Foods For Menopause

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Suggestions for a healthy diet for menopause including vitamins?
    Suggestions for a diet plan for menopause would be so helpful also. Would like to hear from women that have made theirselves feel better with natural progesterone. (What Type) of natural herbs and foods for menopause that you have used?

    • ANSWER:
      I used natural progesterone in the beginning of my pre-menopause. It eliminated my migraines, stabilized my moods and helped me sleep better. It is known for helping with hot flashes, but I didn't have hot flashes until later, and it hasn't helped me with those.

      I've also used several herbs to help with hot flashes, sleep and stress. Motherwort is good for all three. I've also taken vervain, scullcap and Siberian ginseng, among others.

      The diet that is working best for me is from "The Carbohydrate Addict's Life Span Program", by Drs Richard and Rachael Heller. It's the only program I have found that I can lose weight with, mostly because it minimizes cravings and hunger. It also works better with my digestion, which has gone crazy since entering pre-menopause.

      I am eating more vegetables and less grains and sweets, because I feel better eating this way. For more info on diet (and herbs and progesterone cream), you can visit http://www.natural-approaches-to-menopause.com/menopause-diets.html

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the things you have exprienced during menopause?
    I am looking for personal experiences with Menopause. The reason is the websites can give you a clinical explanation but experience is always better than what can be read in a book. Please if you are willing, share your personal experiences with menopause with me. I think mine may have begun. Yikes!

    • ANSWER:
      I didn't have hot flushes during the day, but woke up sweating during the night. I also suffered from depressions, broke out into tears for no reasons until I decided to to hat a grip of the situation.
      I kept a journal with my thoughts, changed the way I ate and added a lot of soy to my diet and generally foods that are rich in phytoestrogens, like beans, legumes, seaweed, yams, apples, potatoes, and carrots.
      To fight my depressions I took a yoga class and also danced a lot whenever things went rough. ;)
      Eventually things calmed down and looking back I think it was not so bad after all.
      I didn't gain weight so far (its five years now) and feel as attractive and as alive and young as before. All the best!

  3. QUESTION:
    What are foods, bath chemicals, or anything else that cause overflow incontinence or make it worse?
    What are foods, bath chemicals, or anything else that cause overflow incontinence or make it worse?
    Basically, I'm only 23 so I'd assume it not one of the scaryer causes.

    • ANSWER:
      are you sure it is not stress incontinence
      Stress incontinence occurs during physical activity; urine leaks out of the body when the stomach muscles contract (for example, when sneezing, laughing, or even standing up from a seated position). Stress incontinence is most commonly caused when the urethra (the tube from the bladder to the outside of the body) is hypermobile because of problems with the muscles of the pelvis. A less common cause of stress incontinence is a muscle defect in the urethra known as intrinsic sphincter deficiency. The sphincter is a muscle that closes off the urethra and prevents urine from leaving the bladder and passing through the urethra to the outside of the body. If this muscle is damaged or deficient, urine can leak out of the bladder. Obviously, some people may have both.

      Stress incontinence is the most common type of bladder control problem in younger and middle-aged women. In some cases, it is related to childbirth. It may also begin around the time of menopause. Stress incontinence affects 15-60% of women and can affect young and older people. It is especially common in young female athletes who have never given birth, and it occurs while they are participating in sports.

  4. QUESTION:
    What foods can help you lose weight during menopause?
    I am 50 years old and do not eat fried foods or any fattening foods yet I cannot seem to lose weight. I lost 50 pounds and am now stuck. I still need to lose about that much more. What are the best foods to help lose weight and what should I avoid? I have lupus and cannot do strenous exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      Check out webMD. Lots of research has been done into the metabolism boosting qualities in green tea. Also soy products, like tofu, soy milk, etc. are known to soothe the less pleasant effects of menopause.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is good fo women after menopause: receive estrogen or eating fruits and veggies rich in phytoestrogen?
    Also can foods rich in phytoestrogen inhibit those few estrogen naturally produced by the body?

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend bio identical estrogen. This naturally occurs in the body and therefore is the logical solution. I use it myself.

  6. QUESTION:
    How can I take off my post-menopause weight gain?
    I've been dieting my whole life and know most of the traditional diet tips. My eating habits are not always the greatest - I nosh "healthy" foods between meals (boredom, emotions) in addition to 3 low fat low carb meals. I count calories and do 1200 on a good day, 1600 on an off day. I exercise fairly regularly 3x weekly walking 1 hour, 2x Pilates and 1x exercise class with weights. I feel good but haven't been able to take off the middle age "tires". Last year I managed to take off 10 pounds, but seem to have put them back on again. I feel discouraged and don't like the way I loook in clothes now. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Try to eat 100 less calories per day. and increase your excercise from 3 times to four times a week. You will see result in couple of months
      best

  7. QUESTION:
    How can I take off my post-menopause weight gain?
    I've been dieting my whole life and know most of the traditional diet tips. My eating habits are not always the greatest - I nosh "healthy" foods between meals (boredom, emotions) in addition to 3 low fat low carb meals. I count calories and do 1200 on a good day, 1600 on an off day. I exercise fairly regularly 3x weekly walking 1 hour, 2x Pilates and 1x exercise class with weights. I feel good but haven't been able to take off the middle age "tires". Last year I managed to take off 10 pounds, but seem to have put them back on again. I feel discouraged and don't like the way I loook in clothes now. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      You have to up your cardio.
      Walking is not great effort for humans.
      Try jogging instead.
      Good Luck

  8. QUESTION:
    How can I take off my post-menopause weight gain?
    I've been dieting my whole life and know most of the traditional diet tips. My eating habits are not always the greatest - I nosh "healthy" foods between meals (boredom, emotions) in addition to 3 low fat low carb meals. I count calories and do 1200 on a good day, 1600 on an off day. I exercise fairly regularly 3x weekly walking 1 hour, 2x Pilates and 1x exercise class with weights. I feel good but haven't been able to take off the middle age "tires". Last year I managed to take off 10 pounds, but seem to have put them back on again. I feel discouraged and don't like the way I loook in clothes now. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Given what you have said above, more aerobic activity would be very beneficial for you. The walking, pilates, and weight classes are excellent, but consider more activities where you get your heart rate a lot higher for sustained periods of time would use a lot more energy.

      Unfortunately, your metabolism has slowed down a bit (so you don't use up much energy at rest, like you use to). You are already eating fairly well, thus the only option is increasing energy use - which, unfortunately, means aerobic activity...

      Consider taking some water aerobic classes! It works great!

      Hope this helps,
      yachadhoo

  9. QUESTION:
    Help my wife is going through menopause and feels really bad about it?
    She just found out last week that she is going through menopause. she feels really bad about it because she feels extremely old now she's only 46. she has been crying all day. she keeps telling me that she is getting gray hair, she is getting old and that i won't love her anymore. all of a sudden she wants to have a baby i don't know what is up with that. she won't come out of the room, she won't put any make up on and she doesn't want to talk to anyone. what do i do?

    • ANSWER:
      =[
      I would like to tell you that this is completly normal for a woman to be going through during menopause...it's as if ALL of her emotions during her menstrual cycle's are comming in a combining into ONE HUGE EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS, your wife is having normal feelings though, most woman if not ALL woman go through this at this time.

      It will pass believe it or not, just give her some time what you can do is help her understand that she is still the woman that you love, some i suggest buying so roses for her, making her favorite food, asking about her day, saying that she is beautiful every morning and every night, say that you love her constantly.....

      EDIT:
      Also make her understand that she is NOT less of a woman because of this, make her feel like a strong woman, beautiful, and wonderful woman. Take care of her but step back at the same time, call her sexy, spice up your sex life, make her feel at her best, because woman at this time believe that their "life is over" because they are old and there is nothing left to do now but wait and die. Show her to enjoy life! =]

      You are the hubby and you have a job to do =] Make your wife the queen of the world, show her she is the only one that matters, good luck! it won't last forever, just be there for her, it is a LOT of work and it may not be fair, but like I said it won't last forever just make her feel special it will mean so much to her.....good luck and it's wonderful that you care so much about her, you must love her so much.

  10. QUESTION:
    What are some foods, herbs, and etc that help your five senses?
    I have heard that there's some foods that helps the eyesight and I want to know what they are. I also want to know if there's a food or herb out there that helps your hearing. I don't want to grow old and have a ringing in my ear like my mom :( I don't really care so much if my touch, smell, and taste get better pretty much, but if they're some foods out there to help them can you write them down.

    • ANSWER:
      Well....

      The ringing in ears is called 'Tinnitus.' Without getting into its complicated details I can claim that the condition is very much 100% curable. However, homeopathy does not provide a single, standard medicine for an ailment to every individual. Every case is unique. And, therefore the medicine is person specific. Don't be anxious about the condition. In most cases, it is quite a harmless accompaniment throughout life unless there is an underlying heart problem.

      For your eyes I suggest you (1) Consume a glass of tomato juice, if possible everyday. Else, make tomatoes a regular part of your diet as salad. Carrots and oranges also serve the same purpose; (2) Eat a bowl of fresh papaya slices as first meal in morning; (3) Ensure a diet full of dark green leafy vegetables: be it juiced or raw, if possible. As a female your requirement for iron and folic acid will be looked after by these veggies. Also, try to make soya, in whatever form, as part of your diet - It is essential for your bones in later adulthood when chances of osteoporosis are immense in the female body after menopause; (4) Take regular aerobic exercise 20-35 min a day 3-5 times a week preferably early in the morning. Your ideal weight should be as per your height and age, and not as per some model's body! Such a routine will ensure that your senses remain sharp and young, and your immune system is strong and fighting fit. Sweet Lime as a fruit (avoid juice) aids in development of healthy immunity, and as roughage enables a clean inner environment for the body.

      For overall good health you must also ensure right company - presence of right people in your life. No need to rush into a relationship just to have one. Pain as result of being in a painful relationship affects senses in a detrimental way in more ways than you can possibly imagine.

      I wish you peace and happiness. Bye.

  11. QUESTION:
    How long does thed menopause last for?
    I haven't had a period for 18 months so does thois mean the menopause is over? I haven't had any symptoms either. I do feel quite depressed does this have anything to do with my hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      The person who answered 'forever' is actually right! Menopause means when you have had your last period, which you can only know retrospectively! I believe that you have to have had no period for 2 years if you are under 50, and no period for 1 year if you are over 50, before you can safely abandon contraception. However, unless in a monogamous relationship you would still need condoms to protect against std's.

      You may well now be menopausal, or you could still be in the peri-menopause. If you feel depressed, what have you done about it? Ideas:

      See the doctor for a chat, and get your blood tested.
      Look at other areas of your life to see if the depression comes from some other aspect of your life.
      Look to your diet, and exercise more.
      Go online and join other menopausal women in forums to get support.
      Go to the Health Food Shop and see if any supplements might be beneficial.

      I hope some of this helps. I am 49 and get depressed too sometimes, but life goes on and you must do what you can to make it the best you can.

      Good luck,

      Faith x

  12. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to like moisturize skin by eating certain foods, or taking certain supplements?
    For example, i heard that taking fish oil daily can increase your skins moisture. I heard the same about green tea.

    Is this true? For fish oil or for any other type of food? Or even supplements?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I believe so though the weather does play a role here, as does genetics, having certain skin disorders and other environmental factors....e.g smoking [which is very bad for skin health].

      Certainly a deficiency in any one nutrient could manifest itself in terms of dry skin...particularly a deficiency of any essential fatty acids. Most diets are not lacking in essential omega 6 fatty acids. Most diets are lacking in essential omega 3 fatty acids. Take fish oil daily as a source of these and vitamin E [daily or every other day...some of it is stored if not used up] because vitamin E helps preserve all fatty acids in the body by helping to prevent their oxidation. It has this effect on any other fat-like molecules, including the sex hormones, too.

      And the sex hormones also play a role in skin health. In the menopause in particular, when oestrogen and progesterone are lacking, skin may often be much drier....hence one of the benefits of HRT is towards healthier and more supple skin.

      Eat macadamia nuts if you can find these for a rare source of omega 7. The latter has an unusual role in promoting healthy secretions and moisturising the skin. Another source is sea buckthorn oil.

      Use extra virgin olive oil in your diet as a source of omega 9 fatty acids. These also play a role in skin health, as well as health of the heart and other organs.

      Always make sure you are well hydrated.....drink plenty of filtered water or herbal tea. This helps to keep the skin moist and supple. Moisturise well in cold weather. Cover up in very sunny weather. Stay away from pollutants such as cigarette smoke and alcohol....both dehydrate the skin. Green tea has potent antioxidants that may give benefit to the skin both from drinking it or using it as a skin toner. But there are many other herbs, fruits and vegetables that have skin and health benefitting antioxidants. Look for a list with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity [ORAC] values or scale.

      Here is one:
      http://optimalhealth.cia.com.au/OracLevels.htm

      Pomegranates are very good this time of year.....try to munch the seeds too as there are they are rich in antioxidants too.

      Hope that helps.
      Best wishes.

  13. QUESTION:
    Best things for a girl to eat and drink whilst on a menopause?
    I'm 15 and my period pains are very very bad, what foods can I eat that might calm me down?

    • ANSWER:
      it is not the age of menopause .as you wanted to know about the diet so please read it

      Menopause brings certain changes in a woman’s body. This affects a woman directly. So it is wise to be healthy. There are some rules to be healthy. Women should follow those rules and enjoy their lives.

      Women should eat plenty of vegetables and fresh foods every single day. Brightly colored varieties should be chosen. Fruit juice is also helpful to control diet. These foods carry high level of nutrients. Choosing carrots, snack on apples, salad leaves to sandwiches, dip strips of fresh sliced pepper into hummus for healthy snack is a nice thing. If anyone likes simple and sustaining soup, she can prepare it from fresh vegetable and fruits. Many people consider canned and frozen fruits as harmful for menopausal period. But this idea is totally wrong. Women can eat them. But canned vegetables with added sugar and of course salty foods are harmful.

