge. Treatment consists of radical hysterectomy. Radiochemotherapy is usually required as well. Prognosis is poor, with an overall 5-year survival of 30%.

  42. QUESTION:
    Can you get vitamin D benefit without going in the sun?
    Much talk about having sun exposure, for vitamin D. Can you get your D from food and supplements. I also realize you can't use sunlight thru glass? Does sunlight go thru clothing? In a cold climate, you'd have very little bare skin exposed to sunlight? What's the minimum amount of time, and what percentage of the body needs complete exposure? Aren't those tanning salons the equivalent of sunshine??

    • ANSWER:
      There are Vitamin D supplements... available as D2 and D3... and are definitely recommend...especially for people who live in the North. The following studies explain why.

      People who do not get enough vitamin D may be at significant risk for developing cancer. This is according to a study conducted by Creighton University School of Medicine.
      The four-year, randomized study followed 1,179 healthy, postmenopausal women from rural eastern Nebraska.* Participants taking calcium, as well as a quantity of vitamin D3 nearly three times the U.S. government’s Recommended Daily Amount (RDA) for middle-age adults, showed a dramatic 60 percent or greater reduction in cancer risk than women who did not get the vitamin.

      The results of the study, conducted between 2000 and 2005, confirm that vitamin D is a critical tool in fighting cancer as well as many other diseases.

      Research participants were all 55 years and older and free of known cancers for at least 10 years prior to entering the Creighton study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take daily dosages of 1,400-1,500 mg supplemental calcium, 1,400-1,500 mg supplemental calcium plus 1,100 IU of vitamin D3, or placebos. National Institutes of Health funded the study.

      Over the course of four years, women in the calcium/vitamin D3 group experienced a 60 percent decrease in their cancer risk than the group taking placebos.

      On the premise that some women entered the study with undiagnosed cancers, researchers then eliminated the first-year results and looked at the last three years of the study. When they did that, the results became even more dramatic with the calcium/vitamin D3 group showing a 77% cancer-risk reduction.

      In the three-year analysis, there was no statistically significant difference in cancer incidence between participants taking placebos and those taking just calcium supplements.
      Through the course of the study, 50 participants developed nonskin cancers, including breast, colon, lung and other cancers.

      There is a growing body of evidence that a higher intake of vitamin D may be helpful in the prevention and treatment of cancer, high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.

      Humans make their own vitamin D3 when they are exposed to sunlight. In fact, only 10-15 minutes a day in a bright summer sun creates large amounts of the vitamin. However, sunscreen blocks most vitamin D production.

      In addition, the latitude at which you live and your ancestry also influence your body’s ability to convert sunlight into vitamin D. People with dark skin have more difficulty making the vitamin. Persons living at latitudes north of the 37th parallel cannot get their vitamin D naturally during the winter months because of the sun’s angle.

  43. QUESTION:
    what are the advantages of taking grapeseed extracts?
    my friends have been taking the pills with grapeseed extrract, and they are claiming that grapeseed extracts can lower choleserol, decrease cardivascular diseases, etc. how true and effective are these grapeseed extracts?

    • ANSWER:
      Now, a new research study finds that a diet moderately high in grape seed extract can blunt salt (sodium chloride)-sensitive hypertension to about the same extent as treatment with either plant estrogens or 17-estradiol. This suggests that mechanisms other than the estrogen receptor activation actually provides the beneficial effects of estrogen therapy and that grape seed extract may be a useful supplement to blunt hypertension and other cardiovascular symptoms in postmenopausal women. >>>

      The results of the study were presented at Digestive Disease Week conference held in Chicago. Dr. Thomas Brzozowski said that, because grapefruit is acidic in nature, people with ulcers might assume that they should not include the fruit in their diet. “However, this research suggests the exact opposite." It is widely accepted in the conference that the extracts would be very useful for the patients who do not want to take anti-secretory drugs. Grapefruit juice can interact with some drugs, including cholesterol-reducing statins, and calcium channel blockers, g

      Chemicals found in grape seeds significantly inhibited growth of colorectal tumors in both cell cultures and in mice, according to researchers who have already demonstrated the extract's anti-cancer effects in other tumor types.

  44. QUESTION:
    What can be done for an ovarian cyst?
    I have a friend who is in pain and thinks it is an ovarian cyst but does not want to go in for surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      How are cysts treated?

      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn’t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you’re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      * Laparoscopy—if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
      * Laparotomy—if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.

      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

  45. QUESTION:
    what is a caruncle and are they dangerous?
    during a recent urology exam the MD said I have a caruncle.does anyone know what this is or what causes it? mine is in a very private place..thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Urethral caruncle is a reddened area involving the posterior margin of the urethral orifice. It is believed to be due to the prolapse of the posterior wall of the urethra. Urethral caruncle is generally asymptomatic and found in postmenopausal women. Occasionally they may present with dyspareunia and/or vaginal bleeding.

      Urethral caruncle Facts and Information
      Urethral caruncles, which often originate from the posterior lip of the urethra, may be described as fleshy outgrowths of distal urethral mucosa. They are usually small but can reach 1-2 cm in diameter.

      Most urethral caruncles are asymptomatic; however, some may be painful, and others may be associated with dysuria. Larger necrotic lesions may bleed. Some caruncular lesions may look like urethral carcinoma.

      Symptom of Urethral caruncle
      The primary sign of this problem is a thin, reddish membrane protruding from one portion of the urethral opening. Other symptoms include bleeding and urination problems such as frequency, urgency and pain. Here are the list of Symptom of Urethral caruncle

      Painful micturition or dyuspareunia.
      bloody spotting with mild trauma
      Sassile or pedunculated red mass that is tender to touch.
      Treatment and Cure of Urethral caruncle
      Urethral caruncles may be associated with tuberculosis, intestinal ectopia, and unusual neoplasms; however, reports of these associations are rare.

      Treat most patients conservatively with warm sitz baths. Topical estrogen creams and topical anti-inflammatory drugs may also be useful.Treatment is generally with diathermy or surgical excision.

  46. QUESTION:
    What about pain during and after sex?
    Within the last couple of months, during sex it has gotten extremely painful, and afterwards, the lower part of my stomach above my hips gets this stabbing pain (extremely painful) and decreases my mobility for hours. I get this at random times during the day, almost making me collapse. Anyone know what this is, or what may be causing it?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have what is known as Dyspareunia. Dyspareunia can be caused by a number of factors, including vaginal dryness, atrophic vaginitis (thinning of the vaginal lining in some women, usually postmenopausal or those on certain drug therapies, including antihistamines and GnRH agonists), an allergic reaction such as to clothing, spermicides, douches or condoms, Endometriosis, Vulvodynia, Vulvar vestibulitis, Interstitial Cystitis, Lichen planus/Lichen sclerosis, urinary tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, sexually transmitted diseases and psychological or physical trauma. Dyspareunia is diagnosed based on specific symptoms and your medical history, and is treated through a number of different means depending on the cause, including use of lubrication during sexual activity, antifungals, antibiotics or other medications, recommending Sitz baths, use of topical estrogen cream or steroid cream, pain medications, surgery where appropriate (such as in the case of Endometriosis; see www.endocenter.org for a self-test to determine if this is your problem) and sometimes physical therapy with biofeedback. In order to determine the cause of your specific dyspareunia (and thereby enable you to choose a proper treatment), talk with your OBGYN.

  47. QUESTION:
    I have been diagnosed with a anteverted uterus and intramural fibroid on the right lateral wall of my uterus?
    I have searched the web and nothing really explains to me what either of these diagnosis mean. I have been 'feeling' this fibroid alot recently and appears to be growing bigger causing a feeling of a large mass on my right hand side. Can anyone explain if this is normal and what intramural and anteverted uterus mean. Also if anyone knows of any natural ways the fibroid could be shrunk, I would be grateful to hear of them. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Let's see if I can help. Anteverted uterus refers to the direction the top of the uterus is pointing. Some are anteverted and some are retroverted. Anteverted is the most common and acceptable position of the uterus. This implies that the top is towards your front, or tummy. So there is nothing wrong with that. It is completeley normal--now on to the fibroid issue.

      Fibroids

      Fibroids, or myomas, are growths or benign tumours that form inside the uterus (womb). Around four in 10 women over the age of 40 will have fibroids. No one knows why fibroids develop, but it is suspected that the sex hormones - oestrogen and progesterone - play significant roles. This is because fibroids rarely grow in prepubescent girls and postmenopausal women. Pre-existing fibroids stop growing, and may even shrink, once a woman passes the menopause. Fibroids often cause no problems, but may occasionally be associated with infertility, miscarriage and premature labour. Other possible problems include heavy, lengthy and painful periods. Treatment depends on the size, number and location of the fibroids, but may include drugs and surgery. Fibroids rarely turn cancerous.
      .
      Different types
      Fibroids are categorised by their location, which includes:
      Intramural - growing in the uterine wall. Intramural fibroids are the most common variety.
      Submucosal - growing in the uterine lining (endometrium). This type tends to cause excessive menstrual bleeding and period pain.
      Subserosal - growing on the exterior wall of the uterus. They sometimes appear like long stalks

      Generally speaking if it doesn't bother you too much, just let it be.

  48. QUESTION:
    forteo injections feed back on this injection?
    I hope to have good results. Any positive, negative on this?

    • ANSWER:
      I, myself, have NOT used this drug,but the FDA reports the following:

      Forteo

      Generic Name: teriparatide
      Dosage Form: injection, solution

      Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

      The safety of Forteo in the treatment of osteoporosis in men and postmenopausal women was assessed in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 1382 patients (21% men, 79% women) aged 28 to 86 years (mean 67 years). The median durations of the trials were 11 months for men and 19 months for women, with 691 patients exposed to Forteo and 691 patients to placebo. All patients received 1000 mg of calcium plus at least 400 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day.

      The incidence of all cause mortality was 1% in the Forteo group and 1% in the placebo group. The incidence of serious adverse events was 16% in Forteo patients and 19% in placebo patients. Early discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in 7% of Forteo patients and 6% of placebo patients.

      The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of Forteo. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

      Osteosarcoma: Cases of bone tumor and osteosarcoma have been reported rarely in the postmarketing period. The causality to Forteo use is unclear. Long term osteosarcoma surveillance studies are ongoing [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]
      Hypercalcemia: Hypercalcemia greater than 13.0 mg/dL has been reported with Forteo use.
      Adverse events reported since market introduction that were temporally (but not necessarily causally) related to Forteo therapy include the following:

      Allergic Reactions: Anaphylactic reactions, drug hypersensitivity, angioedema, urticaria
      Investigations: Hyperuricemia
      Respiratory System: Acute dyspnea, chest pain
      Musculoskeletal: Muscle spasms of the leg or back
      Other: Injection site reactions including injection site pain, swelling and bruising; oro-facial edema

      I hope this information has some value to you..

  49. QUESTION:
    can you give me a scientific basis that endometrial cancer can occur at the age of 30?
    me and my co-researchers already had our case study defense but the panelists did not accept my rationale that endo CA commonly occurs at the age bracket 55-70 and only 2 to 5 percent occurs below 40. our patient was 30 years old when she had the ENDO CA... they said, why such slim percentage for below 40....can u help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Two reasons come to mind:
      1) First, MOST cancers occur in that age range, because cancer is primarily (by the numbers) a disease of older people, due to length of time it takes for genetic damage to accumulate and result in cancer.
      2) Second, menstruation provides a monthly "cleansing" effect of rapidly growing/dividing cells which are highly influenced by hormone levels; these cells being shed lowers the risk for a women until she goes through menopause, when it ceases. I cannot tell you whether the changing hormone milieu is a cause in this or not. Supporting evidence for this: tamoxifen, a well-studied hormonal agent for treatment of breast cancer, is associated with increase risk of uterine cancer, though this risk is primarily confined to postmenopausal women.

  50. QUESTION:
    ny friend has a pain in the lower back that comes around the?
    front to his abdomen?

    • ANSWER:
      Back Pain Health Center
      Low Back Pain - Cause
      Most low back pain is triggered by some combination of overuse, muscle strain, and injury to the muscles, ligaments, and discs that support the spine. Many experts believe that over time muscle strain can lead to an overall imbalance in the spinal structure. This leads to a constant tension on the muscles, ligaments, bones, and discs, making the back more prone to injury or reinjury.

      The causes of pain in the low back, or lumbosacral region, tend to add on to one another. For example, after straining muscles, you are likely to walk or move in different ways to avoid pain or to use muscles that aren't sore. That can cause you to strain other muscles that don't usually move that way.

      The most common causes of low back pain are:

      Injury or overuse of muscles, ligaments, facet joints, and the sacroiliac joints.
      Pressure on nerve roots in the spinal canal. Nerve root compression can be caused by:
      A herniated disc, often brought on by repeated vibration or motion (as during machine use or sport activity, or when lifting improperly), or by a sudden heavy strain or increased pressure to the lower back.
      Osteoarthritis (joint degeneration), which typically develops with age. When osteoarthritis affects the small facet joints in the spine, it can lead to back pain.
      Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis, vertebra defects that can allow a vertebra to slide over another when aggravated by certain activities.
      Spinal stenosis, or narrowing of the spinal canal, which typically develops with age.
      Fractures of the vertebrae caused by significant force, such as from an auto or bicycle accident, a direct blow to the spine, or compressing the spine by falling onto the buttocks or head.
      Spinal deformities, including curvature problems such as severe scoliosis or kyphosis.
      Compression fractures. Compression fractures are more common among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, or in men or women after long-term corticosteroid use. In a person with osteoporosis, even a small amount of force put on the spine, as from a sneeze, may cause a compression fracture.
      Less common spinal conditions that can cause low back pain include:

      Ankylosing spondylitis, which is a form of joint inflammation (arthritis) that most often affects the spine.
      Bacterial infection. Bacteria are usually carried to the spine through the bloodstream from an infection somewhere else in the body or from IV drug use. But bacteria can enter the spine directly during surgery or injection treatments, or as the result of injury. Back pain may be the result of an infection in the bone (osteomyelitis) or in the spinal cord (most often in the material covering the spinal cord, called an epidural infection).
      Spinal tumors, or growths that develop on the bones and ligaments of the spine, on the spinal cord, or on nerve roots.
      Paget's disease, which causes abnormal bone growth most often affecting the pelvis, spine, skull, chest, and legs.
      Scheuermann's disease, in which one or more of the bones of the spine (vertebrae) develop wedge-shaped deformities. This causes curvature of the spine (rounding of the back, or kyphosis), most commonly in the chest region.
      Other medical conditions that can cause pain that may be similar to low back pain include:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease.
      Aortic aneurysm.
      Peptic ulcers.
      Gallbladder disease.
      Pancreatitis.
      Urinary disorders such as kidney stones or urinary tract infections.
      Prostate disease.
      Your state of mind also has an effect on your level of pain and whether it becomes long-lasting (chronic). People who are depressed, under stress, unhappy in their work, or seeking money for an injury are more likely to have chronic back pain.


postmenopausal treatment

Menopause Alternative Treatments

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is a natural way to deal with menopause?
    I had cancer of the cervix, and the radiation treatment threw me into early menopause. What is a natural alternative to hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, and I have read all the latest info about natural alternatives to hormones, nothing really helps. The only remedy (partly a remedy) was to take some of the anti-anxiety medication like Prozac etc. Of course there are natural anti depressants (look at this site)
      http://www.menopause.realage.com/content.aspx/topic/17
      but I am not sure how well they alleviate the symptoms. I wish I kept these medical journals I get to give you the reference. If I find it I will let you have it.

  2. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  3. QUESTION:
    I am looking for a good healty concealer to cover my acne scars. What would be a good one?
    I have tried all of MACS concealers and liked them. However, they clogged my pores. I am looking for a healthy alternative concealer. I am switching to mineral makeup but need a good concealer because mineral makeup doesn't give you much coverage.

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is one of the most common skin disorders and affects mainly young people, but may even appear after the age of 30 years. This condition in many cases tends to disappear by itself after a certain period of time, however, if it is left untreated, it can cause deep scars in the skin. Acne can also cause psychological problems, especially among young people.

      These are the causes of this disorder:

      Excessive hormone production: Every square centimeter of skin contains about 100 sweat glands and 15 sebaceous glands that exist at the base of the hair and produce a substance called sebum. Sebum combined with sweat, form a liquid that acts as barrier against bacteria, parasites and fungus. However, under certain conditions the sebaceous glands produce more sebum than necessary. These conditions occur when there is a major hormonal change, such as an increase in androgens during puberty and an increase of progesterone during menopause. It seems that certain people have a strong sensitivity to these hormones and are therefore more likely to suffer from acne.
      Genetic factors: If your parents used to suffer from this disorder you are more likely to have it yourself. What is more, oily skin (which can be inherited) predisposes to acne due to the fact that it produces excessive sebum that blocks the skin's pores.

      Stress: Stress can increase the production of hormones, which cause acne outbreaks.

      Dietary factors: The excessive intake of fats, sweets, carbohydrates, alcohol and dairy products seem to make the situation worse. Sugar, in particular, is very harmful. In fact, certain pharmacological experiments have revealed that taking small doses of anti-diabetic medicines (which lower sugar in the blood) can improve acne.

      Constipation: surprisingly constipation can cause acne. Constipation leads to the failure to eliminate the toxins that accumulate in different parts of the body and particularly in the skin. Many times in fact, mild cases of acne have been cured due to the correction of this intestinal disorder.

      How to cure this problem:

      Drink plenty of water: it may sound too simple, but the most important thing to do is to drink at least eight glasses of water every day. Water is very beneficial for your skin's health.

      Drink green tea: another great natural treatment is green tea. It also has many other health benefits: it can reduce high cholesterol, infections, viruses, high blood sugar, headaches, and joint discomfort.

      Include fruits in your diet: There are many acids found in fruits that can help reduce sebum, which blocks the pores. Fruits can also eliminate excess toxins that build up in body and reduce the swelling and redness of spots. The best fruits to eat are apples, grapes and oranges. Also, including fresh fruits and green leafy vegetables in your diet can also help you get a better complexion.

      Although, these tips can be helpful but the only way to correct this problem permanently is to balance your hormones.

      .........

  4. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever been prescribed to get a shot called Lupron Depot?
    I have been recently diagnosed with endometriosis and my treatment is to get a Lupron Depot shot, every 3 months for 9 months and I am very weary about medications especially injections. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      The injection throws you into menopause without removing your ovaries. Its supposed to get rid of your pain. Get ready for menopause symptoms. Dont worry about the injection. Thats the easy part. If your having heavy bleeding. It will stop that too.
      Also, its only a temporary fix. You will return to normal after you stop taking the shots and be back in pain again and have to have an alternative treatment.
      Sorry.

  5. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  6. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  7. QUESTION:
    Is a migraine behind eyes and hot flush feeling on left side normal heading into menopause?
    I'm just wondering because it feels like I only get hot on the left side but it radiates to the right...I can feel my left side of my face heat up, but I don't sweat and my face doesn't get red. Or does it sound like something neurological?

    • ANSWER:
      OOOh yes! migraine, stress, anxiety, and many others bad feelings..No hormone replacement please, but natural therapeuty..try this : http://menopauseandweight.com/ Don’t let menopause ruin your quality of life! and Change to alternative and proven methods, natural treatments.
      GOG bless

  8. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  9. QUESTION:
    Anyone out there tired of these awful menopause symptoms?
    Hate these (blankity-blank) Hot flashes. Feels like my head is on fire. Ugh!!!!

    I hate getting old, but I guess considering the alternative, I guess it's ok.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Roz. I'm answering from the male perspective (I've had night sweats), and from an empathetic perspective - I have 5 sisters in various stages of menopause and a partner (Sassy) who just came off hormone replacement therapy and into the pit called menopause after a cervical cancer scare. And before going any further - I'm not a doctor. I'm able to diagnose and fix machines. People? Not so much.
      Sassy found a silver bullet for her hot flashes - venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor) - although it did cause a dry mouth as a side effect. It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms; many doctors aren't even aware of that use for the drug. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may work for you too. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary - or it may not work at all.
      Regardless, Sassy and I put together a web page (below) with comments about diet, herbal remedies, and some other ways to get relief from night sweats, hot flashes, etc. Keep in mind that herbal treatments for night sweats and hot flashes can be broken down into two categories: phytoestrogen and non-estrogenic herbs, and each has their proponents. Hope this helps.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to use a BIRTH CONTROL PATCH prior to losing virginity?
    Hi, I am a 22 year old virgin who's planning to lose it to my boyfriend soon. Do you think it's a smart move to start on the patch already before actually doing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  11. QUESTION:
    Ladies I have a Q on menopause symptoms and how to dodge them?
    what have you experienced besides the (in)famous hot flashes and what did you do about it? (Apart from SHT hormone therapy which I can't do) Txs!

    • ANSWER:
      I went through menopause without really knowing too much that I was,as I was still on the pill. I still had the hot flushes tho. Many of my friends go to health food stores there are many alternative treatments there, most work really well Good Luck

  12. QUESTION:
    Do any female animals experience menopause?
    If so, at what age do they experience it and what are the signs of menopause in say for example a rabbit.

    If not, how can you tell that an animal is to old to conceive a baby animal.

    I am mostly wondering about rabbits but I also want to know about any animal.

    • ANSWER:
      Humans (female) are a species that experience menopause. Info follows:

      Menopause
      Menopause is quite simply the final pause of menstruation. This phase of a woman's life is part of the natural aging process. It is not a disease or a disaster. Your ovaries slowly reduce the level of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) they produce and child bearing is no longer an option. For many women this is a big relief. Generally speaking, health professionals agree that 52 is the average age when full menopause takes affect. The full age range is between 42 to 56.

      Menopause is preceded by perimenopause and followed by post menopause. All three stages come with their own telltale signs with considerable overlap from one to the other. So, unlike the beginning of your period, which seems to happen in a single moment of time, menopause is very wishy washy. Full menopause is considered to be in effect when you have not had your period for a full year.

      Menopause is not experienced by all women in the same way. Much depends on the individual's diet, lifestyle, genetics and attitudes held by the woman, her family, culture and society about aging. If you come from a world that does not respect older people, and is narrowly focused on youth, your menopause transition period may be more difficult to navigate. However, you may also experience deep personal growth and a strong sense of liberation.

      Be aware that our commercialized society will try to medicalize your symptoms. Be wise. Look for natural alternatives before getting on the pill band wagon. Weigh the risks and benefits carefully. Become your own authority.

      There is a home-use test that you can take to determine if you are perimenopausal or fully menopausal. U.S Food and Drug Administration approved kits measure Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland. FSH levels increase temporarily each month to stimulate your ovaries to produce eggs. When you enter menopause and your ovaries stop working your FSH levels also increase. The test will provide a FSH level reading so that you can determine what stage of "the Pause" you are at.

      As for rabbits, this study may interest you:

      Lack of difference among progestins on the anti-atherogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol: a rabbit study
      Peter Alexandersen1,3, Jens Haarbo1, Pieter Zandberg2, Jørgen Jespersen1, Sven O. Skouby1 and Claus Christiansen1
      1 Center for Clinical & Basic Research, Ballerup Byvej 222, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark and 2 Department of Vascular Pharmacology, N.V.Organon, Molenstraat 110, 5340 BH Oss, The Netherlands

      3 To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: pa@ccbr.dk

      Abstract
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      BACKGROUND: Progestins in combination with estrogen are believed to have different effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different oral contraceptive formulations on the development of experimental atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity. METHODS: A total of 160 sexually mature rabbits were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to equally large groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) ethinyl estradiol (EE 70 µg/day, oral), (iii) desogestrel (DSG 525 µg/day, oral), (iv) gestodene (GSD 262.5 µg/day, oral), (v) levonorgestrel (LNG 525 µg/day, oral), (vi) EE + DSG, (vii) EE + LNG, or (viii) EE + GSD. After 31 weeks of treatment, aortic accumulation of cholesterol and vascular vasoreactivity (in vitro) were determined. RESULTS: Progestins alone did not reduce the accumulation of cholesterol. EE alone or in combination with a progestin reduced the accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (P < 0.0001). Isolated vessels from EE-treated animals relaxed significantly more to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine than did placebo (P < 0.001), whereas vessels treated with EE plus a progestin showed an intermediate response. CONCLUSION: The progestins investigated can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE.

      Key words: atherosclerosis/estrogen/progestins/rabbits/vascular reactivity

      Introduction
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The question of whether oral contraceptive (OC) formulations increase the risk of arterial events (such as myocardial infarction) in younger women remains unsolved. Several recent case–control studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction in women using OC compared with non-users (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Lewis, 1998; Dunn et al., 1999; 2001; Farley et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001; Rosendaal et al., 2002), although other recent data have not confirmed this observation (Sidney et al., 1998). Recent European studies have indicated that OC use is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, in contrast to US studies that found no increased risk among OC users (Lewis 1998; Sidney et al., 1998). Only a few studies have directly compared the effect on myocardial infarction of OC formulations containing a second-generation progestin (levonorgestrel) with those containing third-generation progestins (desogestrel or gestodene) (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Dunn et al., 2001; Tanis et al., 2001), but they were all designed as case–control studies; the reported relative risk in these studies varies (between 0.3 and 1.8), and the numbers are small.

      The relative preponderance in venous events (e.g. deep venous thrombosis) as compared with arterial events (e.g. myocardial infarction) in pre-menopausal women is gradually equalized as the menopause is reached, so that the relative frequency of these events is close to 1:1 in peri-menopausal women. Since OC are prescribed for millions of pre-menopausal (and peri-menopausal) women who use these formulations for many years, it would be of the utmost public health importance to establish even a small increase in the relative risk. Therefore, the issue of OC in relation to arterial disease is highly relevant. It should be borne in mind, however, that it is possible that for both OC and HRT users, there may be prothrombotic mechanisms in relation to arterial as well as venous complications that are not necessarily based on atherosclerosis, but that are reflected in the population-based studies. Primary (Rossouw et al., 2002) and secondary (Grady et al., 2002) prevention studies of HRT have failed to show cardioprotection in post-menopausal women.

      We report here the results from an experimental study in rabbits of atherosclerosis designed to investigate the effect of estrogen (ethinyl estradiol, EE) in combination with levonorgestrel (LNG), desogestrel (DSG), or gestodene (GSD) on vascular reactivity, lipoprotein metabolism, and the aortic accumulation of cholesterol.

      Materials and methods
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Study design
      A total of 160 sexually mature female rabbits of the Danish Country strain (SSC:CPH) were obtained from Statens Serum Institute, Denmark. They were individually housed at room temperature (20 ± 2°C), a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%, and with a 12 h light cycle. The study was conducted in the animal facilities at the Center for Clinical & Basic Research (CCBR), Ledoeje, Denmark. After a 2 week period of acclimatization, the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy to inhibit intrinsic production of sex hormones (Alexandersen et al., 1998). One week after surgery, the rabbits were then randomly assigned to one of the following eight treatment groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) EE (orally, 70 µg/day), (iii) DSG (orally, 525 µg/day), (iv) GSD (orally, 262.5 µg/day), (v) LNG (orally, 525 µg/day), (vi) EE continuously combined with DSG (doses as above) (EE + DSG), (vii) EE continuously combined with LNG (doses as above) (EE + LNG), or (viii) EE continuously combined with GSD (doses as above) (EE + GSD). We did not include a sham-operated group in this study as it was previously shown that sham operation per se in rabbits results in a mean accumulation of cholesterol that was not statistically significant from that of the non-treated control group (Haarbo et al., 1992). Hormone doses used in this study were chosen based on previous experience with these doses (the McPhail test in rabbits; EE, LNG and DSG) (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) or from in-house studies (GSD). The EE dose used was kept constant in all EE groups throughout the study period (31 weeks). We used the rabbit to evaluate the effect of sex steroids on atherogenesis because it is known to be a useful model of experimental atherosclerosis (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Sulistiyani et al., 1995).

      Key effect variables of the study comprised aortic atherosclerosis (i.e. fatty streaks and plaque formation), and vascular reactivity (primary key variables); and body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins, uterus wet weight, hepatic cholesterol content, uterine estrogen receptor content, liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count (secondary key variables).

      The study was approved and overviewed by the Experimental Animals Committee under the Danish Ministry of Justice. All procedures complied with the Danish guidelines for experimental animal studies.

      Rabbit chow
      Each rabbit was fed 100 g of chow per day throughout the entire study. The cholesterol-rich chow was prepared by first dissolving the hormone or the combination of hormones (all provided by N.V. Organon, The Netherlands) in ethanol (96%; 0.50 ml per animal per day), then mixing with maize oil (Unikem, Denmark). Another mixture was prepared by dissolving cholesterol (SIGC-8503; Bie & Berntsen A/S, Denmark) in maize oil by slow heating. The hormone solution and the cholesterol solution containing maize oil (total daily intake of maize oil was 8 ml per animal) were then mixed manually together with the pellets (Altromin 2123, Brogaarden, Denmark), as previously described (Alexandersen et al., 1998). Food consumption was monitored weekly by weighing remaining chow. All animals had free access to water.

      Blood samples
      Blood samples were taken at baseline (week 0) and in weeks 6, 14 and 30. Blood samples were collected from a lateral ear vein on fasting animals (24 h) and analysed at the CCBR laboratory (Ballerup, Denmark) immediately after collection, except for the progestin concentrations that were assessed at Organon.

      Safety variables
      Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, leukocyte count (Sysmex K-1000; Toa Medical Electronics, Inc., USA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) (Cobas Mira Plus; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., F.Hoffmann–La Roche, Switzerland) were determined in weeks 0, 6, 14 and 30.

      Serum lipids and lipoproteins
      Total serum cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured enzymatically by kinetic colorimetric methods (Cobas Mira). Ultracentrifuged lipoproteins were determined regularly throughout the study as described in detail elsewhere (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Alexandersen et al., 1998).

      Serum progestin concentrations
      A kinetic study was performed after 16 weeks of treatment to determine the serum concentrations of the respective progestins. Blood samples were taken before dosing, and then again 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h after dosing, but taking only two samples per animal in each group (providing 40 samples per group), to give an impression of the pharmacokinetic profile of these compounds. These hormone concentrations were determined at Organon’s laboratories.

      Desogestrel
      DSG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng DSG per ml plasma DSG and its internal standard (IS), an analogue of DSG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 325.4 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 147.2 for DSG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.1 for its IS.

      Gestodene
      GSD study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of GSD per ml plasma. GSD and its IS, an analogue of GSD, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Hypersil BDS C18 column. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 311.0 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.1 for GSD and m/z 339.10 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.20 for its IS.

      Levonorgestrel
      LNG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of LNG per ml plasma. LNG and its IS, an analogue of LNG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 313.3 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.2 for LNG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.10 for its IS.

      Aortic accumulation of cholesterol
      Necropsy (week 32) was done with an i.v. injection of 1–2 ml of mebumal (pentobarbital) 20% solution. The thoracic aorta (just above the aortic valves to the level of the diaphragm) was dissected free, and the connective tissue adhering to the adventitia was then carefully removed under running saline. The aorta was cut longitudinally and the luminal surface was rinsed with saline. The vessel was fixed at the corners with pins onto a piece of paper on a corkboard. The tissue was separated in two parts (a proximal and a distal part) at the level of the first intercostal arteries. The proximal part was utilized to strip the luminal layer containing the intima and part of the media from the underlying media/adventitia. The proximal part was weighed and stored at –20°C until analysed. For analysis, the luminal layer of the aortic tissue was minced and the lipids were extracted chemically with chloroform and methanol (2:1, vol/vol) over 24 h. The lipids were separated from the proteins (Haarbo et al., 1991). The total aortic cholesterol content in the tissue specimens was measured enzymatically after the fraction containing cholesterol had been taken to dryness by heating and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of 2-propanol. The amount of protein in the aorta was measured as described by Lowry (1951). The weight of the heart was recorded.

      Morphometric analysis of aortic plaque area
      The aorta (comprising the ascendant part, the arch, and the descendant part, from the aortic valves and to the first intercostal artery) was opened longitudinally and rinsed in 50% ethanol and dyed in Sudan Red for 1 min. Each aortic tissue dyed was projected onto a horizontal surface with a projecting videocamera (JAI 2040 Protec, Japan) and videotaped under microscope (Zeiss Stemi 2000/C, Germany). The images obtained were then digitized (ImagePro Plus, USA) to determine the surface involvement of atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) and the total area occupied by the atheroma plaque (see below). Surface involvement by atherosclerosis in an animal was assessed by tracing the contours of the lumen expressed as percentage of the total aortic area. Summing the degree of surface involvement per animal and dividing by the number of animals in the group, the mean degree of surface involvement by atherosclerosis in a treatment group was calculated. Sudan Red was found not to significantly interfere with chemical determination of aortic accumulation of cholesterol (data not shown).

      Preparation of aortic rings and tension monitoring
      Isolated vascular segments (3–4 mm transverse sections) from the thoracic aorta were prepared from the newly killed rabbit (Furchgott and Zawadzki 1980). Five to ten rabbits randomly selected from each group were used. The rings were immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs’ solution and cleaned under careful protection of the endothelium. The Krebs’ solution consisted of (mmol/l): NaCl 118.0, KCl 4.7, CaCl2 2.6, MgSO4 1.2, KH2PO4 1.2, NaCHO3 24.9, and glucose 11.1. The isolated rings were mounted in the organ bath on two parallel and horizontal stainless steel wires (40 µm in diameter) inserted into the lumen of the vessel. The bath contained Krebs’ solution at 37°C, carbonized with 95%/5% of O2/CO2. One hook was fixed, and the other connected to a force transducer measuring the isometric tension of the ring (Myograph 400; JP Trading A/S, Denmark). Initially, the rings were stretched to a basal tension of 2.0 g and allowed to equilibrate for 45 min. From other experiments, it was found that a basal tension of 2.0 g developed the maximal active tension in the rings (data not shown), and the basal tension was therefore increased to 2.0 g before each experiment and allowed to equilibrate for ≥30 min. The rings were then contracted twice with a 126 mmol/l K+ Krebs’ solution, which is identical to Krebs solution, except that Na+ in the Krebs’ was exchanged with K+ on a molar basis. The experiment began with repeated contraction with phenylephrine to 40% of their maximal contraction with high dose potassium (126 mmol/l). Cumulative dose–response curves to acetylcholine were then obtained in the concentration range of 10–8 to 10–5 mol/l. The rings were washed and allowed to relax. The vessels were then stimulated with phenyleprine again to 50% of the maximal contractile response to 126 mmol/l of K+ , and dose–response curves were subsequently obtained for sodium nitroprusside (4x10–8 to 1.3x10–5 mol/l).

      Liver accumulation of cholesterol
      The amount of cholesterol accumulated during the study was determined after homogenization of a liver biopsy taken at the time of necropsy. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations were assessed after homogenization and adjusted for hepatic protein similarly as described for aortic cholesterol determinations (Haarbo et al., 1991).

      The uterus and endometrial tissue
      The bicornuate uterus was cut at the level of the vagina and beginning of the salpinges, removed and the wet weight determined. A sample of endometrial tissue was excised and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at –85°C until analysis. For analysis, the endometrial tissue was homogenized and centrifuged at 800 g. The supernatant was then further centrifuged at 105 000 g, and the obtained supernatant (cytosol) was used for determination of cytosolic estrogen-binding capacity by steroid-binding assay with dextran-coated charcoal separation (Thorpe, 1987). The estrogen-binding capacity was adjusted for the protein concentration in the cytosol (Bradford, 1976). The 800 g pellet was washed, the nuclear receptors extracted by 0.6 mol/l KCl (Thorpe et al., 1986) and the nuclear estrogen receptor content determined by an enzyme immunoassay (Abott Laboratories). The inter-assay variation of the estrogen-binding capacity and the estrogen receptor (immunoassay) and protein determination were 7, 6 and 5% respectively. All analyses were done without knowledge of the treatment group.

      Statistics
      The mean levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins during the treatment period were calculated as the area under the curve (AUC). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the primary and secondary key variables. If ANOVA indicated statistical significance, Student’s t-test was used to compare groups against the placebo group using Dunnett’s correction for multiple comparisons. The relationship between aortic accumulation of cholesterol and the averaged serum total cholesterol (and lipoprotein) level was determined by correlation analysis. Dose–response curves for acetylcholine were performed for each treatment group (n = 5–10), and ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences among groups at each concentration of acetylcholine. Linear correlation was performed between accumulation of cholesterol and vascular response to acetylcholine. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate the significance of serum lipids and lipoproteins and of other non-lipid-mediated effects of the hormone treatments (independent variables) on the accumulation of cholesterol (dependent variable), and to study the degree of endothelial dysfunction (dependent variable) after correction for aortic accumulation of cholesterol and treatment (independent variables). All statistical analyses were performed with 5% as the level of significance.