      During menopausal period, women should eat regularly. They can take small meals but they must not skip a meal. When a woman misses a meal, her body assumes that it is in danger of starvation. As a result body slows down metabolism and stores fat. On the other hand eating regularly ensures proper energy all the time.

      Avoiding a large amount of carbohydrate blesses them a lot. We find high amount of carbohydrates in cakes, breads, biscuits, cookies, pastry, ice cream, sweets, alcohol etc. High amount of carbohydrates increase blood sugar which creates imbalance in body.

      It is not important to count calorie during this period. They only need to concentrate on smaller meals. They should eat more frequently. This is enough of an approach for them to be strong. There is an advantage that if they eat unhealthy food, it will not create major problem. So eating smaller amount is enough for them.

      Choosing unrefined wholegrain foods like whole meal bread or whole-wheat pasta are allowed. But they should avoid white and refined varieties of these foods.

      Another way to become healthy is that they should choose high quality, lean protein while eating foods. Nutritional experts suggest for these types of foods. Thus they can get 40% of protein from these foods. Many foods contain these proteins such as beans, pulses, tofu, soya beans etc. It is notable that they must be able to digest them. Adding them in every meal will help them a lot.

      Many people think that eating fat is harmful for women who are passing menopausal periods. Actually this idea is not true. They can eat fat healthily, that means fat should be very minimal amount in foods. Fat increases weight. They can eat pumpkin, oily fish, sunflower seeds, and nuts. But cakes, cookies, snakes are not allowed.

      A routine with an eating plan is a very important issue. They should include the following rules while eating and set to their daily routine. Maintaining those rules is not difficult rather easy and useful. They must do physical exercises daily. Thus physical exercise and useful foods will be a blessing for them. Thus they will be able to reduce some weight.

      you should read all the articles at http://menopauseandweight.com/

  14. QUESTION:
    How can a magnet worn on your underwear help to reduce menopausal symptoms?
    I have saw a magnet being advertised that claims to help reduce the symptoms of the menopause, it is to be worn on the underwear. Do you know how this works? And if so how?

    • ANSWER:
      The way it works is to put food on the table of the retailer. Commonsense should tell you it's total bullshit.

  15. QUESTION:
    Any good ways to boost metabolism for a middle age female?
    I am beginning menopause and having a terrible time losing weight, it's coming off a pound a week but GAWD I'm working for that! Has anyone had any success with a metabolism accelerator actually working? Not looking for a pill to take, more along natural lines of diet or herbal supplements. Thanks!

    (I asked this yesterday but only got a few answers, was hoping some fitness people are on today that could help me, appreciate all the advice!)

    • ANSWER:
      While exercise and eating 5-6 times a day will help in not only boosting you metabolism and mitigating insulin secretion,drinking water has been proven to be helpful as well.
      Despite the fact that most diets call for drinking at least eight, 8-ounce glasses of water a day, few studies have been done to determine if the practice actually speeds weight loss. In an effort to answer this question, Michael Boschmann, MD, and colleagues from Berlin's Franz-Volhard Clinical Research Center tracked energy expenditures among seven men and seven women who were healthy and not overweight.

      After drinking approximately 17 ounces of water, the subjects' metabolic rates -- or the rate at which calories are burned -- increased by 30% for both men and women. The increases occurred within 10 minutes of water consumption and reached a maximum after about 30 to 40 minutes.

      The study also showed that the increase in metabolic rate differed in men and women. In men, burning more fat fueled the increase in metabolism, whereas in women, an increased breakdown of carbohydrates caused the increase in metabolism seen.

      The researchers estimate that over the course of a year, a person who increases his water consumption by 1.5 liters a day would burn an extra 17,400 calories, for a weight loss of approximately five pounds. They note that up to 40% of the increase in calorie burning is caused by the body's attempt to heat the ingested water. The findings are reported in the December issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
      You must maintain a healthy lower calorie diet.Eat less carbohydrates and more whole foods and protein.Protein is helpful because it's the highest thermic food.

      Going for a walk in the evening can be helpful but weight training is one of the best exercises you can do to lose weight.

      One of the ways this works is by stimulating new muscle growth thus metabolizing more calories even at rest(about 50 cal per pound of muscle).
      The fact of the matter is you MUST just stick with it.Following some of the guidelines here will help.
      It is also unnecessary to drink 8 8 ounce glasses of water per day.

      Calculate you BMR and consume less calories than you burn.

      Consider some low carb protein bars.Stay away from granola and those type snacks.
      This will dispel that stupid cabbage nonsense among other things.This is excerpted from a Yahoo! Health e mail.
      The following diet myths come up over and over again at my nutrition center. My next two blog entries will help set the record straight. Hope you find this helpful!

      If you eat late at night, the food turns straight into fat.

      Not true.If your overall calories are appropriate for weight loss, you certainly can eat something after dinner. Late night calories will ultimately get used the next day (and even while you sleep).

      However, for the sake of energy, it is always better to eat your calories during the day when your body needs the fuel. Plus, eating consistently throughout the day will stabilize blood sugar levels -- so you’ll feel energized and experience fewer cravings. If you are going to snack after dinner, I suggest choosing something 250 calories or less.

      Fresh fruits and vegetables are more nutritious than frozen.

      Not necessarily. Frozen can be a great produce option (just avoid varieties with added salt, sugar, and sauce). Frozen foods are picked in the peak of ripeness, then frozen. You can eat them as you need them -- and most of the nutrients are locked in. On the other hand, fresh fruit and vegetables are typically harvested before they ripen, and can have nutrient variability. Also, the longer fresh produce sits around in your fridge, the less nutrients it will contain.

      Bottom line: Buy both fresh and frozen and eat as much as you can.

      Cravings are your body's way of telling you it needs something.

      This has never been proven. You normally crave what you like to eat (or smell or see someone else eating). Also, hormonal changes are sometimes responsible for food cravings. Ice cream and pickles anyone?

      Any type of water is always better than soda.

      No. There are a few caloric waters with sexy marketing ploys. In fact, some brands have quite a bit of sugar. Always check labels.

      Certain foods, like grapefruit, celery, or cabbage soup can burn fat and make you lose weight.

      These are anecdotal stories that have no scientific back up. It’s true these foods are low in calories, but they do NOT actually burn fat

      The combination of caffeine and aspirin before a work out will help to mobilize fat into your blood stream for use as fuel.Most herbal products with the exeption of ephedra do nothing for your metabolism.Ephedra has been banned by the FDA once again.
      Things like guarana and gotu kola only speed metabolism because of the caffeine they contain.Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) may help people above the age of 35 to regulate their endocrine system

  16. QUESTION:
    what foods have lots of hormones in them?
    cus hormones are what make you go through puberty.right,so i want to know what foods/drinks have lots of hormones in them.apart from milk.

    • ANSWER:
      Well, hormones naturally develop in our systems. However, in a lot of industrialized grown and produced foods they are full of steroids and growth hormones so that they can produce more in less amount of time. More often than not when we consume much of these products over time we may begin to saturate our systems w/ them.

      One of the things that scientists and doctors are attributing to the sky rocketing increase of "precocious puberty" is the amount of these substances being put in our foods. More often than not it's in some of the cheaper products as well. Also, girls who have diets high in milk and red meat will grow their breasts much earlier and menstruate before girls who eat lesser quantities or raised vegetarian.

      EDIT: It is true that girls who develop faster between 10-13 are at a greater risk of breast cancer and early menopause.

  17. QUESTION:
    What nutrients can I take to restore vaginal lubrication after age 60?
    Do not talk about lube tubes. I already know about them. I want nutrient herbs or supplements or foods I can take orally to restore natural vaginal secretions and prevent dryness.

    • ANSWER:
      sorry, but a dry muffin is part of post menopause. nothing you can do but use some extra lube.

      It's just simply your body's way of saying childbearing and mating are over.

  18. QUESTION:
    What can you tell me about the components of soybeans called isoflavones?
    On a molecular level, I've read that they're similar to the female sex hormone estrogen, so similar that they can bind to estrogen receptors in the body. I understand research is continuing, but I've developed a thyroid problem, yet I'm approaching the age of menopause, so I can't determine whether I should be limiting soy in my diet or boosting it.

    • ANSWER:
      From the research I've found on the web, it appears that studies have shown soybean products to be a problem ONLY in humans who were iodine deficient.

      Iodized salt is the primary food source of iodine, however Iodine is also widely available in seafood; and the vegetable Kelp.

      A deficiency in iodine alone can cause thyroid problems. This is a particularly interesting article.
      http://www.qfac.com/articles/august/iodine.html

      There seems to be a lot of information on the link between iodine, thyroid, menopause and soy. If you google all 4 together you will have plenty of information available to browse through.

      I'm sure your doctor will be able to advise you further.

      Why do people give you a thumbs down for a well-answered question?

  19. QUESTION:
    what supplement should i take during menopause?
    i want a natural approach, what has worked best for you? plus what foods should i eat and what foods should avoid.

    • ANSWER:
      My friend had great results with all-natural Menopause Balance Complex. This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. Phytoestrogens are also being currently studied for heart, bone, and breast health.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors, or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions or the website.

  20. QUESTION:
    Why did my wife have a bypass operation 12 months and I am due next week?
    We never eat fatty foods, very little red meat.No pork or mutton
    Always buy low fat foods, skinless chicken and skinless fish.
    Never crustaceans or snails.
    But our arteries still got themselves blocked.

    • ANSWER:
      You have got coronary artery disease. Risk factors for coronary artery disease include:
      * Age. Simply getting older increases your risk of damaged and narrowed arteries.
      * Sex. Men are generally at greater risk of coronary artery disease. However, the risk for women increases after menopause.
      * Family history. A family history of heart disease is associated with a higher risk of coronary artery disease, especially if a close relative developed heart disease at an early age. Your risk is highest if your father or a brother was diagnosed with heart disease before age 55, or your mother or a sister developed it before age 65.
      * Smoking. Nicotine constricts your blood vessels, and carbon monoxide can damage their inner lining, making them more susceptible to atherosclerosis. The incidence of heart attack in women who smoke at least 20 cigarettes a day is six times that of women who've never smoked. For men who smoke, the incidence is triple that of nonsmokers.
      * High blood pressure. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can result in hardening and thickening of your arteries, narrowing the channel through which blood can flow.
      * High blood cholesterol levels. High levels of cholesterol in your blood can increase the risk of formation of plaques and atherosclerosis. High cholesterol can be caused by a high level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), known as "bad" cholesterol. A low level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), known as "good" cholesterol, also can promote atherosclerosis.
      * Diabetes. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Both conditions share similar risk factors, such as obesity and high blood pressure.
      * Obesity. Excess weight typically worsens other risk factors.
      * Physical inactivity. Lack of exercise also is associated with coronary artery disease and some of its risk factors, as well.
      * High stress. Unrelieved stress in your life may damage your arteries as well as worsen other risk factors for coronary artery disease.
      Risk factors often occur in clusters and may build on one another, such as obesity leading to diabetes and high blood pressure. When grouped together, certain risk factors put you at an ever greater risk of coronary artery disease. For example, metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that includes elevated blood pressure, high triglycerides, elevated insulin levels and excess body fat around the waist — increases the risk of coronary artery disease.

  21. QUESTION:
    What are natural foods to help eleviate the side effects of Menopause?
    My mom has Menopause and read somewhere or saw on TV where they said (think it was Dr. Phil) where there are foods you eat and a special diet and you don't get those terrible hot flashes all the time that my mom is currently getting.

    Any advice or links appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      here is a website for your mom:
      http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/252607/top_foods_that_help_alleviate_menopause.html
      http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/womenshealth/a/Menopause_2.htm
      on this one: go down to natural remedies:
      http://www.the-natural-menopause.com/
      hope that helps.
      I have menopause and was taking the synthetic hormones, but I didn't feel right on them, so I took the natural approach and I do feel better. I rarely get hot flashes anymore.
      Hope this helps your mom.

  22. QUESTION:
    Are there any physcial problems that could cause a person to cry more easily than is normal?
    I get a lump in my throat and cry over the slightest thing anymore. I've always been a little bit like this, but for the past year it's gotten worse. My thyroid tests show normal, but I am going through menopause. Could this be the problem or could there be something else?

    • ANSWER:
      Stress. It's a catch-all answer but a very serious answer.
      Has something emotional happened recently?
      Have you 'swept' under the rug emotions of the past?

      If it's happening more now, it could just be a change in hormones. Absolutely 100%, cry when you have to. Don't keep it in, your body is trying to regulate itself. Keep a quick journal about when it is happening...sad commercial? sad TV show? food? someone cut you off when driving?

      You may pick up a pattern, ultimately dig deeper inside and observe EVERY single thought (rational or not) and try to make sense of them (this will take some time) - if you get stuck - talk to a friend to make sense of things (a REAL friend who is not going to brush you off). If you can't find a real friend, find a talk therapist (they aren't prescribing doctors, it's not a psych).

  23. QUESTION:
    What are good healthy comfort foods to eat or drink when having pms?
    I always want salty and sugar stuff. By the time my period staryts afew days later I feel guilty and even more bloated from the salt. Also I hate the craps and blood. I can't wait until menopause. I'm not worried about the mood swings cuz they can't be any worse than mine now.i just want comfort food that is good for me. Also everyone else if I'm happy then I won't be a b#### to them. You women know what I'm talking about.

    • ANSWER:
      The salt is making your cramps worse. Try nibbling on a lower sodium pretzel, don't scarf it down, it will get worse. The sugar cravings get to me too, I would eat lower fat yogurt on strawberries or nibble on Skittles, anything else makes those mood swings and cramps amp up.

      As bad as those cramps feel, exercising is the last thing you want to do, but I found it lessened the severity and duration of cramps, when the cramps were gone, so was the mood swings.

  24. QUESTION:
    I have been trying to stop taking Premarin but the symptoms during withdrawal are horrible. Advice?
    I started taking Premarin at 40 after having a radical hysterectomy. Now 14 years later I'm trying to get off the stuff. The hot flashes and general feelings of being very unwell are debilitating. I've tried the natural remedies offered at the health food stores but none have been effective. Any one out there gone through this? How long does it last? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I don't remember if it was Premarin that my friend was taking prior to deciding to try a natural product called Menopause Balance Complex and is extremely pleased with it.

  25. QUESTION:
    what causes breast cancer and what are the measures needed to prevent it?
    I just want somebody to tell me everything I need to know about breast cancer.What causes it,is it generic,are there foods or other things we use in our daily lives that actually cause it like perfumes?How about chemicals found in the preservatives used in packed or canned foods things like MSG .I would appreciate it if someone clarified this for me

    • ANSWER:
      Breast cancer is a common form of cancer among women in the United States, Canada and Europe. However, in Africa and Asia, the prevalence is much lower, indicating the possibility of environmental triggers as well as a genetic predisposition. While the number one risk factor is simply being female, other risk factors include:

      -Age - Breast cancer occurs more often in women over 50 and is less common in pre-menopausal women. American Cancer Society (ACS).
      -Family History - Women with family history of breast cancer have a greater risk of developing the disease.
      -Genetic factors - Inheriting mutations or alterations of certain genes called BRCA-1 and BRCAS-2 increases the risk of developing breast cancer. The ACS estimates that 5 to 10 percent of breast cancer cases result from inherited mutations of these genes. A woman with these genes has an 80 percent chance of developing breast cancer in her lifetime, according to the ACS. Women with a family history of breast cancer may be tested for the mutated gene. However, interpretation of the test results and decisions about treatment are complicated. Recent studies have identified other genes and gene mutations that may be associated with breast cancer. Several studies have shown nearly 200 gene mutations that are associated with some breast tumors.
      -Previous history of breast cancer or of Benign breast Tumors - This includes being diagnosed with breast cancer as well as non-cancerous tumors. Research has demonstrated the risk of developing breast cancer varies with the actual type of benign breast disease found in a woman.
      -Race - Breast cancer is more common in white women than in those of other races, including Hispanic, Asian or black American. .
      -Hormone factors - Hormones may increase the risk of breast cancer. Hormonal influences that are believed to raise the risk include:
      -Early menstruation - Women who started their period before 12 years of age.
      -Late menopause - Women who go through menopause after age 55.
      -Pregnancy history - Women who have their first child after the age of 30 or who have had fewer pregnancies or no pregnancies.
      -Hormone drugs - The use of oral contraceptives has been linked to a slight increase in breast cancer risk.
      -Breast density - Women with less fatty, denser breasts, which are normally older women, have an increased chance of breast cancer.
      -Obesity after menopause - In postmenopausal women, estrogen is primarily produced by fat tissue. If a woman is significantly overweight, she has more fat tissue and more estrogen is being produced in their body.
      -Radiation to the chest area - For women treated for Hodgkins Lymphoma with radiation to the chest before age 30, the chances of developing breast cancer are higher than the general population.
      -Sedentary lifestyle - Women who are physically inactive have a higher rate of breast cancer, possibly due to a sedentary lifestyle.
      -Use of Alcohol - Several studies have concluded that the more alcohol consumed by a woman, the higher her risk of breast cancer becomes.

      For prevention of Breast Cancer, if at all we can do anything, it starts with our own Lifestyle choices and healthy habits - such as staying physically active, limiting alcohol and eating right. Among the easiest things to control are what you eat and drink and how active you are. Here are some strategies that may help you decrease your risk of breast cancer:

      • LIMIT ALCOHOL
      • MAINTAIN A HELTHY WEIGHT
      • STAY ACTIVE
      • CONSIDER LIMITING FAT IN YOUR DIET
      • Avoid HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY (HRT) –
      • CHECK YOUR BREASTS EVERY MONTH
      • DO NOT FORGETTO GET
      • Consider BREASTFEEDING instead of formula feeding
      • HAVE CILDRENT EARLIER in life
      • Avoid taking unnecessary ANTIBIOTICS.
      • Be CAUTIOUS about PESTICIDES
      • Nothing you can guarantee your life will be free from Cancer. But if you practice healthy habits and consult your doctor about extra measures you can take, you may at least reduce your risk of this potentially fatal disease.-

  26. QUESTION:
    I have problems during my menstruation caused by the Polycystic ovary, Am I going to be menaupose early?
    I'm 21 years old and I've been experiencing 8-9 months without menstruation for 3 years now and I'm really scared of what caused this to happen in my body and what could be the effect if my menstruation is very very irregular. Am I going to be menopause at the early age?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know about a correlation with menopause and PCOS. I just wanted to remind you the importance of working with your health care professional if you suspect you have PCOS. Your doctor will be more aware of any correlation between early menopause and PCOS.

      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder. That means there is a problem with some of the hormones in the body. With PCOS, one of the main problems is that the body is not properly using the insulin that it makes. Insulin levels can then get too high. Insulin is a hormone that plays an important role in digesting and using sugar from the food that we eat. Many women with PCOS are overweight or find it especially difficult to lose weight.

      When insulin levels are too high, it can affect other hormones in the body. One hormone that is affected by too much insulin is androgen. Having too much androgen is what causes some of the more noticeable symptoms of PCOS, like acne (pimples) and hirsutism (too much hair in unwanted places, such as on the face). Irregular menstrual cycles, not having your period at all, or having a period that has stopped are other common symptom of PCOS.

      PCOS can seriously affect your health and also your ability to become pregnant. The good news is that there are effective ways to treat it. Your doctor may prescribe medication. It’s very important that you ask what you can do to help. Changing your lifestyle can greatly improve your overall health and the symptoms of PCOS. Exercise and weight management are two very effective ways to decrease most or all of the symptoms of PCOS.

      Your Beinggirl Expert Panel

  27. QUESTION:
    how to mantain my stomach during menopause?
    I'm 60 years old and I stopped taken my hormone replacement now I have hot flashes during the day and night. I also notice that my waist looks like I'm pregnant and this really depress me. I even eat all the health foods. What can I do to lose that extra weight around my waist?

    • ANSWER:
      Hedy, I have 5 sisters, all in various stages of menopause, a partner Sassy who recently came off hormone replacement therapy (also at age 60), and I've wrestled a bit with night sweats - so we've tried a few remedies. Just to clarify - I'm not a doctor. I'm able to diagnose and fix machines. People? Not so much.
      For what it's worth, Sassy did find a silver bullet for her hot flashes - venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor). It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms; many doctors aren't even aware of that use for the drug. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may work for you too. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary (it caused a dry mouth as a side effect for Sassy) - or it may not work at all.
      Herbs are another way to treat sypmtoms, but note that herbs come in two flavors when it comes to treating the symptoms of menopause, phytoestrogenic and non-estrogenic. This answer is already getting a bit long, so rather than copying and pasting the entire bit, I'll just refer you to the web site below. There's also information there about small fans (regular and misting), wicking pajamas & bedsheets for night sweats, etc.
      Sorry I can't help you with the weight issue, but hopefully you'll find relief from the heat!

  28. QUESTION:
    Are mild cramps common or normal after Menopause?
    I am 52 and have not had a period for 2 or 3 years. Probably 2 out of 7 days a week I have mild cramping on and off. Never any spotting. Since I still have a roller coaster of emotions and other menopause symptoms, it seems to me it might be normal.
    Thank you in advance for your wisdom!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      Its a normal. Many women faces the same and got worried. So Don't worry. Take a proper diet food include lots of vitamins into it. Do regular exercise. This will help you to take relief from cramps.

  29. QUESTION:
    alternative medication: What fruit, vegetables, and foods inhibit estrogen absorption?
    I have found a list of fruit, vegetables, and foods that inhibit estrogen absorption such as broccoli, corn, grapes, white rice, white floor, and so on.
    Does it have some implications to be used as an alternative medicine, for example can we call them foods that women should not eat or avoid consumption them in large amount during menopause or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Estrogen Inhibiting Foods

      If you are suffering from breast cancer, PMS, fibroids, ovarian cysts, and other situations that estrogen might exacerbate, the following estrogen inhibiting foods might be of interest to you.
      Berries
      Broccoli
      Buckwheat
      Cabbage
      Citrus Foods
      Corn
      Figs
      Fruits (except apples, cherries, dates, pomegranates)
      Grapes
      Green beans
      Melons
      Millet
      Onions
      Pears
      Pineapples
      Squashes
      Tapioca
      White rice
      White flour

  30. QUESTION:
    What causes hot flashes in a young woman?
    I am 22 years old, have 1 child (he is 4) and am on birth control. I am having hot flashes 4 or 5 times a day with flushing in my cheeks. My cheeks will turn bright red. I went to my gynecologist and she tested my estrogen and did and ultrasound of my ovaries and tested my thyroid and a few other tests. Everything came out normal except the estrogen test said I was a little low. Could that be causing my hot flashes? She says I'm not going through menopause or anything. What else causes hot flashes? My doctor is a bit clueless as to why I'm getting them otherwise I wouldn't ask here.
    I take women's vitamins, drink lots of water, I don't have diabetes, I never consume energy drinks or caffeine ever, I have never smoked, I don't ever drink, I don't have HIV, I rarely eat spicy food, I eat a very healthy diet of fruits and veggies and whole grains, and the only medication I'm on is birth control. Wish someone had a real answer for me! Even the doctor doesn't know. :(

    • ANSWER:
      These include diabetes, stress, alcohol, white sugar, energy drinks, HIV, smoking, caffeine, spicy food, and certain medications. learn what else causes hot flashes? here - http://goo.gl/LrhbJ

  31. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any suggestions about treatments for menopause other than hormone replacement therapy?
    My mom is 50yrs old and she has been going through menopause since last Jan. She uses progestercare cream from the health food store but she doesnt want to do hormone replacement therapy or premprose because they increase the risk of breast cancer. Her doctor is telling her that she will develop osteoporosis if she doesnt get on some sort of HRT though. Can anyone give her any advice on what to do? Are there any natural ways that anyone has tried that worked? And does anyone know if not going on HRT can really cause osteoporosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is on the right track using natural progesterone. It's the ONLY substance that has been shown to REBUILD bone, from the inside out.

      (Natural progesterone does NOT cause cancer like synthetic HRT does. In fact, it helps protect against cancer.)

      Estrogen (in the synthetic HRT) only delays bone breakdown, and it only works for four to five years. The problem is that it actually stops the bone from performing its natural cycle - breaking down old bone and rebuilding new to replace it. If old bone is not being broken down, there is no new bone being rebuilt! After five years on HRT, bone will be brittle.

      Have her read Dr. John Lee's book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause". He explains it very well!
      He also gives guidelines for finding a quality progesterone cream. She may want to compare the one she's using to his recommendations.

      Your mom's doctor is not fully informed. Dr. Lee says, "You can educate your doctor, or find a new one."

  32. QUESTION:
    Im 52 years old and 2 of my teeth cracked and needs fillings, is this normal when you get older?
    Ive had to have two fillings done in the last two months from cracked teeth. Do I need some kind of mineral? Is this normal with aging? Im a post menopause women of 13 year too. Any advise or knowledge would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      well, are you drinking fluoridated water? chances are your tap water and bottled water (which is from tap) contains fluoride in it...the industrial type.

      So...i recommend you to stop drinking that, and look up the harmful effects of fluoride. Get a filter that can remove chlorine, and fluoride. and for your teeth, try to avoid eating processed food (cereal,pop tart, cookies, junk) , sodas, and eat natural stuff that can be found growing on the earth.

      Fluoride should not be ingested but if you must.....get the toothpaste with fluoride although the body has its own way of replenishing the materials. also the toothpaste should not contain SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) or else you will get canker sores quite often.

      since you have menopause...you might want to take some vitamin D pills, and try to do something outside the house from 7am to 11am to get the good sunlight during those hours to produce vitamin D from your skin. Also... I hope you got composite fillings, not amalgrams (silver fillings aka fillings with mercury).

      and one last thing, a sign of cracked teeth means you're not eating right or not taking good care of yourself, try to brush your teeth with a good toothpaste (w/o fluoride and w/o SLS) often , maybe get the phillips sonic toothbrush and also try to look up Colloidal silver. It boosts your immune system, which could help with your body repairing awry things in your body like cracked teeth. Check out healthfreedomusa.org or camping survival.com for the colloidal silver, (this can also be made but for novice people , they should buy it first)

  33. QUESTION:
    How fast do you gain water weight?
    I am an overweight female who normally watches what she eats and never goes crazy with bad for you foods, Recently I started drinking a ton of water again and I got on the scale and it said I had gained seven pounds. I hope this is all water because I really dont see how I could have gained seven pounds in a week. I am also sick with a headcold at the moment, so I dont know if that contributes to retaining water.

    • ANSWER:
      From your question i'd say you are concerned about putting on the weight rather than trying to gain it as the last answer suggests..