      Results
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Table I gives the baseline characteristics for the eight study groups in terms of body weight and serum lipids and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). There was no statistically significant difference among groups for any variable tested. During the study, all groups significantly increased the body weight by 20% (P < 0.05). Treatment with DSG, GSD, or LNG did not significantly affect the average TC concentration (Table II). However, treatment with EE or EE plus a progestin significantly lowered average TC concentrations. Changes in TC were paralleled by modifications in the atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-C, IDL-C, and VLDL-C) (ANOVA: P < 0.001 for all), and all hormone treatments (progestins alone or in combination with EE) significantly increased average HDL-C concentrations (ANOVA: P < 0.001).

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      Table I. Baseline characteristics

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      Table II. Mean (SEM) serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations calculated from the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC)

      Cholesterol feeding per se resulted in an extensive aortic accumulation of cholesterol (nmol/mg wet weight) and this was significantly attenuated by long-term treatment with EE (P < 0.0001) or EE plus a progestin (P 0.5}.

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      Figure 1. Individual values for the aortic accumulation of cholesterol (µmol/mg wet weight) (upper part of the figure) or the morphometric data based on the area of the aortic arch covered by plaque (lower part of the figure) in the eight groups. EE = ethinyl estradiol; DGS = desogestrel; GTD = gestodene; LNG = levonorgestrel. Rabbits treated with EE alone or in combination with a progestin (DSG, GSD or LNG) had significantly lower accumulation of cholesterol and atherosclerotic plaque than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the progestin groups and the placebo group. ***P < 0.0001 (analysis of variance).

      Morphometric analysis of the plaque covering the surface of the thoracic aorta revealed that there were significantly more atheromatous lesions in the placebo group than in the EE and the EE + progestin groups (P < 0.001 for all groups versus placebo) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). This still held true after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P < 0.0001).

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      Figure 2. Representative samples of the aortic arches used for morhometric determination of the area covered by atherosclerotic plaques. Upper panel shows examples from the placebo group (cholesterol feeding alone; placebo), and the ethinyl estradiol (EE) group; whereas the lower panel shows examples from each of the EE + progestin groups. There was significantly less plaque accumulated in the EE group and the EE + progestin groups compared with placebo (P < 0.0001). Numbers indicate animal identifications.

      Figure 3 shows the EC50 to acetylcholine for the various treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with EE and EE plus a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than controls. The response to two physiological doses of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) in precontracted vessels is shown (centre and bottom). Vessels treated with EE relaxed significantly more to acetylcholine than control vessels or vessels with a progestin alone (P < 0.05). Moreover, combining EE with a progestin relaxed the vessels significantly more than control vessels but to a lesser extent than with EE alone. Vasorelaxation to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) correlated significantly and inversely to aortic accumulation of cholesterol (r = –0.39 P = 0.002 and r = –0.37 P = 0.004 respectively). To study the influence of increasing accumulation of cholesterol on the endothelial dysfunction evaluated by vascular reactivity in vitro, ANCOVA was done. We found that treatment with EE significantly and independently of aortic accumulation of cholesterol restored vasorelaxation {for EE: estimate [mean (SEM)] was 49.3 (10.4)%, P = 0.0001}, whereas the other treatments with EE plus a progestin or a progestin alone [DSG, –7.7 (9.2)% (not significant); GSD, –8.5 (9.1)% (not significant); LNG, –3.2 (9.7)% (not significant); EE + DSG, 17.7 (9.4)% (P = 0.065); EE + GSD, 13.2 (10.2)% (not significant); and EE ± LNG, 17.0 (8.8)% (P = 0.058)], or accumulation of cholesterol per se [–0.1 (0.2)%] did not.

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      Figure 3. The EC50 values for acetylcholine of isolated vessels for the treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with ethinyl estradiol (EE) alone or combined with a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than the placebo group. Long-term treatment with EE alone or combined with a progestin relaxed precontracted vessels to two physiological doses of acetylcholine [1.0x10–7 mol/l (centre) and 3.2x10–7 mol/l (bottom) significantly more than control vessels (black bar; P < 0.0001)]. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      The uterine wet weight was significantly higher in EE-treated animals than in controls (P < 0.0001; Figure 4). Progestins had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with any of the progestins significantly increased the wet weight indicating that the progestins with the doses used were not able to completely abolish the stimulatory effect of EE on this target organ (Figure 4). The uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor (ER) concentrations were significantly lowered in the EE group (P < 0.0001) and also in each of the EE plus progestin groups (P < 0.001–0.0001) relative to the placebo group, but also the progestins alone resulted in reduced concentrations compared with controls (P < 0.001) (Table III). For the nuclear ER concentrations there was no significant differences for any of the treatment groups, but all were lower than the control group.

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      Figure 4. Uterine wet weight for the rabbits according to treatment. The wet weight was significantly higher in ethinyl estradiol (EE)-treated animals than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Progestins themselves had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with a progestin all significantly increased the wet weight (P < 0.0001). Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

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      Table III. Hepatic cholesterol content and uterine cytosolic and uterine nuclear estrogen receptor content (fmol/mg protein)

      Safety aspects in relation to the study
      Figure 5 shows that the rabbits receiving EE or EE plus a progestin had concentration peaks for the progestin between 1 and 8 h after administration, as based on the kinetic study. The differences in the area under the curve for LNG versus DSG, and EE + LNG versus EE + DSG respectively, indicate a difference in the serum concentrations of these two progestins and may, in part, reflect difference in protein binding. Nevertheless, the serum concentrations of LNG in rabbits are similar to those reported for women (Kook et al., 2002).

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      Figure 5. Mean concentrations in serum (ng/ml) of the various progestins alone or when combined with ethinyl estradiol. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      During the last 6–8 weeks, the animals and particularly those in the EE group ceased increasing in body weight probably as a result of general health deterioration, and in the EE group a significant number of rabbits (n = 8) did not complete the study. Autopsy of these animals suggested a toxic estrogenic effect of the liver (liver cirrhosis) and of the uterus (probably deciduocarcinoma) by macroscopic examination, as previously reported as a consequence of exogenous estrogens (Janne et al., 2001). Due to decay of the internal organs the precise cause of death could not be determined in most cases. Table IV summarizes the percentage change in ALAT, haemoglobin, and white cell count. In the EE group, eight rabbits died prematurely (mostly after week 20). The temporary increase in ALAT (week 6) in the LNG, EE + DSG, EE + GSD, and EE + LNG groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment, but never fully returned to pretreatment values (Table IV). The general health of the animals in the EE group as determined by the haemoglobin, red blood cell count and haematocrit (not shown), and clinical appearance deteriorated in the last period of the study, probably as a result of a toxic effect of the EE dose used.

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      Table IV. Mean (SEM) percentage changes from baseline in liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count

      Discussion
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The principal results of this experimental study was that EE either alone or in continuous combination with one of the progestins used, i.e. LNG, DSG or GSD, significantly inhibited the aortic accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (cholesterol-feeding alone), whereas treatment with progestin monotherapy had a neutral effect on atherogenesis, irrespective of the progestin used. After adjustment for lipids and lipoproteins, there still was an apparently inhibitory effect of EE on aortic accumulation of cholesterol suggesting a lipid concentration-independent mechanism of action for EE on atherogenesis. A previous study in non-human monkeys also found that animals treated with EE in combination with LNG (as a triphasic OC formulation) had significantly less iliac artery atherosclerosis than control animals (Kaplan et al., 1995). Extrapolating experimental data to the human situation should be done with caution, but only two population-based studies have been specifically designed to investigate the role of second versus third generation OC formulations on the risk of myocardial infarction (Dunn et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001). In the study by Dunn et al., the relative risk was found to be increased with third generation compared with second generation OC formulations [OR, 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7–4.8)], whereas in the study by Tanis et al. the relative risk was found to be decreased with third generation compared with second generation formulations [OR, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2–1.1]. In addition, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking and arterial hypertension) seems to be crucial for development of myocardial infarction in women taking OC (World Health Organization, 1997; Farley et al., 1998; Lewis, 1998; Petitti et al., 2000; Tanis et al., 2001). In fact, the WHO study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in non-smoking women with no other cardiovascular risk factors who also reported blood pressure check before starting use of combined OC. Controlled, randomized studies are therefore clearly needed, although these studies will be of a considerable size taking into account the expected low incidence of myocardial infarction in pre-menopausal women (Crook and Godsland, 1998), and consequently such trials are very expensive to perform. Therefore, until clinical data on vascular endpoints are available, experimental animal studies may provide important clues in terms of the effect of various OC formulations on atherogenesis.
      Data on the direct effect of OC formulations on the human arterial system are lacking (Kuhl, 1996). We found evidence that the OC formulations used in this study had a direct effect on the arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of precontracted aortic rings was increased in the EE plus progestin groups, although less than in the EE group alone as compared with placebo. EE’s significant effect on restoring vasorelaxation was found to be independent of the accumulation of cholesterol in the aortic wall. However, we also found that the addition of the progestins influenced the estrogen-induced vasorelaxation (Figure 3), although by an unknown mechanism of action. Recently, in a study of precontracted rabbit jugular veins, EE, LNG, DSG and GSD were reported to induce relaxations in vessels with intact endothelium (Herkert et al., 2000). However, this area warrants further investigation.

      It is well known that cholesterol-fed rabbits show alterations in their lipoprotein metabolism that differ from the human situation (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992). Combination of EE with a progestin in this study reflected the estrogenic effect. Furthermore, the three combined treatments lowered serum lipids and the atherogenic lipoprotein levels significantly and similarly to EE monotherapy. In contrast, treatment with a progestin alone did not affect these variables differently from the controls, in accordance with earlier findings (Haarbo et al., 1992). In women, OC frequently increases serum triglycerides (Gevers Leuven et al., 1990; Kuhl et al., 1990; Leuven et al., 1990; Lobo et al., 1996; Cheung et al., 1999).

      The dose of EE was selected to reflect serum concentrations of EE in peri-menopausal women taking OC. However, the duration of the present study was longer than in many previous studies (20 weeks). Among the animals receiving EE alone, 40% died after only ≥21 weeks of treatment, whereas animals given combined treatment did not die prematurely. This suggests that the accumulated estrogen dose may have been too high and/or the study too long, as also indicated by the safety variables of the EE-treated animals at week 30 (Table IV), but also that adding a progestin was able to negate this toxic effect. Progestins were used in equipotent doses (i.e. in combination with EE they inhibit endometrial stimulation equally in humans) relative to each other. The selected dose of the progestins (µg per kg body weight) was chosen based on previous experience (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) and in-house studies (in Organon), but may be considered as high doses. All three OC formulations significantly decreased the concentration of the cytosolic ER concentration relative to controls, suggesting that these formulations affect the endometrium through a down-regulation of the cytosolic ER. Addition of a progestin in this study also down-regulated the ER although less than found for EE, and when combining EE with a progestin, the estrogen component dominated the ER regulation. It should, however, be emphasized that the lack of modifying effect of the progestins relative to the EE dose on the endometrium should not be taken as a lack of progestogenic effect, since the primary intention was to investigate the effect of these hormone combinations on atherosclerosis and arterial responsiveness.

      A type II statistical error is not likely to have occurred in our study. However, the accumulation of cholesterol (and amount of fatty streaks) in the EE group was significantly lower than that of the placebo animals. For a type II error to occur, the null hypothesis (that there was no difference in aortic accumulation of cholesterol between the EE and the placebo group) would not be true, and despite this, we would obtain a non-significant result, i.e. a ‘false negative’ result.

      In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits, the progestins investigated (LNG, DSG, or GSD) can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE, partly by decreasing atherogenic lipoproteins, and partly by a direct effect on the endothelium, modulating the aortic vasomotor response in vitro.

      References
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      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

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      Zandberg, P., Peters, J.L.M., Demacker, P.N., de Reeder, E.G., Smit, M.J. and Meuleman, D.G. (2001) Comparison of the antiatherosclerotic effect of tibolone with that of estradiol and ethinyl estradiol in cholesterol-fed, ovariectomized rabbits. Menopause, 8, 96–105.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Submitted on December 13, 2002; resubmitted on February 20, 2003; accepted on March 25, 2003.

      This article has been cited by other articles:

      T. Hayashi, T. Esaki, D. Sumi, T. Mukherjee, A. Iguchi, and G. Chaudhuri
      Modulating role of estradiol on arginase II expression in hyperlipidemic rabbits as an atheroprotective mechanism
      PNAS, July 5, 2006; 103(27): 10485 - 10490.
      [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

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      Online ISSN 1460-2350 - Print ISSN 0268-1161 [2007 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology]

  13. QUESTION:
    Can you get a rash from Menopause?
    I am getting this rash that really itches all over my neck and chest. Can it be related to Menopause? Or maybe and allergic reaction to something?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Stephanie

      Here are a few ideas to heal the issue.

      Cause
      Although most rashes are not symptoms of a serious health problem, they can be signs of allergies, liver and gallbladder problems, lupus, bleeding disorders, nutritional deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases.

      Rashes can also be due to the elimination of toxic wastes through the skin, or of an active immune reaction to an invading organism. Suppression of such a rash can lead to chronic disease states. Rather than try to suppress the rash, in such cases watchful waiting may be more advisable.

      Caution: If your rash becomes chronic, forms a "butterfly" shape over your cheeks, or is accompanied by high fever and joint pains, seek immediate medical attention to rule out more serious illnesses.

      ------------------------------...

      Natural Cures

      Diet: Screen for and eliminate any foods to which you are allergic or sensitive. Eat an organic, whole foods diet, with plenty of green leafy vegetables and yellow vegetables such as carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, and winter squash. Also drink plenty of pure, filtered water, and avoid all processed foods and chemical food additives.

      Flower Essences: Rescue Remedy Cream® applied topically to the affected areas.

      Herbs: The following herbal remedies can speed healing: A tincture of equal parts burdock root and gentian root, the fresh juice of coriander, and/or aloe vera juice or gel.

      Homeopathy: Useful homeopathic remedies include Belladonna, Sulfur, Graphites, and Calc carb.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment.
      *Purified water is essential for any hydrotherapy treatment. Remedies for Treating Chlorinated Bath Water offers clear instructions and recommendations.

      Juice Therapy: Drink fresh squeezed vegetable juices on a daily basis, especially carrot, beet, radish, and garlic juice.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following nutrients can be helpful to speed healing: vitamin A and vitamin E (both orally and applied topically over the affected areas), vitamin C, essential fatty acids (EFAs), flaxseed oil, and amma linolenic acid (GLA). In addition, add half a teaspoon of baking soda to water and drink every fifteen minutes. Do this three times, and then every two to three hours for two to three days or until the reaction subsides.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating rashes: Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Detoxification Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, Oxygen Therapy (Hydrogen Peroxide), and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

      Best of health to you

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I make peppermint essence?
    I have this peppermint plant at home, I want to do something with it.

    • ANSWER:
      One new aspect of Alternative Medicine is to use the essential oils of plants to treat all sorts of human conditions from fevers to dandruff. I have used many of these treatments myself and my family and pets, and found that some work very well indeed. However, the plant essences used are VERY expensive. They are also so very concentrated they can not be used on the skin undiluted. Just to give you an idea of how strong they are the usual dilution is three drops to a tablespoon of oil or water before use.

      Soooooooooo, rather than buy many expensive distilled essences, and then extensively dilute them, you can make "user friendly" body oils right from the start. What you need are your fresh or dried herb of choice, a jar with a lid, and some cooking oil. With these simple household items you can make your own oils!

      BASIC DIRECTIONS:

      Materials:
      Pint Jar with Lid (recycle!!)
      Fresh Herbs to tightly fill the jar
      Salad Oil
      Sterilized knife blade

      Process:
      Wash and sterilize the jar and lid. Boiling them both, and letting them air dry will work fine.

      Chop fresh herbs to fill the jar. The chopped edge will release more essence to the oil. Pack into the jar. Heat the oil to 160 degrees F. Carefully pour into jar over the herbs. Swish the sterilized knife blade around to release any air bubbles. Cap the jar. Store away from light for a month or more. The essence will infuse the oil to exactly the right dilution for therapeutic use or to just jazz up a salad!

      Suggested Oils for Beginners:

      Peppermint Infused Oil:
      Pick peppermint and process according to directions. If you pick herbs in the wild please never
      take more than a quarter of the patch. You may wipe out next year’s bounty if you take more. Peppermint oil is good for sore muscles and for congestion due to colds and flu. Another use is to rub on one’s abdomen to cure a stomach ache or cramps.

      Sage Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh sage and process according to the above instructions. Sage is an antiseptic and also useful for menopause symptoms.

      Rosemary Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh rosemary sprigs or use one of the containers of dry rosemary you can purchase at the grocery. Infuse according to directions. If you use the dry herbs you need much less only a quarter the amount of fresh. Rosemary is great for scalp problems like dandruff, and also is wonderful mixed half and half with Peppermint Infused oil for a muscle rub.

      Rose Petal Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh rose petals after the dew has dried. Process as above. Great for skin care, and a super mood improver in the winter months!

      To gain more knowledge of Aromatherapy check out the book:
      COMPLETE BOOK OF ESSENTIAL OILS and AROMATHERAPY
      by Valarie Ann Wormwood (great name for a herbalist!!!)

      This text is so helpful and comprehensive I think every house should have one! It focuses on uses of commercial distilled essences, but your infused oils will work fine adapted to her recipes.

      Peppermint Creams are made nearly entirely of icing sugar and are easy to make. Their melt-in-the-mouth quality makes them a treat for anytime.

      Ingredients
      450g icing sugar (plus 50g extra just in case)
      1 tablespoon milk
      1/2-1 teaspoon peppermint essence
      food colouring (optional)

      Steps
      Sift the 450g of icing sugar into a bowl.
      Add in the milk and peppermint essence.
      Mix with your hands as you would for dough.
      If it has too much icing sugar, add some milk. If it is too runny, add icing sugar.
      When it reaches a thick enough texture, take it out of the bowl, and knead it on the on top of a table sprinkled in icing sugar.
      Dust the surface with icing sugar.
      Roll out the mixture till it is about half a centimetre thick.
      Cut out small shapes (circles are easiest), and put the on a tray which has also been dusted with icing sugar.
      Leave for about 10-15 mins then turn over.
      In 15 mins time -enjoy!

      Tips
      If you want solid colour-add the colouring after the peppermint essence. However, for a marbled effect-add in just before you knead the mixture.
      Add in decorations as you put them on the tray-before they start to harden.
      For people who dont quite like peppermint, you could use other flavourings.
      Blue and green work best.

  15. QUESTION:
    Which natural product is working for hot flashes?
    I lost my left ovary to cancer couple of years ago. I wake up so often during the night and it's hard to go back to sleep again. I am against prescription drug which doctor would give me.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      There is two ways to go in the treatment of hot flushes. Allopathic or Naturopathic.

      As hot flashes are the main symptom of menopause, the favorite treatment by your treating doctor will be the Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). On the other hand, the use of herbs for hot flashes is more of alternative way. The basic are herbs such as the Licorice root, Panax ginseng, Black Cohosh and Wild yams. In lite cases, one can experiment with the combination of those.

      If the case of your problem is more deeply seated, then the use of special mixes is the right way to go.

      Out of those, the best ones (in my opinion) are: Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma Longifolia), Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pothoina) and Akar Serapat (Paramignya Polyne) mix.

      Or...
      Shu Di Huang, the steamed and dried form of Sheng Di Huang which does tonify the blood with hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, pale complexion, palpitations, nocturnal emissions, insomnia, irregular menses, uterine bleeding and post partum bleeding. It also does foster Yin – kidney Yin deficiency with constant thirst, steaming bone disorder, tinnitus, premature graying.

      Or...
      Sheng Di Huang as one of herbs for hot flashes, Sheng Di Huang is mainly used to clear the heat, cool the blood and foster Yin for production of body fluid.
      Sheng Di Huang is used for high fever, constant thirst, red tongue, bleeding due to excessive heat in the blood and promote body fluids. Sheng Di Huang is used for Yin deficiency with damage of body fluids by excessive heat, symptoms such as mouth dryness, low fever, constipation, throat pain.
      Also is used for sores in mouth and tongue, irritability, insomnia and malar flush.

      One supporting factor is also the Wu Wei Zi which is mainly used as an astringent preparation to decrease perspiration, benefit kidney to calm heart and benefit Qi to produce fluid.

      Now you have the information but the footwork must be done by you.
      As each of us is an individual, we do respond differently to even the best medication in the world.

      The only way now is the trial and error. To be under the supervision of experienced Naturopath wouldn't hurt you either.

  16. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a drug for women similar to salt peter for males?
    I mean its not fair, we get older, we get hormone fluxuations, and I like to get drunk on occasion, I dont want to be an aging beer slut. Is there anything for women to take?

    • ANSWER:
      Sex Rx for Women

      If you're a woman with a low sex drive, you're probably asking, "Where's my pill?" The short answer is, don't hold your breath—but don't give up hope, either. The most promising treatments:

      >Viagra The Viagra-for-women idea isn't new: Irwin Goldstein, M.D., director of the Institute for Sexual Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, found it enhanced clitoral blood flow in rabbits way back in 1998. More recently, a study in the European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that women treated with Viagra for four weeks reported marked improvement in arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment (side effects were similar to those reported in men). So why aren't women hoarding their partners' pills?

      "Drugs for erectile dysfunction work well for many men because they typically want to have sex but can't," Goldstein explains. "For women there's often a different problem: In many cases what's missing is the desire." A woman's sexuality is more complicated than a man's—big surprise there—which means that boosting desire may require something other than improving circulation. For women, Viagra will likely have a better success rate for lubrication problems than libido problems, since these are less about blood flow and more about hormones and psychology.

      >Estrogen Therapy It's well known that estrogen shortages can lower libido and trigger such problems as vaginal dryness. Events such as childbirth, hysterectomy, and menopause can all cause imbalances, but so can drugs like antidepressants and, ironically, birth control pills. If eliminating problematic prescriptions doesn't correct estrogen imbalances, a woman may need estrogen replacement. For women who've been rattled by the recent controversy over estrogen pills and patches, alternatives include locally applied creams like Premarin and Estrace, and vaginally inserted drugs like Estring and Vagifem.

      >Androgen Therapy Estrogen imbalance isn't even half the problem, explains Goldstein. "There are 10 sex steroids in all, and only three are estrogens; the other seven are androgens, which most people think of as the male sex hormones. We're finding that three out of four women who see us for lack of desire have serious androgen shortages."

      Therapy typically focuses on upping female levels of testosterone. For women, topical formulations are the most common delivery method. Creams have been marketed for men for years, but gels such as Testim and AndroGel get top marks from Goldstein. The big reason: They're more effective and much easier to use. Androgens are also available in pill form—one product, Estratest, combines a type of testosterone with estrogen—but the most exciting news may be the buzz about dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a chemical cousin of estrogen and testosterone. Goldstein's research has found that women who take DHEA show substantial improvements in their self-evaluated sexual performance—though he's quick to warn that women shouldn't take it on their own. "It's sold as a supplement, but DHEA is a drug, and we don't totally understand it yet," explains Goldstein. While side effects of topical and oral testosterone therapy can include weight gain, clitoral enlargement, and unwanted hair growth, DHEA use has been linked to even scarier problems including birth defects and cancer.

      >Talking Cure A wide range of psychological factors, including depression, anxiety, a history of physical and emotional abuse, and an array of interpersonal relationship problems, can drain a woman's interest in sex. "While we never want to say that problems with sex are all in someone's head, the psychological factors are undeniable and may even be more profound in women than they are in men," says Goldstein. That's the reason all of his patients consult with a psychologist as well as a physician—and why anyone who's not enjoying sex should, too.

      >Bottom Line Women may eventually have as many drugs to choose from as their pill-popping partners. But before there's a cure, there has to be research. Think of it as pharmaceutical foreplay. "The really effective medications for men were developed once we understood the physiology of male erections," explains Goldstein. "We won't have a similar answer for women until we have that same understanding of female physiology."

      Melissa Gotthardt is a regular contributor to AARP The Magazine.

  17. QUESTION:
    I want to start taking prenatal vitamins for my skin?
    I break out like a freak, im a girl and i love makeup and having acne just ruins alot! I have a mild cleanser and drink alot of water and clean my hands and im still breaking out!!!

    please help i hear prenatal vitamins can help, what brand should i take? personal experience? someone help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Women can break out because of puberty or periodical menstrual cycle that can last until menopause. These phases makes your hormone out of whack --> hyperactive oil glands --> more oil --> more acne. Prenatal vitamins does not help. If you prefer an oral route for acne, your relevant choices are: antibiotic (like tetracycline) OR hormone blocker OR birth control pills OR accutane (isotretinoin). Birth control ill and hormone blocker regulate hormone production ---> less oil --> less breakouts. Isotretinoin shrinks oil glands --> no more oily skin --> no more blackheads or acne. I think isotretinoin gives you long-term or even permanent "normal" skin after the treatment, but some people need 2 or 3 trials.

      -- Cleansers – removes dirty, oil, makeup, dead skin cells and any other residuals built up over time

      Boots Expert Anti-Blemish Cleansing Foam OR Olay Foaming Face Wash, Sensitive OR CeraVe Foaming Cleanser is great options. All three contain no fragrance or colorant (nFoC).

      -- Exfoliant – Unglues dead skin cell | stimulate collagen over time | even out skin tone

      Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Stress Control 3-in-1 Hydrating Acne Treatment with 2% salicylic acid (SA; pH ~ 3.4). This product does contain fragrance and coloring additives, but they are in minute amounts. If you have sensitivity to those ingredients, then try Paula’s Choice 2% beta hydroxy acid “gel” or “liquid” version (pH 3.2-6); either one is good. SA acts as a triple threat: an antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and an oil-soluble exfoliant. Its solubility allows it to exfoliate the pore lining to dislodge any clog to permit a better flow of oil. If you are allergic to aspirin, then avoid SA. Your alternative is a glycolic acid or lactic acid-based product such as Paula’s Choice 8% Alpha Hydrox Acid with glycolic acid (pH f 3.5-8) with nFoC. If you have sensitivity to any acids, you probably want to stick with a physical scrub such as Neutrogena Fresh Foaming Scrub with round polyethylene beads as the scrubbing agent. The efficacy of exfoliation of scrubs is not on par with chemical exfoliation. But before you go for the scrub, try ease up the application of chemical exfoliant if you have low tolerance for it at first. For example, try to apply it every other night, or every third night, or once a week and gradually increase application frequency. Or, you can apply the chemical exfoliant for 5-10 minutes and rinse it off; do this for a week and increase leave-on application as you achieve higher tolerance for the acid.

      -- Acne Medication – oxidizing agent that destroy acne bacteria

      Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is the gold-standard acne treatment. The FDA and declared it to be safe and effective. Acne bacteria cannot develop resistance to benzoyl peroxide. Research has shown that a 2.5% BP is just as effective as 5% or 10% BP without the irritation (peeling, burning, redness, etc). However, if your skin has a more aggressive form of acne, you may just want to try a higher concentration of BP. If you prefer an organized system that takes the guess work out for you, then try Proactiv. Acne.org also offers a system and it is cheaper because you get for product per dollar. The drugstore has a few good options. Oxy Clinical Clearing Treatment has 5% BP while Clean and Clear Persa-Gel contain 10% BP. If you have sensitive to BP, an alternative may be sulfur-containing product such as Clearasil Adult Acne Treatment Cream, Tinted with 8% sulfur and 2% resorcinol; however, this product can be “strong” so do a patch test to be on the safe side. If you have tolerance issue, try the methods I proposed above in the exfoliant section. You can try tea tree oil too, but I cannot find a product anywhere on the market (as of now) of the appropriate concentration to work effective and gently, that is, 2.5% or 5% tea tree oil. You can buy tea tree oil yourself and try to make it yourself at your own risk. Research has shown that benzoyl peroxide works better than tea tree oil.

      -- Sunscreen – UV protection

      Sunscreen is absolutely important for any skin type. Sun UV-rays are detrimental to the health of your skin. UVB is the burning ray whereas UV-A is the aging ray. Neutrogena Age Shield SPF 55 has nFoC. If you are very oil, then try Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Liquid Sunblock SPF 55 (low amount of fragrance); its liquid consistency and mineral silica leave a matte finish. The duration of the matte effect depends how active your oil glands are, so you may want to blot throughout the day ( a tissue paper is just fine). If you have sensitivity to synthetic sunscreen agent, then your alternative has to be sun product with just titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide. They provide board-spectrum product with high safety profile and almost no irritation potential because of their inert nature. Neutrogena Pure & Free Liquid Sunblock SPF 50 with 5% titanium dioxide and 3% zinc oxide has nFoC.

      Best wishes.

  18. QUESTION:
    What is my teacher going tO have surgery on?
    She is around 60 or so and she is going to be having surgery next week. We have boys in our class so she said it is a female thing. Well I am a girl and I don't know what she is having surgery on! Please help!:)

    • ANSWER:
      She could be having a hysterectomy-the surgical removal of the uterus, usually performed by a gynecologist. Hysterectomy may be total (removing the body, fundus, and cervix of the uterus; often called "complete") or partial (removal of the uterine body while leaving the cervix intact; also called "supracervical"). It is the most commonly performed gynecological surgical procedure. In 2003, over 600,000 hysterectomies were performed in the United States alone, of which over 90% were performed for benign conditions. Such rates being highest in the industrialized world has led to the major controversy that hysterectomies are being largely performed for unwarranted and unnecessary reasons.

      Removal of the uterus renders the patient unable to bear children (as does removal of ovaries and fallopian tubes) and has surgical risks as well as long-term effects, so the surgery is normally recommended when other treatment options are not available. It is expected that the frequency of hysterectomies for non-malignant indications will fall as there are good alternatives in many cases.

      Oophorectomy (removal of ovaries) is frequently done together with hysterectomy to decrease the risk of ovarian cancer. However, recent studies have shown that prophylactic oophorectomy without an urgent medical indication decreases a woman's long-term survival rates substantially and has other serious adverse effects, particularly in terms of inducing early-onset-osteoporosis through removal of the major sources of female hormonal production. This effect is not limited to pre-menopausal women; even women who have already entered menopause were shown to have experienced a decrease in long-term survivability post-oophorectomy.

      Or a breast reduction...

  19. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used bio-identical hormones to treat menopause?
    I found some affordable ones online at www.AgelessApple.com and supposedly they're safer than regular hormone regimines. Does anybody know anything about them?

    • ANSWER:
      I was reading through some articles about the menopause and I noticed that some people have a very positive attitude towards this difficult time of life for women.  I read that the menopause should not be regarded as an illness or a disease. It is simply an occurrence wherein the woman is entering her second phase of feminine life.
      Of course, these women are experiencing a gradual discomfort because of the transition...this is only natural. If there are telltale signs of menopause symptoms, you can opt to procure some treatment in order to minimize the feeling of discomfort. But it is important to remember that any kind of treatment will not prevent you from undergoing menopause process, especially when your age is already falling from and between 48 - 55 years old.
      It will only help you to deal a lot easier with menopause symptoms or relieve the  majority of their major discomfort effects. Your lifestyle might also need some changing especially your smoking, eating, drinking, and sleeping habits in order to minimize the severity of menopause symptoms.
      What can herbs do to treat menopause symptoms?
      There are many types of reliable herbs available that can treat menopause symptoms. They can maintain women's healthy life even when menstruation process causes a lot of discomfort and decline in their health aspect. With herbs carefully and religiously applied you may not only alleviate those various forms of discomfort but you will also maintain your healthy life. Two basic types of herbs for menopause Phytoestrogenic herbs These are the herbs or plants that contain natural phytoestrogen, a type of chemical compound, which is similar to the women body estrogen. These herbs work by replacing the lost natural body estrogen with the plant hormones, phytoestrogen. Aside from this, there are other elements of phytoestrogenic herbs that are considered beneficial to menopausal women such as amino acids, vitamins and minerals.
      Generally, these herbs are an alternative to disorders relating to low hormonal/estrogen levels. Most popular phytoestrogenic herbs: Ginseng. Used to improve your overall vitality and energy, this is a dried root from one of the Araliaceae herb species. Ginkgo. Used to enhance memory, prevent memory-related diseases such as Dementia, Alzheimer's and others. This herb is one of the oldest herbal medicines used in China. Dong Quai. Most effective in treating gynecological complaints caused by the change in hormonal production. Red Clover. Diseases treated are skin disorders and bronchitis, asthma and spasmodic coughing. Black Cohosh. Symptoms treated include depression, night sweats and hot flashes. Non-estrogenic herbs In contrast with the phytoestrogenic plants, non-estrogenic herbs, as the name suggests, are those plants that do not produce estrogen chemical structures.
      These plants are widely recognized by the doctors and medical experts because of their effectiveness to relieve women's menopause symptoms. Furthermore, they are considered completely safe and do not provide side effects. The right non-estrogenic herbs contain nutrients that can nourish endocrine system, eventually balancing your hormonal levels. With the proper application, occurrences of the loss of hormones will be reduced as they can promote your body to naturally produce the needed healthy level of estrogen hormones, without the distracting side effects. Specifically, non-estrogenic herbs will provide relief to the following disorders relating to menopause symptoms: - majority of the menopause symptoms - hormonal imbalance - osteoporosis or bone mass loss - infertility - sexual intercourse problems - cardiovascular disease It is important to note, however, that even these herbs are a natural treatment you need to research on the kind of plant that you are going to take as not all of these will relieve and alleviate you from those menopause symptoms.
      There are herbal plants that can cause many other side effects, may it be minor or major. It has been written that Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals.   These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body's hormonal balance and a natural alternative to HRT.

  20. QUESTION:
    Question about various kinds of hysterectomies?
    When does the doctor feel that you should have one of the following?

    Abdominal hysterectomy
    Vaginal hysterectomy
    Laparoscopic hysterectomy

    Please don’t give me the definitions of each since I have already researched them. What I want to know is under what circumstance does the doctor suggest one or the other?

    Thank you.
    Oh, I am asking this from the point of view of someone who has fibroids.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a Laproscopic Vaginal Hysterectomy last year. My uterus swelled from having Endometriosis and Adenomyosis at the same time and it looked like I was 4 months pregnant!! Even though I was swollen it was best for me to have the vaginal procedure so he could take it out in pieces and I already had 4 c-sections in my past so it wasn't advisable to create another incision. There is less recovery time from the vaginal procedure. I was miserable and my hormones and monthly cycle was so out of whack I was having 2 periods in a month and sometimes skipped a month.My doctor didn't recommend the surgery till I researched it for myself and what alternatives are available. I wanted the surgery since my research showed that with Adenomyosis there is no curable treatment unless you have a hysterectomy. I was already done with childbearing so I had no reason to hold onto it. I opted to keep my ovaries since I'm only 37 and don't want to be forced into premature menopause.Hope this info helped.

  21. QUESTION:
    What can you use for only vagina itching?
    Has no odor , no discharge .
    on outside of vagina area.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal itching
      Overview
      Treatment
      Alternative Names:
      Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching
      Home Care:
      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted. However, sometimes men also develop itching and redness following sexual contact. If this is the case or you get recurrent infections for unclear reasons, both you and your partner may require treatment. Talk to your doctor.

      For itching related to menopause, your doctor may consider estrogen cream or tablets to insert vaginally.

      Teach children to resist and report any attempted sexual contact by another person. Don't try to remove any foreign object from a child's vagina. Take the child to a doctor right away for removal.

      Call your health care provider if:
      Call your doctor right away if:

      You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.
      You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      Call your doctor if:

      Your symptoms worsen, last longer than 1 week, or recur despite self-care.
      You have unusual vaginal bleeding , swelling, or discharge .
      Your partner also has symptoms or you think you may have a sexually transmitted disease.
      You have burning with urination or other urinary symptoms -- you may have a urinary tract infection.
      You have blisters or ulcers on your vagina or vulva.
      What to expect at your health care provider's office:
      Your doctor will exam you, including a pelvic exam, and ask questions to help diagnose the cause of your vaginal itching. These questions may include:

      When did the itching begin?
      Have you had it before?
      Is the itching severe?
      Does it limit your activities?
      Where exactly is the itching? On the inside of the vagina or on the outside (vulva) as well?
      How often do you bathe or shower?
      Do you use scented soap, scented or colored toilet paper, or bubble bath?
      Do you frequently swim or participate in water sports? Do you change your clothes soon after such activities?
      Do you wear cotton panties or synthetic ones?
      Do you wear tight pants or tight pantyhose?
      Do you use douches or feminine hygiene spray?
      Are you sexually active? Do you use contraception? What type?
      Does anything make you feel better?
      Does anything make you feel worse?
      Have you tried any over-the-counter creams? Which ones?
      Do you have any other symptoms like vaginal bleeding, swelling, rash, or pain on urination ?
      Do you have a personal or family history of diabetes?
      What medications do you take?
      What is your menstrual history? Including questions like: How old were you when your periods began? How often do your periods usually come? How long do they generally last?
      Do you have any allergies?