      Causes of body water retention depend on a wide range of factors including a high salt intake, as a reaction to hot weather, gravity, nutritional deficiencies, burns as well as sunburn and as a side effect of certain drugs. Pregnancy, oral contraceptives such as the pill, the menstrual cycle and menopause are also known causes of body water retention.
      Water retention shows in the form of swelling its not like putting on weight where you just look slightly bigger it makes your ankles stomach arms etc swell up.
      Being ill will not necessarily make you put on weight unless you are sitting all day eating! If you don't get up and move about doing things as simple as some house work the weight will start to add up very quickly..
      I think if you continue to put weight on this fast that you go to see a doctor about it as soon as possible, it could be a thyroid imbalance or something that you yourself can do nothing about with out some help.
      xx

  34. QUESTION:
    is it possible to get a belladonna plant? It's been prescribed for my stomach problems, read it works for lots
    I read that it can be used for migraines and menopause which is right around the corner. It is an old remedy and just want to know how to get the actual plant.

    • ANSWER:
      I doubt it. Belladonna is extremely toxic in modest quantities, so you might accidentally take too much and hurt or even kill yourself. It's better to leave the growing and harvesting to professionals.
      Your local health food store might have pills made from belladonna extract, that would be a safer way to go.

  35. QUESTION:
    Regarding menopause; how do I manage to deal with perimenopause and still having PMS without losing my mind?
    I am 37, tested positive for menopause with a home menopause test kit, and have PMS symptoms worse than ever. When will this stop?? I live in a new country with nationalized health care and don't have my card yet so I can't go to the doctor unless it is an emergency. I should get my new medical card in a few months but I am miserable now. Please advise.

    • ANSWER:
      I have been there too, I had surgical menopause at 30. What helps is to cut caffiene, nicotine and extra fats and sugars from your diet. try to eat only whole foods and definitely eat soy if you can tolerate it. Eat things that help detoxify your body, pickles, cranberry juice, grapes, etc. The less toxins you ingest, the less bothersome your hot flashes and other symptoms will be. Try to find some sort of hormone replacement therapy over the counter until you can get to the doctor and get the real thing.
      Best of luck to you.
      Blessings.

  36. QUESTION:
    How long will my generation live to be maybe 200?
    I am 15 and I think my generation will live to be like 500 or 200 cause the world is advancing.Maybe women in the future dont have to go through menopause cause they may invent something to stop people from looking old

    • ANSWER:
      Because of diet the life expectancy of newer generations will most likely decrease despite medical advances. The fast food, frozen meals loaded with salt and preservatives, boxed meals, sodas, and junk foods (dont even get me started with growth hormones in meat) all take their toll. You definitely wont live to 200. Science doesn't advance THAT fast. There are no miracle cures even close to complete that would extend our cellular life and were not likely to see those kinds of advances for another 100+ years. At the moment there is more concern for making the quality of life better as we age (HGH and the like). Rather than extending lifespans like your talking about.

  37. QUESTION:
    Will eating foods containing Phytoestrogens help my breast grow?
    I'm 15 and only a 34A cup. I feel very self conscious about it. I can't compare my breast size to my mom's because she has had a boob job and doesn't recall her original size. My sister is only a half sister so I can't compare to her. My mom's sister is a half sister to my mom. My dad's mom had all boys. I know breast size decreases after menopause, so I don't want to compare to her. My mom's mom is dead. I just can't find someone to compare to because my mom has had work done and most of my female relatives aren't 100% blood related or they've already gone through menopause.

    Back on topic, I want to increase my breast size. I don't know if they have met their final size yet, but I don't want to sit back and do nothing and just wait and see if they grow more or not. I read that Phytoestrogens increases breast size. Can I eat foods containing Phytoestrogens to increase my breast size? What are the best foods?

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    Can lack of sugar contribute to outbreaks?
    Usually, my acne is not to bad but occasionally, i will break out all around my chin. Then, i will try to wash my face alot and avoid sugary foods. But when i do that, it seems to not get any better or actually get worse. I eventually break down and eat a candy bar. After i give up and eat sugar regularly, the breakouts seem to go away. Is this just coincidence or that just how my body works?

    • ANSWER:
      Sugar has nothing to do with acne (which is caused by bacteria and natural oils in the skin (for which extra washing is not what you want to do) but can be influenced by changing hormone levels, such as at puberty, birth control pills, and menopause).

  39. QUESTION:
    Isn't it strange how elderly women are the usual victims of slipping on wet floors?
    Whenever a tiled floor in a supermarket or someplace public is wet, it's usually an elderly woman who slips on it. I just saw this on a rerun of Family Guy. I have also witnessed this in both Harris Teeter & Food Lion.
    Are they ever careful around wet floors?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a good question, from my observations, and having worked as a retail manager decades ago, I would say this.

      At any given time in a super market or store you will see about 10 times as many women as men.

      Of the men in the store about 1/4 will be standing stationary, not walking around, looking at their watches whole the women shop.

      Younger men are the exception, they appear to enjoy shopping more than their fathers and grandfathers did. :-)

      If both a man and a woman are walking together shopping, the woman is the one picking up merchandise and looking at things with about 75% of couples.

      I am not real good at math, but I think I just narrowed down the number of elderly men who could possibly slip on a wet floor at any given time to approx 2. :-)

      In addition men's bones are heavier and denser and they are less likely to break them in a fall. While men do suffer from osteoporosis, it affects far more women than men, because menopause causes bone loss.

      And that is my theory, using deductive logic and not some dumb cartoon shows, and I am sticking to it.

  40. QUESTION:
    Has anyone experienced night sweats during a diet cleanse?
    I recently started a cleansing diet which includes a lot of green juices and I now have been experiencing night sweats. I am only 31 so no menopause.... could this be related?

    • ANSWER:
      Cleansing or detoxing have absolutely no medical benefit and are in fact harmful to the digestive system.
      There is no build up of bad plaque or sludge in a normal system.
      If this was the case we would have people dying left and right from malnutrition since their bodies couldn't absorb nutrients.
      We reabsorb most of the water we drink and from our food in the colon. If the colon wall is coated with toxins like these con artists try to sell, we would all be sloshing around like sponges right?
      We "cleanse and detox" 24 hours a day through respiration, sweat, liver, and kidneys.
      We can help by eating a healthy diet with minimal added sugar and salt. Lots of fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, beans, peas, and brown rice keep a system as healthy as it can be.
      Minimal alcohol, caffeine, soda.
      Read food labels. If you can't pronounce it, don't put it in your body.
      Colon cleanses actually flush out the beneficial bacteria and enzymes in the digestive system.
      Search gut flora to learn about the beneficial bacteria we need in our colon.
      They don't tell you about the gas, cramping, and bloating you will experience when you start eating again and the body has to rebuild this bacteria population.
      Some of these con artists have perfected a formula for coagulating your waste to make it look like the gross pictures they present, not to do anything else.
      Spend your money in the produce department instead of giving it away.

  41. QUESTION:
    Can pickles make your breast bigger?
    if they can, what other foods can make them bigger???

    • ANSWER:
      Question
      If you eat pickles will they make your breasts grow?

      Answer
      In the Ancient world pickles were widely regarded as a beauty aid, partly because Cleopatra attributed her beauty in part to a diet high in pickles. But the ancients did not credit pickles with promoting breast growth, nor has modern nutritional analysis suggested that pickles have any properties relevant to breast development.
      **************************************************
      Question Food to Enlarge Breasts
      http://www.livestrong.com/article/138583-food-enlarge-breasts/#ixzz2OGrpzMQC

      Answer; Scientists are uncertain of the relationship between diet and breast size. Experts such as Dr. Sandhya Pruthi of Mayo Clinic note that there is insufficient evidence to prove that any "natural" product can increase a woman's breast size. In theory, certain foods can alter breast tissue by increasing levels of female reproductive hormones such as prolactin and estrogen. Consult a physician or dietitian before making any major adjustments to your diet.

      Milk
      Reproductive hormones such as estrogen and prolactin are essential for lactation in all mammals. According to a report published in the Harvard Gazette, all dairy products contain trace amounts of these hormones; levels may be higher in milk from cattle treated with recombinant bovine growth hormone (RBGH). Experts disagree about the impact that these hormones can have on human biology, but in theory, they may stimulate the growth of breast tissue in women.

      Soybean
      The National Institutes of Health acknowledge soybean's historical use as a breast enhancer. Its breast-enlarging properties may relate to the fact that it contains isoflavones--natural plant compounds that are chemically similar to estrogen. Whole soybeans are the most concentrated natural source of isoflavones, followed by minimally processed tofu or tempeh. Highly processed soy "burgers" and "cheese" contain few or no hormone-altering compounds.

      Licorice
      Most licorice candies are heavily processed and artificially flavored; these foods do not have any known effect on human hormones. However, naturally flavored licorice candies may help to improve breast size in some women. According to the National Institutes of Health, women taking licorice supplements sometimes experience an increase in levels of estrogen and prolactin, two hormones that may increase breast size. Licorice's hormone-altering effects also make it a popular treatment for menopause-related discomforts.

      Fennel
      Fennel, a relative of dill, has a fragrance and flavor similar to licorice root. The Journal of Ethnopharmacology attributes this similarity to anethole, an estrogenic compound found in both plants. Anethole--and its chemical relatives dianethole and photoanethole--may increase estrogen levels in the human body. Traditionally, herbalists have recommended fennel as a treatment for low supply in breastfeeding mothers. A diet rich in fennel could help to boost breast size by elevating levels of lactation-related hormones. Consider using fennel as a table vegetable; the seeds are an excellent spice for pasta sauces and salad dressing.
      ******************************************************
      Foods That Make Breasts Grow http://www.livestrong.com/article/135295-foods-that-make-breasts-grow/

  42. QUESTION:
    what change leads to substantial reduction in bone density during adulthood?
    i think it might be that new cells accumulate on the outer layers of bone and the bones broaden, but their mineral content declines so they become more porous. this leads to a gradual loss in bone mass that begins in the late thirties and accelerates in the fifties, especially among women. i also think that it could be menopause, but i don't think that's it because men don't go through that. any help would be appreciated and a best answer will be chosen.

    • ANSWER:
      Women produce less oestrogen as they age and men produce less testosterone, both of these are implicated in bone thinning

      Vitamin D deficiencies and, in fact, malnutrition are also factors which affect bone thinning. The elderly are more prone to these due to problems with food absorption in ageing

  43. QUESTION:
    How do I build muscle and collagen?
    I am a 52 year old healthy woman. Until 2 years ago I had muscle tone but I lost it all in my arms and legs. I have always worked out and eat healthy. I think I lost it because of stress and/or menopause. How can I get some of it back? There is hardly any muscle there to even tone. Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      Start taking vitamins, if you smoke cigaretes stop that it helps with your lungs and you'll tlel a diff after 2 weeks of quitting, alochol tears your muscles, start going to the gym, work one the stairmaster for 30 minutes, run a couple laps around the laps, 4 times around is a mile, maybe do 2 laps first, then do 4 and kieep working your way up, do sit up press machines help lose weight in your stomach and strengthen your your muscles in your stomach and tone them up, do leg lifts, you dont ahve to do a lot of weight, just do them until you start to feel a burn and do it a little more, do a couple sets of everything, swimming is really healthy, that works out almost everything in your body, do a couple laps int he pool, when your done sit in a sauna for awhile, saunas help sweat out chemicals and shit in your body that you dont need, start drinking water more, stop eating fast food as much as you can helps make you more healthy, when you wake up in the morning go for a jog, even if its just around your block its healthy for you, at nighttime before you go to sleep do some sittups, side crunches, pushups, pullups if you can, and if you want actuall workouts my email is koket_phantom@yahoo.com my name is will just email me i'll help you out i know a lot on working out and getting healthy and im willing to help you out

  44. QUESTION:
    Can you get a rash from Menopause?
    I am getting this rash that really itches all over my neck and chest. Can it be related to Menopause? Or maybe and allergic reaction to something?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Stephanie

      Here are a few ideas to heal the issue.

      Cause
      Although most rashes are not symptoms of a serious health problem, they can be signs of allergies, liver and gallbladder problems, lupus, bleeding disorders, nutritional deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases.

      Rashes can also be due to the elimination of toxic wastes through the skin, or of an active immune reaction to an invading organism. Suppression of such a rash can lead to chronic disease states. Rather than try to suppress the rash, in such cases watchful waiting may be more advisable.

      Caution: If your rash becomes chronic, forms a "butterfly" shape over your cheeks, or is accompanied by high fever and joint pains, seek immediate medical attention to rule out more serious illnesses.

      ------------------------------...

      Natural Cures

      Diet: Screen for and eliminate any foods to which you are allergic or sensitive. Eat an organic, whole foods diet, with plenty of green leafy vegetables and yellow vegetables such as carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, and winter squash. Also drink plenty of pure, filtered water, and avoid all processed foods and chemical food additives.

      Flower Essences: Rescue Remedy Cream® applied topically to the affected areas.

      Herbs: The following herbal remedies can speed healing: A tincture of equal parts burdock root and gentian root, the fresh juice of coriander, and/or aloe vera juice or gel.

      Homeopathy: Useful homeopathic remedies include Belladonna, Sulfur, Graphites, and Calc carb.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment.
      *Purified water is essential for any hydrotherapy treatment. Remedies for Treating Chlorinated Bath Water offers clear instructions and recommendations.

      Juice Therapy: Drink fresh squeezed vegetable juices on a daily basis, especially carrot, beet, radish, and garlic juice.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following nutrients can be helpful to speed healing: vitamin A and vitamin E (both orally and applied topically over the affected areas), vitamin C, essential fatty acids (EFAs), flaxseed oil, and amma linolenic acid (GLA). In addition, add half a teaspoon of baking soda to water and drink every fifteen minutes. Do this three times, and then every two to three hours for two to three days or until the reaction subsides.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating rashes: Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Detoxification Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, Oxygen Therapy (Hydrogen Peroxide), and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

      Best of health to you

  45. QUESTION:
    Burning sensation on the roof of my mouth?
    At random times, at random intervals, I'll get this strange burning sensation on the roof of my mouth. It starts in the front and gradually moves back. There's sort of a coppery taste left behind, and when I feel it with my tongue, it feels really bumpy. This has been happening for years. I don't think it's allergies, because I wasn't exposed to anything I don't see every day. I also highly doubt it's menopause mouth burning, because I'm sixteen. Does anyone else experience this? Do you know what brings it on? Or is it completely normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have a tongue piercing? Sometimes that will cause discomfort.

      It also may have something to do with your diet, eating rough foods such as cereal can irritate parts of your mouth if they're sensitive.

  46. QUESTION:
    What could be causing my periods to be so weird?
    I missed a period in October (I had light spotting but no period), then for about 3 weeks I was experiencing pregnancy-like symptoms (Sore, enlarged breasts, sensitive nipples, nausea, stomach pains, food cravings etc) and then on Monday afternoon I got my period (About a week late) and it only lasted until Wednesday night (Usually my periods are about 6 days long) and it was heavier than normal on Monday (Had to change my tampon once every 2hrs or so) and then on Tuesday it was slightly lighter than normal and on Wednesday it was so light it was barely there, it was more like spotting than an actual period. Normally if I miss a period I get the next one early and its heavy. My periods usually last about 5-6 days and are heavy on the first 2-3 days and then lighten for the last 2-3 days. What could be causing these symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Well if your young then its normal unless you older then 30 then it would just be menopause other wise consult a family doctor. Hope this helped!!

  47. QUESTION:
    How long after starting to take a hair supplement for hair falling out will it take to see a difference?
    Doctor thinks it might be from lack of biotin and magnesium. (due to food allergy, I can't eat most fruits or veggies, and can't eat meat because of something else).

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors don't know everything!

      They start prescribing you pills, just to get your teeth cleaned.

      People spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements.

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t have to approve supplements — no agency in the United States does. So it’s up to consumers to bring health concerns to light. “It’s important to understand the difference between over-the-counter medications and dietary supplements,” say Pieter Cohen, MD, an internist at Cambridge Health Alliance and instructor at Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Mass. The FDA gets involved only after the fact, if the supplement later appears to be causing harm. By that time, the supplement may already have harmed many consumers who used it. “The burden of proof is on the FDA to determine [a supplement] is dangerous and remove it from the market,” Cohen says. Consumer complaints are the primary trigger for investigations. One recent investigation of the dietary weight-loss supplement ephedra resulted in it being banned for sale in the United States.
      China, which has repeatedly been caught exporting contaminated products, is a major supplier of raw supplement ingredients. The FDA has yet to inspect a single factory there.

      We have identified a dozen supplement ingredients that we think consumers should avoid because of health risks, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney problems. We found products with those ingredients readily available in store.

      Because of inadequate quality control and inspection, supplements contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs have been sold to unsuspecting consumers. And FDA rules covering manufacturing quality don’t apply to the companies that supply herbs, vitamins, and other raw ingredients.
      Beginning in February 2008, he experienced one symptom after another: diarrhea, joint pain, hair loss, lung problems, and fingernails and toenails that fell off.
      http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm228052.htm

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:
      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything.

      "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php
      Fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains all supply B-complex vitamins, like biotin, folic acid and vitamin B12, as well as vitamin A, copper and zinc, which are all necessary for remedying dry, brittle hair and nourishing a healthy scalp. Some prime examples of foods that contain these nutrients for healthy hair include:
      ·                     Folic Acid - asparagus, beets, broccoli, avocados, Brussels sprouts, beans, chickpeas, soybeans, lentils, oranges, fresh peas, turkey and spinach.
      ·                     Biotin - cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast, and soy flour. Keep in mind that biotin content is reduced when food is cooked or preserved.

      Sources:
      Everyday Health, Consumer Reports, Slate.com, CNN Health/herbal-supplements, FDA.gov for consumers protect yourself health fraud

  48. QUESTION:
    Can anyone think of ways to motivate me?
    I need to lose 20lbs. I have plantar fasciitis so exercising is difficult. Im not an over eater, I don't eat enough or I eat the wrong foods. I am on the downside of menopause and during it I gained the weight, mostly in my midsection. I just dont seem to be able to movtivate myself. Each day I say I will, then put it off another day.

    • ANSWER:
      Sit down and make a list of "what if I lost all this weight.....". Then print out a picture of the body you want and deserve to have. I know it's hard in the beginning, but when you see the changes in your body you won't want to stop!

  49. QUESTION:
    Do any female animals experience menopause?
    If so, at what age do they experience it and what are the signs of menopause in say for example a rabbit.

    If not, how can you tell that an animal is to old to conceive a baby animal.

    I am mostly wondering about rabbits but I also want to know about any animal.

    • ANSWER:
      Humans (female) are a species that experience menopause. Info follows:

      Menopause
      Menopause is quite simply the final pause of menstruation. This phase of a woman's life is part of the natural aging process. It is not a disease or a disaster. Your ovaries slowly reduce the level of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) they produce and child bearing is no longer an option. For many women this is a big relief. Generally speaking, health professionals agree that 52 is the average age when full menopause takes affect. The full age range is between 42 to 56.

      Menopause is preceded by perimenopause and followed by post menopause. All three stages come with their own telltale signs with considerable overlap from one to the other. So, unlike the beginning of your period, which seems to happen in a single moment of time, menopause is very wishy washy. Full menopause is considered to be in effect when you have not had your period for a full year.

      Menopause is not experienced by all women in the same way. Much depends on the individual's diet, lifestyle, genetics and attitudes held by the woman, her family, culture and society about aging. If you come from a world that does not respect older people, and is narrowly focused on youth, your menopause transition period may be more difficult to navigate. However, you may also experience deep personal growth and a strong sense of liberation.

      Be aware that our commercialized society will try to medicalize your symptoms. Be wise. Look for natural alternatives before getting on the pill band wagon. Weigh the risks and benefits carefully. Become your own authority.

      There is a home-use test that you can take to determine if you are perimenopausal or fully menopausal. U.S Food and Drug Administration approved kits measure Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland. FSH levels increase temporarily each month to stimulate your ovaries to produce eggs. When you enter menopause and your ovaries stop working your FSH levels also increase. The test will provide a FSH level reading so that you can determine what stage of "the Pause" you are at.

      As for rabbits, this study may interest you:

      Lack of difference among progestins on the anti-atherogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol: a rabbit study
      Peter Alexandersen1,3, Jens Haarbo1, Pieter Zandberg2, Jørgen Jespersen1, Sven O. Skouby1 and Claus Christiansen1
      1 Center for Clinical & Basic Research, Ballerup Byvej 222, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark and 2 Department of Vascular Pharmacology, N.V.Organon, Molenstraat 110, 5340 BH Oss, The Netherlands

      3 To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: pa@ccbr.dk

      Abstract
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      BACKGROUND: Progestins in combination with estrogen are believed to have different effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different oral contraceptive formulations on the development of experimental atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity. METHODS: A total of 160 sexually mature rabbits were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to equally large groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) ethinyl estradiol (EE 70 µg/day, oral), (iii) desogestrel (DSG 525 µg/day, oral), (iv) gestodene (GSD 262.5 µg/day, oral), (v) levonorgestrel (LNG 525 µg/day, oral), (vi) EE + DSG, (vii) EE + LNG, or (viii) EE + GSD. After 31 weeks of treatment, aortic accumulation of cholesterol and vascular vasoreactivity (in vitro) were determined. RESULTS: Progestins alone did not reduce the accumulation of cholesterol. EE alone or in combination with a progestin reduced the accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (P < 0.0001). Isolated vessels from EE-treated animals relaxed significantly more to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine than did placebo (P < 0.001), whereas vessels treated with EE plus a progestin showed an intermediate response. CONCLUSION: The progestins investigated can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE.

      Key words: atherosclerosis/estrogen/progestins/rabbits/vascular reactivity

      Introduction
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The question of whether oral contraceptive (OC) formulations increase the risk of arterial events (such as myocardial infarction) in younger women remains unsolved. Several recent case–control studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction in women using OC compared with non-users (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Lewis, 1998; Dunn et al., 1999; 2001; Farley et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001; Rosendaal et al., 2002), although other recent data have not confirmed this observation (Sidney et al., 1998). Recent European studies have indicated that OC use is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, in contrast to US studies that found no increased risk among OC users (Lewis 1998; Sidney et al., 1998). Only a few studies have directly compared the effect on myocardial infarction of OC formulations containing a second-generation progestin (levonorgestrel) with those containing third-generation progestins (desogestrel or gestodene) (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Dunn et al., 2001; Tanis et al., 2001), but they were all designed as case–control studies; the reported relative risk in these studies varies (between 0.3 and 1.8), and the numbers are small.

      The relative preponderance in venous events (e.g. deep venous thrombosis) as compared with arterial events (e.g. myocardial infarction) in pre-menopausal women is gradually equalized as the menopause is reached, so that the relative frequency of these events is close to 1:1 in peri-menopausal women. Since OC are prescribed for millions of pre-menopausal (and peri-menopausal) women who use these formulations for many years, it would be of the utmost public health importance to establish even a small increase in the relative risk. Therefore, the issue of OC in relation to arterial disease is highly relevant. It should be borne in mind, however, that it is possible that for both OC and HRT users, there may be prothrombotic mechanisms in relation to arterial as well as venous complications that are not necessarily based on atherosclerosis, but that are reflected in the population-based studies. Primary (Rossouw et al., 2002) and secondary (Grady et al., 2002) prevention studies of HRT have failed to show cardioprotection in post-menopausal women.

      We report here the results from an experimental study in rabbits of atherosclerosis designed to investigate the effect of estrogen (ethinyl estradiol, EE) in combination with levonorgestrel (LNG), desogestrel (DSG), or gestodene (GSD) on vascular reactivity, lipoprotein metabolism, and the aortic accumulation of cholesterol.

      Materials and methods
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Study design
      A total of 160 sexually mature female rabbits of the Danish Country strain (SSC:CPH) were obtained from Statens Serum Institute, Denmark. They were individually housed at room temperature (20 ± 2°C), a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%, and with a 12 h light cycle. The study was conducted in the animal facilities at the Center for Clinical & Basic Research (CCBR), Ledoeje, Denmark. After a 2 week period of acclimatization, the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy to inhibit intrinsic production of sex hormones (Alexandersen et al., 1998). One week after surgery, the rabbits were then randomly assigned to one of the following eight treatment groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) EE (orally, 70 µg/day), (iii) DSG (orally, 525 µg/day), (iv) GSD (orally, 262.5 µg/day), (v) LNG (orally, 525 µg/day), (vi) EE continuously combined with DSG (doses as above) (EE + DSG), (vii) EE continuously combined with LNG (doses as above) (EE + LNG), or (viii) EE continuously combined with GSD (doses as above) (EE + GSD). We did not include a sham-operated group in this study as it was previously shown that sham operation per se in rabbits results in a mean accumulation of cholesterol that was not statistically significant from that of the non-treated control group (Haarbo et al., 1992). Hormone doses used in this study were chosen based on previous experience with these doses (the McPhail test in rabbits; EE, LNG and DSG) (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) or from in-house studies (GSD). The EE dose used was kept constant in all EE groups throughout the study period (31 weeks). We used the rabbit to evaluate the effect of sex steroids on atherogenesis because it is known to be a useful model of experimental atherosclerosis (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Sulistiyani et al., 1995).

      Key effect variables of the study comprised aortic atherosclerosis (i.e. fatty streaks and plaque formation), and vascular reactivity (primary key variables); and body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins, uterus wet weight, hepatic cholesterol content, uterine estrogen receptor content, liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count (secondary key variables).

      The study was approved and overviewed by the Experimental Animals Committee under the Danish Ministry of Justice. All procedures complied with the Danish guidelines for experimental animal studies.

      Rabbit chow
      Each rabbit was fed 100 g of chow per day throughout the entire study. The cholesterol-rich chow was prepared by first dissolving the hormone or the combination of hormones (all provided by N.V. Organon, The Netherlands) in ethanol (96%; 0.50 ml per animal per day), then mixing with maize oil (Unikem, Denmark). Another mixture was prepared by dissolving cholesterol (SIGC-8503; Bie & Berntsen A/S, Denmark) in maize oil by slow heating. The hormone solution and the cholesterol solution containing maize oil (total daily intake of maize oil was 8 ml per animal) were then mixed manually together with the pellets (Altromin 2123, Brogaarden, Denmark), as previously described (Alexandersen et al., 1998). Food consumption was monitored weekly by weighing remaining chow. All animals had free access to water.

      Blood samples
      Blood samples were taken at baseline (week 0) and in weeks 6, 14 and 30. Blood samples were collected from a lateral ear vein on fasting animals (24 h) and analysed at the CCBR laboratory (Ballerup, Denmark) immediately after collection, except for the progestin concentrations that were assessed at Organon.

      Safety variables
      Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, leukocyte count (Sysmex K-1000; Toa Medical Electronics, Inc., USA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) (Cobas Mira Plus; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., F.Hoffmann–La Roche, Switzerland) were determined in weeks 0, 6, 14 and 30.

      Serum lipids and lipoproteins
      Total serum cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured enzymatically by kinetic colorimetric methods (Cobas Mira). Ultracentrifuged lipoproteins were determined regularly throughout the study as described in detail elsewhere (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Alexandersen et al., 1998).

      Serum progestin concentrations
      A kinetic study was performed after 16 weeks of treatment to determine the serum concentrations of the respective progestins. Blood samples were taken before dosing, and then again 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h after dosing, but taking only two samples per animal in each group (providing 40 samples per group), to give an impression of the pharmacokinetic profile of these compounds. These hormone concentrations were determined at Organon’s laboratories.