      Diagnostic tests that may be performed include:

      Culture and microscopic exam of vaginal discharge
      Pap smear
      Urine and blood studies (including hormone levels)
      Skin biopsies of the vulvar area
      Antifungal drugs may be prescribed for yeast infections. When indicated, steroid creams or lotions may be prescribed to reduce inflammation. Ointments containing hormones may be ordered, and benzodiazepines or antihistamines may be prescribed for nighttime relief.

      Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial vaginal infections, including sexually transmitted diseases.

      References:
      Clark LR, Atendido M. Group B streptococcal vaginitis in postpubertal adolescent girls. J Adolesc Health . 2005; 36(5): 437-440.

      Edwards L. The diagnosis and treatment of infectious vaginitis. Dermatol Ther . 2004; 17(1): 102-110.

      Reid G, Bruce AW. Urogenital infections in women: can probiotics help? Postgrad Med J . 2003; 79(934): 428-432.z

  22. QUESTION:
    What other methods can you use besides taking birth control pills since studies show the pill bc is?
    causing cancer. Or is their a bc method that is safe

    • ANSWER:
      Congrats for taking charge of your own health!

      All hormonal birth control methods have the same cancer risk as bc pills. Hormonal methods include The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. They all administer the same hormones by different delivery methods. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      NOW TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION
      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, contraceptive sponges, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin).

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html

  23. QUESTION:
    Is there any known cases of a person being cured of rheumatoid arthritis?
    Alternative medicine?

    • ANSWER:
      HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT FOR ARTHRITIS without any side effects or complications of any sort, (Arthritis including Gout, Arthritis Deformans/Osteoarthritis and Rheumatism). 100% Cure when prescribed exactly according to the patients symptoms :-

      Pain knee joints, worse by movements; better initial movements, continuous pain in joints, worse while rising from seat; pain in heels, worse by movements. Cassia Sophera 30X, 4 hourly

      Acute attack of gout of joints of the feet.Pain with bright red swelling Aconite Nap 200, 2 hourly

      Pain with inflammation, worse by movements. Bryonia Alba 200 or 1M, 6 hourly

      Complaints worse after rest and exposure to cold Rhus tox 200 or 1M, 4 hourly

      Complaints worse during menstruation; beginning at the time of menopause; more in hands and feet Caulophyllum 30X, 4 hourly

      When the origin of complaints is gonorrhoeal; worse during day time. Medorrhinum 1M. fortnightly (3 Doses)

      When the origin of complaints is tubercular Tuberculinum k, 1M fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of small joints with red or pale swelling; tenderness and shifting pains; worse by motion. Main remedy for gout during cold weather Colchicum 30X, 4 hourly

      When Rhus Tox cease to work; pain is worse in cold damp weather and better by movements Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, 6 hourly (6 Doses)

      Nodosities in the joints with gastric complaints. At last nodules become painless (Rheumatoid Arthritis). Tongue whitish thickly coated Antim Crud 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Complaints of feets and ankles; stiffness Drosera 200 fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of long bones; contraction of ligaments Causticum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain worse at night; in wet weather; Rheumatism of large muscles Cimicifuga 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism; worse in damp cold weather. Gout.Pain in limbs and hip joints Natrum Sulph 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain travels downwards affecting the large part of a limb and passes through quickly along course of nerve Kalmia Lat 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Pains worse during rest, night and warmth, better by cold, open air and movements Pulsatilla 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain :- violent; bruised or as if sprained ; cannot bear touch, feels somebody coming near him may touch him and hit the affected part Arnica Montana 200, 4 hourly

      Gout of great toe and joints with swelling; soreness and drawing pain on stepping; worse in warmth, pressure and motion. Pain travels upwards; better cold compresses Ledum Pal 200, 4 hourly

      Gouty nodosities of joints; tearing pain and extremities and contraction of the muscles Guaiacum 30 4 hourly

      Chronic nodosities of joints; hands twisted, out of shape due to deposits of water of soda Ammonium Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      Gouty complaints with offensive urine Acid Benzoic 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      When there is red sand in urine in gouty patients Lycopodium 30, 4 hourly

      Severe pain with enlargement of the joints; worse during rest and when storm approaches Rhododendron 200 or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Almost a specific for gout (to drain out uric acid and urates) Urtica Urens Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 -10 drops in hot water

      Arthritic deformans (chronic rheumatoid, particularly of fingers) Picric Acid 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pains or arthritis after checked diarrhoea Abrotanum 30 or 200 4 hourly (6 Doses)

      Specific for pain with numbness; Pain so severe patient says that he would prefer death than the pain Chamomilla 200 or 1M, 1/2 hourly (3 Doses)

      Pain appear diagonally as right arm and left leg with sensation of cold, numbness and tingling Agaricus Mus 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      In weak persons; burning pain with chilliness, feels better by heat, while eating, and worse in cold open air Capsicum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Unbearable pain; rigidity and stiffness. Superiority / inferiority complex Platina 1M, weekly (3 Doses)

      Pain flies like electric shock; due to exposurse of damp cold weather. Better by warmth and rest Phytolacca 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pain, worse after washing clothes, doing laundry work Sepia 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain in long bones; may be due to injury or rheumatism Ruta Grav 200, 6 hourly

      Pain worse on slightest touch specially after loss of vital fluids like excessive bleeding, diarrhoea, vomiting China Off 6X or 30, 3 hourly

      Pain in the small joints of extremities with swelling. Backache, worse in the morning before rising Staphysagria 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain heels; better by putting most of the weight on them Berberis Vulgaris Q (Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 - 10 drops

      Stiffing pain in all parts of the body; worse by movement Stellaria Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8-10 drops in warm water

      Rheumatic pain without swelling; pain joints; worse at night Iodium 30X, 4 hourly

      Osteo-arthritis of large joints with degeneration. Pain, swelling, stiffness and tenderness of joints; worse by motion (cracking joints) and cold ; better by warmth O.A.Nosode 1M, weekly (6 Doses)

      Chronic muscular rheumatism of back and neck. Intense pain along with sciatic nerve. Numbness alternates with pain Gnaphalium 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Muscular atrophy; rigidity and stiffness Strychninum 3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism accompained with skin ailments and itiching; cannot walk erect Sulphur 200, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Rheumatism of knee joint; with round worms Natrum Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      For defective bony growth; better by warmth and worse by cold Calcarea Flour 12X or 30, 4 hourly

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms.
      No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine. Cures Par Excellence.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  24. QUESTION:
    Alternative remedies for menstrual migraines?
    Is it ok to take 'agnus cactus' along with 'starflower oil capsules' which are both recommended for menstrual migraines and PMS? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Hormones Headaches/Menstrual Migraines

      It has been estimated that 70 percent of migraine sufferers are female. Of these female migraine sufferers, 60 to 70 percent report a menstrual relationship to their migraine attacks.

      What is the relationship between hormones and headaches?
      Headaches in women, particularly migraines, have been related to changes in the levels of estrogen during a woman’s menstrual cycle. (Estrogen is a female hormone.) Levels of estrogen drop immediately before the start of the menstrual flow (menses).

      Premenstrual migraines regularly occur during or after the time when the female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, decrease to their lowest levels.

      Migraine attacks typically disappear during pregnancy. In one study, 64 percent of women who described a menstrual link to their headaches noted that their headaches disappeared during pregnancy. However, some women have reported the initial onset of migraines during the first trimester of pregnancy, with disappearance of their headaches after the third month of pregnancy.

      What triggers migraines in women?
      Birth control pills, as well as hormone replacement therapy for menopause, can change the frequency or severity of headaches. If you notice your headache getting worse after starting one of these medications, it may be worthwhile to ask your physician for an agent that contains a lower dose of estrogen, or request a change from an interrupted dosing regimen to a continuous one.

      What are the treatment options for menstrual migraine?
      The medications of choice in the treatment of menstrual migraine are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs).

      The NSAIDS most often used for menstrual migraine include:

      Ketoprofen (Orudis)
      Ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin)
      Fenoprofen calcium (Nalfon)
      Naproxen (Naprosyn)
      Nabumetone (Relafen)
      Therapy with the NSAID should be started two to three days before the onset of the menstrual flow and continued through the flow. Because the therapy is of short duration, the risk of gastrointestinal side effects is limited.

      Other medications prescribed include:

      Small doses of ergotamine (including Bellergal-S) or a similar compound, methylergonovine maleate (for example, Methergine)
      Beta blocker drugs such as propranolol
      Anticonvulsants such as valporate
      Calcium channel blockers such as veraperamil
      These drugs should also be started two to three days pre-menses and continued throughout the menstrual flow.

      Because fluid retention is often associated with menses, diuretics have been used to prevent menstrual migraine. Some physicians may recommend that the patient follow a salt-restricted diet immediately before the start of menses.

      Lupron is a medication that affects hormone levels and is used only when all other treatment methods have been tried and have been unsuccessful.

      What are the treatment options for menopausal migraine?
      For patients who need to continue post-menopausal estrogen supplements, the patient should be started on the lowest dose of these agents, on an uninterrupted basis. Instead of seven days off the drug, the patient should take it on a daily basis. By maintaining a steady dose of estrogen, the headaches may be prevented. An estrogen patch (such as Estraderm) may be effective in stabilizing the levels of estrogen.

      What are the treatment options for migraine during pregnancy?
      During pregnancy, no treatment is recommended to treat migraines. Medication therapy used to treat migraines can affect the uterus and can cross the placenta and affect the baby, so these medications should be strictly avoided..

      A mild analgesic can be used for pain, such as acetaminophen. It is imperative that pregnant women suffering from headaches discuss the safety of headache medications with their obstetricians and headache specialists.

      This is for information only, It is important that you consult your professional healthcare provider to make sensible diagnosis and treatment decisions

  25. QUESTION:
    Why does my breasts hurt so bad before I get my period?
    I mean they hurt sooooooo bad!!!! I cannot even touch them!! Why do they hurt, and feel big, and full....Ima 36B. I just want to get a full body massage now lol

    • ANSWER:
      Breast tenderness can be explained as pain, soreness or any discomfort in the breasts. Also, breast tenderness is generally associated with swelling.

      A certain degree of breast tenderness is normal during menstruation periods, pregnancy and breast-feeding. It is slightly noticeable, little uncomfortable, but this symptom stabilize after those periods end. However, most women will suffer severe breast tenderness when approaching menopause (this includes during and after it).
      Breast tenderness during menstruation periods can be caused by a combination of various factors. This is why women should know them in detail to be aware on how to face breast tenderness. Please read the following articles which explain the different causes for breast tenderness during menstruation periods.

      What Causes Breast tenderness during Menstruation Periods?

      Breast tenderness during menstruation periods can be caused by various factors. Most of the cases, unbalanced level of estrogen hormones is the main cause for breast tenderness during menstruation periods.

      The most common cause for breast tenderness during menstruation periods is hormonal imbalance. During the menstrual cycle, estrogen and progesterone levels vary in different ways. Normally, when estrogen is down and progesterone is up, breasts get bigger in size. But, hormonal imbalance could alter this cycle, making breasts even bigger, more susceptible to pain, and for more prolonged periods. Therefore, when hormones are not balanced and estrogen levels decrease more than progesterone ones, it ends in breast tenderness.

      Because the most common cause for breast tenderness during menstruation periods is unbalanced amounts of estrogen hormone, maintaining healthy hormone levels is important to avoid this symptom. Take a look at the following articles, which explain the steps to take for controlling breast tenderness during menstruation periods.

      What to do about Breast tenderness during Menstruation Periods?

      As hormonal imbalance is the most probable cause for breast tenderness during menstruation periods, the first step is to ensure your body has the support it needs to maintain good hormonal levels. The best way to go should be to start with a healthy nutrition and maybe follow a hormonal imbalance treatment such as alternative medicine.
      Healthy nutrition implies changes in lifestyle. It's always recommended to be complemented with an exercise program too. In fact, these may not be enough nor easy to accomplish. However, doctors think that healthy lifestyle complemented with a natural treatment like alternative medicine is excellent for treating breast tenderness during menstruation periods.

      As breast tenderness during menstruation periods is mainly caused by imbalanced hormonal levels, maintaining healthy amounts of hormones in your body is the most important thing. There are several ways to manage breast tenderness during

      Healthy life prevents breast tenderness during menstruation periods menstruation periods, but a safe and efficient way is by combining therapies such as "lifestyle approaches" and alternative medicine.

      You can click on the link in the article below to learn more about the treatment for breast tenderness during menstruation periods that most fits you.

  26. QUESTION:
    Is there a relation between Parkinson's disease and brain hemorrhage?
    Can someone who has suffered brain or cerebral hemorrhage develop Parkinson's disease?
    Please I really need to know.....

    • ANSWER:
      Viewing the brain hemorrhage as a severe trauma, the answer is yes, there is a greater possibility of developing Parkinson's disease than if that trauma had not occurred. However, that sort of trauma should not see the development of PD until at least 10-20 years afterward.

      Causes of cerebral hemorrhage which for this argument = severe head trauma:
      Brain aneurysm
      Ruptured aneurysm - various arterial conditions
      Arteriosclerosis
      Cerebral arteriosclerosis
      Brain injury
      Head injury
      Post menopausal vaginal bleeding
      Congenital artery defect
      Cerebrovascular accident
      Hemorrhagic stroke
      As a complication of concussion, hypertension, polycystic kidney disease, whooping cough, drug interactions such as Warfarin & ginkgo

      Risk factors: hypertension, diabetes, menopause, cigarette smoking, alcohol, caffeine
      What is interesting is that both cigarette smoking and caffeine are somewhat neuroprotective for Parkinson's so that might work to reduce the odds. Menopause, however is an increased risk factor for women developing PD so that would probably up the odds.

      You have the brain hemorrhage and survive - beating some significant odds and "Whew! made it out safely" and then it appears years later. It isn't BAM and then PD.

      Here are some links about head trauma which might help. As you will see, it is thought that the trauma initially kills brain cells and as the person ages, more cells die of the aging process itself.
      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0…

      In 2003 the Mayo Clinic found that people who had a head injury were 4x more prone to having PD later in life than those who had not. If the injury required hospitalization, the odds went up 8X. The the injury was severe - 11X. Severe means loss of consciousness and brain bruising.

      There have been recent small studies which contradict the above however. Still the majority of research points to severe head trauma as a contributory factor. This link indicates the importance in the care of the original injury(s):
      http://drtanase.com/2009/02/22/upper-cervical-care-helps-parkinsons-disease-sufferers/

      Currently there is at least one long term study following athletes who play in sports which contain a greater risk of severe head trauma. Back in the day when Mohammad Ali fought, the brain scan technology was limited. Now injury can be seen in many cases: This may provide hope for athletes and others who suffer head trauma but also for researchers investigating conditions resulting from the trauma in an attempt to find treatments and cures.

      http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/health/2009/06/03/2009-06-03_modern_brain_scanning_technology_offers_simple_look_at_.html
      http://brainandspine.titololawoffice.com/2009/09/articles/brain-injury/new-hope-for-severe-head-trauma-treatment/

      Knowing the odds are greater, patients should be their own best monitors for precursor signs of Parkinson's disease because even beginning to lose the sense of smell which can often be seen by decreased sense of flavor of food which is related to the aroma, should not be overlooked. If PD treatments begin early, whether with nutritional supplements, alternative treatments or medication or all of the above, there is a greater chance to slow progression.

      In situations like this regular check-ups following the trauma are important to track any changes. If suspected precursor symptoms occur, your cardiologist or primary care physician will refer you to a neurologist specializing in motor disorders.

      I hope this helps.

  27. QUESTION:
    When one ovary is removed, does the other over-compensate for it?
    I just found out that I have a large cyst on my right ovary, so large that my entire ovary may have to be removed. Will my left ovary over-compensate since my right one will be missing?

    • ANSWER:
      Not, over-compensate, but it will continue to do its job if it's functioning properly.

      What kind of treatment has been suggested BEFORE surgery becomes your only option?

      I had a cyst measuring 10cm on an ovary measuring 6cm, and went on Lupron to induce temporary menopause. Not fun, but avoiding the surgery was better in the long run.

      Look for alternatives!

  28. QUESTION:
    When does Lupron's side effects kick in?
    I have endometriosis and a week ago I was given Lurpon for three months. I know all the side effects and the menopause symptoms. How long does it take for the hot flashes to appear? I figured I would've had something by now. I've read about the shot but nothing has been helpful. If you have been through this or know someone please help.

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there,
      Lupron will vary in the level of side-effects and some woman experience only a mild case of them. I had them within 2 months on it and they kept saying they will improve. I personally found them unbearable. I have found better ways of dealing with Endometriosis than with hormonal treatments that just mess up your body. If you want to look at alternatives or even just want some little tips to help you when you have pain, you can check out my blog.

  29. QUESTION:
    Have you ever been on seasonale? If so how did this work for you and what are the pros and cons?
    I am considering using this or a new one called seasonique or something close to that but am a little afraid of the side effects such as spotting or bleeding frequently, because this is the reason I am trying to get on birth control to regulate periods and my pms

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  30. QUESTION:
    Trying to help a massage client with evasive lobular carcinoma of the breast?
    I have a client who has stage 4 evasive lobular carcino of the right breast. It is caused by her body making massive amounts of estrogen and progesterone from some where in her body. They tried giving her a medication that would put her into menopause to stop the production of the estrogen but she got violently
    ill after just two tablets. It actually did give her the symptoms of menopause but the depression was so severe she cryed for two days and was actually thinking of suicide which is something she never thinks of. She stopped taking the medication after the second pill and it took 2 days to lose the side effects. They say it is too big to do surgery (the tumor) and that chemo and radiation will not cure this type of cancer. We have been doing energy work which helps but periods make the tumor grow more. We are looking to find out if there is any other type of treatment for this condition that is alternative. I have some carsinoma homeopathic beads Will this help?

    • ANSWER:
      There is an alternative treatment if your interested, its not used alot in the US. Europe and other nations worldwide are using it alot more. Its called BCEC (Biologically closed electrical circuit). It might sound weird but the treatment method is easier on the patient than traditional chemo/radiation and the end results are remarkebly high. I suggest it to people before starting the chemo/radiation treatment.
      It was created by Dr. Björn E.W. Nordenström.
      His website is http://www.iabc.readywebsites.com/page/page/623957.htm
      If you want more info check out http://www.emfscience.net

  31. QUESTION:
    Hyperhidrosis Treatment - How Do I Stop Excessive Sweating?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperhidrosis (or excessive sweating / perspiration) is caused by underlying conditions such as hyperthyroidism, endocrine treatment for prostatic cancer, psychiatric disorders including stress & anxiety, obesity and menopause.

      In secondary hyperhidrosis, the underlying condition should be treated first, which is usually done through the administration of antiestrogens (ciproterone acetate).

      In people with primary hyperhidrosis or for treatment of heavy sweating in patients with secondary hyperhidrosis, not treatable otherwise, the methods adopted include antiperspirants, iontophoresis, drugs, botulinum toxin (botox), surgery and alternative remedies.

  32. QUESTION:
    what natural herbal remedies can be used for menapausal cancer patient?
    the menapause was brought on by the cancer,is there a safe herbal treatment normal medicines cannot be used due to post cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend you go to see a homeopathic doctor who can give you some specific remedies tailored to the person. A good one that I know of is Sepia 30CH...but you should see a homeopath. Homeopathic remedies are the SAFEST medicines in the whole world. They do not interact with any medications or treatments and cause absolutely no side effects. They work 100% of the time if the remedy matches the symptom. Try them out! Its the only 100% safe alternative. Some herbs you can use are black cohosh, sage extract, Evening Primrose oil or Dong Quai...but if the person is on medications, then I wouldnt use herbs. The evening primrose might be ok because its a oil from a flower. Alot of menopause symptoms show themselves because our livers are so overtaxed that they cant filter our hormones properly. A simple safe way to help out your liver is to take the juice of an organic lemon in a cup of warm water every morning as a little mini safe liver cleanser. That can help a bit too. But please seek out a natural practitioner, you can ask your local health food store because they normally have a list of names of good ones that they come accorss. Good luck!

  33. QUESTION:
    How do u get ride of ovarian cyst?
    I have had a surgery for ovarian cyst last yr... but it's growing again and im getting more pain... but i dont want to have another surgery, is there any other treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      YES!!!!

      An alternative treatment for ovarian cysts is natural progesterone.

      The signaling mechanism that shuts off ovulation in one ovary each cycle is the production of progesterone in the other. If sufficient natural progesterone is supplemented prior to ovulation, LH levels are inhibited and both ovaries think the other one has ovulated, so regular ovulation does not occur. (This is the same effect as contraceptive pills.) Similarly, the high estriol and progesterone levels throughout pregnancy successfully inhibit ovarian activity for nine months. Therefore, adding natural progesterone from day 10 to day 26 of the cycle suppresses LH and it’s luteinizing effects. Thus the ovarian cyst will not be stimulated and, in the passage of one or two such monthly cycles, will very likely shrink and disappear without further treatment.

      This is from the book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause" by Dr. John R. Lee. He is a foremost authority in treating women with Natural Progesterone for so many things. So much of what a woman suffers is from hormone imbalance and nothing else.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are good alternative treatments (natural, herbal) for Menopause-specifically hot flashes? ?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, the most popular natural products for hormone support would be Dong Quai, Black Cohosh, Vitex (also called Chasteberry), Wild Yam, Damiana Leaf, Motherwort, GLA (Gamma Linolenic Acid, commonly in Borage Oil and Evening Primrose Oil), and/or some Soy germ products.
      Good luck!

  35. QUESTION:
    What are some safe, natural products that promote weight loss?

    Okay, I should have been a little more specific. I was thinking more along the lines of herbs and products that a naturopath would recommend. Not the obvious stuff that some people have come up with. Thank you in advance. PS, due to an earlier experience, I truly would appreciate sincere, constructive advice minus unnecessary name calling.

    • ANSWER:
      If we offered you a miracle remedy that prevents and cures "Obesity" would you buy it? Certainly you would. You won’t find it in a Pharmacy but at the Grocery Store.

      Try the Natural Cures for Obesity.

      Obesity may be described as a bodily condition characterised by excessive deposition or storage of fat in adipose tissue. It usually results from consumption of food in excess of physiological needs. Obesity is common among people in Western countries and among the higher income groups in India and other developing countries.

      Obesity can occur at any age in either sex. Its incidence is higher in persons who consume more food and lead sedentary lives. Among women, obesity is liable to occur after pregnancy and at menopause. A woman usually gains about 12 kgs of weight during pregnancy. Part of this is an increase in the adipose tissue, which serves as a store against the demands of lactation. Many women gain more and retain part of this weight. They become progressively obese with each succeeding child.

      Obesity is a serious health hazard as the extra fats puts a strain on the heart, kidneys and liver as well as the large weight-bearing joints such as the hips, knees and ankles, which ultimately shortens the life span. It has been truly said, ‘the longer the belt, the short the life.‘ Overweight persons are susceptible to several diseases like coronary thrombosis, heart failure, high blood pressure, diabetes, arthritis, gout, and liver and gall-bladder disorders.

      Causes: The chief cause of obesity, most often, is overeating - i.e., the intake of calories beyond the body’s energy requirement. Some people are habituated to eating too much while others may be in the habit of consuming high-calorie foods. These people gain weight continuously as they fail to adjust their appetite to reduce energy requirements. There has, in recent times, been an increase in awareness of psychological aspects of obesity. Persons who are generally bored, unhappy, lonely, or unloved, those who are discontented with their families, or social or financial standing usually tend to overeat as eating is a pleasure and solace to them.

      Obesity is sometimes also the result of disturbances of the thyroid or pituitary glands. But glandular disorders account for only about 2% of the total incidence of obesity. In such persons, the basal metabolism rate is low and they keep gaining weight unless they take a low-calorie diet.

      Treatment: A suitably planned course of dietetic treatment, in conjunction with suitable exercise and other measures for promoting elimination is the only scientific way of dealing with obesity. The chief consideration in this treatment should be the balanced selection of foods which provide the maximum essential nutrients with the least number of calories.

      To begin with, the patient should undertake a juice fast for 7-10 days. Juices of lemon, grape fruit, orange, pineapple, cabbage, celery, may be taken during this period. Long juice fast up to 40 days can also be undertaken, but only under expert guidance and supervision. In the alternative, short juice fasts should be repeated at regular intervals of two months or so till the desired reduction in weight is achieved.

      After the juice fast, the patient should spend a further four or five days on an all-fruit diet, taking three meals of fresh juicy fruits such as oranges, grapefruit, pineapple and papaya. Thereafter, he may gradually embark upon a low-calorie well- balanced diet of three basic food groups, namely (i) seeds, nuts and grains, (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits, with emphasis on raw fruits, vegetables, and fresh juices.

      The foods which should be drastically curtailed or altogether avoided are high-fat foods such as butter, cheese, chocolates, cream, ice-cream, fat meats, fried foods, and gravies; high carbohydrate foods like bread, candy, cake, cookies, cereal products, legumes, potatoes, honey, sugar, syrup and rich puddings beverages such as all-fountain drinks and alcoholic drinks.

      One sure method of reducing weight is by practicising what is known as "Fletcherism". It was discovered in 1898 by Horace Fletcher of the U.S.A.. Fletlcher, at 40, considered himself an old man. He was 50 pounds overweight, contracted flu every six months and constantly complained of indigestion and a tired feeling. After a deep study, he made some important discoveries and prescribed the rules for "Fletcherism" which are as follows:

      1. Chew your food to a pulp or milky liquid until it practically swallows itself.
      2. Never eat until hungry.
      3. Enjoy every bite or morsel, savouring the flavour until it is swallowed.
      4. Do not eat when tired, angry, worried, and at mealtime refuse to think or talk about unpleasant subjects.

      Horace Fletcher followed these rules for five months. As a result he lost more than 60 pounds and felt better than he had for 20 years. A weight-reducing programme built on Fletcherism works wonders and is worth a trial.

      Ingestion of honey is an excellent home remedy for obesity. It mobilises the extra deposited fat in the body and puts it into circulation which is utilised as energy for normal functions. One should start with small quantity of about 10 g to be taken with hot water. The dose can be gradually increased.

      Fasting on honey-lime juice water is highly beneficial in the treatment of obesity without the loss of energy and appetite. In this mode of treatment, one spoon of fresh honey should be mixed with a juice of half a lime in a glass of lukewarm water and taken at regularly intervals. Another effective remedy for obesity is an exclusive lemon juice diet. On the first day the patient should be given nothing but plenty of water. On the second day juice of three lemons mixed with equal amount of water should be given. One lemon should be subsequently increased each day until the juice of 12 lemons is consumed per day. Then the number of lemons should be decreased in the same order until three lemons are taken in a day. The patient may feel weak and hungry on the first two days, but afterwards the condition will be stabilised by itself. Cabbage is considered to be an effective home remedy for obesity. Recent research has discovered in this vegetable a valuable content called tartroric acid which inhibits the conversion of sugar and other carbohydrates into fat. Hence, it is of great value in weight reduction. A helping of cabbage salad would be the simplest way to stay slim, a painless way of dieting. A 100 g of cabbage yields only 27 kg of calories of energy while the same quantity of wheat bread will yield about 240 calories. Cabbage is found to possess the maximum biological value with minimum calorific value. Moreover, it gives a lasting feeling of fullness in the stomach and is easily digestible.

      Along with dietetic treatment, the patient should adopt all other natural methods of reducing weight. Exercise is an important part of weight reduction plan. It helps to use up calories stored in body fat and relieves tension, besides toning up the muscles of the body. Walking is the best exercise to begin with and may be followed by running, swimming, rowing, and other outdoor sports.

      Certain yogi asanas are highly beneficial. Not only do they break up or redistribute fatty deposits and help slimming, but they also strengthen the flabby areas.

      Sarvangasana, halasana, bhujangasana, shalabhasana, dhanurasana, chakrasana, naukasana, ardh-matsyendrasana, paschimottanasana, vajrasana, yogamudra, and trikonasana are recommended. These asanas work on the glands, improve circulation, strengthen many weak areas and induce deep breathing which helps to melt off excess fat gradually. Yogic kriyas like kunjal and jalneti and pranayamas such as kapalbhati and bhastrika are also helpful in normalising body weight.

      The patient should also adopt measures which bring on excessive perspiration such as sauna baths, steam bath, and heavy massage. They help to reduce weight. Above all, obese persons should make every effort to avoid negative motions such as anxiety, fear, hostility and insecurity and develop a positive outlook on life.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  36. QUESTION:
    treatment for peri menopause?
    hi i am 47 and think that i have symptoms of the peri menopause.

    Can any one advise me what treatment there is for the mood swings/depression associated with the above?

    Should i try alternative remedies ? do they work? i dont want to waste money.
    should i ask gp for the pill or hrt?

    i just dont want to go on feeling like this .
    can anyone advise?

    • ANSWER:
      The average UK age at menopause is 52, however 47 is not uncommon. Generally the diagnosis is based on symptoms rather than investigation. HRT is still the most effective symptom management, though you must weigh up the risks against the benefits. Discuss this with your GP.

  37. QUESTION:
    How to help oily skin?
    my skin has recently gotten really oily. I don't know why. But, anyone know what I can do to help get rid of it? i already wash my face on a daily basis and i have blotting papers. and still within a few hours of blotting my face or washing it, my face gets insanely oily again. anyone know how i can fix this?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Your "skin has recently gotten really oil" because of a few reasons: 1) puberty 2) menstruation 3) stress. Females can get oily skin as long has they have their periods until menopause. The best you can do is not irritate your oil glands and make it worse with a well-designed regimen with well-formulated products while absorbing excess oil. Even the "best" mattifying absorbent product on the market would fail if your oil glands is hyperactive. For women, you can ask your personal physician for hormone block or birth control bills to regulate hormone fluctuation.

      Overview: Cleanse (AM/PM) --> Exfoliate (AM or PM) --> Acne Medication (AM/PM) --> Moisturizer (AM or PM; optional) --> Sunscreen (AM)

      -- Cleansers – removes dirty, oil, makeup, dead skin cells and any other residuals built up over time
      Boots Expert Anti-Blemish Cleansing Foam OR Olay Foaming Face Wash, Sensitive OR CeraVe Foaming Cleanser is great options. All three contain no fragrance or colorant (nFoC).

      -- Exfoliant – Unglues dead skin cell | stimulate collagen over time | even out skin tone
      Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Stress Control 3-in-1 Hydrating Acne Treatment with 2% salicylic acid (SA; pH ~ 3.4). This product does contain fragrance and coloring additives, but they are in minute amounts. If you have sensitivity to those ingredients, then try Paula’s Choice 2% beta hydroxy acid “gel” or “liquid” version (pH 3.2-6); either one is good. SA acts as a triple threat: an antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and an oil-soluble exfoliant. Its solubility allows it to exfoliate the pore lining to dislodge any clog to permit a better flow of oil. If you are allergic to aspirin, then avoid SA. Your alternative is a mandelic acid or glycolic acid -based product such as M2 Skin Refinish 12% OR 20% OR Paula’s Choice 8% alpha hydroxy acid gel (pH ~3.5-3.8) with nFoC. Mandelic acid is better because it has antibacterial properties, too. If you have sensitivity to any acids, you probably want to stick with a physical scrub such as Neutrogena Fresh Foaming Scrub with round polyethylene beads as the scrubbing agent. The efficacy of exfoliation of scrubs is not on par with chemical exfoliation. But before you go for the scrub, try ease up the application of chemical exfoliant if you have low tolerance for it at first. For example, try to apply it every other night, or every third night, or once a week and gradually increase application frequency. Or, you can apply the chemical exfoliant for 5-10 minutes and rinse it off; do this for a week and increase leave-on application as you achieve higher tolerance for the acid.

      -- Acne Medication – oxidizing agent that destroy acne bacteria
      Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is the gold-standard acne treatment. The FDA and declared it to be safe and effective. Acne bacteria cannot develop resistance to benzoyl peroxide. Research has shown that a 2.5% BP is just as effective as 5% or 10% BP without the irritation (peeling, burning, redness, etc). However, if your skin has a more aggressive form of acne, you may just want to try a higher concentration of BP. If you prefer an organized system that takes the guess work out for you, then try Proactiv. Acne.org also offers a system and it is cheaper because you get for product per dollar. The drugstore has a few good options. Oxy Clinical Clearing Treatment has 5% BP while Clean and Clear Persa-Gel contain 10% BP. If you have sensitive to BP, an alternative may be sulfur-containing product such as Clearasil Adult Acne Treatment Cream, Tinted with 8% sulfur and 2% resorcinol; however, this product can be “strong” so do a patch test to be on the safe side. If you have tolerance issue, try the methods I proposed above in the exfoliant section.

      -- Sunscreen – UV protection
      Sunscreen is absolutely important for any skin type. Sun UV-rays are detrimental to the health of your skin. UVB is the burning ray whereas UV-A is the aging ray. Neutrogena Age Shield SPF 55 has nFoC. If you are very oil, then try Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Liquid Sunblock SPF 55 (low amount of fragrance); its liquid consistency and mineral silica leave a matte finish. The duration of the matte effect depends how active your oil glands are, so you may want to blot throughout the day ( a tissue paper is just fine). If you have sensitivity to synthetic sunscreen agent, then your alternative has to be sun product with just titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide. They provide board-spectrum product with high safety profile and almost no irritation potential because of their inert nature. Neutrogena Pure & Free Liquid Sunblock SPF 50 with 5% titanium dioxide and 3% zinc oxide has nFoC.

      Result may take at least 2 months with PATIENCE & COMPLIANCE. If your acne is persistent and non-responsive to this regimen, consult with a board-certified dermatologist for topical prescription or even Isotretinoin. Isotretinoin shrinks oil glands --> no more oil --> no more acne or blackheads.

      Best wishes

  38. QUESTION:
    adrenal fatigue and helicobacter pylori infection?
    It is related right?
    what would be the common symptoms of adrenal fatigue?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not a doctor, but have learned a few things from some excellent ones that cared for me, and I was also a pre-med student.

      My understanding is this - Adrenal glands are an integral part of the endocrine system of both sexes. Adrenal stress may be caused by many factors which eventually overburden the organism so it no longer can keep up with demand for the "stress hormones" secreted by the adrenals. Chronic "negative" stress includes: sleep deprivation, excessive consumption of refined sugars, long-term steroid use (as for lung disease), hostile work environment, abusive home, inadequate nutrition to meet body demands, etc.

      The result is a weakened or absent stress response, which at worst may put a person into shock from something as ordinary as having a tooth pulled. At the minimum it can cause irritability, chronic fatigue, body aches, low resistance to infection, and poor/fuzzy thinking.

      It is not connected to menopause. Adrenal glands sit atop the kidneys, and produce cortisol, not "sex hormones". Homeopathic support may help, as may herbs, supplements, and accupuncture, but a trained N.D. (naturopathic doctor) is needed. Adrenal fatigue and adrenal exhaustion are serious conditions, which need careful monitoring and holistic care for recovery.

      Allopathic medicine (western medicine), the conventional MD, is not well versed in these conditions, and holds no hope for adrenal failure or adrenal failure cases - which are potentially life threatening. (See Cushing's Disease.) They will tell a patient that lifetime steroid dependance and treatment of concurrent damage from that drug must be accepted.

      Naturopaths, TCM (Chinese medicine), and holistic MDs like Dr. Andrew Weil or Derrick Lonsdale (both poineers in alternative or complementary medicine)have different views. The have had some success with "incurable" cases of various sorts, including adrenal suppression.

      An MD can have a cortisol response test done, using an IV, a shot of steroid, and 2 steroid blood levels over 2 hours. There is also a saliva collection test to monitor steroids in the body, which is also reliable, but less well known. You MAY be able to order one online, but a doctor should help you interpret the lab's report for you.

  39. QUESTION:
    mono pose problem like bed Hadek last 2 months as like migraine please tell me what to do i like to no?
    .

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause problem? like bad. had for like the last two months. Its like a migraine. Please tell you what you want to know?

      What is it that you would like to know? Menopause is when a woman stops having her period. It can cause many different kinds of symptoms. These problems are a result of changing hormones.