      Desogestrel
      DSG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng DSG per ml plasma DSG and its internal standard (IS), an analogue of DSG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 325.4 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 147.2 for DSG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.1 for its IS.

      Gestodene
      GSD study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of GSD per ml plasma. GSD and its IS, an analogue of GSD, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Hypersil BDS C18 column. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 311.0 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.1 for GSD and m/z 339.10 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.20 for its IS.

      Levonorgestrel
      LNG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of LNG per ml plasma. LNG and its IS, an analogue of LNG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 313.3 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.2 for LNG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.10 for its IS.

      Aortic accumulation of cholesterol
      Necropsy (week 32) was done with an i.v. injection of 1–2 ml of mebumal (pentobarbital) 20% solution. The thoracic aorta (just above the aortic valves to the level of the diaphragm) was dissected free, and the connective tissue adhering to the adventitia was then carefully removed under running saline. The aorta was cut longitudinally and the luminal surface was rinsed with saline. The vessel was fixed at the corners with pins onto a piece of paper on a corkboard. The tissue was separated in two parts (a proximal and a distal part) at the level of the first intercostal arteries. The proximal part was utilized to strip the luminal layer containing the intima and part of the media from the underlying media/adventitia. The proximal part was weighed and stored at –20°C until analysed. For analysis, the luminal layer of the aortic tissue was minced and the lipids were extracted chemically with chloroform and methanol (2:1, vol/vol) over 24 h. The lipids were separated from the proteins (Haarbo et al., 1991). The total aortic cholesterol content in the tissue specimens was measured enzymatically after the fraction containing cholesterol had been taken to dryness by heating and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of 2-propanol. The amount of protein in the aorta was measured as described by Lowry (1951). The weight of the heart was recorded.

      Morphometric analysis of aortic plaque area
      The aorta (comprising the ascendant part, the arch, and the descendant part, from the aortic valves and to the first intercostal artery) was opened longitudinally and rinsed in 50% ethanol and dyed in Sudan Red for 1 min. Each aortic tissue dyed was projected onto a horizontal surface with a projecting videocamera (JAI 2040 Protec, Japan) and videotaped under microscope (Zeiss Stemi 2000/C, Germany). The images obtained were then digitized (ImagePro Plus, USA) to determine the surface involvement of atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) and the total area occupied by the atheroma plaque (see below). Surface involvement by atherosclerosis in an animal was assessed by tracing the contours of the lumen expressed as percentage of the total aortic area. Summing the degree of surface involvement per animal and dividing by the number of animals in the group, the mean degree of surface involvement by atherosclerosis in a treatment group was calculated. Sudan Red was found not to significantly interfere with chemical determination of aortic accumulation of cholesterol (data not shown).

      Preparation of aortic rings and tension monitoring
      Isolated vascular segments (3–4 mm transverse sections) from the thoracic aorta were prepared from the newly killed rabbit (Furchgott and Zawadzki 1980). Five to ten rabbits randomly selected from each group were used. The rings were immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs’ solution and cleaned under careful protection of the endothelium. The Krebs’ solution consisted of (mmol/l): NaCl 118.0, KCl 4.7, CaCl2 2.6, MgSO4 1.2, KH2PO4 1.2, NaCHO3 24.9, and glucose 11.1. The isolated rings were mounted in the organ bath on two parallel and horizontal stainless steel wires (40 µm in diameter) inserted into the lumen of the vessel. The bath contained Krebs’ solution at 37°C, carbonized with 95%/5% of O2/CO2. One hook was fixed, and the other connected to a force transducer measuring the isometric tension of the ring (Myograph 400; JP Trading A/S, Denmark). Initially, the rings were stretched to a basal tension of 2.0 g and allowed to equilibrate for 45 min. From other experiments, it was found that a basal tension of 2.0 g developed the maximal active tension in the rings (data not shown), and the basal tension was therefore increased to 2.0 g before each experiment and allowed to equilibrate for ≥30 min. The rings were then contracted twice with a 126 mmol/l K+ Krebs’ solution, which is identical to Krebs solution, except that Na+ in the Krebs’ was exchanged with K+ on a molar basis. The experiment began with repeated contraction with phenylephrine to 40% of their maximal contraction with high dose potassium (126 mmol/l). Cumulative dose–response curves to acetylcholine were then obtained in the concentration range of 10–8 to 10–5 mol/l. The rings were washed and allowed to relax. The vessels were then stimulated with phenyleprine again to 50% of the maximal contractile response to 126 mmol/l of K+ , and dose–response curves were subsequently obtained for sodium nitroprusside (4x10–8 to 1.3x10–5 mol/l).

      Liver accumulation of cholesterol
      The amount of cholesterol accumulated during the study was determined after homogenization of a liver biopsy taken at the time of necropsy. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations were assessed after homogenization and adjusted for hepatic protein similarly as described for aortic cholesterol determinations (Haarbo et al., 1991).

      The uterus and endometrial tissue
      The bicornuate uterus was cut at the level of the vagina and beginning of the salpinges, removed and the wet weight determined. A sample of endometrial tissue was excised and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at –85°C until analysis. For analysis, the endometrial tissue was homogenized and centrifuged at 800 g. The supernatant was then further centrifuged at 105 000 g, and the obtained supernatant (cytosol) was used for determination of cytosolic estrogen-binding capacity by steroid-binding assay with dextran-coated charcoal separation (Thorpe, 1987). The estrogen-binding capacity was adjusted for the protein concentration in the cytosol (Bradford, 1976). The 800 g pellet was washed, the nuclear receptors extracted by 0.6 mol/l KCl (Thorpe et al., 1986) and the nuclear estrogen receptor content determined by an enzyme immunoassay (Abott Laboratories). The inter-assay variation of the estrogen-binding capacity and the estrogen receptor (immunoassay) and protein determination were 7, 6 and 5% respectively. All analyses were done without knowledge of the treatment group.

      Statistics
      The mean levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins during the treatment period were calculated as the area under the curve (AUC). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the primary and secondary key variables. If ANOVA indicated statistical significance, Student’s t-test was used to compare groups against the placebo group using Dunnett’s correction for multiple comparisons. The relationship between aortic accumulation of cholesterol and the averaged serum total cholesterol (and lipoprotein) level was determined by correlation analysis. Dose–response curves for acetylcholine were performed for each treatment group (n = 5–10), and ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences among groups at each concentration of acetylcholine. Linear correlation was performed between accumulation of cholesterol and vascular response to acetylcholine. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate the significance of serum lipids and lipoproteins and of other non-lipid-mediated effects of the hormone treatments (independent variables) on the accumulation of cholesterol (dependent variable), and to study the degree of endothelial dysfunction (dependent variable) after correction for aortic accumulation of cholesterol and treatment (independent variables). All statistical analyses were performed with 5% as the level of significance.

      Results
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Table I gives the baseline characteristics for the eight study groups in terms of body weight and serum lipids and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). There was no statistically significant difference among groups for any variable tested. During the study, all groups significantly increased the body weight by 20% (P < 0.05). Treatment with DSG, GSD, or LNG did not significantly affect the average TC concentration (Table II). However, treatment with EE or EE plus a progestin significantly lowered average TC concentrations. Changes in TC were paralleled by modifications in the atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-C, IDL-C, and VLDL-C) (ANOVA: P < 0.001 for all), and all hormone treatments (progestins alone or in combination with EE) significantly increased average HDL-C concentrations (ANOVA: P < 0.001).

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      Table I. Baseline characteristics

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      Table II. Mean (SEM) serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations calculated from the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC)

      Cholesterol feeding per se resulted in an extensive aortic accumulation of cholesterol (nmol/mg wet weight) and this was significantly attenuated by long-term treatment with EE (P < 0.0001) or EE plus a progestin (P 0.5}.

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      Figure 1. Individual values for the aortic accumulation of cholesterol (µmol/mg wet weight) (upper part of the figure) or the morphometric data based on the area of the aortic arch covered by plaque (lower part of the figure) in the eight groups. EE = ethinyl estradiol; DGS = desogestrel; GTD = gestodene; LNG = levonorgestrel. Rabbits treated with EE alone or in combination with a progestin (DSG, GSD or LNG) had significantly lower accumulation of cholesterol and atherosclerotic plaque than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the progestin groups and the placebo group. ***P < 0.0001 (analysis of variance).

      Morphometric analysis of the plaque covering the surface of the thoracic aorta revealed that there were significantly more atheromatous lesions in the placebo group than in the EE and the EE + progestin groups (P < 0.001 for all groups versus placebo) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). This still held true after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P < 0.0001).

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      Figure 2. Representative samples of the aortic arches used for morhometric determination of the area covered by atherosclerotic plaques. Upper panel shows examples from the placebo group (cholesterol feeding alone; placebo), and the ethinyl estradiol (EE) group; whereas the lower panel shows examples from each of the EE + progestin groups. There was significantly less plaque accumulated in the EE group and the EE + progestin groups compared with placebo (P < 0.0001). Numbers indicate animal identifications.

      Figure 3 shows the EC50 to acetylcholine for the various treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with EE and EE plus a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than controls. The response to two physiological doses of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) in precontracted vessels is shown (centre and bottom). Vessels treated with EE relaxed significantly more to acetylcholine than control vessels or vessels with a progestin alone (P < 0.05). Moreover, combining EE with a progestin relaxed the vessels significantly more than control vessels but to a lesser extent than with EE alone. Vasorelaxation to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) correlated significantly and inversely to aortic accumulation of cholesterol (r = –0.39 P = 0.002 and r = –0.37 P = 0.004 respectively). To study the influence of increasing accumulation of cholesterol on the endothelial dysfunction evaluated by vascular reactivity in vitro, ANCOVA was done. We found that treatment with EE significantly and independently of aortic accumulation of cholesterol restored vasorelaxation {for EE: estimate [mean (SEM)] was 49.3 (10.4)%, P = 0.0001}, whereas the other treatments with EE plus a progestin or a progestin alone [DSG, –7.7 (9.2)% (not significant); GSD, –8.5 (9.1)% (not significant); LNG, –3.2 (9.7)% (not significant); EE + DSG, 17.7 (9.4)% (P = 0.065); EE + GSD, 13.2 (10.2)% (not significant); and EE ± LNG, 17.0 (8.8)% (P = 0.058)], or accumulation of cholesterol per se [–0.1 (0.2)%] did not.

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      Figure 3. The EC50 values for acetylcholine of isolated vessels for the treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with ethinyl estradiol (EE) alone or combined with a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than the placebo group. Long-term treatment with EE alone or combined with a progestin relaxed precontracted vessels to two physiological doses of acetylcholine [1.0x10–7 mol/l (centre) and 3.2x10–7 mol/l (bottom) significantly more than control vessels (black bar; P < 0.0001)]. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      The uterine wet weight was significantly higher in EE-treated animals than in controls (P < 0.0001; Figure 4). Progestins had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with any of the progestins significantly increased the wet weight indicating that the progestins with the doses used were not able to completely abolish the stimulatory effect of EE on this target organ (Figure 4). The uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor (ER) concentrations were significantly lowered in the EE group (P < 0.0001) and also in each of the EE plus progestin groups (P < 0.001–0.0001) relative to the placebo group, but also the progestins alone resulted in reduced concentrations compared with controls (P < 0.001) (Table III). For the nuclear ER concentrations there was no significant differences for any of the treatment groups, but all were lower than the control group.

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      Figure 4. Uterine wet weight for the rabbits according to treatment. The wet weight was significantly higher in ethinyl estradiol (EE)-treated animals than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Progestins themselves had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with a progestin all significantly increased the wet weight (P < 0.0001). Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      View this table:
      [in this window]
      [in a new window]
      Table III. Hepatic cholesterol content and uterine cytosolic and uterine nuclear estrogen receptor content (fmol/mg protein)

      Safety aspects in relation to the study
      Figure 5 shows that the rabbits receiving EE or EE plus a progestin had concentration peaks for the progestin between 1 and 8 h after administration, as based on the kinetic study. The differences in the area under the curve for LNG versus DSG, and EE + LNG versus EE + DSG respectively, indicate a difference in the serum concentrations of these two progestins and may, in part, reflect difference in protein binding. Nevertheless, the serum concentrations of LNG in rabbits are similar to those reported for women (Kook et al., 2002).

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      Figure 5. Mean concentrations in serum (ng/ml) of the various progestins alone or when combined with ethinyl estradiol. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      During the last 6–8 weeks, the animals and particularly those in the EE group ceased increasing in body weight probably as a result of general health deterioration, and in the EE group a significant number of rabbits (n = 8) did not complete the study. Autopsy of these animals suggested a toxic estrogenic effect of the liver (liver cirrhosis) and of the uterus (probably deciduocarcinoma) by macroscopic examination, as previously reported as a consequence of exogenous estrogens (Janne et al., 2001). Due to decay of the internal organs the precise cause of death could not be determined in most cases. Table IV summarizes the percentage change in ALAT, haemoglobin, and white cell count. In the EE group, eight rabbits died prematurely (mostly after week 20). The temporary increase in ALAT (week 6) in the LNG, EE + DSG, EE + GSD, and EE + LNG groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment, but never fully returned to pretreatment values (Table IV). The general health of the animals in the EE group as determined by the haemoglobin, red blood cell count and haematocrit (not shown), and clinical appearance deteriorated in the last period of the study, probably as a result of a toxic effect of the EE dose used.