      For either migraine headaches or menopause symptoms you need to talk to a medical doctor. Only a professional can help you figure out a good treatment plan.
      At least visit a doctor to get a firm diagnosis. Once you know for sure what it is that you have then you have the option of treating it with either western medicine, eastern / alternative medicine, ayurvedic medicine, or with traditional herbs.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is a hysterectomy painful after wards?
    I am in alot of pain with Endometriosis and I want the pain to stop but will the histerectomy hurt as well when the surgery is done and what about all the hormones will they change my sex life?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on a lot of factors...for instance:

      "Why": if Endo is the "only" reason for the hysterectomy, please know that there are alternative treatments and that a hyst is *not* in any way a cure for Endo. At all. If you have disease left behind anywhere in the body after the hyst, whether the ovaries are removed or not, you will have disease recurence without fail. Endo implants produce their own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme called Aromatase; it is because of Aromatase that the majority of women who have undergone hyst without proper removal of disease (excision, see www.centerforendo.com for details) will continue to experience pain. "Hyst as a cure" is an old wives tale, along with "pregnancy is a cure" and "menopause is a cure."

      "How:" an LAVH [laparoscopic assisted vaginal hyst] is less invasive and offers quicker recovery. An abdominal hyst is far more invasive and has longer recovery. Vaginal hyst is less invasive and has faster recovery overall than the others above, but can affect sexual function. Vaginal hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy where possible, however. Where vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, laparoscopic hysterectomy is preferable to abdominal hysterectomy, although it brings a higher chance of bladder or ureter injury [Methods of Hysterectomy: Systematic Review & Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials; BMJ. 2005 Jun 25;330(7506):1478].

      "What:" as in, what will be done, i.e., removal of uterus only, hysterectomy with oophorectomy [removal of one or both ovaries], hysterectomy with salpingoopherectomy [removal of one or both fallopian tubes], radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus, cervix, the top portion of the vagina and most of the tissue that surrounds the cervix in the pelvic cavity. Pelvic lymph nodes may also be removed; supracervical hysterectomy, also referred to as a subtotal hysterectomy, which removes the uterus while leaving the cervix intact.

      It is a major operation, any way you cut it (no pun intended). It will take at least 2 weeks or longer to be completely healed, again, depending on what was done, how complicated your surgery was, etc. Abdominal surgery recovery is expected to be easily longer than 2 weeks till you feel "normal."

      If the surgery is done for a good and valid reason (valid scientific research has offered abundant evidence that Endometriosis does not count as a "good, valid reason" if no other treatment has been conferred previously), and all precautions are being taken to give the patient the most effective, safest and least invasive method of surgery, AND her surgical menopause issues will be addressed (if ovaries are removed) by her concerned, compassionate doctor afterward, AND she feels comfortable with all of the decisions, then the long-term outlook should be perfectly fine. It hurts, just as with any other surgery, but the pain does resolve.

      I am concerned for you that you are undergoing a hyst without being fully informed. Please - do talk to others first and do some research on excision of Endometriosis as a worthwhile, advanced treatment option before consenting to the hyst. I would hate for you to suffer needlessly. http://www.endocenter.org, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/erc and http://www.centerforendo.com are good places to start.

      Good luck no matter what you decide.

  41. QUESTION:
    having piles and suggested for laser. what to do?
    my mother is 47 and has piles. both inner and outer piles. she is now suggested to undergo a laser operation. my question is what is laser operation?
    will it have any side effects in future and forever?
    will she be a position to undergo an another operation in her life for this sake?
    how much hours will be taken to do a laser?
    how much hours for rest after operation? am being in chennai how much will it cost for a laser and which hospital is cheap and best for it? though its not cheaper no issues treatment is important.
    note: she is nearing her menopause and having irregular periods right now. she has only one baby with a normal delivery. no obortion undergone. diabtic patient for four years. 216 before fasting and 292 after eating. (as per march 1st)
    exact answers are welcomed.
    thanks a ton in advance

    • ANSWER:
      Laser treatment is very expensive. Even diabetes plays a role in this. Her blood sugar is not under control. Take her to a Diabetologist for treatment asap. Try the following first.
      Piles
      Piles are either dry or bleeding and often caused by chronic constipation, hard and knotty slots, intake of spices, wines, meats and also by poor or absent physical activity. Dry piles are more painful, while bleeding piles render a person weaker. Pregnant ladies, elderly persons, sedentary persons who eat enormously and quite often but do no exercise, or the person taking above-mentioned dietary items, are more prone to piles. Persistent complaint may cause other complications also, such as fissures, cancerous growths, pain, swelling, smarting etc.
      Types of Piles
      Dry piles - In dry piles there is inflammation of the external piles, continuous pain and become unbearable while voiding the bowels.
      Bleeding piles - In bleeding piles, the internal piles start bleeding and there may be excessive bleeding which lead to anaemia and consequent emaciation.
      Causes
      A person suffers from piles when the anal region veins become varicose. The prime causes of piles are:
      Constipation
      Sedentary way of life
      Lack of exercise
      Some morbid conditions of the liver.
      Ayurvedic Home Remedies
      Use oil of Cypress or Juniper in the bath or using some drops of either to a bowl of cold water for improving circulation. Abdomen should be massaged with a 2% oil dilution, to any vegetable oil used as a base oil of Rosemary or Marjoram.
      Apply locally commercial creams processed from the extracts of -
      (i) Morse chestmt (Aescutus hippocastanum)
      (ii) Pilecort (Ranunculus ficaria) or Marigold (Calendula officinalis).
      Tincture of distilled witch Hazel (Hamamelis Virginiana) is astringent and can be safely used as a compress. It will also provide relief in prolonged bleeding which can also be prevented by using tea prepared from Nettle (Urtica Deocca).
      All the ointments or cream are available from homeopath pharmacists retailers. Remember, frequent and profuse bleeding is liable to cause general weakness and anaemia also, hence don't let it prolong.
      Use of caster oil with milk or 1 TSP with a warm cup of tea or, still better, Isabghole Husk (1 TSP) with warm milk will help in softening stool and thus, cause easy and almost painless passage thereof.
      Alternative is to take a tea spoon of Triphala with water at bed-time. It shows its effects.
      Precaution
      The patient should be advised not to use a hard seat or ride horses during the course of treatment. He should not indulge in too much sex, nor suppress the urge to void the stools for fear of pain which accompanies dry piles.

  42. QUESTION:
    My period is always long and heavy, is this bad?
    It's been going on for 8 days right now. It usually goes on for 8 or 9 days, but last month it was only for three days.

    It's always moderately heavy too (I bleed through a regular tampon every 3 or 4 hours).

    Is this bad? Why is this? Is it genetic? (my mom had long periods too) What can I do to shorten my periods, besides birth control?

    I am VERY active and pretty light (5'3", 99lbs) and my period is getting in the way of sports!

    • ANSWER:
      First i would like to tell u the Medical name of your condtion and its called (menorrhagia)

      and second there is 2 reason for that:

      In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself.

      In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age.

      third You can treat it In this :

      If the problems are severe, bleeding may be regulated by tablet treatment. These may be hormonal or non-hormonal.

      Hormonal treatments include the contraceptive pill and danazol (eg Danol).

      Progestogens are effective in making a woman's periods more regular but do not reduce the monthly flow.

      Non-hormonal treatments include tranexamic acid (eg Cyklokapron), which reduces the blood loss by up to half.

      Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce monthly loss by about a third.

      Alternative approaches include the use of a hormone containing contraceptive coil (Mirena), which is suitable for most women.

      Surgical alternatives include destroying the lining of the womb with a laser or applying heat treatment to the lining of the womb with hot water in a balloon. Hysterectomy - the removal of the uterus - is commonly performed for heavy periods. These two surgical procedures are only appropriate for women who do not wish to have any more children.

      If a diagnosis of an underlying condition is made, then the treatment will be tailored towards that condition.

      If the woman is anaemic, iron or folic acid supplements may be needed.

      Dr: Martin larson

      feel free to ask me anything

  43. QUESTION:
    Best type of birth control for me?
    Im currently on the pill Yasmin, which is working fine for me but Im really worried about the side effects. Breast cancer really runs in my family, and so does strokes and high blood pressure. Also, my mom had a really painful ovarian cyst when she was my age, which is also caused by the pill. What other type of birth control do you suggest I try? Im thinking either the patch or the shot, but how effective are they/is anyone of you on these? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The patch and the shot are also both hormonal methods of birth control, so switching to those from the BC pill would do nothing to alleviate your risk of breast cancer.

      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  44. QUESTION:
    Is anyone familiar with black cohosh?
    I am wondering about its effectiveness in bringing on a delayed period. I am looking for a good alternative to provera. My cycles are already irregular and I really want to limit the hormones that I put into my body. I have the capsules.

    • ANSWER:
      I hope this site helps.

      Introduction
      This fact sheet provides basic information about the herb black cohosh--common names, uses, potential side effects, and resources for more information. Black cohosh is a plant native to North America.

      Common Names--black cohosh, black snakeroot, macrotys, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot, rattleweed

      Latin Names--Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa

      What It Is Used For
      Black cohosh has a history of use for rheumatism (arthritis and muscle pain), but has been used more recently to treat hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and other symptoms that can occur during menopause.
      Black cohosh has also been used for menstrual irregularities and premenstrual syndrome, and to induce labor.
      How It Is Used
      The underground stems and roots of black cohosh are commonly used fresh or dried to make strong teas (infusions), capsules, solid extracts used in pills, or liquid extracts (tinctures).

      What the Science Says
      Study results are mixed on whether black cohosh effectively relieves menopausal symptoms.
      Studies to date have been less than 6 months long, so long-term safety data are not currently available.1
      NCCAM is funding studies to determine whether black cohosh reduces the frequency and intensity of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms.
      There are not enough reliable data to determine whether black cohosh is effective for rheumatism or other uses.
      Side Effects and Cautions
      Black cohosh can cause headaches and stomach discomfort. In clinical trials comparing the effects of the herb and those of estrogens, a low number of side effects were reported, such as headaches, gastric complaints, heaviness in the legs, and weight problems.
      No interactions have been reported between black cohosh and prescription medicines.
      Black cohosh has recently been linked to a few cases of hepatitis (inflammation of the liver), but it is not clear whether black cohosh caused the problem.
      It is not clear if black cohosh is safe for women who have had breast cancer or for pregnant women.
      Black cohosh should not be confused with blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), which has different properties, treatment uses, and side effects than black cohosh. Black cohosh is sometimes used with blue cohosh to stimulate labor, but this therapy has caused adverse effects in newborns, which appear to be due to blue cohosh.
      It is important to inform your health care providers about any herb or dietary supplement you are using, including black cohosh. This helps to ensure safe and coordinated care.
      http://nccam.nih.gov/health/blackcohosh/

      Also check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_cohosh

  45. QUESTION:
    Are there other alternative treatments for Endometriosis other than the Lupron Depot Shot?

    • ANSWER:
      Let me make one thing very clear to you that there is no cure to endometriosis. Treatment for endometriosis is aimed at easing the symptoms so that the condition does not interfere with your daily life.

      Not treating at all is an option if the symptoms are mild and there are no problems with subfertility of infertility. In about a third of cases, endometriosis gets better by itself without treatment. It is also possible to keep an eye on the symptoms and decide to have treatment if they get worse.

      Drug treatments

      Pain killers:

      Non-steroidal anti inflammatory (NSAIDS) are usually the preferred treatment, as they act against the inflammation caused by endometriosis as well as helping ease pain and discomfort. Examples are ibuprofen and naproxen.
      Paracetamol is sometimes used as an alternative. It is not usually as effective as NSAIDS, but may be used if NSAIDS cause any side effects
      Codeine is a stronger pain killer that is sometimes combined with paracetamol or used alone if other pain killers are not suitable. Constipation is a common side-effect

      Hormone treatments:

      Hormone treatments aim to stop egg release (ovulation). This encourages the endometrial tissue to shrink and this helps to reduce the symptoms. In some cases, they may eventually disappear. In effect the treatment stops your periods. There are four broad types of hormone-based treatment:

      Progestogens: these drugs stop egg release and help to shrink endometrial tissue. They sometimes have unpleasant side effects such as bloating, mood changes, irregular bleeding and weight gain. Drug names include medroxyprogesterone acetate, dydrogesterone, and norethisterone.

      Antiprogestogens: these drugs create an effect similar to after the menopause. They can have unpleasant side effects including weight gain, acne, mood changes and the development of masculine features (hair growth and deepening voice). Drug names include danazol and gestrinone; gestrinone is known to have fewer unpleasant side effects

      Combined oral contraceptive pill: Although not officially licensed for the treatment of endometriosis, it can help to relieve symptoms and can be taken indefinitely

      Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues: this is a group of drugs that create an effect similar to after the menopause. They often have unpleasant side effects similar to the menopause such as hot flushes, difficulty sleeping, vaginal dryness, low libido, and headaches and reduced bone mineral density (‘thinning' bones). For this reason they can only be used for relatively short periods of time (6 months). Drug names include buserelin, goserelin, nafarelin, leuprorelin, and triptorelin.

      Surgery

      Surgery can be used to remove areas of endometrial tissue and this can help with the symptoms. This kind of surgery will depend on where the tissue is. Often it is carried out as ‘keyhole’ surgery during a laparoscopy and may include the use of laser surgery techniques. This type of surgery is sometimes called ‘conservative’ surgery as it has a smaller impact on your body and the operations are generally minor.

      If other treatments have not worked and if you have decided not to have any more children, then a hysterectomy is an option. Sometimes this includes removal of the ovaries too (Oophorectomy). Generally, this is considered to be a ‘last resort’ treatment and there is evidence that, even after this operation, endometriosis can come back. Hysterectomy and Oophorectomy are sometimes called ‘radical’ surgery as they are major operations that will have a significant impact on your body.

      Support from self-help groups can be very helpful if you are learning to manage endometriosis.

  46. QUESTION:
    Does soya milk have any health advantages over semi-skimmed milk?

    To old know it all, I would never claim to be vegan, since I like meat it would be hypocrtical.

    I am however willing to try new foods if they make me healthier.
    Wow I didn't know it could control blood sugar in diabetes, I will definelty be trying it then.

    Type 1 diabetic.

    • ANSWER:
      Soy milk is nutritionally close to cow's milk, though most soy milk commercially available today is enriched with added vitamins such as vitamin B12. It naturally has about the same amount of protein as cow milk. Natural soy milk contains little digestable calcium as it is bound to the bean's pulp, which is insoluble in a human. To counter this, many manufacturers enrich their products with calcium carbonate which can dissolve in the acid of the stomach. Notably it has little saturated fat, which many consider to be a benefit. Lower fat varieties, however, contain less protein than cow's milk.

      Soy milk is promoted as a healthy alternative to cow's milk for reasons including:

      * Contains no antibiotics, hormones, cholesterol, or links to cancer, diabetes, and other diseases
      * Diabetes management through its ability to control blood sugar levels. However, diabetics should be aware that most brands of soymilk - even those labelled "plain" or "organic" - are actually sweetened. Look for the word "unsweetened" on the label.
      * Source of lecithin and vitamin E
      * Lacks casein
      * Safe for people with lactose intolerance or milk allergy
      * Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats are good for the heart.
      * Contains isoflavones, organic chemicals, that may possibly be beneficial to health.

      In 1995 the New England Journal of Medicine (Vol.333, No. 5) published a report from the University of Kentucky entitled "Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Soy Protein Intake on Serum Lipids." It was financed by the PTI division of DuPont,"The Solae Co." St.Louis. This meta-analysis concluded that soy protein is correlated with significant decreases in serum cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), a.k.a. bad cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations. However, high density lipoprotein (HDL) a.k.a. good cholesterol, did not increase. Soy phytoestrogens (isoflavones:genistein and daidzein) adsorbed onto the soy protein were suggested as the agent reducing serum cholesterol levels. On the basis of this research PTI, in 1998, filed a petition with FDA for a health claim that soy protein may reduce cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.

      The FDA granted this health claim for soy: "25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease." One serving of soy milk (1 cup or 240 mL), for instance, contains 6 or 7 grams of soy protein.

      In January, 2006 an American Heart Association review (in the journal Circulation) of a decade-long study of soy protein benefits cast doubt on the FDA-allowed "Heart Healthy" claim for soy protein. The panel also found that soy isoflavones do not reduce post menopause "hot flashes" in women, nor do isoflavones help prevent cancers of the breast, uterus, or prostate. Thus soy isoflavones in the form of supplements is not recommended. Among the conclusions the authors state, "In contrast, soy products such as tofu, soy butter, soy nuts, or some soy burgers should be beneficial to cardiovascular and overall health because of their high content of polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals and low content of saturated fat. Using these and other soy foods to replace foods high in animal protein that contain saturated fat and cholesterol may confer benefits to cardiovascular health."

      However, the soy industry has also received similar criticism from the dairy industry for reasons including:

      * High levels of phytic acid
      * Hemagglutinin content. Soybean hemagglutinins are glycoproteins that cause red blood cells to agglutinate or clump together. Hemagglutinins are concentrated in the whey protein fraction of soy milk. Hemagglutinating activity of raw soybeans is readily destroyed by moist heat treatment. This is similar to a substance found in flu viruses, although it is rather unlikely to be harmful unless the soy milk is taken intravenously.
      * Processing of soybeans, including genetic modification, which may result in lysinoalanine or nitrosamines
      * Trypsin inhibitors content
      * Soy phytoestrogens as antithyroid agents
      * Aluminum content.

      Although in general soy milk is not suitable for babies or infants, there exist baby formulas based on soy protein, i.e. soy milk, that are used primarily in the case of lactose intolerant children, those allergic to cow's milk or parental preference for a vegetarian or vegan diet. Heinz Farley's Soya Infant Formula is suitable for vegans and is approved by the Vegan Society in the UK. These formulas are commonly named "soy milk", but contain extra carbohydrates, fat, vitamins, and minerals. However care must be taken that children with "Soy protein intolerance" are not fed soy milk.
      Using soybeans to make milk instead of raising cows is said to have ecological advantages, as the amount of soy that could be grown using the same amount of land would feed more people than if used to raise cows. This is debated as grazing land for animals is very different from land used to farm. Because the soybean plant is a legume, it also replenishes the nitrogen content of the soil in which it is grown.

  47. QUESTION:
    Are there any alternative treatment methods for uterine fibroids besides surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes there is. Here is a link that shows various treatments.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uterine_fibroids#Treatment

      I had the uterine arterial embolization. It hurt like a mofo, but it was worth it. If you go with this option, you can email me at zyada_tx @ yahoo.com for more information.

      Do NOT let a doctor convince you that you must get a hysterectomy! Some doctors are convinced that hystorectomy is the only way to treat this (or perhaps they prefer the profit margin).

      Also, I heard very, very bad things about the medicine listed in that article. It's basically an artificial menopause with all the grief that entails.

  48. QUESTION:
    I have heavy periods i'm to young for surgery or medician how can i stop them???(Dose exersize help)?
    I am trying to find ways to stop it i don't want blood to soak thru my cloths at school hhhhhhhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeeeeellllllllllllllllpppppppp

    • ANSWER:
      What are heavy periods?

      The correct medical definition of heavy periods is the passage of more than 80ml of blood each period. It is seldom realistic or practical, however, to actually measure the blood loss and so doctors rely on the woman's description of her period.

      Periods are considered heavy when:

      a woman bleeds for more than 8 to 10 days, especially if this is repeated month after month.

      a woman bleeds so much that it is difficult for her to attend her job. She may be forced to plan her holidays and leisure time according to the timings of her period.

      the bleeding is continuously so heavy that the woman becomes anaemic.

      the presence of other than small clots for more than one or two days suggests heavy periods.

      'flooding' describes the sudden, unexpected onset of periods, like turning on a tap, and indicates heavy periods.

      Why do some women have heavy and long menstrual flows?

      The causes of prolonged and heavy bleeding are given below.

      In younger women heavy periods are most often due to a temporary hormone imbalance, which eventually corrects itself.

      In the years close to the menopause, (45 years of age onwards) heavy periods are usually a sign of hormone imbalance. However, the possibility of heavy periods being caused by an underlying disease increases with age.

      The following conditions are associated with heavy periods:

      fibroids.

      endometriosis.

      pelvic inflammatory disease.

      polyps of the lining of the womb.

      the commonest cause is a condition called dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). This refers to heavy bleeding with no apparent explanation.

      Is it necessary to consult a doctor?

      If a woman is experiencing heavy or irregular periods that are interfering with her quality of life, then she should consult a GP or gynaecologist.

      What will the doctor do?

      A pelvic examination is usually necessary. If the woman is over 40 years of age, then a pelvic ultrasound scan or a biopsy of the lining of the womb is appropriate. This is to ensure that there is no abnormality with the cells of the lining of the womb.

      An examination called a hysteroscopy is often suggested. This involves placing a fine telescope through the neck of the womb so that the lining of the womb can be seen. Most hysteroscopies are performed without the need for general anaesthesia.

      How are heavy periods treated?

      If there are no signs of an underlying abnormality, treatment is not absolutely necessary but most women prefer to have something to help them cope more easily each month.

      If the problems are severe, bleeding may be regulated by tablet treatment. These may be hormonal or non-hormonal.

      Hormonal treatments include the contraceptive pill and danazol (eg Danol).

      Progestogens are effective in making a woman's periods more regular but do not reduce the monthly flow.

      Non-hormonal treatments include tranexamic acid (eg Cyklokapron), which reduces the blood loss by up to half.

      Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce monthly loss by about a third.

      Alternative approaches include the use of a hormone containing contraceptive coil (Mirena), which is suitable for most women.

      Surgical alternatives include destroying the lining of the womb with a laser or applying heat treatment to the lining of the womb with hot water in a balloon. Hysterectomy - the removal of the uterus - is commonly performed for heavy periods. These two surgical procedures are only appropriate for women who do not wish to have any more children.

      If a diagnosis of an underlying condition is made, then the treatment will be tailored towards that condition.

      If the woman is anaemic, iron or folic acid supplements may be needed.

      Hope tobe useful for you

  49. QUESTION:
    What do u do if ur underarm is sweaty? Even when u put deodorant?
    HElp please

    • ANSWER:
      Try to put some baby powder under your armpits. Try a different deodarant...Yes thats perfectly normal to sweat at 10. Also after you pick on of these tips you wont need an outfit to wear that you wont sweat in because you wont sweat.
      But if you are concerned about your clothes making you swear try this:
      * Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. If you sweat through your clothes, it will be less visible on light colors, and a loose fit will allow air to circulate next to your skin.

      * Don't wear silk or artificial fibers (like nylon and polyester) next to your skin. These can cling to skin and restrict airflow. Instead, wear cotton. In fact, natural cotton perspiration shields can be worn under clothing to provide an extra layer of protection; check out several options (including shields that can be worn with sleeveless clothing and ones that are disposable or washable) at comfywear.com.

      * Look for an antiperspirant with aluminum chloride. This is the active ingredient in most antiperspirants that works by blocking the pores to prevent sweat from escaping. While you may have heard rumors about aluminum chloride being linked to diseases such as breast cancer, it has never been proven to increase any health risks, says Jim Garza, M.D., founder of The Hyperhidrosis Center in Houston.

      There are numbers of factors that can affect the quantity and odor quality of your sweat which will increase the need to stop sweating. Some of the factors that can increase your concern to stop sweating are discussed below:

      1. Heredity

      Hyperhidrosis is believed to be an inherited problem and palms and soles are most affected areas of this problem. It can be clearly gauged that the problem in hands and feet can severely impair the ability to work and therefore you need seriously to think about treatment for stop sweating.

      2. Certain foods and beverages

      Excessive sweating is directly linked to your eating habits. If you want to stop sweating you should have control on drinking hot beverages and alcohol eating spicy foods etc. All these food items increase the rate of sweat in your body!

      3. Certain medication

      There are some drugs and medication that can potentially increase the problem of sweating in your body and you should refrain yourself from taking these drugs to stop sweating. Drugs that can cause excessive sweating include some antipsychotic medications—used to treat mental disorders—morphine and excess doses of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. You should always consult your doctor before you get the prescription of these drugs about your problem of excessive sweating. Sometimes an overdose of analgesics can also increase the problem.

      4. Menopause

      Menopause can potentially cause a form of heavy sweating known as hot flashes in women. Hot flashes can also occur in night and during sleep and the women wake up drenched totally in their own sweat which is a troublesome condition. You should immediately consider for treatments to stop sweating if you face this condition.

      5. Overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism

      Sometimes the thyroid gland of our body produces excess amounts of the hormone thyroxine which can increase the sensitivity to heat. This directly results in more sweating which can hinder your day-to-day working and you will have to look for alternatives to stop sweating in order to get to the normal conditions.

      Another way you can tackle this problem is to use talcum powder along with the antiperspirant. This will help keep you dry and at the same time work towards preventing sweating.

      Diet and Lifestyle, avoid caffeinated drinks - caffeine can lead to anxiety and anxiety is one of the known causes of secondary hyperhydrosis. Exercise, this will help get your body in shape and as result it will perform better helping you to tackle this condition.

      Eat lots of fruit - one of the good fruits to eat is grapes. Lastly drinks lots of water this will help flush your system and keep your skin hydrated and in good health.

      - denvirox :-)

  50. QUESTION:
    Do the side effects of Arimidex subside the longer you use it?

    • ANSWER:
      Anytime you have to start taking a prescription drug you should thoroughly research it as much as possible to be able to weigh the pros and cons of the medication. Type in your searchbar, "side effects of arimidex" and read through the listed sites. Are you taking this for menopause? If so, type in "alternative treatments for menopause" and see what else is available, especially if it is more natural. Be informed about your choices and your body! I have a doctor that wanted to put me on cholesterol medication and against his advice I refused it and told him I would see him in 6 weeks. With a diet change and supplements I got my cholesterol down to perfect without medication that could harm my liver! Good Luck!


menopause alternative treatments

Women In Menopause Side Effects

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of taking menopause (estrogen) pills at a young age?
    If a girl in her early twenties (that clearly does not have menopause) were to take menopause medication, like Estroven, as a way to receive estrogen, what would the consequences or side effects be?

    • ANSWER:
      I answered your other question, but now that I see this, i see you're talking about estroven, which isn't an estrogen pill, really. That is, it's just non-steroidal plant estrogen. it won't have any effect on you because the very small amount of estrogen in this just competes with your own body's estrogen for estrogen receptors. Because the estrogen in Estroven is very weak as compared to the type of estrogen in the body of a woman in her 20s, it's just not going to have any effect, it's too weak.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of clomid and progesterone?
    I took Clomid days 4-8 and Progesterone suppositories since 6 days post ovulation, and since about 3 DPO I have had increasing sore breasts (today is 10 DPO and they're KILLING me) and nausea all morning, getting worse each day, since 8 DPO. Did others have this as side effects from these medications or could I be pregnant? This is my second cycle on Clomid, TTC since 5/06.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Mrs 1101...My boobs hurt, i bloated in the stomach, and I can't take a dump for anything....LOL. I think even when you quit taking it your boobs can still hurt and you can stay constipated. I did read something interesting that some women are prescribed progesterone during menopause to dull breast tenderness...so this made me think in the past that i must be pregnant because progesterone would make the pain go away. Well, I've been on clomid since Sept...and no baby yet...so those sore boobs weren't pregnancy. :-(

  3. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know if side effects of Arimidex subside after a period of time?
    My mother has been on it after stage IV breast cancer for almost 2 years now and the side effects keep getting worse. Any help for sleeplessness, hot flashes or depression?

    • ANSWER:
      Arimidex suppresses the production of estrogens. It is quite normal that it causes severe menopause symptoms. Even menopaused women normally retain half their production of estrogen; on that medication, it is almost all suppressed.

      There are other options for cancer hormonal treatment, which could be less debilitating for your mother. She could be treated using a SERM (Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator) such as Raloxifen. I suggest you talk about it to her doctor.

      Normally, breast cancer hormonal treatment should be discontinued after 5 years.

      Anyway, whatever you do, DO NOT encourage your mother to take phytoestrogen supplements, as those will stimulate tumor growth.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  5. QUESTION:
    What will happen if I go through menopause with no hormone replacement or medications at all?
    I have tryed bioidentical hormone replacement and had severe symptoms. I was currently given prometrium and estropipate. I read the possible side effects including increased risk of dimentia and I dont want to take that risk. Alzheimer's runs in my family. ( I am only 47).

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is a stage in life when a woman stops having her monthly period.It is a normal part of aging, marking the end of a woman's reproductive years.Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  6. QUESTION:
    How successful were you with conceiving while on Clomid?
    How many cycles were you on clomid before you conceived? What side effects did you suffer from? Was the pregnancy a single pregnancy or did it result in a multiple birth? If so, did you have twins, triplets?
    This is all for a paper I'm working on. Honest and serious answers only please. Prefer woman who have actually been on clomid or Clomiphene Citrate.

    • ANSWER:
      i am currently on clomid and i thought i would give my side effects as they seem a little bit different to other people, my boobs are so tender sometimes its more like an ache and sometimes its as if there is something hanging off them, lol. i also have really bad hot flushes and sweat a a lot, i feel like i am going through the menopause or something (i am not though as i am only 22) i haven't had the moodiness that some people have had but i have had some swelling to the ankles and weird sensations in my uterus and ovary area, i hope this helps some.

  7. QUESTION:
    How long should women take pill for?
    I have been on the pill for past 14 years. First on Norinyl and then now on Brevinor due to heavy bleeding each month. I stopped for close to a year and was then put on Brevinor. Since reading about DVT and all the other side effects that come with it, I am now wondering if I should stop and seek alternative natural therapies for my heavy periods. Has anyone been affect by deep vein thrombosis related to pill?

    • ANSWER:
      Depending on the overall medical history it can be ok for some to stay on the pill it's just about time for menopause. I had wondered the same thing with in regards to a different way to take the pill.

      I would recommend checking with your doctor as well to see what they say.

      I've never experienced DVT before.

  8. QUESTION:
    How dangerous is using Hormone Replacement to stop abnormal menopausal bleeding? ?
    My girlfriend is 47, and is probably going through menopause, but I understand using Hormones can cause a person to have to take blood thinners possibly the rest of their life, among other side effects.

    • ANSWER:
      Not very dangerous, frankly. HRT has gotten a bad rap because it's slightly risky. But it also has benefits. So it's a cost/benefit analysis. It's often quite worth it for some women who are having a lot of menopause problems. I've not heard of women using HRT going on blood thinners. If the person has a clotting problem, they shouldn't be on HRT. But here's something important: oral estrogen does raise your risk of blood clots. But non-oral estrogen does NOT raise risk, so if blood clotting is a concern, then the person taking the HRT should think about using an estrogen patch instead.

  9. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when someone havea retroverted uterus?
    What are the side effects of having a retroverted uterus? Can I still get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      From http://www.womens-health.co.uk/retrover.asp

      A retroverted uterus is the name given to a uterus that is tilted backwards inside of the pelvis. Normally, women are born with a uterus that is located in a straight up and down position inside of the pelvis, or with a uterus that tips slightly forwards, towards the stomach. However, some women have a uterus that tilts backwards, pointing towards the spine. Commonly referred to as a tipped uterus, this condition affects more than 20% of women worldwide. Generally associated with no health complications, a retroverted uterus can occasionally cause painful symptoms or signal an underlying health disorder.

      What Causes a Retroverted Uterus?

      In the vast majority of women with retroverted uteruses, causes are completely genetic. Many women are simply born with a uterus that is tipped in this position, and this is entirely normal. However, certain factors can cause a uterus that is in a normal placement to become retroverted. These causes include:

      Pregnancy: During pregnancy, the uterus becomes enlarged and the ligaments that hold the uterus in place become weakened. As a result, many women find that their uterus becomes retroverted after they have delivered their babies.
      Menopause: During menopause, estrogen levels drop rapidly in women. As with pregnancy, this can cause the ligaments that hold the uterus in place to weaken, allowing it to slip into a retroverted position.
      Reproductive Health Problems: Certain reproductive health issues, including pelvic inflammatory disease and endometriosis, can cause the uterus to tilt backwards. This is because these illnesses can lead to scar tissue formation on the inside of the abdomen, forcing the uterus out of position.

      What are the Symptoms of a Retroverted Uterus?

      Generally, the majority of women suffering from a retroverted uterus experience no symptoms. However, if symptoms do present, the two most commonly-occurring symptoms include:

      pain during sexual intercourse, particularly vaginal intercourse (dyspareunia)
      pain during menstruation (dysmenorrhea)

      This pain and discomfort is the result of pressure that the retroverted uterus places on the rectum and the ligaments around the tailbone.

      Rare symptoms associated with a retroverted uterus include:

      lower back pain
      increased number of urinary tract infections
      incontinence
      pain while using tampons
      fertility difficulties

      Diagnosing a Retroverted Uterus

      If you are experiencing symptoms of a retroverted uterus, you may want to make an appointment with your health care provider for an examination. By performing a few simple tests, your health care provider can easily diagnose the condition. Diagnosis usually consists of:

      a pelvic exam
      an abdominal ultrasound

      Occasionally, it is difficult to differentiate a retroverted uterus from a pelvic tumor. In this case, your health care provider may have to perform a rectovaginal exam.

      Are There Any Health Complications Associated with a Retroverted Uterus?

      Few women with retroverted uteruses experience health complications as a result of their condition. However, sometimes a retroverted uterus can be a warning sign of another underlying reproductive issue, including pelvic inflammatory disease or endometriosis. Be sure to contact your health care provider if you are experiencing:

      severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      irregular menstrual periods
      irregular ovulation or infertility

      If left untreated, these conditions can have dangerous effects on your reproductive organs and overall health.

      Will A Retroverted Uterus Affect Fertility?

      Many women who have a retroverted uterus worry that it will affect their future fertility. However, this condition does not appear to affect conception in any way, and most women with retroverted uteruses will go on to experience healthy pregnancies. If you are experiencing difficulties getting pregnant, it could be a sign of an underlying reproductive problem. Be sure to contact your health care provider for assistance.

      Treatment for A Retroverted Uterus

      If your retroverted uterus is causing you a lot of pain or discomfort, you may want to consider treatment for the condition. Treatment options include:

      Exercises: Women can perform knee-to-chest exercise in order to encourage the uterus to slip back into its proper place. Unfortunately, this tends to be a temporary solution for the problem.
      Pessaries: A pessary is a plastic device that is worn inside of the vagina. It helps to support the uterus in the proper position. However, these devices can only be worn in the short term because of the risk for developing a vaginal infection.
      Surgery: Surgery for a retroverted uterus is available. Known as the UPLIFT procedure, this procedure works to reposition the uterus by cutting and shortening the ligaments that support it. UPLIFT is a laparoscopic surgery that is performed with the aid of a small camera.

  10. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for the hormones in birth control to get out of your system?
    I was using the NuvaRing and had some awful side effect. Low sex drive, massive mood swings, I was depressed and homicidal with people. So naturally I went off of it. This of course was too late before my mood swings drove my boyfriend away and we broke up. We're talking now and things are OK, but EVERY. SINGLE. TIME. I start my period I lose my mind. It's be about 5 months since I stopped the BC and I feel normal, until my period hits. Then I become a hyper sensitive mess to everything he says and does.
    What do I need to be doing? Or Eating to clear these bad hormones out of my system?

    • ANSWER:
      That's not to say estrogen isn't a major player in regulating moods. Estrogen acts everywhere in the body, including the parts of the brain that control emotion.

      Some of estrogen's effects include:

      Increasing serotonin, and the number of serotonin receptors in the brain
      Modifying the production and the effects of endorphins, the "feel-good" chemicals in the brain
      Protecting nerves from damage, and possibly stimulating nerve growth
      What these effects mean in an individual woman is impossible to predict. Estrogen's actions are too complex for researchers to understand fully. As an example, despite estrogen's apparently positive effects on the brain, many women's moods improve after menopause, when estrogen levels are very low.

      Some experts believe that some women are more vulnerable to the menstrual cycle's normal changes in estrogen. They suggest it's the roller coaster of hormones during the reproductive years that create mood disturbances.

  11. QUESTION:
    Are there any alternatives to spaying my female cat?
    She is an indoor cat and soooo sweet. I am worried about her personality changing and any health side effects from having a full hysterectomy without hormone supplement, which is essentially what spaying does.

    • ANSWER:
      You can simply just not spay her and tolerate her when she goes into heat. She will cry a lot, may spray, and be desperate for a mate for a couple of months every year. She will be miserable, and make you miserable as well.

      There are some hormonal shots and pills to prevent that, but the side effects are worse than simply spaying her. There is also evidence that ovaban (hormones) also increase chances of mammary cancer. Or you may forget a dose, and like clockwork your cat will go in heat and have all the dangers associated w it.

      An unspayed cat is at risk of pyometra (more info here: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?articleid=917 ) They also become great escape artists and may wander far in search for a mate and get lost

      A kitten recovers sooooo quickly and the risks are so minimal, even more minimal when you compare it w the risks of possible delivery if she gets pregnant, mammary cancer, spaying a pregnant cat or cat w pyometra. Hormones in dogs and cats is different than in women, they don't go into menopause like we do, and they are miserable when they go in heat. Their bodies are prepared to live without hormones since they only have all that hormonal rush once a year (twice in dogs), while our body is really not used to being without hormonal fluctuations since we deal w it all the time, every month... if we are not ovulating... we are having a period.... no break

      Im sure she will be much happier spayed than not and forced to be celibate w her raging hormones :-)

  12. QUESTION:
    If you are in menopause and medication brought back spotting, should I stop using it?
    Certain medications that I noticed that have an affect on my head from allergies to mood swings, seem to be connected to my female functions. When I tell the doctor, he acts like that is highly impossible but I heard from the natural health book promotions, that there is a natural turn on product for women that is sprayed in the nose. To me, it must be something to this situation. Sometimes I wonder if the medication is worth continuing if the side effects become uncomfortable if not life dangering?

    • ANSWER:
      see your doctor. The bleeeding can be from a number of causes, and you need to make certain that your assumption the cause is the medicationn is correct.

  13. QUESTION:
    Which birth control pill should I take to make my boobs bigger?
    Specific experiences and side effects would be nice to know to please :)
    Wow thank you both.
    Tayy,I cannot believe your boobs shrunk afterwards! Did you stop taking it?
    Jobanana85, do you think if I exercise while taking it my boobs will still grow? because I am a very active and avid exerciser.
    Thanks NFangora That probably is true I will keep that in mind.

    • ANSWER:
      Dear friend,

      Just Stop Worrying and Start Living,
      I Admire that you take care of yourself and examine very well, but don't worry, Just be happy and Relax. And Many Girls change their figures every now and Then, their body hormones are just too Dynamic, so just relax and wait for the body to naturally flow accordingly.

      We boys confess that sexy figures with big boobs are attractive, But when it comes to a Life Partner or Wife, we prefer looking at a girl on whom we can trust, share emotions and a Positive mind set. Attraction and true love are Two Separate things, never confuse them. Be natural and stay simple, that is what boys like :).

      A true Lover, will Love it when his girl is just Close to him, . . Boobs or No boobs. . it doesn't matter to Us..

      Answer to your Question :
      Yes Proper eating habits combined with Body Hormones make em grow bulky/fatty. They tend to improve in skin fat. But this growth is just 7 - 10% visible growth. There are some medicines or birth control pills, which have these hormones, but they 'just are not right'.

      Exercising the Muscle tone there also gains a Few percentage, exercising also helps reduce boobs sagging.

      Boobs and whole body growth depends on YOUR Genes. The genes code of your OWN Body. There is a 40% chance that the code of the gene is copied from your mother or fathers side. Yes sometimes also from the fathers side. Many times gene code behaves according to own new style.(ie. Granny's Chest Shaped not male/dads shaped chest :P. daddys momma side gene code might be present)

      The size of a woman's breasts may fluctuate during the menstrual cycle, particularly with premenstrual water retention. An increase in breast size is a common side effect of use of the combined oral contraceptive pill.

      Breasts sag if the ligaments become elongated, a natural process that can occur over time and is also influenced by the breast bouncing while exercising. Breasts can decrease in size at menopause if estrogen levels decline.

      Some exercises & Hormonal pills have proven effects to Enhance growth, by making the process rapid. But finally they grow according till the size which is present in your gene code. Except for surgery, there is no proven method to make them too BIG, and its highly not recommended, as the breast tissue is fragile and prone to infections and easily painful.

      Normally heavy growth of breast is seen after marriage, when boobs get enough sexual massage treatment, with birth control pills and culminated with changing hormonal pattern. A Huge change is Visible specially during or before pregnancy.

      Involving in sex releases hormones which Hasten body growth for bigger boobs, butt and other fat development. But finally its highly risky in terms of STD, or you might get pregnant or worst, girls when sexually involved, get physically attached and attracted towards that partner, which further makes their emotional life miserable. So it is best to control these emotions. You just don't wanna rune your life involving with someone Unknown.

      Remember about the Hormones, They just don't increase boob Growth, but they tend to increase fat all over you. Your body becomes a Energy Consumption and Storage Vault, for the coming Baby.

      Practice Yoga or keep yourself busy in some hobbies and activities. Don't think so much negative, because we good boys do get attracted towards sexy figures with big boobs, But finally we want a life partner or girl friend who has a Good Character, a Beautiful Smile, Who understands our emotions and shares trust, not just a stupid sexy body.

      Girls with only looks and no brains get miserable love life, but girls with positive mind and presentable looks make it successful.

      So just Chill and Live your life, You have a Big road ahead!!

  14. QUESTION:
    Is taking estrogen hormones for woman, can cause dementia?
    I was reading on the encyclopidia that one of the side effects for womand with menopause from taking estrogen can be dementia. I wonder if there is the same risk for a healthy woman who has natural levels of estrogen but is taking more.

    • ANSWER:
      That's interesting, I hadn't heard of that. Not good news for me, I've been on HRT for 5 years now after a total hysterectomy at 35 due to an intestinal perforation. From one article I read it seemed to occur when the women over 60 started to take them, not as evident when taking them earlier in life. Hope that's the case. And if that is the case quite possibly the hormone pills combined with other common medication taken in older age could be helping to cause the effect and they haven't figured it all out yet, or the group they did this study on possibly a good number of them may have had dementia without taking the hormone. I hope they are wrong, I'm too uncomfortable to live without it.

  15. QUESTION:
    Peri-menopausal Women: What vitamins do you take to COMBAT some of the perimenopause symptoms?
    My aunt is 47 years old & is experiencing HORRIFIC peri-menopause symptoms.

    She & I have researched HRT & have decided she WILL NOT be taking it, due to the MANY negative side effects.

    We know there is a better way to great health, i.e. diet, exercise & nutrients, basically, a life-style change, if you will.

    That being said, what vitamins have helped you to COMBAT the perimenopausal symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      I've researched peri-menopause & the vitamins listed below will COMBAT some of the symptoms

      Omega 3
      Multi-vitamins
      B-Vitamins
      Calcium Tablets
      Vitamin D3

  16. QUESTION:
    Can I reduce the chance of hair loss like how women reduce the chance of wrinkles?
    I read about a year ago women can reduce their chances of facial wrinkles by applying cream early before the wrinkles starts to develop.
    Can this apply to men too in terms of hair loss?
    Would any damage be done if I used products from Hair Club for Men right now to reduce the chances of hair loss later on?
    Does the Hair Club for Men work and is it obvious that a person is using their products?

    • ANSWER:
      You can! Find out what, when, why and HOW and your hair will improve by eliminating the 'cause'.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

  17. QUESTION:
    What would suddenly cause low sex drive in a woman?
    About a week ago, I lost all interest in sex, and I have NO clue why. I know that as a woman gets closer to menopause, it drops considerably. However, I'm 24, have always had a healthy libido, and am nowhere close to being menopausal. What could cause this, and how can I get my normal sex drive back?

    • ANSWER:
      One common problem that happens is this. I have been there and done that. You have to figure out what it is first that is destroying your sex drive. If your on medication like birth control or anti-depressants that is something to think about and do research on. Other then that it could just be stress, maybe the kids, really anything that makes your life stressful can do this and lower the libido.

      One thing I tried that seemed to work while I was doing it was exercising. I just felt sexier doing it which kind of boosted my libido. However it wasn't the best solution for me. My friend told me about these herbal enhancers that are made from natural herbs and don't cause any side effects besides having wild sex. She said it's the female version of viagra. I had to find out.

      I would always have a weak orgasm too (if I had one at all), which after trying this sex enhancer, it boosted them tremendously. I don't get multiple orgasms but I've had plenty since being on these herbs. It's seriously like the best vibrator ride you've ever experienced. These things make me horny all the time, some days I don't even take them because the urge is just too strong.

      Don't try out single herbs because they don't do it like the blend of herbs these scientists and researchers pick out. I've tried a couple of them by itself and they did crap. The stuff that I'm on is called Hersolution, at the time I saved money on it at herenhancement.com . Make sure you get the 3 month supply that way you fall under the guarantee/return policy if the herbs don't work for you, you can return them with no questions ask. I bet they will work though and you won't have any problems. Also if your on medication of any sort, check out the gel because if your like me, you wouldn't want to swallow any thing that might react with the medications your already on.

      Well have a good day and hopefully you solved your problem.

  18. QUESTION:
    Is their a homeopathic type medicine for women who have hot flashes?
    Is there something natural on the market a woman can take to help her with hot flashes without taking drugs which have horrible side effects? I know there is homeopathic medicines which leave no side effects whatsoever. Thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      "Back to Eden" by Jethro Kloss tells you everything about what herbs are good for menopause, hot flashes and much more. Black Cohosh and Soy is best for hot flashes.

  19. QUESTION:
    How do I combat a womens low sex drive? I have heard of hormone injections and am in need of info about them.
    I need info about hormone injections into women to combat low sex drives. Length the injection will last, cost, side effects, and effectiveness. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      a lower cost ,safer method may be to ask your MD to prescribe testosterone cream...It is prescibred for some women with low sex drives and those in every phase of menopause (depending on their symptoms) My grandmother swears by it, (my grandfather swears because of it...now he needs Viagra just to keep up)

  20. QUESTION:
    What percent of women that get breast cancer are obese?
    I've noticed that a majority of women who get breast cancer are obese.
    Denise: It is just something I noticed during breast cancer month. I noticed most women who have the 'i am a survivor tshirt' were obese. Just on observation, so I thought I would see what % of women who have breast cancer were obese.
    aburn's rush...did I offend you with this question...should I have said 'plus size' instead? No need for your foul language.
    denise, also there is a strong correlation between fat peopel and diseases. This specific question is directed at obese women.
    my guess is from the lack of answers that most of the women on this board that have been belittling me are obese

    • ANSWER:
      Overweight after the menopause slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Overweight is also linked to some other types of cancer; for example, some studies indicate that obese men are at greater risk of dying from prostate cancer and some studies show that being overweight causes a small increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer.

      I wondered initially how you came to have seen the 'majority' of women who had or have had breast cancer; thanks for the clarification - you saw some obese women wearing breast cancer survivor t shirts. I see.

      Cancer treatments can cause weight gain; it is very common now for people receiving chemotherapy to gain weight as a result of the steroids given with it, and breast cancer patients are no exception.

      In addition, as Chemo angel has pointed out, many women with oestrogen positive breast cancers (and that's the overwhelming majority) are required to take hormone therapy treatments for five yeas after diagnosis and treatment. They do it so as not to die, and so the fact that a very common side effect is weight gain, while distressing for many, is viewed preferable to recurrence.

      I haven't seen the majority of breast cancer patients and survivors, but I have known hundreds and they have been of all shapes and sizes, the majority being of average weight. I can't give you all their names, but it may be interesting for you to contemplate a short list of people who've had breast cancer some of whom you might have heard of (you can look up the ones you haven't). How many cases of obesity can you spot?

      Kylie Minogue, Sheryl Crow, Martina Navrataloa, Christina Applegate, Olivia Newton John, Linda McCartney, Jill Ireland, Edie Falco, Melissa Etheridge , Gloria Steinem, Kate Jackson, Dihann Carroll, Suzanne Somers, Carly Simon, Jaclyn Smith, Peggy Fleming (olympic ice skating champ).

      And in answer to another question you asked re physical exercise and breast cancer, note the presence of two world class athletes among that very short list...

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the best contraceptive for older women?
    I am 39 and as my periods seem to be becoming less regular, I asked my doctor today if I could go on the combined pill. He said 'no'. Apparently, I am now too old!

    He has booked me in for a smear test and says we can talk about it again.

    I would just like to hear what other women use. I am not planning on having any more children.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      As you are getting closer to the menopause and not planning on having any more children I would suggest an IUD. This is fitted in the womb and last from 2-5 years. It is used also to control some of the side effects of the menopause. I have an IUD and think it's great. It's quite painless to fit (a little like having a tampon inserted) has little side effects and you don't have to have breaks from it like other contraception.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why do women marry men that they are not sexually attracted to?
    I see a lot of men on here that claim their wives NEVER want sex. I do not understand why any woman would marry a man that they didn't have a strong sexual attraction to.

    Can someone explain?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I think there are a ton of answers to your question. I do not think the majority of women started out without sexual attraction for their husbands.

      Some women do not like sex.

      Many women need for the relationship to be working well in all aspects to be interested in sex.

      Some women use withholding sex as a punishment.

      Some women are at a stage in life where there is a lot of outside demands on their bodies and time so sex (often temporarily) goes off the priority list - an example is while children are small.

      Some older women lose sexual desire as a side effect of menopause

      Some women do not truly love their husbands and therefore sexual desire goes as well. They chose to marry him for the 'wrong' reasons.

      Some women grow to despise their husbands after years of neglect in all areas of their life except in the bedroom.

  23. QUESTION:
    what happens if a woman uses hormonal pills?
    if a man uses hormonal pills, the breast of a man grow to form more like a woman. what happens if a woman uses it? what are its side effects?

    • ANSWER:
      A woman who is not even in menopause yet who took Estrogen pills would have a severely high risk of breast and uterine cancer, along with increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

      Your breast size might increase though.

  24. QUESTION:
    So what can I expect during menopause?
    I just got my test results today to say I am in my menopause. I am 49. So far I've had no symptoms or discomfort. Is this a sign that I might skip all the uncomfortable side effects, or is it too soon to say? Also what kinds of supplements are best for calcium and what kinds of exercise can I motivate myself to do, as I really hate it?

    • ANSWER:
      During the perimenopausal transition, a woman's estrogen levels decrease, leading to the typical symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, problems with concentration or mood, vaginal dryness...the list goes on. Some options for relief include hormone replacement therapy (HRT), an alternative medical therapy, or herbal remedies

  25. QUESTION:
    How much do you dry up during menopause?
    During menopause it is common for women to dry up 'down there'.
    Does anyone know from experience or as a medical professional how much you actually do dry up?

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal mucosal atrophy and vaginal dryness are signs of estrogen decline.

      The most common cause of vaginal dryness is declining estrogen production, which leads to thinning and drying of the vaginal wall. Other factors that contribute to vaginal dryness include reduced muscle tone and the longer time needed for sexual arousal that is so common in perimenopause.

      Emotional stress can cause vaginal dryness. Depression or being under tremendous amounts of stress contribute to the issue.

      Also, vaginal dryness can be a side effect of underlying medical conditions, so it's a good idea to check with your doctor for any underlying conditions.

  26. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to adjust to lower hrt levels?
    I am 35yrs old and went into early menopause 5yrs ago. I have been taking oral contraceptives for hormone replacement for 3years. My doctor had me on a very high dose for two years of these years. Less than three months ago I lowered my dose. I was wondering how long does it take for my body to adjust to this change or has it already?

    • ANSWER:
      It might not adjust. When you go through early menopause, you could very well experience menopausal side effects until you reach the normal age of menopause--so like for 20 years. The National Institute of Health recommends that women with premature menopause be on higher dosages of hormones because their younger bodies need it. It's not the same as an older, naturally menopausal woman. The risks are greater by NOT taking hormones than by taking hormones.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is YAZ birth control safe for my 16yr old?
    I am considering Yaz for my daughter but as always I hate all the side effects? Are ther any long term effects ? Is this something a 16yr old should consider? She isnt sexually active yet but her hormones and cramps are high, also she has some acne and we heard its good for that. Give me some info if anyone who is taking it likes it or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Been on Yaz for 4 months now, haven't had a problem with it at all. Make sure Yaz is right for her. The reason I went on Yaz was because of PMDD, and 4 months later, I feel as if a ton of bricks has been lifted off my shoulders after all these years of suffering (depression, anxiety, panic attacks, horrible cramps/nausea associated with PMDD). Make sure your daughter is mature enough to take a pill every single day at the same time every day. Even if she's not using it for BC, the only way for any BC to help control hormones/period issues is if it's taken correctly. A young person shouldn't have a ton of problems using a BC pill - side effect wise I mean. A younger persons body can adjust fairly quickly and easily to things. The body sometimes needs up to 3 months to adjust to a BC pill, but like I said, I had no problems at all when starting it, but everyone is different. I take my pill at night, which was suggested to me by my doctor, said if I did have any side effects when starting it (upset stomach ect) that I would sleep through it and not notice it.

      I would just be sure she is mature enough to do this and also talk to her doctor (and I do NOT suggest her getting the HPV vaccine if suggested by her dr - it's dangerous and we don't know anything about it or why it's being pushed on little girls to have it - the only way you get HPV is by multiple sex partners with MEN who are infected- why aren't they treating the men?). I haven't been relieved fully of cramps and you will still get a pretty "normal" but lighter period. She's a woman - and being a woman means having this lovely visitor come each month until she hits menopause. :-D

      If it wasn't for my PMDD and using it for BC, I would not take a pill. I don't know, that's just me.

  28. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  29. QUESTION:
    How serious are the risks of a 50 year old woman taking birth control?
    Since my friends monthly friend is so heavy, the doctor wants her to have a hysterectomy, but she won't. She thinks birth control will be better to stop the heaviness. Is 50 too old to be on birth control due to side affects?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, sorry i'm a day late on answering.

      There's got to be something else going on with your friend that birth control would not fix, otherwise her doctor would have certainly recommended this first. One of the many things going on could be fibroids growing in your friend's uterus. Fibroids are minimally effected by the pill, so it would not help at all. If she has fibroids and seems far away from entering menopause (fibroids tend to shrink in menopause) then her doctor probably would have recommended a hysterectomy. There are other ways, but none of them permanent, to get rid of fibroids. Only a hysterectomy would make sure they are gone for good and not coming back. All other methods would only be a temporary fix.

      But, since your friend is already 50, the temp fix might just be enough. Your friend is close to menopause. So I would recommend she speak to her doctor one more time to really make him understand her thoughts on the matter. If he is adamant, then she should go for a second opinion for sure, before doing anything.

  30. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of getting an elective total hysterectomy?
    I don't want to have to worry about periods and possible future ovarian cancer and stuff!

    • ANSWER:
      Hysterectomy patients may have a fever during recovery, and some may develop a mild bladder infection or wound infection. If an infection occurs, it can usually be treated with antibiotics. Less often, women may require a blood transfusion before surgery because of anemia or during surgery for blood loss. Complications related to anesthesia might also occur, especially for women who smoke, are obese, or have serious heart or lung disease.

      As with any major abdominal or pelvic operation, serious complications such as blood clots, severe infection, adhesions, postoperative (after surgery) hemorrhage, bowel obstruction or injury to the urinary tract can happen. Rarely, even death can occur.

      In addition to the direct surgical risks, there may be longer-term physical and psychological effects, potentially including depression and loss of sexual pleasure. If the ovaries are removed along with the uterus prior to menopause (change of life), there is an increased risk of osteoporosis and heart disease as well. These will be discussed later along with possible treatments.

      In making a decision, you should also consider that a hysterectomy is not reversible. After a hysterectomy, you will no longer be able to bear children and you will no longer menstruate. You need to think about the impact these changes would have on you.

      Talk about your concerns with your doctor or a counselor and your partner. You may want to bring your partner to your doctor's office to discuss concerns before having the operation.

  31. QUESTION:
    How young can a woman go through the change of life?
    Most women don't want to get it but i can't wait. I just want the menstra cycle to be done. i've been on mind for two years without a break. this is my normal.

    • ANSWER:
      A few women do go through menopause while they are still teenagers, some women never get their menstrual period and they all have to be very careful because the hormones released during a normal cycle usually aid in preventing or offer you a bit more protection again things like breast cancer, cervical cancer, uterine cancer, osteoporosis, memory loss, and all the other things post-menopausal women deal with. (Saggy breasts, loss of lubricating discharge, even skin changes and hair changes and so many other things.) I always hated my period, even from the very first time, but now that I'm post-menopausal, although it's great not having to bother with the monthly bloody mess, I am threatened by breast cancer since it runs in my family, hypertension (also runs in the family), memory loss, bone loss (will need to go on medication probably by next year is they don't come up with something better then a pill you have to take daily on an empty stomach after which you cannot eat for at least an hour, and this pill has some bad side effects), plus there's the knowledge that you cannot have kids anymore (not that I'd want a screaming baby around, but still, making a miracle only a fertile woman can perform). I hear they have available these days forms of birth control that will stop your period for 3 months at a time, maybe even longer (haven't been keeping up with all this stuff since I don't need to anymore)--you might want to talk to your doctor or planned parenthood about what's available, you might be able to do the next best thing--limit the number of periods you have but keep all the protective functions of your womanly hormones.

  32. QUESTION:
    how long does the withdrawal side effects from Prozac last?
    I was taking 20 mg of Prozac to help with menopause/hormone disorder and am now stopping it, taking it every other day and weaning off (doctor's orders). How long does it take for headache and dizziness and tiredness t ogo away?
    Thanks. I go back Monday to get all that treated. I think yo uare right.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, first the headache/dizziness tiredness, depression, and probably insomnia, etc... are ALL symptoms of menopause... and psychiatry isnt what you need... they cant help, basically....
      So I dont think it will take more than two weeks to come off it...
      Oprah and others are doing a lot about menopause , so let me give you some people / books to look up..... and also recommend that you have a complete hormone profile done when you settle on the right doc..... also include your FSH and TSH(thyroid).... the nine major ones to be tested (a simple blood test) are thyroid;, cortisol , DHEA, estradiol, progesterone, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin
      Now ddr. christiane northrup has written a good book on menopause
      So has Susanne Somers....
      Dr. Phils wife goes to the www.hallcenter.com (i think that is it, look for it) in sandiego.... and recommends women go there or somewhere and have their hormones tested , then some are going onto bioidentical hormone replacement...
      research it all because there is a lot about it, at oprah.com , also...
      Your symptoms are not going away unless you treat the cause,
      I use traditional chinese medicine which I prefer, and you can research their treatment of menopause also, www.ITMonline.org take care

  33. QUESTION:
    What kind of an affect does age have on a woman's libido? How often do middle aged women(40+) have orgasms?
    How many times in a week do women have sex post menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      One common problem that happens is this. I have been there and done that. You have to figure out what it is first that is destroying your sex drive. If your on medication like birth control or anti-depressants that is something to think about and do research on. Other then that it could just be stress, maybe the kids, really anything that makes your life stressful can do this and lower the libido.

      One thing I tried that seemed to work while I was doing it was exercising. I just felt sexier doing it which kind of boosted my libido. However it wasn't the best solution for me. My friend told me about these herbal enhancers that are made from natural herbs and don't cause any side effects besides having wild sex. She said it's the female version of viagra. I had to find out.

      I would always have a weak orgasm too (if I had one at all), which after trying this sex enhancer, it boosted them tremendously. I don't get multiple orgasms but I've had plenty since being on these herbs. It's seriously like the best vibrator ride you've ever experienced. These things make me horny all the time, some days I don't even take them because the urge is just too strong.

      Don't try out single herbs because they don't do it like the blend of herbs these scientists and researchers pick out. I've tried a couple of them by itself and they did crap. The stuff that I'm on is called Hersolution, at the time I saved money on it at herenhancement.com . Make sure you get the 3 month supply that way you fall under the guarantee/return policy if the herbs don't work for you, you can return them with no questions ask. I bet they will work though and you won't have any problems. Also if your on medication of any sort, check out the gel because if your like me, you wouldn't want to swallow any thing that might react with the medications your already on.

      Well have a good day and hopefully you solved your problem.

  34. QUESTION:
    why can't women be given estrogen and progesteron to prevent menopause?
    is it possible to give women suffering from menopause estrogen and progesteron in order to stop bad effects of menopause on them?
    if so,then why there'r still women suffering from it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can take to prevent menopause. Hormones are given to women to ease the symptoms they are having while they go through menopause. Many women choose HRT or alternative treatments to stop all of the side effects. You don't have to suffer because there is lots of things that you can do to ease the side effects.

  35. QUESTION:
    When women reach menopause do they typically lose their sex drive? Is there a women's Viagra equivalent?
    Typically one year after periods cease a women is considered in menopause. What happens to her sex drive--mine disappeared--I am not on any estrogen or premarin--do they increase llibido? Is there a women's pill like Viagra for men?

    • ANSWER:
      There s no Viagra for women and hormones replacement therapy has some side effects. There is a FDA approved gadget called Eros that applies suction to the clitoris to engorge it. The idea is somewhat similar to Viagra because, as Viagra, it does not really boost sexual desire: it only provokes the mechanics of it ( blood flow to the genitals ).
      I think people have been looking for aphrodisiacs for thousands of years and there must be dozens or hundreds of substances that are supposed to boost libido. I m not too sure if any of those sold in drugstores really work. All I can say is that some substances that seem to have a real and immediate effect are illegal as far as I know....

  36. QUESTION:
    Is throwing up one of the side effects before a period?
    I've been having mood swings lately, and I know that's one of the effects of a period, so I was just wondering if that was one cause I've been doing that too.

    • ANSWER:
      yes. If your menses is regulated, you shall be fine. Details follow-------------------

      MENSES*
      1. Every young girl/spinster/woman must know the significance of Menses cycles, regularity of maintenance with the aid of acupressure techniques & to maintain ‘the best of woman’s health’ for life. The success depends up on the extent of compliance of all stipulated instructions.
      Menses------- is nothing but the God's Special gift given to the female. It is one of the routes of excretion of toxins, pus cells, dead cells running to millions produced during Catabolism [part of metabolism on daily basis], bad blood, bacteria, viruses, hormonal discharges, etc.
      So long as a female passes through regular menses right from puberty to menopause, she will be well balanced, pretty with natural and healthy glow, good moods of love and affection, excellent immunity/disease resistance power, excellent growth in height up to 21st birthday, etc.
      Irregular periods/heavy periods may be an offshoot of hormonal imbalance, psychological disturbances, indiscriminate consumption of birth control pills, steroids for other causes like allergy, thyroid problems, asthma/bronchitis, etc.
      By and large, the menses cycle ranges from 3 weeks to 5 weeks as and when it is regular. In certain ladies, it is not regular. It can be regulated just in 5 days. During menses, it is advisable to take maximum rest.
      [a]. Ur [Menses related gonads]-remote control-Acupressure points are located in Ur wrists and ankles on both sides to be activated for regulating Ur menses cycle.
      Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment, hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      To activate Ur gonads—13 [vagina], No.14 [uterus]. No.15 [Testes & Ovaries] All these points are located in both wrists and ankles.
      Palms/Soles:
      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      Cure is available by Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies.

      3. Regular menses with the best of Health for life? Yes, Acupressure & Natural Remedies may solve Ur problem of irregular Menses.
      ACUPRESSURE TECHNIQUES:

      Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomiting and all the organs shall function upto optimal levels.

      With Ur thumb, press Ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

  37. QUESTION:
    Will I go through early menopause if I get one ovary removed?
    I recently found out that I have a huge ovarian cyst on my left side and that I am going to need surgery ASAP! My gynecologist wants to remove the whole ovary because there is a very small chance that it could be malignant. Is there any possibility that it would cause me to go into early menopause if I keep the right ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Jesus_is.., So sorry for your Medical condition and hope you will feel better soon. that said as to your question Your doctor may conduct an ovary removal, or oophorectomy, as part of a hysterectomy or if you have an abnormal growth. This surgery is often performed by laparoscopy so you can go home the same day or the following day.An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both your ovaries (female reproductive structure responsible for producing eggs and generating hormones). When one ovary is removed, the procedure is called a unilateral oophorectomy, and when both ovaries...Surgical menopause is the removal of a woman's ovaries during surgery. Only the ovaries may be removed, or the woman may have a partial or total hysterectomy. Removing the uterus and fallopian tubes will not cause surgical menopause, only the...If only one ovary is removed, the woman will not go through surgical menopause because there is still another ovary producing hormones.Know Who Needs Surgical Menopause, Women who have ovarian cancer may have their ovaries removed during surgery. Women who suffer from painful fibroid tumors may also opt to have the ovaries surgically removed. Some women who are genetically predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer opt to have their ovaries removed, especially if their sisters or mother have developed breast or ovarian cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a high risk for breast or ovarian cancer. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, get genetic testing to find out if you have the mutation.All surgeries have risks that are serious considerations for you. Excessive blood loss, infection and complications from anesthesia are just some of the risks of all surgery. Other complications for removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy) include unintentional injury to other internal organs during surgery and intestinal blockages.Predicting Hot Flashes, Yes! You will have all the symptoms of natural menopause after surgery to remove the ovaries. You may experience one or all of these symptoms immediately after surgery including hot flashes, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, night sweats, vaginal dryness, diminished sex drive and fatigue, unless you start on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) right away. HRT can be in the form of a pill, gel or a patch prescribed in the lowest possible dosage,Understand Hormone Replacement Therapy ,Estrogen Therapy alone does increase the risk of uterine cancer, so most women are given a combination of estrogen and progestin, called Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or Hormone Therapy. If you've had a total hysterectomy and the uterus has been removed, you no longer have to worry about uterine cancer. Progestin protects the uterus from cancer, which is why it's combined with estrogen to provide protection against cancer in HRT. Most doctors agree that women should remain on HRT for no more than 5 years. Side effects of HRT can include headaches and breast pain. Some women temporarily gain water weight. More serious side effects of HRT include bleeding, cancer, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Go for regular check ups while you're on HRT, and contact your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects. I hope all these information helped you with more knowledge which will take you from Zero to hero. Good luck best wishes hope you get better soon. Sorry for your problems but you will get better dear hope for the best.

  38. QUESTION:
    How to lose fats at the sides of ur stomach?
    i understand situps and crunches can help flatten the stomach.. however i find tt it is not very helpful for my sides are still fatty.. anyone have any idea how to lose these fats?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Obesity - Corpulence and Fatness (Without any side effects or Complications) :-

      OBESITY(Corpulence) along with :-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30 or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion; easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goitre or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 -20 drops in a sip of warm water

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese,chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted;(whether they do anything or not) Lac Def 200 weekly (6 Doses)

      To reduce weight(flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops in a sip of warm water. (also available in tablet form)

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon Carb 200, 6 hourly

      FATNESS along with :-

      With excessive appetite; obesity after abdominal operation; craving for eggs; chilly patient Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      If Calcarea carb fails; specific for persons suffering from goitre Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 20 - 30 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Accompanied with unhealthy skin. Obesity during menopause; stools constipated Graphites 200, 6 hourly

      In shy and emotional weepy individuals; loss of thirst; feels better in open air Pulsatilla 200, 6 hourly.

      When due to malfunctioning of thyroid gland Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once fortnightly (6 Doses)

      To reduce fats from the body (also available in tablet form) Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 - 15 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Obesity with flesh decreases, muscles become harder and firmer Calotropis 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Fatness; more around buttocks and thighs Ammonium Mur 200, 6 hourly

      Fatness; due to gastric complaints; constipations; tongue thickly whitish coated as if white washed Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly.
      ______________________________________

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  39. QUESTION:
    How does the body react and compensate when one fallopian tube is removed?
    This Q is specific to two things does the other ovary with tubes compensate and puts out an egg every month. or will the person be fertile only every other month. and will this cause menopause to happen early?

    • ANSWER:
      Excellent questions...

      Several of the cases studies I found on line suggest that on months where the missing ovary was to provide the egg, the woman had lighter period with no cramps. This is assuming the other ovary is taken along with the one tube. If the tubeless ovary is still present, an egg will still be released, but will float around randomly until it decomposes and is removed by the immune system. There is even a tiny, tiny, tiny chance that egg could find its way to the uterus if an opening still exist on the tubeless side.

      The side with ovary and tube will still produce, and on those months pregnancy is still possible. If only one ovary is present, certain hormones will be lacking and conception might be more difficult, but the number of cases proves it can be done and happens frequently.

      I didn't find any concrete info on bringing on earlier menopause, but my instinct is that while it might not bring on actual menopause, it quite possibly contribute to "peri-menopause" which carries many menopause-like symptoms, so the practical effect could be the same.

      Hope that gives you some ideas to keep looking under...
      Best,
      Ed, RN

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it true that when a women goes into menopause, that it hurts her to have sex?
    Do all menopausal woman not want to have sex anymore? I also heard that other menopausal woman crave more sex? So which is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Just because a woman is going through menopause doesn't mean her libido completely vanished. Of course a menopausal woman will still want sex. And no, it won't hurt her. It may be uncomfortable if they arent lubricated enough, which is a side effect from menopause, but it shouldnt be extremely painful or anything. I dont know where youre hearing this stuff from but its wrong lol

  41. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  42. QUESTION:
    I need to know what side effects people have after a complete hysterctomy?
    Is it bad as people says it is and do u feel like a total different person once its all over?

    • ANSWER:
      For some it is quite bad. For others, it's not so bad, and for others, it's so much better than it was before that they're quite happy about it. It depends on your own physiology, your age (easier if you've already gone through menopause), the type of surgery and the reason for surgery. The word "hysterectomy" is thrown around a lot and used to refer to a lot of different procedures, basically involving the removal of any of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, or cervix, or any combination of them. It literally means "removal of uterus." So one of the problems of ascertaining how bad or not bad it is is that some women will say "oh, it was great, I'm so happy!" And others will say "I don't feel like me anymore. I wish I were dead." And they might have had vastly different surgeries, and vastly different after-care regimens. But both with say they had a "hysterectomy." For example, there are often sexual side effects--but they occur far more often in women who have had ovaries removed, and less often with women who've had their uterus out. Post-op problems can be blunted with the right combinations of hormones. But some don't go on any hormones, or have a bad hormone regimen that is unhelpful. So my advice to you is to make sure that everything you are having removed is something you genuinely need removed, since docs are often cavalier about taking out women's body parts. And do research on hormones. Check out this website, too: http://surmeno.blogspot.com/2006/07/table-of-contents-by-topic.html

      That will tell you a bit about potential side effects. Keep in mind that it's the people with the most trouble who will be on websites like that. So the silent, content people aren't making their presence felt.

  43. QUESTION:
    What's the best remedy for getting rid of excess belly fat without any side effects?
    not relacore or any cortisol remedies!!!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Treatment for Shedding Excessive Fat and Weight /Obesity (Without any side effects or complications of any kind) :-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200X, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion;easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200X or 1M, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200X, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goitre or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves, Q(Mother Tincture). 4 hourly,10 -20 drops

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200X or 1M, weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese, chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted; (whether they do anything or not) Lac-def.200 weekly (6)

      To reduce weight (flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca Berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops Now its available in tablets form too very easily available in India and Pakistan manufactured by Dr.Willmar Schwabe Pharmacy, Germany

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon-Carb.200, 6 hourly.

      No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.

      Take Care and God Bless !

  44. QUESTION:
    Can partial seizures occur once a month regularly and last for the whole day recurring about every hour?
    My friend has been having them since her menopause started. Her EEG and MRI were normal and her doctor says it is depression.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the Ontario Epilepsy website
      http://www.epilepsyontario.org/client/EO/EOWeb.nsf/web/
      which describes as many seizure types as there are(a lot!). I looked up both partial seizures simple and complex. Then I looked at this types. The key here is that these are rooted in emotional issues, there is no EEG abnormality and that medication for epilepsy is ineffective. Since she only gets the seizures once a month, it could well be tied into some kind of menstrual issue surrounding menopause. I hope this helps you out.

      Psychogenic Seizures

      (Pseudo-seizures)

      Psychogenic seizures are not classified as a form of epilepsy. They affect between 5 and 20 percent of people thought to have epilepsy. Psychogenic seizures can occur at any age, but are more common in people under the age of 55. They occur 3 times more frequently in women than men. They may arise from various psychological factors, may be prompted by stress, and may occur in response to suggestion. It has also been found that such disorders may be self-induced. They may be used to get attention, to be excused from work, to collect financial compensation, or merely to escape an intolerable social situation. They seldom occur in the absence of others. Trauma related to physical illness has been found to trigger these seizures in elderly individuals. People with early-onset psychogenic seizures often have a history of sexual abuse.

      Psychogenic seizures can be characterized by features common with epilepsy like writhing and thrashing movements, quivering, screaming or talking sounds, and falling to the floor. Psychogenic attacks differ from epileptic seizures in that out-of-phase movements of the upper and lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, and side-to-side head movements are evident. However, psychogenic seizures vary from one occurrence to another and are not readily stereotyped. Indicators like pupillary dilation, depressed corneal reflexes, the presence of Babinski responses, autonomic cardiorespiratory changes, tongue biting and urinary/fecal incontinence are more probable with epilepsy and are not usually manifested in psychogenic seizures.