      View this table:
      [in this window]
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      Table IV. Mean (SEM) percentage changes from baseline in liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count

      Discussion
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The principal results of this experimental study was that EE either alone or in continuous combination with one of the progestins used, i.e. LNG, DSG or GSD, significantly inhibited the aortic accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (cholesterol-feeding alone), whereas treatment with progestin monotherapy had a neutral effect on atherogenesis, irrespective of the progestin used. After adjustment for lipids and lipoproteins, there still was an apparently inhibitory effect of EE on aortic accumulation of cholesterol suggesting a lipid concentration-independent mechanism of action for EE on atherogenesis. A previous study in non-human monkeys also found that animals treated with EE in combination with LNG (as a triphasic OC formulation) had significantly less iliac artery atherosclerosis than control animals (Kaplan et al., 1995). Extrapolating experimental data to the human situation should be done with caution, but only two population-based studies have been specifically designed to investigate the role of second versus third generation OC formulations on the risk of myocardial infarction (Dunn et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001). In the study by Dunn et al., the relative risk was found to be increased with third generation compared with second generation OC formulations [OR, 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7–4.8)], whereas in the study by Tanis et al. the relative risk was found to be decreased with third generation compared with second generation formulations [OR, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2–1.1]. In addition, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking and arterial hypertension) seems to be crucial for development of myocardial infarction in women taking OC (World Health Organization, 1997; Farley et al., 1998; Lewis, 1998; Petitti et al., 2000; Tanis et al., 2001). In fact, the WHO study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in non-smoking women with no other cardiovascular risk factors who also reported blood pressure check before starting use of combined OC. Controlled, randomized studies are therefore clearly needed, although these studies will be of a considerable size taking into account the expected low incidence of myocardial infarction in pre-menopausal women (Crook and Godsland, 1998), and consequently such trials are very expensive to perform. Therefore, until clinical data on vascular endpoints are available, experimental animal studies may provide important clues in terms of the effect of various OC formulations on atherogenesis.
      Data on the direct effect of OC formulations on the human arterial system are lacking (Kuhl, 1996). We found evidence that the OC formulations used in this study had a direct effect on the arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of precontracted aortic rings was increased in the EE plus progestin groups, although less than in the EE group alone as compared with placebo. EE’s significant effect on restoring vasorelaxation was found to be independent of the accumulation of cholesterol in the aortic wall. However, we also found that the addition of the progestins influenced the estrogen-induced vasorelaxation (Figure 3), although by an unknown mechanism of action. Recently, in a study of precontracted rabbit jugular veins, EE, LNG, DSG and GSD were reported to induce relaxations in vessels with intact endothelium (Herkert et al., 2000). However, this area warrants further investigation.

      It is well known that cholesterol-fed rabbits show alterations in their lipoprotein metabolism that differ from the human situation (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992). Combination of EE with a progestin in this study reflected the estrogenic effect. Furthermore, the three combined treatments lowered serum lipids and the atherogenic lipoprotein levels significantly and similarly to EE monotherapy. In contrast, treatment with a progestin alone did not affect these variables differently from the controls, in accordance with earlier findings (Haarbo et al., 1992). In women, OC frequently increases serum triglycerides (Gevers Leuven et al., 1990; Kuhl et al., 1990; Leuven et al., 1990; Lobo et al., 1996; Cheung et al., 1999).

      The dose of EE was selected to reflect serum concentrations of EE in peri-menopausal women taking OC. However, the duration of the present study was longer than in many previous studies (20 weeks). Among the animals receiving EE alone, 40% died after only ≥21 weeks of treatment, whereas animals given combined treatment did not die prematurely. This suggests that the accumulated estrogen dose may have been too high and/or the study too long, as also indicated by the safety variables of the EE-treated animals at week 30 (Table IV), but also that adding a progestin was able to negate this toxic effect. Progestins were used in equipotent doses (i.e. in combination with EE they inhibit endometrial stimulation equally in humans) relative to each other. The selected dose of the progestins (µg per kg body weight) was chosen based on previous experience (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) and in-house studies (in Organon), but may be considered as high doses. All three OC formulations significantly decreased the concentration of the cytosolic ER concentration relative to controls, suggesting that these formulations affect the endometrium through a down-regulation of the cytosolic ER. Addition of a progestin in this study also down-regulated the ER although less than found for EE, and when combining EE with a progestin, the estrogen component dominated the ER regulation. It should, however, be emphasized that the lack of modifying effect of the progestins relative to the EE dose on the endometrium should not be taken as a lack of progestogenic effect, since the primary intention was to investigate the effect of these hormone combinations on atherosclerosis and arterial responsiveness.

      A type II statistical error is not likely to have occurred in our study. However, the accumulation of cholesterol (and amount of fatty streaks) in the EE group was significantly lower than that of the placebo animals. For a type II error to occur, the null hypothesis (that there was no difference in aortic accumulation of cholesterol between the EE and the placebo group) would not be true, and despite this, we would obtain a non-significant result, i.e. a ‘false negative’ result.

      In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits, the progestins investigated (LNG, DSG, or GSD) can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE, partly by decreasing atherogenic lipoproteins, and partly by a direct effect on the endothelium, modulating the aortic vasomotor response in vitro.

      References
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Alexandersen, P., Haarbo, J., Sandholdt, I., Shalmi, M., Lawaetz, H. and Christiansen, C. (1998) Norethindrone acetate enhances the antiatherogenic effect of 17beta-estradiol: a secondary prevention study of aortic atherosclerosis in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol., 18, 902–907.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Bradford, M.M. (1976) A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Anal. Biochem., 72, 248–254.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Cheung, M.C., Walden, C.E. and Knopp, R.H. (1999) Comparison of the effects of triphasic oral contraceptives with desogestrel or levonorgestrel on apolipoprotein A-I-containing high density lipoprotein particles. Metabolism, 48, 648–664.

      Crook, D. and Godsland, I. (1998) Safety evaluation of modern oral contraceptives. Effects on lipoprotein and carbohydrate metabolism. Contraception, 57, 189–201.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Dunn, N.R., Faragher, B., Thorogood, M., de Caestecker, L., MacDonald, T.M., McCollum, C., Thomas, S. and Mann, R. (1999) Risk of myocardial infarction in young female smokers. Heart, 82, 581–583.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Dunn, N.R., Arscott, A. and Thorogood, M. (2001) The relationship between use of oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction in young women with fatal outcome, compared to those who survive: results from the MICA case–control study. Contraception, 63, 65–69.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Farley, T.M., Meirik, O., Chang, C.L. and Poulter, N.R. (1998) Combined oral contraceptives, smoking, and cardiovascular risk. J. Epidemiol. Community Health, 52, 775–785.[Abstract]

      Farley, T.M., Meirik, O. and Collins, J. (1999) Cardiovascular disease and combined oral contraceptives: reviewing the evidence and balancing the risks. Hum. Reprod. Update, 5, 721–735.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Furchgott, R.F. and Zawadzki, J.V. (1980) The obligatory role of endothelial cells in the relaxation of arterial smooth muscle by acetylcholine. Nature, 288, 373–376.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      GeversLeuven, J.A., Dersjant-Roorda, M.C., Helmerhorst, F.M., de Boer, R., Neymeyer-Leloux, A. and Havekes, L. (1990) Estrogenic effect of gestodene- or desogestrel-containing oral contraceptives on lipoprotein metabolism. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 163 (1 Pt 2), 358–362.[ISI][Medline]

      Grady, D., Herrington, D., Bittner, V., Blumenthal, R., Davidson, M., Hlatky, M., Hsia, J., Hulley, S., Herd, A., Khan, S. et al. (2002) Cardiovascular disease outcomes during 6.8 years of hormone therapy: Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study follow-up (HERS II). J. Am. Med. Assoc., 288, 49–57.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Haarbo, J., Leth-Espensen, P., Stender, S. and Christiansen, C. (1991) Estrogen monotherapy and combined estrogen-progestogen replacement therapy attenuate aortic accumulation of cholesterol in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits. J. Clin. Invest., 87, 1274–1279.[ISI][Medline]

      Haarbo, J., Svendsen, O.L. and Christiansen, C. (1992) Progestogens do not affect aortic accumulation of cholesterol in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits. Circ. Res., 70, 1198–1202.[Abstract]

      Herkert, O., Kuhl, H., Busse, R. and Schini-Kerth, V.B. (2000) The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP. Br. J. Pharmacol., 130, 1911–1918.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Janne, O.A., Zook, B.C., Didolkar, A.K., Sundaram, K. and Nash, H.A. (2001) The roles of estrogen and progestin in producing deciduosarcoma and other lesions in the rabbit. Toxicol. Pathol., 29, 417–421.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Jick, H., Jick, S., Myers, M.W. and Vasilakis, C. (1996) Risk of acute myocardial infarction and low-dose combined oral contraceptives (research letter). Lancet, 347, 627–628.[ISI][Medline]

      Kaplan, J.R., Adams, M.R., Anthony, M.S., Morgan, T.M., Manuck, S.B. and Clarkson, T.B. (1995) Dominant social status and contraceptive hormone treatment inhibit atherogenesis in premenopausal monkeys. Arterioslcer. Thromb. Vasc. Biol., 15, 2094–2100.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Kook, K., Gabelnick, H. and Duncan, G. (2002) Pharmacokinetics of levonorgestrel 0.75 mg tablets. Contraception, 66, 73–76.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Kuhl, H. (1996) Comparative pharmacology of newer progestogens. Drugs, 51, 188–215.[ISI][Medline]

      Kuhl, H., Marz, W., Jung-Hoffmann, C., Heidt, F. and Gross, W. (1990) Time-dependent alterations in lipid metabolism during treatment with low-dose oral contraceptives. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 163 (1 Pt 2), 363–369.[ISI][Medline]

      Leuven, J.A., Dersjant-Roorda, M.C., Helmerhorst, F.M., de Boer, R., Neymeyer-Leloux, A. and Havekes, L.M. (1990) Effects of oral contraceptives on lipid metabolism. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 163 (4 Pt 2), 1410–1413.[ISI][Medline]

      Lewis, M.A. (1998) Myocardial infarction and stroke in young women: what is the impact of oral contraceptives? Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 179, S68–S77.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Lewis, M.A., Spitzer, W.O., Heinemann, L.A., MacRae, K.D., Bruppacher, R. and Thorogood, M. (1996) Third generation oral contraceptives and risk of myocardial infarction: an international case–control study. Transnational Research Group on Oral Contraceptives and the Health of Young Women. Br. Med. J., 312, 88–90.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Lewis, M.A., Heinemann, L.A., Spitzer, W.O., MacRae, K.D. and Bruppacher, R. (1997) The use of oral contraceptives and the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction in young women: results from the Transnational study on oral contraceptives and the health of young women. Contraception, 56, 129–40.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Lobo, R.A., Skinner, J.B., Lippman, J.S. and Cirillo, S.J. (1996) Plasma lipids and desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol: a meta-analysis. Fertil. Steril., 65, 1100–1109.[ISI][Medline]

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      Poulter, N.P., Chang, C.L., Farley, T.M.M., Kelaghan, J., Meirlk, O. and Marmot, M.G. (1997) Acute myocardial infarction and combined oral contraceptives: results of an international multicentre case–control study. WHO Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception. Lancet, 349, 1202–1209.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Rosendaal, F.R., Helmerhorst, F.M. and Vandenbroucke, J.P. (2002) Female hormones and thrombosis. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol., 22, 201–210.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Rossouw, J.E., Anderson, G.L., Prentice, R.L., LaCroix, A.Z., Kooperberg, C., Stefanick, M.L., Jackson, R.D., Beresford, S.A., Howard, B.V., Johnson, K.C. et al. (2002) Risks and benefits of estrogen plus progestin in healthy postmenopausal women: principal results from the Women’s Health Initiative randomized controlled trial. J. Am. Med. Assoc., 288, 321–333.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Sidney, S., Siscovick, D.S., Petitti, D.B., Schwartz, S.M., Quesenberry, C.P., Psaty, B.M., Raghunathan, T.E., Kelaghan, J. and Koepsell, T.D. (1998) Myocardial infarction and use of low-dose oral contraceptives: a pooled analysis of 2 US studies. Circulation, 98, 1058–1063.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

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      Submitted on December 13, 2002; resubmitted on February 20, 2003; accepted on March 25, 2003.

      This article has been cited by other articles:

      T. Hayashi, T. Esaki, D. Sumi, T. Mukherjee, A. Iguchi, and G. Chaudhuri
      Modulating role of estradiol on arginase II expression in hyperlipidemic rabbits as an atheroprotective mechanism
      PNAS, July 5, 2006; 103(27): 10485 - 10490.
      [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

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      Online ISSN 1460-2350 - Print ISSN 0268-1161 [2007 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology]

  50. QUESTION:
    Can someone help me with my hot flashes?
    I am 43 years old and have stopped having my period 18 months ago. I now have hot flashes. Went to GNC and bought vitamins for menopause. They help some. How do I know if I'm taking right amount? Can I take more then suggested on label?

    • ANSWER:
      Hot flashes are a common part of menopause. It has been estimated that 60% of women will experience them. There are ways to deal with hot flashes, however.
      Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms, meaning biochemical events resulting from your body's temperature control being "off". Basically your body thinks it's overheated but it's not. Your blood vessels then quickly discharge what your body perceives as heat.

      Fabrics You Wear

      Nylon, spandex, and close-knit polyester trap body heat, which is definitely not what you want to have on when you get a hot flash. Avoiding nylon pajamas and satin or polyester sheets will help with night sweats.

      Exercise

      Regular exercise may reduce the number of hot flashes you get. It can also decrease how long each one lasts.

      Cold Compresses or Water

      Cold compresses or cool water can help stop a hot flash. This can also help keep one you just had from coming back. The inside of the wrist, inside of elbows and the back of your neck are good places to apply a cold compress. Applying to either side of your groin can help with a hot flash too.