      Psychogenic seizures may last a couple of minutes or hours, ending as abruptly as they began. Anxiety may be experienced prior to an attack, followed by relief and relaxation afterwards, leading some to postulate that psychogenic seizures may occur as a direct response to stress in order to relieve tension. Afterwards, patients usually have a vague recollection of the seizure, without the usual postictal symptoms of drowsiness and depression.

      It is difficult to differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures. However, one highly reliable indicator of a psychogenic seizure is eye closure during the seizure; when people with epilepsy have seizures the eyes tend to remain open. Still, statistics indicate that, in 20-30% of cases, epileptologists are incorrect in attempting to distinguish one from the other. Although psychogenic seizures are not caused by electrical discharges in the brain and thus do not register any EEG abnormalities, they are often mistaken for epileptic disorders. It is also possible to have both psychogenic seizures and epilepsy. Most patients with psychogenic seizures are misdiagnosed and consequently treated with epilepsy drugs or other epilepsy therapies, sometimes with severe and fatal side effects.

      Medications are ineffective in the treatment of psychogenic disorders. Patients who are diagnosed with psychogenic seizures are usually referred to a therapist, to learn to control stress and become familiar with coping techniques. Since the vast majority of psychogenic seizures operate on a psychological level, behavioral manipulation methods may be used.

  45. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a drug for women similar to salt peter for males?
    I mean its not fair, we get older, we get hormone fluxuations, and I like to get drunk on occasion, I dont want to be an aging beer slut. Is there anything for women to take?

    • ANSWER:
      Sex Rx for Women

      If you're a woman with a low sex drive, you're probably asking, "Where's my pill?" The short answer is, don't hold your breath—but don't give up hope, either. The most promising treatments:

      >Viagra The Viagra-for-women idea isn't new: Irwin Goldstein, M.D., director of the Institute for Sexual Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, found it enhanced clitoral blood flow in rabbits way back in 1998. More recently, a study in the European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that women treated with Viagra for four weeks reported marked improvement in arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment (side effects were similar to those reported in men). So why aren't women hoarding their partners' pills?

      "Drugs for erectile dysfunction work well for many men because they typically want to have sex but can't," Goldstein explains. "For women there's often a different problem: In many cases what's missing is the desire." A woman's sexuality is more complicated than a man's—big surprise there—which means that boosting desire may require something other than improving circulation. For women, Viagra will likely have a better success rate for lubrication problems than libido problems, since these are less about blood flow and more about hormones and psychology.

      >Estrogen Therapy It's well known that estrogen shortages can lower libido and trigger such problems as vaginal dryness. Events such as childbirth, hysterectomy, and menopause can all cause imbalances, but so can drugs like antidepressants and, ironically, birth control pills. If eliminating problematic prescriptions doesn't correct estrogen imbalances, a woman may need estrogen replacement. For women who've been rattled by the recent controversy over estrogen pills and patches, alternatives include locally applied creams like Premarin and Estrace, and vaginally inserted drugs like Estring and Vagifem.

      >Androgen Therapy Estrogen imbalance isn't even half the problem, explains Goldstein. "There are 10 sex steroids in all, and only three are estrogens; the other seven are androgens, which most people think of as the male sex hormones. We're finding that three out of four women who see us for lack of desire have serious androgen shortages."

      Therapy typically focuses on upping female levels of testosterone. For women, topical formulations are the most common delivery method. Creams have been marketed for men for years, but gels such as Testim and AndroGel get top marks from Goldstein. The big reason: They're more effective and much easier to use. Androgens are also available in pill form—one product, Estratest, combines a type of testosterone with estrogen—but the most exciting news may be the buzz about dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a chemical cousin of estrogen and testosterone. Goldstein's research has found that women who take DHEA show substantial improvements in their self-evaluated sexual performance—though he's quick to warn that women shouldn't take it on their own. "It's sold as a supplement, but DHEA is a drug, and we don't totally understand it yet," explains Goldstein. While side effects of topical and oral testosterone therapy can include weight gain, clitoral enlargement, and unwanted hair growth, DHEA use has been linked to even scarier problems including birth defects and cancer.

      >Talking Cure A wide range of psychological factors, including depression, anxiety, a history of physical and emotional abuse, and an array of interpersonal relationship problems, can drain a woman's interest in sex. "While we never want to say that problems with sex are all in someone's head, the psychological factors are undeniable and may even be more profound in women than they are in men," says Goldstein. That's the reason all of his patients consult with a psychologist as well as a physician—and why anyone who's not enjoying sex should, too.

      >Bottom Line Women may eventually have as many drugs to choose from as their pill-popping partners. But before there's a cure, there has to be research. Think of it as pharmaceutical foreplay. "The really effective medications for men were developed once we understood the physiology of male erections," explains Goldstein. "We won't have a similar answer for women until we have that same understanding of female physiology."

      Melissa Gotthardt is a regular contributor to AARP The Magazine.

  46. QUESTION:
    what natural vitamins or OTC medicines can a woman take to reduce/relieve symptoms of menopause(cramps, flashe?
    my mother-in-law is going through menopause and she doesn't have very much money to spare, and she asked me to find out some stuff about it menopause and what she can take to help.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause with no side effects.

      Key ingredients are: Black Cohosh, Soy Isoflavones, Flaxseed, and a blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. Has no artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      A friend of mine has been taking it for some time and is very pleased with the results.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  47. QUESTION:
    I am 26 years old and for the last 3 months i have been getting constant hotflashes , blurred vision, headache
    dizzyness, extreme fatigue, depression, and breast tenderness. I have been on yasmin 28 for years and recently switched to seasonique ( which is a 3 month treatment with menstrual cycles every 3 months.) But what is puzzling is the symptoms were occurring way before my switching the pills. Is there a possibility that i am going through menopause? What is wrong with my body>? Are there certain vitamins or herbals or even other meds that can cause these uncomfortable side effects or maybe some that might even help diminish them>?

    • ANSWER:
      Women can go on the menopause as early as 16, so go see your doctor to see what is up. It is more likely to be something else causing this. Maybe a problem with your hormones, perhaps you're pregnant, or there is something wrong with your ovaries and so you are not getting enough oestrogen. See your doctor!

  48. QUESTION:
    Can you get severe fatigue or breathlessness during the onset of the menopause?
    I had a hysterectomy in December. I still have my ovaries,but lately, my hair seems drier and thinner. I also have this overwhelming tiredness during the day, and breathlessness.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi!

      I hope you'll check with your health care provider about these symptoms. While they may be related to a surgically induced menopause, they may also be a symptom of another condition or conditions. As women enter menopause, they may begin to experience several symptoms typically associated with the changes that are taking place in their bodies. These symptoms include:

      Hot flashes. This is a feeling of warmth in the face, neck or chest that ranges from mild to severe. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), about 85 percent of women approaching or going through menopause have hot flashes.

      Night sweats (evening versions of “hot flashes”) and difficulty sleeping. Lack of sleep can contribute to women feeling tired, stressed or tense.

      Changes in vaginal tissue, including thinning, dryness, itchiness or burning. In some cases, sex may become painful (dyspareunia) due to decreased vaginal secretions.

      Thinning of bones. Known as osteoporosis, this condition can lead to a reduction of bone mass that reaches 20 percent in some women. As a result, menopausal and postmenopausal women are susceptible to fractures of the hip, spine, wrist and other bones. In some cases, osteoporosis can lead to loss of height.

      Abnormal vaginal bleeding or “spotting.” This is a common sign of menopause. However, women who have not had a period for 12 consecutive months should see a physician if they experience spotting, as this can sometimes be a sign of other conditions, such as:

      Cancer

      Side effects of using birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy

      Hormonal imbalance

      Noncancerous growths in the lining of the uterus, such as fibroids

      Mood changes. These changes can include mood swings, depression and irritability. Some researchers believe these emotions are a result of changes in the brain caused by a decrease in estrogen. Others think menopausal symptoms such as sleep problems, hot flashes and fatigue cause the feelings. Still others maintain that a combination of these factors is probably responsible.

      Urinary problems. These may include leaking, burning or pain when urinating (dysuria) or urgency. Leakages may also occur during sneezing, coughing or laughing. An increase in urinary tract infections (UTIs) is also associated with menopause as a result of a thinning of the urethra that happens at this time.

      Other symptoms may occur, also. You can read more about them at this medically-reviewed site - an excellent one!

      http://obgyn.health.ivillage.com/menopausehrt/menopause.cfm

      Feel better : )

  49. QUESTION:
    What are the physical and emotional implications of having my remaining ovary removed?
    When I was 17 I had one of my ovaries removed along with a large cyst and the docs were able to find and remove some smaller cysts on my other ovary. I've had them come and go on their own since then, but now 12 years later I have another large stubborn one on my remaining ovary, I won't know until I wake up if they will have had to take the entire ovary, but odds indicate I should be prepared for that. I've had two boys (miraculously!!) and I'm happy with our family size as is my husband. I'm more concerned about early menopause and it's effect on my well being...I've read some studies that show all sorts of complications, shorter lifespan etc if you have early menopause. Not to mention I'm so scared of how it will effect my sex life with my husband, which is wonderful, and my moods, since I've been on mild anti-depression medications since the birth of my 2nd son. I just keep having this dream that I wake up next to my husband and then look in the mirror and see this old old woman. Has anyone gone through this at all? I'm totally alone in this. Thanks a bunch :o)

    • ANSWER:
      Some women are fine with surgical menopause--though at your age you should always go on hormone replacement. Others have a great deal of trouble and things are never the same again. This advocacy group's web page shows worst case scenario situation, which is all too common: http://www.hersfoundation.com/effects.html

      You don't know whether you'll be on the totally fine side or the terrible problem side... not until you have the surgery. So what do you do? Well, first of all, you should be aware that your chances of saving your ovary are greatly increased by getting a better doctor. Go to a large urban teaching hospital and see a reproductive endocrinologist there. Don't just get it done by your local gyn, who won't tell you that there are better doctors than him/her out there. They'll just do it themselves and act like this is the only option. It's not. If you want to save the ovary (which I recommend), then you must be proactive to get the most skilled surgeon you can. It's really easy and routine to remove an ovary. It's complicated and time consuming to reconstruct an ovary after removing a cyst from it.

  50. QUESTION:
    Will a Period affect my Psychological Issues?
    Right now I'm currently battling a serious case of anxiety/OCD/Depression, I think Im going to start my period for the first time soon...Will the side effects of a period screw with my Psychological problems?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't believe that old wives tale!
      Too often people think that women become emotional before during and after their periods...but do the math: That's being emotional 24/7 for 365 days a year and a woman starts menstruation at around age 13 and the median age for menopause is 56 when our periods stop.
      Man! That's one hell of a long time to be emotional!
      Relax!
      We are going to menstruate for EVERY month of EVERY year for decades of our lives and whatever we feel emotionally or otherwise is totally normal and natural.
      You'll be normal.


women in menopause side effects

Premenopausal Symptoms And Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    can uterine sarcoma occur without any vaginal bleeding in premenapausal women?
    I am a 47 premenopausal woman diagnosed with 5 fibroids (largest being 35*41) three years ago. I only experience occasional pelvic pain.

    • ANSWER:
      To look at your fibroids, I will quote from the Merk manual.

      "Uterine fibroids are benign uterine tumors of smooth muscle origin. Fibroids frequently cause abnormal vaginal bleeding (eg, menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia), pelvic pain and pressure, urinary and intestinal symptoms, and pregnancy complications. Diagnosis is by pelvic examination and imaging. Treatment of symptomatic patients depends on the patient's desire for fertility and desire to keep her uterus and may include oral contraceptives, brief presurgical gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy to shrink fibroids, and more definitive surgical procedures (eg, myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometrial ablation). "

      Then to look at what the Merk says on endometrial cancer.
      "Symptoms and Signs. Most (> 90%) women have abnormal uterine bleeding (eg, postmenopausal bleeding, premenopausal recurrent metrorrhagia); 1⁄3 of women with postmenopausal bleeding have endometrial cancer. A vaginal discharge may occur weeks or months before postmenopausal bleeding."

      So, I would say that there are approximately 10% of endometrial cancers that do not present with vaginal bleeding or discharge to begin with. I think you are needlessly worrying about something. Continue to have your fibroids checked, especially if you have any change in discharge or bleeding!

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the side effects of hormone treatments?
    My wife needs them after she is done with chemo from breast cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      Tamoxifen (Tam) and the aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the primary drugs used in this situation- Tam for premenopausal (or intolerant postmenopausal) patients, and AIs for postmenopausal patients.

      Tam has two serious but very uncommon side effects: uterine cancer (primarily sarcoma) and blood clots. Both risks are only a few in a thousand range, and uterine cancer is basically not seen in premenopausal patients, presumably due to protective effect of menstrual cycle. These are important to be aware of but ARE NOT reasons to not take the drug, as the benefits are many-fold greater than the risks (put another way, the risk of recurrent breast cancer dwarfs the risk of these problems). Much more common side effects are estrogen-deprivation symptoms, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, mood changes.

      AIs have no increased risk for uterine cancer; they have minimal increased risk for blood clots compared with placebo. They cause less hot flashes; estrogen deprivation symptoms are the most common symptoms too. They also cause joint and sometimes muscle aches in folks- I find these to be the most irritating symptoms for my patients. These drugs are more effective than Tam but again have to be postmenopausal to use. Or, one can have the ovaries removed chemically/surgically/radiation and then use AIs if one is premenopausal.

      In any case, for patients eligible to take hormonal therapy, they usually provide as much if not more benefit than the chemotherapy, so are an extremely important part of overall therapeutic plan.

      God bless, best wishes

  3. QUESTION:
    What happens in chemotherapy and why does it make people tired?

    • ANSWER:
      Chemotherapy is the use of chemicals to treat cancer. Usually more than one chemical is used and treatment is cyclical over a period of time to correspond with the cycle of cell division.
      The chemicals kill fast-growing cells including hair, bone marrow, digestive tract, and others and it is in these areas that side effects usually occur.

      Side effects of chemotherapy can range from mild to extreme.

      Almost everyone undergoing chemotherapy has some hair loss. Some may choose to wear wigs or other headcoverings during treatment, but if you’re comfortable without hair that’s OK, too!

      Many people experience nausea, fatigue, sleeplessness, periods of hyperactivity, irritability, and/or depression. If the symptoms interfere with your quality of life alert your medical team. They can help.

      Premenopausal women may experience premature menopause symptoms as a side effect. Talk with your oncologist and your OB/GYN.

      Your immune system is dependent on your bone marrow cells and they will be affected by chemotherapy. Your immune system will be depressed during and after chemotherapy and you should take prudent precautions.

      Women may find themselves particularly susceptible to vaginal and urinary tract infections during chemotherapy. Talk with your doctor about prophylactic medications. Read about sex and cancer.

      Chemotherapy is usually administered in a doctor’s office or clinic. The most common method is through an IV, however, long-term chemotherapy sometimes requires the insertion of a "port" or "heplock" which remains in your body for the duration of your treatments

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?
    What do you have to do to get it cure. Tell me what you went through with. If you are cancer free now . Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I am a man and my wife is a survivor of Cervical cancer. It was noticed and diagnosed 4 years back as Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB. She underwent treatments and now the Oncologist have told that she has been cured fully from cancer. I am giving the symptoms and treatment for your information. -

      You may not experience any cervical cancer symptoms — early cervical cancer generally produces no signs or symptoms. As the cancer progresses, these cervical cancer symptoms and signs may appear:

      Vaginal bleeding after intercourse, between periods or after menopause
      Watery, bloody vaginal discharge that may be heavy and have a foul odor
      Pelvic pain or pain during intercourse.

      Cervical cancer that invades deeper than the outside layer of cells on the cervix is referred to as invasive cancer and requires more extensive treatment. Treatment for cervical cancer depends on several factors, such as the stage of the cancer, other health problems you may have and your own preferences about treatment. Treatment options may include:

      Surgery. Surgery to remove the uterus (hysterectomy) is typically used to treat the early stages of cervical cancer. A simple hysterectomy involves the removal of the cancer, the cervix and the uterus. Simple hysterectomy is typically an option only when the cancer is very early stage — invasion is less than 3 millimeters (mm) into the cervix. A radical hysterectomy — removal of the cervix, uterus, part of the vagina and lymph nodes in the area — is the standard surgical treatment when there's an invasion of greater than 3 mm into the cervix and no evidence of tumor on the walls of the pelvis.

      Radiation. Radiation therapy uses high-powered energy to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy can be given externally using external beam radiation or internally (brachytherapy) by placing devices filled with radioactive material near your cervix. Radiation therapy is as effective as surgery for early-stage cervical cancer. For women with more advanced cervical cancer, radiation is often the best treatment.

      Both methods of radiation therapy can be combined. Radiation therapy can be used alone, with chemotherapy, before surgery to shrink a tumor or after surgery to kill any remaining cancer cells. Side effects of radiation to the pelvic area include upset stomach, nausea, diarrhea, bladder irritation and narrowing of your vagina, which can make intercourse difficult. Premenopausal women may stop menstruating as a result of radiation therapy and begin menopause.

      Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses strong anti-cancer chemicals to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs, which can be used alone or in combination with each other, are usually injected into a vein and they travel throughout your body killing quickly growing cells, including cancer cells. Low doses of chemotherapy are often combined with radiation therapy, since chemotherapy may enhance the effects of the radiation. Higher doses of chemotherapy are used to control advanced cervical cancer that may not be curable. Side effects of chemotherapy depend on the drugs being administered, but generally include diarrhea, fatigue, nausea and hair loss. Certain chemotherapy drugs may cause infertility and early menopause in premenopausal women.

      My wife had Sugery, Radiation (External and internal both) and Chemo theraphy. I you have anyone having Cervical cancer of any stage it is very essential to see an Oncologist and proceed with the treatments as suggested by him as CANCER IS STILL AN ENIGMA.-

  5. QUESTION:
    I want the real low down on weight gain during treatment for breast cancer. Is it really that bad?
    I am 44, premenopausal, stage IIB, one positive node, 4 removed, not sure yet on Her2 or estrogen +, get pathology report next week. Just had a masectomy 5 days ago. I am starting to read all about treatments and starting to get freaked out with all my body might have to go through!! I am set to start chemo in about 4 weeks and now I learn that on top of everything else, weight gain is on the list too!! I am already 40 lbs overweight and can't afford to get any heavier!! I'm just so overwhelmed with everything. I need the real low down on breast cancer side affects. Also, is this it for menopause? Will I menstruate after treatments end? Again, not only do you have to go through side effects of this dreaded disease, you have to endure the symptoms of menopause!! The hair loss is enough to endure. How can you have a positive attitude when you're bald, fat, having hot flashes, fatigued, scarred, nauseous, etc.?! Please help with any advice you may have! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      First off, all of these side effects are alot better than dying from cancer, so count your blessings and don't piddle in what your problems are now. If I were you, I'd be pretty thankful.. My mom had a masectomy just a week ago as well. Weight gain will generally only be cause becuase the drugs they give you will help up your appetite, since most cancer patient's don't have much of one. It's only to keep you healthy, but it doesn't mean you can't manage your weight. Don't eat like a cow, just eat healthily. And after chemo and such, you will probably stop menstrating but can't say for sure.. but generally, yes.

      The truth is, if you can't laugh about it, then you're just going to cry over it. So incorporate your own ways to find humor and positivity in your situation, I know me and my mother have.

  6. QUESTION:
    what are the causes of bleeding after menopause for three years?

    • ANSWER:
      When menopause occurs naturally, it tends to take place anywhere between the ages of forty-eight and fifty-two, but it can occur as early as your late thirties, or as late as your mid-fifties. When menopause occurs before thirty-five, it is technically considered premature menopause, but just as menarche is genetically predetermined, so is menopause. For an average woman with an unremarkable medical history, what she eats or does in terms of activity will not influence the timing of her menopause. Women who have had chemotherapy, though, or have been exposed to high levels of radiation (such as radiation therapy in their pelvic area for cancer treatment) may go into menopause earlier. In any event, the average age of menopause is fifty.

      Other possible causes of early menopause include mumps (in small groups of women, the infection causing the mumps has been known to spread to the ovaries, prematurely shutting them down) and specific autoimmune diseases, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis (in some of these women, their bodies develop antibodies and attack the ovaries). Smokers also tend to have earlier menopause.

      The Stages of Natural Menopause

      Socially, the word menopause refers to a process, not a precise moment in the life of your menstrual cycle. Medically, the word menopause does indeed refer to one precise moment: the date of your last period. The events preceding and following menopause amount to a huge change for women both physically and socially. Physically, this process has four stages:

      1. Premenopause. Although some doctors may refer to a thirty-two-year-old woman in her childbearing years as premenopausal, this is not really an appropriate label. The term premenopause ideally refers to women on the cusp of menopause. Their periods have just started to get irregular, but they do not yet experience any classic menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes or vaginal dryness. A woman in premenopause is usually in her mid-to-late forties. If your doctor tells you that you're premenopausal, you might want to ask him or her how he or she is using this term.

      2. Perimenopause. This term refers to women who are in the thick of menopause. Their cycles may be wildly erratic, and they are experiencing hot flashes and vaginal dryness. This label is applicable for about four years, covering the first two years prior to the official "last" period to the next two years following the last menstrual period. Women who are perimenopausal will be in the age groups discussed above, averaging about age fifty-one.

      3. Menopause. This refers to your final menstrual period. You will not be able to pinpoint your final period until you've been completely free from periods for one year. Then, you count back to the last period you charted, and that date is the date of your menopause. Note: After more than one year of no menstrual periods, any vaginal bleeding is now considered abnormal.

      4. Postmenopause. This term refers to the last third of most women's lives, ranging from women who have been free of menstrual periods for at least one year to women celebrating their one hundredth birthday. In other words, once you're past menopause, you'll be referred to as postmenopausal for the rest of your life. The terms postmenopausal and perimenopausal are sometimes used interchangeably, but this is technically inaccurate.

      Used in a social context, nobody really bothers to break down menopause as precisely. When you see the word menopausal in a magazine article, you are seeing what's become acceptable medical slang, referring to women who are premenopausal and perimenopausal, a time frame that includes the actual menopause. When you see postmenopausal in a magazine article, you are seeing another accepted medical slang, which includes women who are in perimenopause and "official" postmenopause.

      "Diagnosing" Premenopause or Perimenopause

      When you begin to notice the signs of menopause, either you'll suspect the approach of menopause on your own, or your doctor will put two and two together when you report your symptoms. Two very simple tests will accurately determine what's going on and what stage of menopause you're in. Your follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels will dramatically rise as your ovaries begin to shut down; these levels are easily checked through one blood test. In addition, your vaginal walls will thin, and the cells lining the vagina will not contain as much estrogen. Your doctor will simply take a Pap-like smear from your vaginal walls -- simple and painless -- and analyze the smear to check for vaginal "atrophy," the thinning and drying out of your vagina. As I'll discuss below, you'll need to keep track of your periods and chart them as they become irregular. Your menstrual pattern will be an added clue to your doctor about whether you are pre- or perimenopausal.

      Recognizing the Signs of Natural Menopause

      In the past, a long list of hysterical symptoms have been attributed to the "change of life," but medically, there are really just three classic short-term symptoms of menopause: erratic periods, hot flashes, and vaginal dryness. All three are caused by a decrease in estrogen. As for the emotional symptoms of menopause, such as irritability, mood swings, melancholy, and so on, they may or may not be directly related to hormone changes. Some women may find that estrogen therapy improves these symptoms, some may not, and some actually have psychiatric illnesses that require appropriate treatment. Decreased levels of estrogen, however, can make you more vulnerable to stress, depression, and anxiety, because estrogen loss affects REM sleep.

      Every woman entering menopause will experience a change in her menstrual cycle. Not all women will experience hot flashes or even notice vaginal changes. This is particularly true if a woman is overweight. Estrogen is stored in fat cells, which is why overweight women also tend to be more at risk for estrogen-dependent cancers. The fat cells convert fat into estrogen, creating a type of estrogen reserve that the body will use during menopause, which can reduce the severity of estrogen loss symptoms. In addition, many women go through menopause without experiencing changes in their moods. The assumption that mood swings always accompany menopause, or that women who suffer from premenstrual syndrome (PMS) will always experience more severe menopausal symptoms, is an absolute myth. It is believed, however, that women who do suffer from PMS are more likely to experience mood swings.

      Erratic periods

      Every woman will begin to experience an irregular cycle before her last period. Cycles may become longer or shorter with long bouts of amenorrhea. Sometimes she will just stop having her periods, never experiencing an erratic phase in her cycles. Periods may suddenly become light and scanty or heavy and crampy. The impact of suddenly irregular, "wild" cycles can be disturbing because menstrual cycle changes may also signify other problems. It's imperative to chart your periods and try to sort out your own pattern of "normal" irregular cycles. Bring your chart to your gynecologist to help confirm your suspicions that you are indeed entering menopause. If you're not entering menopause, you'll need to isolate the cause of your cycle changes.

      Of course, since you can go into menopause earlier than you might have anticipated, irregular cycles may not always be on your list of suspected causes behind your sudden cycle changes. Is there any way you can more accurately predict when your own menopause might occur? Yes. Although most women can expect their menopause to occur in their fifties, women who go into earlier menopause will usually have a family history of earlier menopause. Periods will generally become erratic approximately two years before the final period. However, some women may experience a longer premenopausal process than others.

      Hot flashes

      Roughly 85 percent of all pre- and perimenopausal women experience "hot flashes." Hot flashes can begin when periods are either still regular or have just started to become irregular. They usually stop one to two years after your final menstrual period. A hot flash can feel different for each woman. Some women experience a feeling of warmth in their faces and upper bodies; some women experience sweating and chills. Some women feel anxious, tense, dizzy, or nauseous just before the hot flash; some feel tingling in their fingers or heart palpitations just before. Some women will experience their hot flashes during the day; others will experience them at night and may wake up so wet from perspiration that they need to change their bedsheets or nightclothes.

      Nobody really understands what causes a hot flash, but researchers believe it has to do with mixed signals from the hypothalamus, which controls both body temperature and sex hormones. Normally, when the body is too warm, the hypothalamus sends a chemical message to the heart to cool off the body by pumping more blood, causing the blood vessels under the skin to dilate, which makes you perspire. During menopause, however, it's believed that the hypothalamus gets confused and sends this "cooling off" signal at the wrong times. A hot flash is not the same as being overheated. Although the skin temperature often rises between 4 to 8*F, the internal body temperature drops, creating this odd sensation.

      Why does the hypothalamus get so confused? The answer is decreasing levels of estrogen. We know this because when synthetic estrogen is given to replace natural estrogen in the body, hot flashes disappear. Some researchers believe that a decrease in luteinizing hormone (LH) is also a key factor, and a variety of other hormones that influence body temperature are being looked at as well. Although hot flashes are harmless in terms of health risks, they are disquieting and stressful. Women in the following categories will experience more severe hot flashes than will others:

      Women who are in surgical menopause.
      Women who are thin. When there's less fat on the body to store estrogen reserves, estrogen loss symptoms are more severe.
      Women who don't sweat easily. An ability to sweat makes extreme temperatures easier to tolerate. Women who have trouble sweating may experience more severe flashes.
      Just as you must chart your periods when your cycles become irregular, it's also important to chart your hot flashes. Keep track of when the flashes occur, how long they last, and number their intensity from 1 to 10. This will help you determine a pattern for the flashes and allow you to prepare for them in advance, which will help reduce the stress. Report your hot flashes to your doctor, just as you would any changes in your cycle. Symptoms of hot flashes can also indicate other health problems, such as circulatory problems.

      Short of taking ERT or HRT (see below), the only thing you can do about your hot flashes is to lessen your discomfort by adjusting your lifestyle to cope with the flashes. The more comfortable you are, the less intense your flashes will feel. Once you establish a pattern by charting the flashes, you can do a few things around the time of day your flashes occur. Some suggestions:

      Avoid synthetic clothing, such as polyester, because it traps perspiration.
      If you have night sweats, use only 100 percent cotton bedding.
      Avoid clothing with high necks and long sleeves.
      Dress in layers.
      Keep cold drinks handy.
      If you smoke, cut down or quit. Smoking constricts blood vessels and can intensify and prolong a flash.
      Avoid "trigger" foods such as caffeine, alcohol, spicy food, and sugar, and avoid eating large meals. Substitute herbal teas for coffee or regular tea.
      Discuss with your doctor the benefits of taking vitamin E supplements. Evidence suggests vitamin E is essential for proper circulation and production of sex hormones.
      Exercise to improve your circulation.
      Reduce your exposure to the sun; sunburn will aggravate your hot flashes because burnt skin cannot regulate heat as effectively. (Sun effects are discussed below.)
      Vaginal changes

      Estrogen loss will also cause vaginal changes. Since the production of estrogen causes the vagina to stay moist and elastic, the loss of estrogen will cause the vagina to become drier, thinner, and less elastic. This may also cause the vagina to shrink slightly in terms of width and length. In addition, the reduction in vaginal secretions causes the vagina to be less acidic. This can put you at risk for more vaginal infections, particularly yeast overgrowth. Again, women who are in surgical menopause and women who are physically thinner tend to have more severe vaginal dryness and repeated yeast infections.

      As a result of these vaginal changes, you'll notice a change in your sexual activity. Your vagina may take longer to become lubricated, or you may have to depend on lubricants to have comfortable intercourse.

      Estrogen loss can affect other parts of your sex life as well. Your sexual libido may actually increase because testosterone levels can rise when estrogen levels drop. (The general rule is that your levels of testosterone will either stay the same or increase.) However, women who do experience an increase in sexual desire will also be frustrated that their vaginas are not accommodating their needs. First, there is the lubrication problem: More stimulation is required to lubricate the vagina naturally. Second, a decrease in estrogen means that less blood flows to the vagina and clitoris, which means that orgasm may be more difficult to achieve or may not last as long as it normally has in the past. Other changes involve the breasts. Normally, estrogen causes blood to flow into the breasts during arousal, which makes the nipples more erect, sensitive, and responsive. Estrogen loss causes less blood to flow to the breasts, which makes them less sensitive. Finally, since the vagina shrinks as estrogen decreases, it doesn't expand as much during intercourse, which may make intercourse less comfortable, particularly since the vagina is less lubricated.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is Declining Complexion A Symptom Of Menopause?
    I am breaking out all of the sudden and don't know why. I am old enough that menopause is around the corner, wondering if that could cause it.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause itself is when our bodies stop manufacturing the female hormones our bodies previously made in the millions. As we age, (or other various factors such as steriodal medication use etc), we start to slow down on manufacturing these hormones which is when we are said to be Premenopausal. During this stage, we start to skip menstrual cycles, or have much lighter cycles, we may feel nervous or jittery, slightly deprressed or "weepy" at times and many other symptoms.Pre-menopause can cause breakouts due to hormonal imbalance, which in turn can cause excess stress, but it is more common to have very dry skin when we become premenopausal, which is also due to imbalanced hormones. Lesser manufacturing of hormones can effect all areas of our bodies so taking a head to toe physical is a good idea, as well as an eye exam (including dilation and glaucoma testing) The imbalance is why it is important to take any meds prescribed when we reach menopause since without enough of these hormones we are more prone to calcium and iron deficiency which leads to bones being easier to break, greater chance of heart attack etc, making our skin less dry or less broken out is only the superficial side of taking any needed medications, tho I do understand wanting to look good too. Im a Grandmother, but I do not want to look like one, lol... Meanwhile there are many good over the counter acne skin treatments that will dry up any breakouts, look for one with 5-10% Benzoyl peroxide in a cream base since if it isnt in a cream mature skin is more likely to dry out and get red and splotchy. Keep in mind, even your diet and the air itself can cause breakouts, change in or lack or exercise,as well as a change in detergents, shampoo and other hygiene products, stress, lack of rest, smoking, caffeine, alcohol/druugs prescribed or otherwise, etc...Hope this answer helps.

  8. QUESTION:
    My right breast is tender and feels kind of lumpy.?
    I am only 30 years old. Could I have breast cancer or could this be something else?
    I am not due for my period until April 4th.

    • ANSWER:
      Usual causes of lumpy tender breasts in young premenopausal woman which matches with ur symptoms are-

      A) fibrocystic disease of breast- occurs in women of 15-30 yrs of age.very common condition.breast feels lumpy,tender sometimes a bit swollen.pain sometimes have a relation with menstruation.benign condition & generally treated medically.surgical intervention rarely needed.
      B) Acute mastitis- acute infection of breast.breast is tender,swollen,reddish in color with /without nipple discharge.occurs in sexually active women & lactating mothers.antibiotic treatment is needed & mostly medical treatment in early stage.surgical intervention may be needed if breast abscess develops.
      C) breast carcinoma- varied presentation,generally non tender condition but may be tender in some variety or in late stage.there is usually a lump.whole breast generally isn't lumpy in breast carcinoma.

      ur history is insufficient,so it's not possible to give a exact diagnosis at this point but u may have fibrocystic disease of breast.

      what u should do-
      1) consult with ur internist immediately.
      2)arrange an appointment for mamography.
      3) do a through self breast examination urself while u r obtaining the date of appointment with ur internist.
      40don't panic at all.even if ur worst fear is true( i mean breast ca) u still don't have to worry.there are extremely good treatments available now a days for breast ca & with treatment u will surely lead a completely normal life.many persons do & i myself know many such.

      so don't panic,take it easy & consult ur doctor.probably u have fibrosystic disease but u should see a doctor in person even for that condition.good day.

  9. QUESTION:
    what is entometriosis cancer?&can a complete hysterectomie really take in all away?
    i am waiting for my sugury date and am very scared,alot of things run threw my mind, like once they remove this will the cancer be gone?&like how will this affect me as a woman?with ur hormones and stuff?will a sex life still extist?

    • ANSWER:
      Endometrial cancer is cancer of the lining of the uterus. According to Medline, it is the most common type of uterine cancer. Although the exact cause of endometrial cancer is unknown, increased levels of estrogen appear to have a role. One of estrogen's normal functions is to stimulate the buildup of the epithelial lining of the uterus. Excess estrogen administered to laboratory animals produces endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. It is also associated with obesity, hypertension and polycystic ovarian disease. Tamoxifen, used to treat breast cancer, may also increase the risk of developing endometrial cancer.

      Endometrial cancer should not be confused the disease Endometriosis, or with the malignant shifts that can and do occur (albeit rarely) in women with Endometriosis.

      Symptoms include abnormal uterine bleeding, abnormal menstrual periods, bleeding between normal periods in premenopausal women, vaginal bleeding or spotting in postmenopausal women, extremely long, heavy, or frequent episodes of bleeding in women over 40, lower abdominal pain or pelvic cramping, and thin white or clear vaginal discharge in postmenopausal women.

      Treatment varies based on the stage. For example, women with the early stage 1 disease may be candidates for treatment with surgical hysterectomy, but removal of the tubes and ovaries (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) is also usually recommended for 2 reasons, 1.) tumor cells can spread to the ovaries very early in the disease and 2.) any dormant cancer cells that may be present could possibly be stimulated by estrogen production by the ovaries. Abdominal hysterectomy is recommended over vaginal hysterectomy, because it affords the opportunity to examine and obtain washings of the abdominal cavity to detect any further evidence of cancer.

      Women with stage 1 disease who are at increased risk for recurrence, and those with stage 2 disease are often offered surgery in combination with radiation therapy. Chemotherapy may be considered in some cases, especially for those with stage 3 and 4 disease.

      The 5-year survival rate for endometrial cancer following appropriate treatment is:

      75 - 95% for stage 1
      50% for stage 2
      30% for stage 3
      Less than 5% for stage 4

      You can find others who understand at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002166.htm.

      Good luck to you.

  10. QUESTION:
    what if testosterone is high in female?
    hi i m 25 yrs old female....in recent blood test i found my testosterone level as 92.98......is it much? why i m getting high testosterone level? what are the reason behind? anything serious to me? if so what is the remedy?

    • ANSWER:
      Significance
      High testosterone may occur among women because of diseases affecting the ovaries, adrenal glands or pituitary gland in the brain. Testosterone levels vary throughout the day and during the menstrual cycle, so if you have high levels, consider the time of day and the day of your menstrual cycle. Testosterone levels are highest in the morning; as well as between the first day of your menstrual period and ovulation. Other reasons for high testosterone levels include ovarian or adrenal cancer and polycystic ovary syndrome.
      PCOS
      Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is a condition that causes infertility and an increase in male characteristics among women; such as facial hair, male pattern baldness and acne. Some women overproduce testosterone, contributing to PCOS. This leads to hormone imbalance and a decrease in ovulation, causing fertility problems if you are trying to conceive. Many women with PCOS must take medication to induce ovulation if testosterone levels are inhibiting egg release.
      Levels
      According to the University of Michigan Health System, normal levels of testosterone for women vary depending on age. Teen girls between the ages of 14 and 17 and who have entered puberty have normal levels of testosterone between 8 and 53 nanograms per deciliter, or ng/dL. Adult women over 17 and who are premenopausal can have testosterone levels between 10 and 70 ng/dL; while postmenopausal women often have lower levels, running between 7 and 40 ng/dL.
      Correction
      Treatment of high testosterone levels involves defining the underlying cause and managing symptoms. If high testosterone is related to illness or disease, such as ovarian or adrenal cancer, tumor removal and cancer treatment can reduce testosterone levels. Some physicians prescribe birth control pills because they contain estrogen and progesterone, which are female hormones. Birth control pills may help reduce levels of testosterone in women. A medication called spironolactone can help to block the body's receptors to testosterone, which can reduce symptoms. If you are suffering from symptoms of high testosterone, check with your doctor about which types of medications are available.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/294796-what-is-considered-to-be-high-testosterone-levels-in-women/#ixzz2HvkTq7Ce
      Good luck and God bless you

  11. QUESTION:
    Sharp pains in breast, could it be breast cancer?
    Last night I couldn't sleep because of sharp pains in my right breast. I have had dull pains before, but I don't know why never paid it much attention. Now, it's more frequent, and last night and just now at work, sharp pains. Anyone know if this could be a symptom of something?

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe Mastalgia.

      Mastalgia is more common in premenopausal women than in postmenopausal women, and it is rarely a presenting symptom of breast cancer.The etiology of breast pain is unknown. Its relationship to the menstrual cycle and its more frequent occurrence in premenopausal women suggest a hormonal etiology, but no reproducible alterations in estrogen, progesterone or prolactin levels have been identified in women with mastalgia. Premenstrual water retention in the breasts has also been proposed as a cause of mastalgia and is the rationale for the use of diuretics in the treatment of this condition.

  12. QUESTION:
    my last period was in 18 march 2012. and now almost 3 months but still no period what happen to me? I'm 47?
    I did pregnancy test that time 1 month delay..but the result was negative.But now this coming 18 June 2012 is 3 months no period what happen to me?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello There, I am 42 and have read about this in many articles as I help answer questions on this site. Possibly pre menopause.

      Signs of Premenopause

      As hormone production becomes imbalanced, women experience a wide range of physical, emotional, and cognitive symptoms. The duration of premenopause varies from one woman to the other, lasting anywhere from one to six years. The most prominent symptom noticed in premenopausal women is changes in their menstruation cycle. The cycle could be short, causing frequent periods, or it could be longer, resulting in less frequent periods. Some women are known to even skip periods completely. Other symptoms pertaining to premenopause are mentioned below.

      • Physical Symptoms: Drop in the level of estrogen during premenopause causes physical symptoms such as vaginal dryness, breast tenderness, weight gain, hot flashes (also known as hot flushes or night sweats if they happen at night), heavy or scant bleeding, spotting, sleep problems, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (during coughing, sneezing, laughing, or exercise), hair loss, dry eyes, dry skin, fatigue, indigestion, reduced metabolic rate, and increased vulnerability to many diseases.

      • Emotional Symptoms: Women also experience emotional changes like anxiety, moodiness, depression, irritability, forgetfulness, anger, nervousness, sudden inability to handle stress, and decreased libido causing frustration and helplessness.

      • Cognitive Symptoms: Confusion, difficulty in multitasking, loss of concentration, and memory loss are some symptoms that reflect changes in a woman's thought process, memory, learning, judging, and reasoning ability in the premenopausal stage.

      Premenopausal Management

      The most important thing to be understood about menopause is that it is not a disease and hence needs no treatment. However, depending on the range and severity of symptoms, menopause can be managed medically or with a few lifestyle changes.

      • Medication: Some medical practitioners prescribe oral contraceptives in low doses to reduce excessive bleeding and hot flashes. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), phytoestrogens, antihypertensives, bisphosphonates, and lipid-lowering drugs are commonly prescribed for premenopausal women, after a careful study of risk factors and needs. Medications such as Zoloft and Prozac are also recommended to control the emotional changes.

      • Nutritional Supplements: Supplements like bioflavonoids (natural pigment in fruits and vegetables), vitamin E, folic acid, vitamin C, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, borage oil, vitamin B12, etc., are also prescribed for easing hot flashes, lessening depressive symptoms and relieving joint pains.

      • Lifestyle Changes: Premenopausal hormonal imbalances reduce bone mineral density (BMD) and lipid profile, which lead to osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. A diet rich in calcium, such as milk, cheese, yogurt, and other calcium fortified food helps protect a woman's body from osteoporosis. A diet full of fruits and cruciferous veggies, like broccoli, watercress, cauliflower, cabbage, etc., helps fight against the increased risk of heart disease. Soy protein or soy foods are also known to aid in reducing the severity of premenopausal or perimenopausal symptoms.

      Going through menopause is a stressful time for any woman. It is difficult to accept the physical, emotional and cognitive changes caused by hormonal imbalances in the body. This phase in a woman life cannot be avoided, but a thorough understanding of its causes, symptoms and management can help one cope with the symptoms better and stay healthy

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

  13. QUESTION:
    natural ways to fix hormone imbalance in woman?

    • ANSWER:
      Natural Progesterone can be produced in the Body by intake of a Herbal Dietary Supplement called Wild Yam and eating Soy Bean rich foods. Wild Yam and Soy contain Diosgenin which when digested are converted by the Body into Progesterone. Since the Body has its own intelligence and knows how much Progesterone is required by it, there is no chance of excessive Progesterone being produced and causing any side effects in the Body. The use of Synthetic or Natural Progesterone treatment is plagued by the problems of deciding the correct dose and the days of application. Herbal Dietary Supplements like Wild Yam and foods like Soy Beans do not have these problems as the Body itself regulates the digestion and absorption of these foods and takes from them exactly what ever it needs and the rest gets eliminated from the Body as waste matter in due course.

      In addition, there is a Hormone Balance Massage Oil which can be used to strengthen the Hormone Balance in the Body. It also helps alleviate PMS and Premenopausal symptoms.
      The Hormone Balance Massage Oil should be massaged into the soft capillary-rich areas of the skin such as the face, neck, upper chest, breast, inner arms, palms and backs of the hands, and soles of feet until it has noticeably disappeared. It is important to rotate the sites of application. In other words, choose four sites for application and rotate daily. For example, if you choose to apply the Massage Oil to your face on the first day, you may choose the upper chest the next day, the inner arms on the third day, the hands or the soles of the feet on the fourth day, and then start over with the face. Rotating sites is important because it prevents the subdermal receptors from becoming saturated, which could impair absorption.
      Apply 4 to 6 drops in the morning and / or evening. Some women feel the Hormone Balance Massage Oil helps them to relax and prefer using it in the evening.
      Wait and see what your results are during the first week or so. Then you may want to increase the number of applications from one to two per day. The best way to tell if you are using enough is to see whether or not your symptoms are relieved, keeping in mind that results may take time. Every woman's biochemistry and ability to absorb is different. Since Natural Progesterone is known for its freedom from side effects, there is room to experiment.

  14. QUESTION:
    What is Menorrhagia Exactly?
    I think I may have it, but I'm not sure. I don't know much about it but I wanted to look up why I was having heavy periods. Is it bad or dangerous to have or what?

    • ANSWER:
      At some time in your reproductive life, you've probably experienced heavy bleeding during your menstrual period. If you're like some women, every period you have causes enough blood loss and cramping that you can't maintain your usual daily activities. The medical term for periods like these — excessive or prolonged or both — is menorrhagia.

      Although heavy menstrual bleeding is a common concern among premenopausal women, few women experience blood loss severe enough to be defined as menorrhagia. If you have menstrual bleeding so heavy that you dread your period, talk with your doctor. There are many effective treatments for menorrhagia.

      The signs and symptoms of menorrhagia may include:

      ■Menstrual flow that soaks through one or more sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several consecutive hours
      ■The need to use double sanitary protection to control your menstrual flow
      ■The need to change sanitary protection during the night
      ■Menstrual periods lasting longer than seven days
      ■Menstrual flow that includes large blood clots
      ■Heavy menstrual flow that interferes with your regular lifestyle
      ■Tiredness, fatigue or shortness of breath (symptoms of anemia)
      When to see a doctor
      Doctors generally recommend that all sexually active women and women over the age of 21 have yearly pelvic exams and regular Pap tests. However, if you experience heavy or irregular vaginal bleeding, schedule an appointment with your doctor and be certain to record when the bleeding occurs during the month. If you're having heavy vaginal bleeding — soaking at least one pad or tampon an hour for more than a few hours — seek medical help. Call your doctor if you have any vaginal bleeding after menopause

      Its not bad or dangerous for you, but if you feel like you may have it, and are worried, contact your doc or obgyn, and I'm sure that they would answer all your questiions!!!

      Good Luck!

  15. QUESTION:
    I am 48 years old .My serum oestradiol (E2)is 27 pg/ml.What does this indicate?

    • ANSWER:
      Harjinderjit Singh,
      An oestradiol test measures the amount of a hormone called oestradiol in the blood. Oestradiol is the most important form of oestrogen found in the body. Most of it is made in and released from the ovaries, adrenal cortex, and the placenta, which forms during pregnancy to feed a developing baby. Oestradiol is responsible for the growth of the female uterus, Fallopian tubes, and vagina. It promotes breast development and the growth of the outer genitals. The hormone plays a role in the distribution of body fat in women and stops the process of growing taller. It is also present in males, being produced as an active metabolic product of testosterone. The “Normal” results for Female (premenopausal):- 30 to 400 pg/mL. Female (postmenopausal):- 0 to 30 pg/mL. Male:- 10 to 50 picograms per milliliter (pg/mL). As you do not indicate your menopausal state, I leave the deduction to you!

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  16. QUESTION:
    My doctor seems to believe I have fibroied tumors? Do anyone know the symptoms for this and treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Uterine fibroids are benign tumors of muscle and connective tissue that develop within, or are attached to, the uterine wall.

      Symptoms:
      Sensation of fullness or pressure in lower abdomen
      Pelvic cramping or pain with periods
      Abdominal fullness, gas
      Increase in urinary frequency
      Heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia), sometimes with the passage of blood clots
      Sudden, severe pain due to a pedunculated fibroid

      Note: There are often no symptoms.

      Methods of treatment depend on the severity of symptoms, the patient's age, her pregnancy status, her possible desire for future pregnancies, her general health, and characteristics of the fibroids. Treatment may consist of simply monitoring the rate of growth of the fibroids with periodic pelvic exams or ultrasound.

      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen or naprosyn may be recommended for lower abdominal cramping or pain with menses. Iron supplementation will help to prevent anemia in women with heavy periods. These methods are usually sufficient in premenopausal women.

      Hormonal treatment, involving drugs such as injectable Depo Leuprolide, causes fibroids to shrink, but can also cause significant side effects. This method is sometimes used for short treatment periods before surgical procedures or when menopause is imminent.

      The hormones produce an environment in the body that is very similar to that of menopause, with associated side effects like hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and loss of bone density.

      The treatment lasts several months and during this time the reduction in estrogen concentration allows the fibroids to shrink. Fibroids will begin to enlarge as soon as treatment stops.

      Hysteroscopic resection of fibroids (an outpatient surgical procedure) may be appropriate for women with fibroids growing within the uterine cavity. In this procedure, a small camera and instruments are inserted through the cervix into the uterus to remove the fibroid tumors.

      Uterine artery embolization is a new procedure aimed at preventing the need for major surgery. Small catheters are placed through veins in the pelvis and advanced to the arteries that supply the uterus with blood.

      Materials are then injected to block these arteries permanently. The decreased blood supply to the uterus may prevent further growth of the fibroids and may cause them to shrink. The long-term effects of this procedure are still unknown, and the safety of pregnancy after this procedure is questionable.

      A myomectomy, which is a surgical procedure to remove just the fibroids, is frequently the chosen treatment for premenopausal women who want to bear more children, because it usually can preserve fertility.

      Another advantage of a myomectomy is that it controls pain or excessive bleeding that some women with uterine fibroids experience. However, a myomectomy often cannot remove very small fibroids that may grow and cause symptoms in the future.

      A total hysterectomy, which involves removal of the uterus, is a curative option that is often chosen by older women.

  17. QUESTION:
    Could this be premenopausal symptoms?
    I have been having panic attacks. The other day, some napkins fell off of my desk, and I screamed so loud the neighbors heard me. All I saw was a shadow moving past me and I didn't know what it was. This is just a small example of how jittery and irritable I've been. I've been forgetting words, phrases, names, even in a temporary instance, my own daughter's age (how embarrassing!). I'll forget what I was thinking two minutes ago, or why I walked into a room. I've been snapping at people for petty reasons. My cat is afraid of me.

    I really feel like I'm losing it. I am tired and fatigued more often. It doesn't matter if I slept or not, or even how much I've exerted myself, I am tired no matter what. I am also restless, fidgety, and cannot concentrate on anything for the life of me. I cannot even do the things I used to enjoy doing. I just pace. I can't calm down enough to do anything. It's as if every moment is terminal.

    I have also recently developed facial hair over the past year, a small subtle patch on my chin that I have waxed monthly. For some reason I don't gain weight as often as I used to, or at least it seems that way. I become angry more often. My diet has become erratic. I don't crave things anymore, or even get hungry as often. PMS is TERRIBLE. I never used to have PMS symptoms, but for the past few months they have been progressively getting worse, and my periods are a lot heavier as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like systemic candidiasis to me. Spit in a cup of water and see if your spit grows legs. If it does, that's candida. I have it too! The best treatment I know of is Fivelac, but it makes you much sicker at first. I don't know about the periods though. I don't have periods so can't vouch for that, but all of your other symptoms sound like candida.

  18. QUESTION:
    menopause symptoms. please help...?
    my mom is 45 years old and she's experiencing symptoms of menopause since a year. her doc told her to get pap test and they don't have any appointment available . it's been a whole years that i am trying to make an appointment and they keep telling me , there's no space for new patients. i don't know believe it's happening! anyway, she's exercising 6 days a week and trying to eating healthy and she's getting periods once in two or three months. i wanted to know if there's any supplement she can take that would help her ease her symptoms or any home remedy. i don't believe having her doctor put her into artificial hormones as there are a lot of side effects so not worth it! thanks....

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is lucky to have such a caring and supportive child.

      Signs and Symptoms of Pre Menopause
      Pre-menopause is characterized by a gradual slow down of the reproductive cycle and hormonal changes. The ovaries gradually lower the production of both the sex hormone, estrogen and progesterone. As a result, a woman can undergo a lot of mental, physical and emotional changes. The most important change that a woman experiences is irregularity in her menstrual cycle. The cycles can be short and frequent or they can be longer and less frequent. The periods can be lighter than usual or marked by heavy bleeding. In all, a lot of irregularities can be noticed in the menstrual cycle, due to skipped ovulation.

      Other physical symptoms of pre-menopause are hot flushes or night sweats, vaginal dryness, weight gain, especially around the abdomen and hips, hair loss, dry eyes, breast tenderness, joint pain or stiffness, headaches or migraines, palpitation, water retention, osteoporosis, increased frequency of urinary tract infection, loss or decreased sexual drive and painful intercourse.

      Hormonal fluctuations can also bring about mood disorders, irritability, forgetfulness, anxiety and depression in some women. One of the most uncomfortable pre menopause symptoms can be sleep disorders or insomnia. A woman going through this phase can have a really tough time getting enough sleep in the night. She may also feel the inability to handle stress and anxiety. However, every woman may not experience all the symptoms of pre menopause. The severity of the symptoms can also vary from woman to woman and the hence, the phase may not be so difficult and uncomfortable for all women. More on premenopausal symptoms.

      Dealing with Menopause
      Though menopause is an inevitable phase in a woman's life, it is possible to handle the symptoms that it produces, so that they do not cause major physical and mental stress. The key to manage menopause is the adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Nutrition and appropriate exercises can help a lot to deal with the pre menopause symptoms. Eating a balanced diet with lots of fruits, vegetables, low fat dairy products, cereals and whole grains and less of fats and sugar can ensure general health and well-being of a woman. This would enable her to cope with the situation. If required, nutritional supplementation can also be taken along with eating a healthy diet.

      Similarly, regular physical exercises can help to manage weight and improve both mental and physical well-being of an individual. This holds greater important for aging women, as it would help to strengthen the bones and muscles of their body. However, medications and treatment options like hormone replacement therapy may be required, if a large fluctuation in the level of hormones lead to heavy bleeding and other pre menopause symptoms. Therefore, if the pre menopause symptoms become unbearable, it is better to seek medical attention.

      Menopause is no doubt a tough phase for women. Understanding the phase and the pre menopause symptoms are therefore, very essential for a woman, so that she can prepare herself to cope with the situation better and maintain her physical and mental health and well-being.

  19. QUESTION:
    My FSH is 12 and LH is 2. I am trying to concive. Can I conceive after any treatment ?

    My age is 25 years

    • ANSWER:
      I found this for you...

      Normal FSH day 3 value is 3-20 mlU/ml
      FSH levels above 10 to 12 mlu/ml indicate that your ovaries are starting to fail. In other words, this means that you are in perimenopause -- the beginning stages of menopause when you notice physical symptoms, but before you have stopped having a period for a year, or have "diminished ovarian reserve"
      Higher FSH levels -- levels about 30 to 40 or above -- are usually taken to signal menopause or ovarian failure. You may even be getting periods with your FSH levels this high, but it still is a sign that your body isn't producing enough estrogen to maintain regular ovarian function.
      Keep in mind that you may end up with FSH levels that are well in the post-menopausal range, but still be getting a period. This is one of the things that differentiates premature menopause or premature ovarian failure from "regular" menopause (i.e. menopause that occurs to older women after a full year without a period). Yet again, this hammers home the unfortunate fact that you may indeed be in premature menopause even if you're having periods. Once your FSH levels have reached a certain height for a period of time, it's highly unlikely that they'll drop back to premenopausal levels.

      Since the levels can fluctuate, I'd have the test repeated in your next cycle. And even with these results, I have heard of women who conceived, but really your best chances are with a fairly aggressive supportive Dr.

      Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what this means? "hyperplastic endometrial polyp with mild focal atypicality"? is this bad?
    Does this mean cancer? This was one f the findings when my mom had a hysterectomy. Were still waiting for the oncologist though becasue he's out of the country.

    • ANSWER:
      ENDOMETRIAL POLYPS — Endometrial polyps are localized hyperplastic overgrowths of endometrial glands and stroma that form a sessile or pedunculated projection from the surface of the endometrium. Single or multiple polyps can occur that range from a few millimeters to several centimeters in size. They rarely contain foci of neoplastic growth. In one large series of 509 consecutive women with endometrial polyps removed by operative hysteroscopy, histology was benign in 70 percent, and showed hyperplasia without atypia in 26 percent, hyperplasia with atypia in 3 percent, and cancer in 0.8 percent. The mean age of the women was 56 years and just over one-half had abnormal uterine bleeding.
      Epidemiology — Endometrial polyps are rare among women younger than 20 years of age. The incidence rises steadily with increasing age, peaks in the fifth decade of life, and gradually declines after menopause. Among women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy, the prevalence of endometrial polyps is 10 to 24 percent.
      Clinical features — Endometrial polyps are responsible for approximately one-fourth of cases of abnormal genital bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. (See "Evaluation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women" and see "Evaluation and management of uterine bleeding in postmenopausal women"). Metrorrhagia (ie, irregular bleeding) is the most frequent symptom in women with endometrial polyps, occurring in about one-half of symptomatic cases. Less frequent symptoms include menorrhagia, postmenopausal bleeding, prolapse through the cervical os, and breakthrough bleeding during hormonal therapy.
      Diagnosis — Endometrial polyps are diagnosed by microscopic examination of a specimen obtained after curettage, endometrial biopsy, or hysterectomy. Excision permits both diagnosis and cure of these lesions. Neither ultrasonography nor hysteroscopy can reliably distinguish between benign and malignant polyps.
      Natural history — A prospective study on the course of endometrial polyps performed two saline infusion sonograms 2.5 years apart on 64 initially asymptomatic women (mean age 44 years). Seven women had polyps on the first examination. Four of these women had spontaneous regression of their polyps at the second scan, while seven women developed new polyps over the 2.5 year interval. Polyps larger than 1 cm were least likely to regress. Hormone use did not appear to affect the natural history of the polyps, but the study sample was small.
      Treatment — Thorough curettage cures the majority of cases of endometrial polyps. Curettage followed by blind extraction with Randall polyp forceps improves the detection rate over curettage alone. Hysteroscopic-guided curettage is recommended since small polyps and other structural abnormalities can be missed by blind curettage.
      For women desiring pregnancy, short-term downregulation with a GnRH-agonist may be useful. However, clinical experience with this approach is restricted to a few case reports and symptoms reappear after discontinuation of agonist therapy. In a randomized trial with inclusion criteria 24 months infertility, candidate for intrauterine insemination, and histologically confirmed sonographic diagnosis of endometrial polyp, hysteroscopic polypectomy before intrauterine insemination was associated with a significantly higher pregnancy rate (63 versus 28 percent in controls). Based on this trial, and other data from observational studies, we remove endometrial polyps in infertile women, even in the absence of abnormal bleeding.

  21. QUESTION:
    does nettle tea help with menopause symptons?

    • ANSWER:
      Some would say one herb verses another. Research has show-en how certain herbs work better together.

      Feminene® Female Support Formula is a natural supplement combined of 11 specially selected herbs including black cohosh, don quai, soy extract, St. John’s Wort, evening primrose and additional vitamins to help support stamina. Feminene® helps to alleviate mild symptoms of menopause, helps counteract mild adverse effects of premenstrual syndrome and helps stabilize mood. Feminine helps women keep their bodies in balance resulting in peace of mind. When you’re juggling so many things in life the last thing you want is to have hormones and mood swings to deal with as well.*
      Scientific Studies:
      Albertazzi, P., et al. The effect of dietary soy supplementation on hot flushes. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 91(1): 6-11, 1998.
      Araghiniknam, M., et al. Antioxidant activity of dioscorea and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in older humans. Life Sciences. 59(11): 147-157, 1996.
      Berger, D., et al. Efficacy of Vitex agnus castus L. extract Ze 440 in patients with pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS). Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 264(3): 150-153, 2000.
      Bronstrup, A., et al. Effects of folic acid and combinations of folic acid and vitamin B-12 on plasma homocysteine concentrations in healthy, young women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 68(5): 1104-1110, 1998.
      Carroll, D. Nonhormonal therapies for hot flashes in menopause. American Family Physician. 73(3): 457-465, 2006.
      Cassidy, A., et al. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 60(3): 333-340, 1994.
      Cott, J. and Fugh-Berman, A. Is St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) an effective antidepressant? Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 186(8): 500-501, 1998.
      Friso, S., et al. Low plasma vitamin B-6 concentrations and modulation of coronary artery disease risk. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 79(6): 992-998, 2004.
      Gardner, C. Ease through menopause with homeopathic and herbal medicine. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing. 14(3): 139-143, 1999.
      Hardy, M. Herbs of special interest to women. Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 40(2): 234-242, 2000.
      Israel, D. and Youngkin, E. Herbal therapies for perimenopausal and menopausal complaints. Pharmacotherapy. 17(5): 970-984, 1997.
      Kim, H., et al. St. John's wort for depression: a meta-analysis of well-defined clinical trials. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 187(9): 532-539, 1999.
      Knight, D. and Eden, J. A review of the clinical effects of phytoestrogens. 87(5): 897-904, 1996.
      Larsson, B., et al. Evening primrose oil in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Current Therapeutic Research. 46(1): 58-63, 1989.
      Leathwood, P., et al. Aqueous extract of valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L.) improves sleep quality in man. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 17(1): 65-71, 1982.
      Lieberman, S. A review of the effectiveness of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) for the symptoms of menopause. Journal of Women’s Health. 7(5): 525-529, 1998.
      Lindahl, O. and Lindwall, L. Double blind study of a valerian preparation. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 32(4): 1065-1066, 1989.
      Linde, K., et al. St John's wort for depression--an overview and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. BMJ. 313(7052): 253-258, 1996.
      Loch E., et al. Treatment of premenstrual syndrome with a phytopharmaceutical formulation containing Vitex agnus castus. Journal of Women’s Health and Gender-Based Medicine. 9(3): 315-320, 2000.
      Low Dog, T. Menopause: a review of botanical dietary supplements. American Journal of Medicine. 118(Suppl 12B): 98-108, 2005.
      McKinley, M., et al. Low-dose vitamin B-6 effectively lowers fasting plasma homocysteine in healthy elderly persons who are folate and riboflavin replete. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 73(4): 759-764, 2001.
      Monograph. Angelica sinensis. Alternative Medicine Review. 9(4): 429-433, 2004.
      Murkies, A., et al. Dietary flour supplementation decreases post-menopausal hot flushes: effect of soy and wheat. Maturitas. 21(3): 189-195, 1995.
      Nestel, P., et al. Isoflavones from red clover improve systemic arterial compliance but not plasma lipids in menopausal women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 84(3): 895-898, 1999.
      Potter, S., et al. Soy protein and isoflavones: their effects on blood lipids and bone density in postmenopausal women. 68(6): 1375S-1379S, 1998.
      Rimm, E., et al. Folate and vitamin B6 from diet and supplements in relation to risk of coronary heart disease among women. JAMA. 279(5): 359-364, 1998.
      Robinson, K., et al. Low circulating folate and vitamin B6 concentrations: risk factors for stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary artery disease. European COMAC Group. Circulation. 97(5): 437-443, 1998.
      Shaw, C. The perimenopausal hot flash: epidemiology, physiology, and treatment. Nurse Practitioner. 22(3): 55-56, 61-66, 1997.
      Sliutz, G., et al. Agnus castus extracts inhibit prolactin secretion of rat pituitary cells. Hormone and Metabolic Research. 25(5): 253-255, 1993.
      Sliutz, G., et al. Agnus castus extracts inhibit prolactin secretion of rat pituitary cells. Hormone and Metabolic Research. 25(5): 253-255, 1993.
      Smidt, L., et al. Influence of thiamin supplementation on the health and general well-being of an elderly Irish population with marginal thiamin deficiency. Journal of Gerontology. 46(1): M16-M22, 1991.
      Soulimani, R., et al. Behavioural effects of Passiflora incarnata L. and its indole alkaloid and flavonoid derivatives and maltol in the mouse. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 57(1): 11-20, 1997.
      Uesugi, T., et al. Beneficial effects of soybean isoflavone supplementation on bone metabolism and serum lipids in postmenopausal Japanese women: a four-week study. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 21(2): 97-102, 2002.
      Verhoef, P., et al. Homocysteine, vitamin status and risk of vascular disease; effects of gender and menopausal status. European COMAC Group. European Heart Journal. 20(17): 1234-1244, 1999.
      Viereck, V., et al. Black cohosh: just another phytoestrogen? Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism. 16(5): 214-221, 2005.
      Wolfman, C., et al. Possible anxiolytic effects of chrysin, a central benzodiazepine receptor ligand isolated from Passiflora coerulea. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 47(1): 1-4, 1994.
      Gordon P. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nutriwell

  22. QUESTION:
    15 to 25 days i bleed every month since last year , am turning 38 this year is this premenopausal ?
    it started lastyear , when my sleeping trouble at the same get worse i only sleep 3 to 4 hours a day , my mom says that it might premenopausal but am only 37 , honestly though am a little scared that this might be some cyst or cervical problems, i was diagnosed of cancer 15 years ago total parotidectomy adenocarcinoma am afraid that it has something to do about it. Am scared to visit and see a doctor , because am not ready to accept anything about my illness i thought am okay after 15 years , i just need more knowledge about my situation before i decide to see a doc. i need help...........thanks

    • ANSWER:
      This is a tough question but I need to be honest. It's possible that the excessive bleeds and the sleep issues are part of early perimenopause, the phase that preceeds actual menopause. The stages of menopause can begin in the 30s. The earliest I've ever encountered was a family friend, a woman of 25. Periods can become heavier and come closer together or become shorter, lighter and farther apart. There can be sleep diffculties, leg cramps and we're all familiar with hot flashes.

      I doubt that your parotidectomy/adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland has anything to do with this especially if (15 years ago) the tumor margins were clear. However, it wouldn't hurt to have tumor markers checked if your primary thinks so and you agree. Remember, you have the right to refuse any or all forms of diagnostics and/or treatment at your discretion. I hope you'll agree to it because it's important that you know in your mind and your heart that you're healthy.

      Speak to your OB/Gyn and don't be afraid to find out. I know you're scared the cancer is back but I really think it's hormonal. I've given you 3 links to check out symptoms of perimenopause and, of course, I encourage you to do your own independent research on perimenopause, menopause and postmenopause. God bless you, you'll get through this.

      http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/menopause/a/sympperimeno.htm

      http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide/guide-perimenopause

      http://www.womentowomen.com/menopause/perimenopause.aspx

  23. QUESTION:
    what is Bifosa-35?
    Is it harmful if we takes long time? Is there any side effects? After histerectomy operation one of my friend is using these tablets. Doctor stopped HRT treatment. Now she is taking only these tablets weekly once.Is it safe>Please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      Bifosa is Alendronate sodium and is indicated for:

      • Treatment and prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.
      • For the treatment of osteoporosis, alendronate sodium increases bone mass and reduces the incidence of fractures, including those of the hip and spine (vertebral compression fractures). Osteoporosis may be confirmed by the finding of low bone mass (for example, at least 2 standard deviations below the premenopausal mean) or by the presence or history of osteoporotic fracture. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Pharmacodynamics.)
      • For the prevention of osteoporosis, alendronate sodium may be considered in postmenopausal women who are at risk of developing osteoporosis and for whom the desired clinical outcome is to maintain bone mass and to reduce the risk of future fracture. Bone loss is particularly rapid in postmenopausal women younger than age 60. Risk factors often associated with the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis include early menopause; moderately low bone mass (for example, at least 1 standard deviation below the mean for healthy young adult women); thin body build; Caucasian or Asian race; and family history of osteoporosis. The presence of such risk factors may be important when considering the use of alendronate sodium for prevention of osteoporosis.
      • Treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis.
      • Treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in men and women receiving glucocorticoids in a daily dosage equivalent to 7.5 mg or greater of prednisone and who have low bone mineral density (see PRECAUTIONS, Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis ). Patients treated with glucocorticoids should receive adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D.
      • Treatment of Paget's disease of bone in men and women.
      • Treatment is indicated in patients with Paget's disease of bone having alkaline phosphatase at least 2 times the upper limit of normal, or those who are symptomatic, or those at risk for future complications from their disease.

      Non-FDA Approved Indications

      Preliminary data have shown alendronate to reduce bone turnover in early rheumatoid arthritis. Alendronate has been used in patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism to prevent postparathyroidectomy induced hypocalcemia.

      Contraindications:
      • Abnormalities of the esophagus which delay esophageal emptying such as stricture or achalasia.
      • Inability to stand or sit upright for at least 30 minutes.
      • Patients at increased risk of aspiration should not receive alendronate sodium oral solution.
      • Hypersensitivity to any component of this product.
      • Hypocalcemia

      Dosing Instructions

      Patients should be instructed that the expected benefits of alendronate sodium may only be obtained when it is taken with plain water the first thing upon arising for the day at least 30 minutes before the first food, beverage, or medication of the day. Even dosing with orange juice or coffee has been shown to markedly reduce the absorption of alendronate sodium (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Pharmacokinetics, Absorption).

      To facilitate delivery to the stomach and thus reduce the potential for esophageal irritation patients should be instructed to swallow each tablet of alendronate sodium with a full glass of water (6-8 oz). To facilitate gastric emptying patients should drink at least 2 oz (a quarter of a cup) of water after taking alendronate sodium oral solution. Patients should be instructed not to lie down for at least 30 minutes and until after their first food of the day. Patients should not chew or suck on the tablet because of a potential for oropharyngeal ulceration. Patients should be specifically instructed not to take alendronate sodium at bedtime or before arising for the day. Patients should be informed that failure to follow these instructions may increase their risk of esophageal problems. Patients should be instructed that if they develop symptoms of esophageal disease (such as difficulty or pain upon swallowing, retrosternal pain or new or worsening heartburn) they should stop taking alendronate sodium and consult their physician.

      Patients should be instructed that if they miss a dose of once weekly alendronate sodium, they should take 1 dose on the morning after they remember. They should not take 2 doses on the same day but should return to taking 1 dose once a week, as originally scheduled on their chosen day.

  24. QUESTION:
    Help, premenopausal women talk to me?
    Man I feel rough its day 19 of my cycle and as of yesterday all **** broke loose as it does every month for about the last 2 years, I feel sick have a head ache, brain fog, my body aches and well my mood well lets just say its dangerous for family members to say the wrong thing to me. I feel like my body is racing even when I am sitting still. Medical Doc says nothing wrong with you...LOL what a joke or another she likes is its just stress, right! I know stressful things can do amazing things to ones body but I don't think it only comes 2 weeks before your cycle begins. Does any one have any suggestions before my family decides I should lock myself in a room for two weeks? I have heard the doc can do blood tests for homone levels and I have ask her but she refuses and tells me I am to young to be premenopausal in yet my natual health care provider says she thinks that is what is happening. Advise please how to deal with this situation 2 weeks out of the month?
    Sorry ladies forgot to state my age I am 38.

    • ANSWER:
      You are not too young to be perimenopausal. Many ladies start in their mid thirties. I would go to a different doctor and ask for a FSH test which will tell you hormone levels. You can also buy an over the counter saliva test that will tell you your hormone levels. You have all of the symptoms and you do need the tests so that you can make the decision to go on HRT or alternative treatments. I have written several papers on this and have done a lot of research. When you are going through this you need a good doctor that will guide you. The mood swings, brain fog, headaches are all major symptoms.

  25. QUESTION:
    right ovary pain feels like miscarriage ovary pain?
    ive been having pain it seems to be my ovary it fees like period cramps . i had a miscarriage i think two months ago and ive been feeling this for about a month...when i had my miscarrige it would feel like this now.. i havent been on my period when i was feeling these pain but now i just started my peeriod and and it feelin the same way but i have no idea what it could be please anyone tell me all you think i need to know and what could this be ???? HELP

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than an orange.
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).[1] In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women.
      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove cysts larger than 5 centimeters in diameter.
      Contents [hide]
      1 Classification
      1.1 Functional cysts
      1.1.1 Graafian follicle cyst
      1.1.2 Corpus luteum cyst
      1.1.3 Hemorrhagic cyst
      1.2 Dermoid cyst
      1.3 Endometrioid cyst
      1.4 Pathological cysts
      2 Signs and symptoms
      3 Diagnosis
      4 Treatment
      5 References
      6 External links
      [edit]Classification

      [edit]Functional cysts
      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated. There are 3 types, Graafian, Luteal, and Hemorrhagic. These types of cysts occur during ovulation. If the egg is not released, the ovary can fill up with fluid. Usually these types of cysts will go away after a few period cycles.
      [edit]Graafian follicle cyst
      Main article: Follicular cyst of ovary
      One type of simple cyst, which is the most common type of ovarian cyst, is the graafian follicle cyst, or follicular cyst.
      [edit]Corpus luteum cyst
      Main article: Corpus luteum cyst
      Another is a corpus luteum cyst (which may rupture about the time of menstruation, and take up to three months to disappear entirely).
      [edit]Hemorrhagic cyst
      A third type of functional cyst, which is common, is a Hemorrhagic cyst, which is also called a blood cyst, hematocele, and hematocyst.[2] It occurs when a very small blood vessel in the wall of the cyst breaks, and the blood enters the cyst. Abdominal pain on one side of the body, often the right side, may be present. The bleeding may occur quickly, and rapidly stretch the covering of the ovary, causing pain. As the blood collects within the ovary, clots form which can be seen on a sonogram.[3][4] Occasionally hemorrhagic cysts can rupture, with blood entering the abdominal cavity. No blood is seen out of the vagina. If a cyst ruptures, it is usually very painful. Hemorrhagic cysts that rupture are less common. Most hemorrhagic cysts are self-limiting; some need surgical intervention. Even if a hemorrhagic cyst ruptures, in many cases it resolves without surgery. Patients who don't require surgery will experience pain for 4 - 10 days after, and may require several days rest. Studies have found that women on tetracycline antibiotics recover 25% earlier than the majority of patients, a surprising correlation found in 2004. Sometimes surgery is necessary,[5][6] such as a laparoscopy ("belly-button surgery" that uses small tools inserted through one or more tiny slits in the abdomen).[7]
      [edit]Dermoid cyst
      Main article: Dermoid cyst
      [edit]Endometrioid cyst
      Main article: Chocolate cyst of ovary
      An endometrioma, endometrioid cyst, endometrial cyst, or chocolate cyst is caused by endometriosis, and formed when a tiny patch of endometrial tissue (the mucous membrane that makes up the inner layer of the uterine wall) bleeds, sloughs off, becomes transplanted, and grows and enlarges inside the ovaries.
      [edit]Pathological cysts
      The incidence of ovarian carcinoma (malignant cancer) is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.[8]
      Other cysts are pathological, such as those found in polycystic ovary syndrome, or those associated with tumors.
      A polycystic-appearing ovary is diagnosed based on its enlarged size — usually twice normal —with small cysts present around the outside of the ovary. It can be found in "normal" women, and in women with endocrine disorders. An ultrasound is used to view the ovary in diagnosing the condition. Polycystic-appearing ovary is different from the polycystic ovarian syndrome, which includes other symptoms in addition to the presence of ovarian cysts, and involves metabolic and cardiovascular risks linked to insulin resistance. These risks include increased glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is associated with infertility, abnormal bleeding, increased incidences of pregnancy loss, and pregnancy-related complications. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is extremely common, is thought to occur in 4-7% of women of reproductive age, and is associated with an increased risk for endometrial cancer. More tests than an ultrasound alone are required to diagnose polycystic ovarian syndrome.
      [edit]Signs and symptoms

      Some or all of the following symptoms[9] [10] [11] [12] [13] may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:
      Du

  26. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had the new Nova-Sure procedure?
    I am having surgery in 2 days to remove a cyst and am very aprehensive. The Dr. wants to do the Nova-Sure procedure to reduce monthly bleeding & cramps, but it involves electric-shock to kill the lining of my utereus. I am worried about infection or something worse. Doc says risk of infection is less than 1%....Is this true??? Have You had an Oopherectony???(removal of one or both ovaries, but utereus stays)??? Help !!!!! I don't have much time for answers!!!! THank-You SSSSOOOOO much for caring!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Cytyc Corp. says:

      "If heavy periods have been keeping you from enjoying your life to the fullest, you should know about NovaSure®. NovaSure is a safe, simple procedure that’s been proven to help control heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia) without any need for hormones or a hysterectomy. NovaSure can help put an end to the embarrassment and awkwardness that heavy bleeding can cause. Endometrial ablation may be your doctor’s recommended treatment if you do not plan to have children in the future. A new generation of endometrial ablation devices is now available. Some devices remove the endometrium by using heated fluid. Others use freezing temperatures to remove the tissue. NovaSure® uses a precisely controlled dose of energy. Hysterectomy, or surgical removal of the uterus, is the only definitive treatment for menorrhagia. Hysterectomy is a major procedure, performed in the hospital under general anesthesia, and is accompanied by surgical risks, hospitalization, and, depending on the technique used, a recovery period of up to 6 weeks. NovaSure Endometrial Ablation is an endometrial ablation procedure that provides an effective and minimally invasive outpatient alternative to hysterectomy, while avoiding the potential side effects and long-term risks of hormone therapy. The NovaSure System delivers precisely measured electrical energy via a slender, handheld wand to remove the endometrial lining. This quick, simple procedure requires no incisions. It can be performed in an office or outpatient setting, and generally takes less than 5 minutes, significantly less time than any other endometrial ablation procedure. NovaSure Endometrial Ablation offers a treatment that is quick, simple, safe, and requires no endometrial pre-treatment. Before other endometrial ablation procedures, women often need to take a pre-treatment drug such as Lupron Depot® for as long as 2 months to thin the lining of the uterus. NovaSure Endometrial Ablation eliminates the cost, potential side effects, and delays in treatment commonly associated with endometrial pretreatment. NovaSure Endometrial Ablation is also more convenient because it can be performed at any time during your cycle, even during your period. Most women see a significant reduction in their level of menstrual bleeding. In a randomized, controlled clinical study using the NovaSure System, a majority of patients returning for follow-up at 12 months had their bleeding reduced to light or moderate periods, and many reported that their bleeding had stopped completely. Many women may also experience the added benefits of a significant reduction in painful menstruation (dysmenorrhea), as well as a meaningful reduction in PMS symptoms. Premenopausal women with heavy menstrual bleeding who have completed childbearing may be candidates for NovaSure Endometrial Ablation. Your physician may perform diagnostic tests to rule out other abnormal uterine conditions, and your Pap test and biopsy must be normal. Many doctors choose for their patients to be awake during the procedure, as the NovaSure procedure does not require general anesthesia. If your physician performs the procedure with a local anesthetic injected in and around the cervix, he or she may administer an intravenous sedative to make you more comfortable during the procedure. While some women may feel slight cramping, others may not experience any discomfort at all. As with any endometrial ablation method, you may experience some post-operative uterine cramping and discomfort shortly after the procedure. This can generally be treated with mild pain medication such as ibuprofen (e.g., Advil® or Motrin®). Some patients may experience nausea and vomiting as a result of anesthesia. Watery and/or bloody discharge is also common for several weeks after any endometrial ablation. Excellent results have led to very high satisfaction rates among patients treated with the NovaSure System. According to results of a patient satisfaction survey, over 92% of patients treated with the NovaSure System were satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure 12 months after treatment, and 95% indicated that they would recommend NovaSure Endometrial Ablation to a friend. For any endometrial ablation procedure, commonly reported post-operative events include the following: Cramping/pelvic pain. Post-treatment cramping can range from mild to severe. This cramping will typically last a few hours and rarely continues beyond the first day following the procedure. Nausea and vomiting have been reported in patients immediately following the procedure and can be managed with medication. Vaginal discharge. Vaginal bleeding/spotting. As with all endometrial ablation procedures, serious injury or death can occur. The following adverse effects could occur or have been reported in association with the use of the NovaSure® system: Thermal injury to adjacent tissue. Perforation of the uterine wall. Post-ablation tubal sterilization syndrome. Air or gas embolism. Complications with pregnancy (Note: Pregnancy following endometrial ablation is very dangerous for both the mother and the fetus). Infection or sepsis. Complications leading to serious injury or death. It is important to know that although the chances for pregnancy are reduced following an endometrial ablation procedure, it is still possible to become pregnant. However, pregnancy following endometrial ablation is very dangerous for both the mother and the fetus. You should not have an endometrial ablation if you think you want to have a baby in the future. After an endometrial ablation, you should use some form of birth control. Please discuss these issues with your physician."

      The important thing to consider is what your end goal is - i.e., do you want the lining of your uterus ablated so that you don't have any more heavy period? Do you want an oopherectomy, which brings its own host of risks and problems? Is you "only" issue one or two cysts and heavy bleeding from time to time? There are different options to consider, based on your needs, medical situation and your desired outcome. If you feel your doctor is being too aggressive with his or her suggested treatment, consider a second opinion. If you are comfortable with the idea of endometrial ablation, know that NovaSure® has received high marks in the clinical studies and throughout the professional data available from the company. Only you can decide for sure what you want; just make sure you take your time to decide what you're really comfortable with - you can always reschedule your procedure...that's your right as a patient. Good luck.

  27. QUESTION:
    after reading certain articles on menopause im certain im premenopausal but my docs say im not wot can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      you say you're "certain" you are premenopausal (or perimenopausal)...it's usualy very defined with the types of symptoms you get. if you're approaching menopause you're likely: older than 51, have not had any ovarian activity the last 6 months, have symptoms such as hot flashes/nightsweats/irritability...and others

      if you're not sure, you can get an FSH test to see if your ovaries really are failing. and while you're at it, you can test your thyroid function too! i'd look into your personal symptoms a bit more...they might be caused by another problem. but if you're really sure that its menopause then you can go see another dr for a second opinion.

      but the big question is, why does it matter if the dr officially says you are premenopausal? it will hopefully not change the way you do things daily. if you're looking for treatment for menopause its all based on symptom management and prevention of osteoporosis. all women will eventually get menopause so...why worry?

  28. QUESTION:
    Can HRT cause skin ageing?
    I have noticed a difference in my body over the past couple of months and feel that my body now looks older than it should. I am on estrogen only, and have been now for about a year, due to having to have a hystorecomy because of a cancer scare. Have any other women noticed this while on estrogen and if so is there some way to solve this problem? For some reason I have not noticed a difference in my face, only on my body. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have had a hysterectomy, including the loss of ovaries, you are Estrogen Dominant.
      And now, you are pumping MORE estrogen into your already overloaded hormone system.

      In addition, synthetic estrogen is known to CAUSE cancer!!

      Get a saliva test done to evaluate your hormone levels. I'm willing to bet that you need progesterone. NATURAL progesterone.

      Estrogen Dominance & What Are The Symptoms

      Doctors have historically recommended, and prescribed, synthetic estrogens and progestins to treat the symptoms of menopause and PMS. This is largely because most of the information that the doctors receive about new treatments are from the pharmaceutical companies. And because a product that can be produced naturally can not be patented the pharmaceutical companies have to create a synthetic version with a slightly modified molecule in order to patent the product.

      This however has been shown to be extremely unhealthy for your body. A New England Journal of Medicine article in 1995 involving 121,700 women showed that the chance of developing breast cancer went up to 40 percent in women that used estrogens and progestins (synthetic progesterone) for more than five years. Estrogen dominance is a term coined by Dr. Lee. It describes a condition where a woman can have deficient, normal, or excessive estrogen but has little or no progesterone to balance its effects in the body. Evan a woman with low estrogen levels can have estrogen-dominance symptoms if she doesn’t have any progesterone.

      The symptoms and conditions associated with estrogen dominance are:
      ******Acceleration of the aging process******
      Allergy symptoms, including asthma, hives, rashes, sinus congestion
      Arthritis
      Autoimmune disorders such as lupus erythematosis and thyroiditis, and possible Sjogren’s disease
      Breast cancer
      Breast cysts
      Breast tenderness
      Candida
      Cervical dysplasia
      Chronic fatigue
      Cold hands and feet as a symptom of thyroid dysfunction
      Copper excess
      Decreased sex drive
      Depression with anxiety or agitation
      Dry eyes
      Early onset of menstruation
      Endometriosis
      Endometrial (uterine) cancer
      Fat gain, especially around the abdomen, hips, and thigh
      Fatigue
      Fibrocystic breasts
      Foggy thinking
      Gallbladder disease
      Hair loss
      High blood pressure
      Headaches
      Hot flashes
      Hypoglycemia
      Increased blood clotting (increasing risk of strokes)
      Infertility
      Irregular menstrual periods
      Irritability
      Insomnia
      Magnesium deficiency
      Memory loss
      Mood swings
      Osteoporosis
      Painful swollen breasts
      PMS
      Polcystic ovaries
      Premenopausal bone loss
      Prostate cancer
      Sluggish metabolism
      Skin: Rosacea, rashes, dermatitis
      Thyroid dysfunction mimicking hypothyroidism
      Uterine cancer
      Uterine fibroids
      Water retention, bloating
      Yeast infection
      Zinc deficiency
      The above information was taken from "What Your Doctor may not tell you about Premenopause" by John R. Lee, M.D.

      John R. Lee, M.D. is internationally acknowledged as a pioneer and expert in the study and use of the hormone progesterone, and on the subject of hormone replacement therapy for women. He used transdermal progesterone extensively in his clinical practice for nearly a decade, doing research which showed that it can reverse osteoporosis.

  29. QUESTION:
    Cervical cancer or ovarian cysts?
    hese are the symptoms I have:

    sweating
    a clear mucus discharge
    light/medium green mucus discharge
    light/dark brown discharge
    burning feeling all over
    tight pain in upper/lower hip
    burning feeling inside of hip
    stinging in hip and pelvic area
    air coming out
    stinky sweaty smell w/ discharge
    pain in pelvic upper leg and thighs
    pain where ovaries are
    pain in rectum area
    dont have a menstruation cycle every month
    stinging in hip bone
    sounds in pelvic rectum area (popping sounds)
    sting or burn feeling in lower back

    I thought that I have had cervical cancer since 2008. Now I think that I really do have it. Im starting to get all of the symptoms of cervical cancer. I am a teenager and I am not a sexually active person. In fact I have never had sex before. I have been depressed since I was a child and I still am. I do have my other problems with my body but I think that they might just be from being stressed all day everyday. Right now my whole reproductive system just feels like its been being eatin up by cancer for about 2 years..

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include: persistent indigestion, gas, nausea, unexplained weight loss or gain, changes in bowel or bladder habits, fatigue, pelvic, low back pain, abdominal heaviness, bloating, etc. Typically symptoms are relatively constant or persistent and gradually worsen.

      One of the most imortant risk factors for ovarian cancer is a family history of a first-degree relative with the disease. Ovarian cysts most commonly appear in premenopausal women (women in their child bearing years). Ovarian cysts may cause no symptoms at all and be found incidentally by a routine exam, or for example, by ultrasound. When symptoms arise they typically cause pelvic pain, abdominal heaviness, menstrual abnormalities, etc. etc. Regular examinations are done to evaluate the presence and or type of cyst, follicular, corpus luteum, etc. to assure no further treatment is warranted. If you are not having regular evaluations, taking into consideration that you already have a history of a gynecological cancer I would strongly suggest that you inquire about this with your physician.

      You can consult SurgeryPlanet, which is a global healthcare facilitator. They can suggest you the best doctors. For more information you can also visit http://www.surgeryplanet.com/oncology/

  30. QUESTION:
    Lower Abdominal Pains after Sex, Normal?
    i had sex with my bf for the second time yestersday. We used a condom and everything. Then maybe and hour or hour and a half later i had lower abdominal pains. it didnt hurt much then it started to hurt alittle more then it didnt hurt that much. the pains only lasted acouple hours. It dont really hurt anymore. Is there anything i should be worried about? im kinda freakin out

    • ANSWER:
      well ,you may have ovarian cysts,, Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain,, one symptom is Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides),,, and you may have it or not,, but it may,, or may not appear after having sex or even some sport exercises,Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended,,Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      do not worry at all ,, as you said it does not hurt anymore,,unless you have more different symptoms,, or the pain persists beyond two or three menstrual cycles,,, then check up is needed

  31. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts??????
    I went to the ER in August b/c I was having an early miscarriage. They did an ultrasound to confirm the miscarriage (which was a blighted ovum), and found I had a 21mm cyst on my right ovary (which made sense b/c I was having sharp shooting pains in my right side). They said it was small and functional and not to worry about it since there were no masses. Got my period in normal time and everything was back to normal (no pains). My second cycle post-miscarriage was really weird. When I ovulated it was late and I had severe bloating and cramping the evening I ovulated, then it went away, but for the 2 weeks before my period I had weird symptoms that made me think I was pregnant (breasts got huge, felt sick to my stomach, etc). And when I did get my period I felt a little throbbing on my right side for the 1st day or so. Then it went away. My 3rd post-miscarriage period started last night, and I have felt some little jabs in my right side, but they have gone away this morning. I should mention I've been to my OBGyn twice in the last 4 weeks as well as the ER (there was no pain but I was just worrying myself sick b/c I tend to obsess about this kind of stuff and I wanted to be seen asap) and had 3 pelvic exams and was told everything was completely normal and my ovaries felt totally normal and not to worry. But I can't help worrying... do you think the cyst they found on the ultrasound went away and these are all different cysts? Could I have had these all my life and never known? Some info on me that may help- I'm 29, have an 18-month-old son, weigh 130 pounds. Hubby and I will start trying for #2 in a few weeks so I just want to make sure everything is good to go!
    Thanks everyone- I really already know all the info that is out there on the internet about cysts- I really just want to hear personal stories from other women who have had them- thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts

      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      There are also types of other ovarian cysts you caould of been missed diagnoised with functional-more info here-
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

      Symptoms
      Some or all of the following symptoms may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:

      Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides), pelvis, vagina, lower back, or thighs; pain may be constant or intermittent -- this is the most common symptom
      Fullness, heaviness, pressure, swelling, or bloating in the abdomen
      Breast tenderness
      Pain during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period
      Irregular periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding or spotting
      Change in frequency or ease of urination (such as inability to fully empty the bladder), or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      Weight gain
      Nausea or vomiting
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Increased level of hair growth
      Increased facial hair or body hair

      Treatment
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. [citation needed]

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain.NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.
      a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.
      chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.
      urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.
      avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.
      in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

  32. QUESTION:
    Am I premenopausal already?
    I'm only 34...for the last several months I've been getting hot flashes occasionally, and a headache lasting about a day not long before my period starts. My cycles are also really irregular...one will be 28 days, the next 38, sometimes longer...been known to go 6-7 weeks.

    My mother is 58 and she has just gone through menopause--she's done with her periods now.

    Don't know if this means anything, but I have one child, born when I was 28.

    • ANSWER:
      I started with symptoms when I was 36, but it took nearly FOUR YEARS to find a doctor who would even listen to me...even though my mother started menopause when she was 37!

      If you're not using any sort of hormone treatment (BCP's for example) the doctor can perform a test called an FSH indicator. It will check the levels of hormones in your blood that make eggs mature in your ovaries. If it is at a lower "average" point, it could indicate that you've begun menopause (called Peri-menopause).

      You can also read more here:

      http://www.knowmenopause.com
      http://www.menocheck.com

  33. QUESTION:
    Menstrual gotten wrost?
    I bleed more heavy on the days of my menstrual.I bleed out big blood cogs.I can't go no where because I feel uncomfortable.I always stain my clothes.Now I have my menstrual twice a month.Can somebody please help me.

    • ANSWER:
      Honey you seriously need to go to the doctor, sounds to me like you might have Menorrhagia.
      Menorrhagia is the medical term for excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding or both. The condition is also known as hypermenorrhea.
      Although heavy menstrual bleeding is a common concern among premenopausal women, only a few women experience blood loss severe enough to be defined as menorrhagia. Treatments and self-care steps may help you...

      Here are some signs and symptoms of Menorrhagia/.............

      .Menstrual flow that soaks through one or more sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several consecutive hours
      .The need to use double sanitary protection to control your menstrual flow
      .The need to change sanitary protection during the night
      .Menstrual period that lasts longer than seven days
      .Menstrual flow that includes large blood clots
      .Heavy menstrual flow that interferes with your regular lifestyle
      .Constant pain in your lower abdomen during menstrual period.....

      As for the period twice a month you will really have to seek help from a doctor, that can be normal for some woman depending on your age, if your young and haven't had your period for that long then it can be normal it's just your bodies way of getting use to everything ect...

      Best thing would be to see a doctor good luck
      .Irregular menstrual periods
      .Tiredness, fatigue or shortness of breath (symptoms of anemia)

  34. QUESTION:
    why am i bloated so much?
    is this a sign u will becomeing on your period soon or not from a side veiw i look like i am pregnate but i havent had sex only useing a bottle can u get pregnate by this please write bk

    • ANSWER:
      Hormonal Bloating
      For premenopausal women, bloating is often related to the menstruation. During the last two weeks of the menstrual cycle, known as the luteal phase, women can retain water, which causes swelling in not only the abdomen, but also sometimes in the hands, feet and breasts.

      The rising levels of hormones also have a direct effect on the gastointenstinal tract. "This hormonal effect causes the GI tract not to empty as quickly and to produce gas," explains Dr. Grace Janik, director of Reproductive Endocrinology at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee.

      Because stool and gas are moving more slowly through the intestines, women often have constipation and bloating in the two weeks before their periods. When women get their periods, their hormone levels drop and they sometimes get diarrhea.

      Although it's less common, women can also have hormone-related bloating from changing, starting or stopping birth control pills, or from the contraceptive Depo-Provera. Bloating due to these contraceptives, however, usually subsides after about three months.

      Abdominal swelling may be a sign of early pregnancy, particularly in women who aren't using birth control. Older women who are taking hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes may also have discomfort from bloating.

      Dr. Linda Bradley, a gynecologist and director of hysteroscopic services at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, says that after taking a younger woman's medical history, she often suggests the patient keep a diary of her symptoms to help determine the cause(s). If it appears to be related to the menstrual cycle, she may prescribe a mild diuretic or birth control pills. Exercising, avoiding gas-producing foods and adding bulk fiber to the diet may also ease premenstrual bloating.

      Sometimes, Bradley says, women are not necessarily seeking treatment; many just want to know that the cause is nothing serious.

      Gynecological Obstruction
      If abdominal bloating is persistent rather then cyclical, it might be due to a mass such as an ovarian cyst or uterine fibroid. Women older than 50 need to be especially cautious and consult a doctor about any chronic bloating, because it could be a sign of an ovarian tumor. "Age makes a difference," Janik says. "An increase in abdominal size is much more concerning in women in the postmenopausal range."
      To determine whether a mass is present, gynecologists will usually perform a transvaginal ultrasound. This will allow them to see if there is a mass on the ovaries that is putting pressure on the bladder or bowel and causing abdominal swelling and tightness. Women with ovarian cancer may also have ascites, an accumulation of fluid around the abdomen that can cause bloating.

      Gastrointestinal Bloating
      Bloating that is not hormonal in nature is often due to a gastrointestinal problem. Dr. Lin Chang, an associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, says that the first step in figuring out the cause of abdominal bloating is taking a detailed history to determine whether it's associated with eating or drinking.

      Bloating can be caused by diet, particularly if someone who has a high salt intake or eats a lot of gas-producing foods, such as dark leafy vegetables or beans. Calcium supplements can also cause gas in some people. Doctors may recommend that people avoid these foods or products to see if they're the culprit.

      But the most common gastrointestinal cause of abdominal bloating, Chang says, is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a common condition characterized by abdominal discomfort and bloating, along with diarrhea and/or constipation.

      Women with IBS do not usually have more gas and bloating than other people, but instead are more sensitive to it. While IBS is difficult to treat, it may be helped by medications or even psychotherapy.

      Persistent bloating can also sometimes be a sign of a partial or complete intestinal blockage. There are many possible causes of these blockages, including scar tissue from prior surgeries, certain medications, abdominal infections and hernias. Additional symptoms of a partial or complete blockage are colicky abdominal pain, swelling, rumbling bowel sounds (borborygmi) and vomiting.

      When bloating is accompanied by gas and diarrhea, a food intolerance could be the culprit. For example, people might be sensitive to lactose, the sugar in milk, or fructose, the sugar in fruit. This can be handled by simply avoiding lactose or fructose. Women with lactose intolerance may also choose to treat milk products with the enzyme lactase.

      Bloating is very common in women, but if the problem is making you uncomfortable, especially if it's persistent, experts say that getting it checked out is worthwhile.

  35. QUESTION:
    what could happen if you have?????
    endometrial thickness?

    Can you still have babies?
    what does it do?
    i dont have cancer...
    My mom says it runs in the family. I just want to know whats going on bc everytime i look it up online it says somthing about cancer but my doc said i dont have it.

    BTW IM ONLY 18

    • ANSWER:
      INTRODUCTION — Endometrial cancer is a type of uterine cancer that involves the lining of the uterus (the endometrium). In the United States, it is the most common cancer of the female reproductive system. Fortunately, most women are diagnosed at an early stage (before the has spread beyond the uterus) and the disease can be cured with surgery alone. The five-year survival rate among women with for early stage endometrial cancer is over 90 percent.

      This topic review discusses the risk factors, symptoms, and diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the most common type of endometrial cancer, called endometrioid endometrial cancer. A separate topic is available that discusses the treatment of this disease. (See "Patient information: Endometrial cancer treatment").

      THE UTERUS — To understand how endometrial cancer develops, it is helpful to understand the structure of the uterus. The uterus is a pear-shaped organ located between the bladder and the rectum. The inside of the uterus has two layers. The thin inner layer is called the endometrium. The thick outer layer is composed of muscle and is called the myometrium (myo = muscle) (show figure 1).

      In women who menstruate, the endometrium thickens every month in preparation for pregnancy. If the woman does not become pregnant, the endometrial lining is shed during the menstrual period. After menopause, when menstrual periods stop, the lining normally stops growing and shedding. In women who have endometrial cancer, the uterine lining is abnormal and may grow into the myometrium and adjacent organs (show picture 1).

      RISK FACTORS — There are two main types of endometrial cancer: type I (also called endometrioid endometrial cancer) and type II (called papillary or serous endometrial cancer). Type I endometrial cancers occur 80 percent of the time while type II cancers occur in the remaining 20 percent of patients. Type II cancers tend to be more aggressive.

      The risk factors for type I are well known while type II risk factors are less clear. The risk factors for type I include the following:

      * Older age — Endometrial cancer is most common in postmenopausal women, with the mean age of diagnosis in the early 60s. However, it can develop in premenopausal women as well, particularly in women who are obese or have polycystic ovary syndrome. (See "Patient information: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)").

      * Obesity — Obesity is a major risk factor for endometrial cancer. Obese women have higher levels of estrogen in their body, which stimulates the growth of the uterine lining (the endometrium). Women who are morbidly obese are at a significantly increased lifetime risk of developing endometrial cancer.

      * Long-term estrogen exposure — Women who still have a uterus and who take estrogen replacement therapy alone (without a progestin) have a significant risk of endometrial cancer. Women who have a uterus and want to take hormone replacement therapy are advised to take estrogen plus progestin to reduce this risk. (See "Patient information: Menopausal hormone therapy").

      Other settings in which there might be long-term exposure to estrogen include:

      - Young age at the time of the first menstrual period
      - Older age at the time of the last menstrual period (menopause)
      - Never having given birth to a child

      * Tamoxifen use — Women who take tamoxifen to prevent or treat breast cancer have an increased risk of endometrial cancer. In most cases, the risks of taking tamoxifen to treat breast cancer are outweighed by the benefits. There is controversy about the risks and benefits of taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer. (See "Patient information: Tamoxifen and raloxifene for the prevention of breast cancer").

      * Family predisposition and genetics — Women with a strong family history of colon cancer are at increased risk of developing endometrial cancer if they have the gene for an inherited condition known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, also known as Lynch syndrome).

      SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS — The most common sign of endometrial cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding.

      * In a woman who is still having menstrual periods, abnormal bleeding is defined as bleeding between menstrual periods or excessive menstrual bleeding. (See "Patient information: Abnormal uterine bleeding").

      * In a postmenopausal woman, any vaginal bleeding is considered abnormal, even if it is only one drop of blood, and especially if the woman is not taking hormone replacement therapy. Women who take hormone replacement therapy may experience bleeding in the first few months of treatment, although any vaginal bleeding should be reported to a healthcare provider.

      DIAGNOSIS AND STAGING — Endometrial cancer is diagnosed by using a microscope to examine a sample of endometrial tissue. The tissue can be obtained with an office test (endometrial biopsy) or a day surgery procedure (hysteroscopy with dilation and curettage).

  36. QUESTION:
    i don't know what to do now!?
    I just found out i have a large cyst on my left ovary
    I'm very scared and terrified =(
    What is it? How do you get it? What am i going to be going through?
    Is it normal for it to stop your period (havn't had one since the end of April)
    Any information will help me out!!!
    Thank you so much!
    Is it also normal for it to make me tired, light headed, spotting couple weeks ago, little light brown discharge couple weeks ago, dizzy, nipples hurt, or nausea?

    • ANSWER:
      An Ovarian Cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or as large as a cantaloupe.
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign). In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.
      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts.

      Many women experience no symptoms when they have an ovarian cyst, especially if it is small. Certain cysts may grow large and cause the abdomen to swell. Depending on where the cyst is and its size, it can exert pressure on the bladder or bowel, cause abdominal discomfort, uncomfortable or painful sex and irregular periods. Sometimes complication such as intense pain, vomiting and heart palpitation can take place if the stem attached to the cyst is twisted causing a condition called torsion or if the cyst is ruptured.
      Ovarian cyst treatment often involved the use of prescription drugs that can affect the hormonal levels of the body. Contraceptive pills, anti-androgen drugs, fertility drugs, luteinising hormone-suppressing drugs, antibiotics or a combination of these drugs are normally used to treat these ovarian cysts. Surgery is the next available option but this form of treatment should be considered only as a last resort. If hysterectomy is recommended, please seek a second or third opinion before taking that option.

      Herbal remedies have proven to be effective in the treatment of ovarian cysts. It usually takes between two to six months for the treatment to be completely effective depending upon the size and number of ovarian cysts present. Herbs such as echinacea and milk thistle are known to effectively treat and control these ovarian cysts. Diet is also very important, as some foods can aggravate the condition, and some foods are very beneficial in controlling the recurrence of the ovarian cysts. Foods that help ease the discomfort and recurrence include plenty of raw fruits and vegetables (especially the dark green leafy vegetables), garlic, legumes, whole grains and other whole foods. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, red meats, eggs, white sugar, carbonated beverages and processed or refined foods.
      Supplements have also been found to be effective in the treatment and control of ovarian cysts. A good quality multivitamins and minerals will enhance the dietary changes your are making, working to balance the hormones, improve immunity, enhance liver function and protect against abnormal cell growth. A high daily dose of Vitamin C, zinc, B vitamins and a good antioxidant are known to be helpful in the treatment and control of the cysts.
      Life is too short to suffer needlessly with ovarian cysts. If you are finished for good with all the pain and discomfort of ovarian cysts and you want to avoid surgery, then this is the honest and effective Ovarian Cyst Treatment that you have been searching for!

      for further queries pls go to this link:http://www.bio-medicine.org/Medicine-Dictionary/ovarian_cysts/

  37. QUESTION:
    what is menopause ?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause
      The irreversible cessation of regular monthly uterine bleeding in the adult human female, marking the end of her ability to become pregnant. Menopause commonly occurs in the United States between the ages of 47 and 53. It probably occurs because the ovary runs out of eggs and the cyclic rise and fall of brain and ovarian hormones designed to prepare the uterus to receive and nourish pregnancy no longer occur.

      Menopause is one event in the climacteric, the period of time during which the reproductive machinery slows down and finally stops. The biochemical hallmark of this period is a reduction in estrogen production by the ovary. Some estrogen continues to be produced by the adrenal gland and the fatty tissues throughout the body, but this amount is very small compared with premenopausal levels. Estrogen has widespread effects on both genital and extragenital systems, and the withdrawal of estrogen accounts for many of the signs and symptoms attributed to menopause, although these are influenced by both hereditary and social factors. Many psychological problems have been attributed to estrogen deprivation, but well-documented proof of those relationships is lacking.

      While estrogen can reverse or halt many of the physical changes described, it will not prevent aging or restore reproductive ability. Treatment of menopausal symptoms should be undertaken on an individual basis, with careful discussion of the risks and benefits currently known. See also Estrogen; Menstruation.

  38. QUESTION:
    risks factors of myoma?

    • ANSWER:
      A: When it comes to myomas, neither size nor progression is a definitive indicator of cancer or for surgery. First, a little background information: Myomas, also called fibroids and leiomyomas, are benign (not cancerous) growths that commonly occur in the wall — the smooth muscle portion –– of the uterus. They are typically found in women who are still having periods (premenopausal women) and often will regress after menopause, when there is less estrogen circulating to stimulate them. Leiomyomas may cause no symptoms, in which case they are found incidentally when a woman has a sonogram for some other reason or they are felt on physical examination, or they may cause heavy periods or irregular bleeding, pelvic pain or pressure, and recurrent urinary tract infections.
      Most studies suggest that benign leiomyomas do not turn into cancer. Benign leiomyomas can be present in the same uterus that has a leiomyosarcoma (a true cancer of the smooth muscle tissue of the uterus), but the two types most likely grew from separate cells rather than some of the benign leiomyoma cells becoming malignant.

      One could ask your question this way: Of all the women whose leiomyomas are bothersome enough or large enough that they elect to have the uterus removed (hysterectomy), what percentage are found to actually have had a leiomyosarcoma (cancer) instead of just a benign leiomyoma? The answer is about 1 to 2 in 1,000. This is true even for women who have a hysterectomy because of a "rapidly growing" fibroid. These numbers are usually quite reassuring to women with leiomyomas who are not having any physical symptoms.

      The specifics of how you and your doctor deal with your myoma depend on such things as whether you wish to preserve your fertility and whether you have any symptoms or significant bleeding. You can talk to your doctor about these issues. The answers will help you decide among such choices as observation of the fibroid for now, treatments to change your hormone levels, surgery to try to remove just the fibroid (myomectomy), or surgery to remove the uterus (hysterectomy).

  39. QUESTION:
    Do most women recovery from Menopause and can I be angry at someone in Menopause?
    My uncle was recently talking about a friend of his whose mother hit menopause around age 45-50 and became a bitter and mean person until about age 60 and then was sweet and likeable again as she had been before age 45. My father used to joke that there is a time in women's lives where they go through an emotional crisis and as I would phrase it as a kid "women hit 45 and they snap". I know as an adult that its not their choice and not as simple as "just snap". However my mother is in her 50's and very unhappy and while always nice to me she is very bitter at loved ones of mine in the extended family. Some of this my mother has always been guilty of but in recent years the bitterness and gossip has increased. She has always been divisive but she had overcome some of that in her 40's and now is back to a bitter divisive period. She has an in-law, a brother, a daughter-in-law, and a cousin's family who are all not speaking to her her right now. While its not all her fault my mother always increases and escalates what would otherwise be a small argument. She had kids young so though I am 28 she is only 52. My question is does this usually pass when she hits about 60 other then the divisive part that she always has had. Also, do I have a right to be angry at her for this and try and work with her to become nicer or if it is Menopause is it a mental health crisis she has no control over like a Bipolar Person would have. I have anxiety issues and so I would feel bad being mad at my mother if it is something outside her control. She even got where she was mistreating my father terribly because of 1 financial mistake he made.

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some facts about menopause, so you can get a better idea of what these women go through and make a decision.

      Menopause is when there is permanent cessation of the ovarian functions which affects women in their late 40s and early 50s. It signals the end of the fertile phase of a woman's life. The change from being fertile to non-fertile brings about numerous hormonal changes. However, these changes are often not sudden but are spread over a number of years. Normally, no medical intervention is required but medical help may be required to take care of the accompanying signs and the effects.

      What are the Symptoms of Menopause Onset?

      The period when the initial signs of menopause begin manifesting is called perimenopause. The duration is different for different women. However, most of the symptoms of menopause last for about 2 to 5 years after onset and improve on their own. In some cases, the transition can be smooth but in others, a woman can face a lot of physical as well as psychological changes and discomforts.

      The most common symptom of approaching menopause is irregular menstrual cycle. This is caused due to changes in the reproductive hormones. If the woman has had a regular menstrual cycle, she may notice that the menstrual cycle have now become longer or shorter. In some cases, the menstruation can occur every 2 to 3 weeks and in some cases, it may not happen for 6 to 8 weeks at a length as well. In some cases, the menstrual period symptoms may be seen but the woman may not menstruate. The amount of blood loss during menstruation may also change. It can either become scant or heavy depending upon the changes which have come about in the body.

      After irregular menstrual cycles, hot flashes are a symptom which can help to recognize the onset of menopause. This is one of the symptoms for which most women seek treatment. A hot flash is a sudden sensation of warmth or intense heat which spreads to different parts of the body, especially, the face, head and chest. The warmth is followed by flushing and sweating, after which, the woman may experience chills. This condition may be experienced in the first two years after the onset of menopause. Hot flashes lessen over a period of time. Some women may experience hot flashes for many years after menopause has set in as well.

      The lining tissues of the vagina become thinner, drier and less elastic which give rise to vaginal changes. This is caused due to fall in the estrogen level. The vaginal symptoms also include vaginal itching, dryness, irritation and/or pain during sexual intercourse. The chances of vaginal infections increase due to the vaginal changes. Along with vaginal changes, there are also urinary tract changes. For instance, the vaginal tissues and the lining of the urethra also become drier, less elastic and thinner due to a drop in the estrogen levels. This can also cause urinary tract infection. The woman may want to urinate more often, there can be urinary incontinence which can cause leakage of urine while coughing, sneezing, laughing, etc.

      There are some emotional changes which are also brought about. Mood swings are also a premenopausal symptom. The woman may get depressed easily, may be irritable, may become anxious and nervous as a result of hormonal changes which are coming about in the body. Poor sleep and fatigue are perimenopause symptoms which often aggravate the condition. Any additional stress will do more harm to the existing condition.

      The most prominent change which is among the symptoms of menopause onset is weight gain. With age, there is slowing of the metabolism of the body. However, the intake of food may not reduce as expected which leads to increase in weight. Water retention can also lead to weight gain. There can be thinning of hair and/or hair loss which is also among the 34 menopause symptoms.

      Among the other pre menopause symptoms is difficulty in concentration, disorientation and confusion. There can also be memory lapses, feeling of doom, etc. The woman can be apprehensive all the time. Depression can hit the woman as well.

      When the symptoms of menopause onset are seen, it is important to understand that this is a normal