      Stay Away from Hot Water

      Hot showers and hot tubs raise your body temperature, which can stimulate a hot flash, so steer clear of these.

      Paced Breathing

      When in the middle of a hot flash, paced breathing can be key. The North American Menopause Society has shown that women who practice steadied breathing had many fewer hot flashes - 50% less.

      Smelling Flowers

      Even smelling flowers can help. Some scents calm the body, like roses, vanilla, lavender, lemongrass, geranium, ylang-ylang and clary sage.

      Don't Smoke

      Smokers may also experience more hot flashes, especially for thinner women. Cutting down on smoking will help but quitting is even better. Smoking triggers body changes that cause earlier, more frequent, and more intense hot flashes.

      Herbal Supplements or Vitamins

      Incorporating herbal supplements or vitamins into your diet can help, but you should consult your doctor before making a diet change. Vitamin E has been used to help with hot flashes but there's no concrete evidence it helps and it may be linked to breast cancer. Bioflavinoids have some of the same benefits as estrogen. Black Cohosh, an herb, may help with hot flashes.

      Stay Away from Caffeine, Spicy Food or Alcohol

      Some women have found that caffeine, spicy food or alcohol trigger their hot flashes. Avoiding these may help. Adding soy to your diet can help as well, but it may not be a good option for those at risk for breast cancer. As always, check with your doctor before making a serious diet change


foods for menopause

Premature Menopause Age

[STARTPOSTCONTENT][POSTCONTENT][ENDPOSTCONTENT]

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a test to determine if someone is going through premature menopause?
    I have found lists of symptoms for premature menopause, but am looking for something more definitive. Is there such a thing as a test for this condition? If so, how readily available is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. YOu get your FSH tested. This is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland that is very low when your ovaries are working normally, and very high when they're not working. The only reason it would get high in someone who is not of menopausal age is if her ovaries have stopped working due to premature menopause. The doc will also test you estradiol level.

  2. QUESTION:
    Extreme hot flashes during menstrual period?
    I am having extreme hot flashes during my menstrual period. I feel like I'm in an oven. I've searched online, but not much is coming up other than early menopause, but I'm only 23, even though the average age for premature menopause is 27. Does anyone else experience this?

    • ANSWER:
      ive been having the same thing for years im 18. im going to the doc. next week. you should go to.

  3. QUESTION:
    could night sweats around the time of my period be premature menopause?
    I've been having night sweats a few days before my period and now during, and I don't know why, so I have assumed it has something to do with this. People associate it with menopause. I haven't been on any pills ever. I'm 17. I wake up in cold sweat wet.

    • ANSWER:
      This is quite common in women of all ages due to falling oestrogen pre period. If you do not have any other symptoms it is normal but uncomfortable and not a sign of premature menopause.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the youngest age a woman can go through menopause?
    I'm only 25 but I've been having symptoms of menopause, is this even possible? I've had problems with my period ever since I got it, so I wouldn't be surpised! Thanks.
    I won't be able to go to a doctor for about 2 weeks, we're in the middle of moving and pretty much all of our time is used up packing and working. I'm kinda embarrassed to even ask a Doc about it. It seems kinda ridiculous.
    I'll give you some history real quick.
    I've always missed periods, from 6 weeks in between to 4 months (been since Sept this time). Bad cramps all the time. Went on the pill for about 7 years on and off to control it. Didn't have insurance for the last 2 years and went off it. In the last year, had major issues, longer gaps and longer lasting (3 weeks one time), had hair grow on my face and breasts (never did before) and had a higher temp then normal.
    I guess it is pretty dumb that I'm embarassed to ask my doc, I had a bad experinace when I asked one about something I thought I had. I was mocked and laughed at. I stopped going to see him.

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a link on Premature Ovarian Failure aka Premature Menopause:
      http://www.4woman.gov/menopause/stages/premature.cfm
      and
      http://www.medicinenet.com/premature_menopause/article.htm

      You more likely have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.
      Here's a link for that:
      http://www.4woman.gov/faq/pcos.htm

      Don't be affraid to talk to your gynecologist about this. You've got something going on hormonally. It needs checked out.

      If you had symptoms for diabetes would you feel silly for seeing a doctor? Well, this is the same type of thing. Your body isn't giving you what it needs.

  5. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for periods to stop with premature ovarian failure?
    My periods last a day and a half to two days now, just wondering when they will stop completely. I have almost all symptoms of menopause from hot flashes to anxiety to cold sweats to the embarrassing parts, and I am 24. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      There's no clear guide--everyone is different. Complicating matters is that women with premature ovarian failure are advised to take hormone replacement to avoid the numerous body-damaging problems inherent in ovarian failure at a young age. Hormone replacement causes a bleed that is like a period, so they can't tell what their body is doing on its own. If you have premature ovarian failure, then you should be taking hormones. And check out www.ipofa.org, which is a support group.

  6. QUESTION:
    How does a doctor diagnose premature ovarian failure?
    POF means you are going through menopause early (like before the age of 40). Just curious as to how a doctor would diagnose that.

    • ANSWER:
      They probably do multiple tests . . . but I am sure that one of them would be the CD3 FSH blood test - this indicates the egg reserve and potentially quality.

      http://www.advancedfertility.com/day3fsh.htm

  7. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to adjust to lower hrt levels?
    I am 35yrs old and went into early menopause 5yrs ago. I have been taking oral contraceptives for hormone replacement for 3years. My doctor had me on a very high dose for two years of these years. Less than three months ago I lowered my dose. I was wondering how long does it take for my body to adjust to this change or has it already?

    • ANSWER:
      It might not adjust. When you go through early menopause, you could very well experience menopausal side effects until you reach the normal age of menopause--so like for 20 years. The National Institute of Health recommends that women with premature menopause be on higher dosages of hormones because their younger bodies need it. It's not the same as an older, naturally menopausal woman. The risks are greater by NOT taking hormones than by taking hormones.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can I plan a new baby in the age of 45 while my wife is 48 years?
    As i mentioned above I want to plan a new baby. It it safe pregnancy in this age. My age age is 45 while my wife's age is 48. Will my new baby be Ok and fit with good mental health.? Please answer me according to medical views.

    • ANSWER:
      I would honestly consult your doctor.
      For a male it doesnt really matter at what age you decided to want to have a child simply because men are always producing sperm
      while females which a point where they can release any more eggs which is known as menopause.
      Honestly, its a really high risk for your wife to have a baby at such an age. Like from an article "Any woman over the age of 40 constitutes a high-risk pregnancy — the medical risks rise rapidly for mothers older than 40 and for their babies"
      Risk include the baby being premature, the baby can be lost, it could be a stillborn baby (where the baby is born dead)
      the other concern is that the baby is having a chromosomal problem and it goes up every year "For example, the risk of having a baby with Down syndrome rises from about 1 in 759 at age 30 to 1 in 302 at age 35, 1 in 82 at age 40"
      But life works miracles, i say talk to your doctor :)

  9. QUESTION:
    What age is normal for the menopause?
    I am 20 and I thought menopause occurred in your late 40s but then I became confused when watching Im a celeb last night. Apparently Gillian Mckeith - 51 - still has periods. Is this possible and did anyone else think it was strange?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause normally begins in the late 40's through the early 50's. But menopause can also start in your 20's and 30's, in which case it is called premature menopause. Premature menopause can be triggered by many things including living at high altitudes and smoking.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why is it bad to go into early menopause?
    I'm 40 and I think I've been having hot flashes. Alot of people tell me it's bad to go into early menopause. Why?

    • ANSWER:
      Basically, if you are done having kids, then you're like millions of other women going through menopause.

      I was 21 when I was diagnosed with POF - Premature Ovarian Failure (ran out of eggs). I remember at the age of 15 my periods started to get irregular (2 times a month or skip 2-3 months) and I was always hot (hot flashes).

      My sex drive has been low. I feel anxious all the time and we do use more lubrication when making love. I am 37 now and my ob/gyn still thinks I need Estrogen and I've been taking BC pill - Ortho Tri-cyclen for awhile now and probably will until I reach 45-50 years old.

      Not everyone has the same symptoms and you should discuss this with your ob/gyn.

  11. QUESTION:
    Turner Syndrome, What happens when they reach the age of 25?
    I have a 17 year old sister that have turner syndrome. She went through hormone therapy for about 4 years. When she reached her teenage years , she started having problems with her kidneys and she is now prone to diabetes. What happens to girls to have TS when they reach the age of 25? Is it true that they will also experience pre-mature aging?

    • ANSWER:
      No, I'm not aware of any correlation between premature aging as such and Turner's. There are medical issues she needs to be aware of, though, like cardiac issues and the propensity to diabetes you mentioned. When you say she "went through hormone therapy," do you mean estrogen or growth hormone? If she's 17, she's probably old enough that she's stopped growth hormone, but she still needs to be on estrogen/progesterone replacement therapy. Adequate HRT throughout adulthood is *very important* in women with TS, and the current thinking is that women with TS should remain on HRT until 50 or so, the age at which menopause would naturally be beginning. It will do a lot to combat osteoporosis and other issues. I don't know why you picked 25, but there's nothing in particular that "happens" to women with TS at that age or any age, they just need to be aware throughout their adulthood of the medical issues that can arise with TS and be sure they are getting good medical care from a doctor who is knowledgeable about the condition. The Turner's Syndrome Society of the United States is a great resource for keeping up with the latest medical research on TS - http://www.turnersyndrome.org.

  12. QUESTION:
    is it possible to have menopause at the age of 18?
    i have been having abit of mood swings & minor bladder leaks lately, i have search on the internet and found that some symptons do apply to me for menopause, but im only 18, is it possible ?
    my periods hasnt come yet this month. so could i possibly really be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      They don't call it menopause, its called POF - Premature Ovarian Failure. I was diagnosed at age 21.

      Here's more info on POF: http://pofsupport.org

      Good Luck!

  13. QUESTION:
    Is soy bean milk really good for our body?
    can it really substitute the regular cow milk? what's the benefit of it? is it true that soy bean able to postpone menopause? and can prevent premature-aging?

    • ANSWER:
      some babies like me when small need it cuz theyre allergic to cows milk

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I am going through Early Onset Menopause?
    The only real symptom I have is a screwed up menstrual cycle. I work with menopausal women that say I am about to go through the change. I am only 42. No night sweats, in fact I am always cold.

    • ANSWER:
      You should talk to your doctor but here's some information.
      http://www.epigee.org/menopause/early.html

      Early and Premature Menopause

      When we hear the word menopause, we usually think of older women above the age of 60. Very rarely do we ever think of ourselves. However, menopause is not a stage necessarily relegated to elderly women. Early or premature menopause is more common than most women realize - it affects about 1% of women between the ages of 15 and 45. Early or premature menopause can occur for a variety of reasons, but in the end it leaves an imprint on the lives of all of the women it affects.

      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      Because doctors are finally beginning to recognize the symptoms of menopause in younger women, more and more women are being diagnosed with early or premature menopause. As a result, women who are experiencing infertility or are dealing with menopause symptoms at a young age no longer have to wonder why.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that aren’t functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers’ footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Surgical Menopause
      Surgical menopause involves the conscious decision of forcing women into menopause for specific health reasons. Women who suffer from endometriosis, polyps, or ovarian cancer may have to undergo an oopherectomy (removal of the ovaries) or a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and sometimes ovaries). These surgeries dramatically cut off ovarian function causing estrogen levels to drop suddenly and forcing the woman into menopause.

      Menopause Caused by Cancer Treatment
      Menopause can be caused by chemotherapy or radiation cancer treatments. Chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells but, unfortunately, they also kills healthy cells. Hair cells, digestive cells, and ovarian cells are particularly at risk. Some women who have undergone cancer treatment temporarily enter menopause, while others permanently enter menopause.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the body’s functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen (known as "estrogen crash") in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isn’t so bad – in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest that women starts to go through the?
    change of life. I am 36. I think I might be going through it. I guess other people call it menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  16. QUESTION:
    If anyone did IVF using donor eggs instead of your own, how did you reconcile not being the biological mother?
    I am almost 44 and am thinking of having one last child before it's too late, but at my age using your own eggs is almost impossible. Can anyone help me out here? How did you approach this and get over the feeling of it wanting to be your own child biologically?

    • ANSWER:
      Please allow me to address the other answer you've received first, then I will continue. For the other person's response with a blanket statement of "Most have overcome that need for biological by that point when they make that decision." is absolutely ridiculous and ignorant. I know of PLENTY of women who are in their 40s who still are resolved in their attempts to use their own eggs during their IVF cycles. And for those women in that age group that could not afford IVF, they have reported to feel some sort of emptiness for not having had the experience of pregnancy and birthing. This of course does not apply to ALL women, but to some. Which is my point exactly in calling you out on your statement. I can only assume that you are not in your 40s, and therefore cannot possibly make such a statement.

      With that being said, here is my personal experience:

      I am 39, and had been ttc for 15 years. After a failed IVF cycle, I was found to have Premature Ovarian Failure (early menopause). My husband and I felt devastated initially. We were told that our only options left on the table were to either pursue another IVF cycle using an egg donor, adoption, or remain childless. We knew we wanted to be parents desperately, so remaining childless was out of the question. We also knew that we were not ready to adopt an older, special needs child. And if we wanted to adopt an infant, we knew that the waiting lists were on average to be about 2 years, and we would spend tens of thousands of dollars with no guarantee of a baby to call our own. Furthermore, we also felt that we would not qualify for infant adoption, as most agencies are Christian-based and my husband is atheist. Also, I have been previously married, which would preclude us from qualifying with many an agency. So that option was out. Besides that, I desired greatly to experience pregnancy and breastfeeding. It was an extremely strong maternal drive I had within. So my husband and I decided that we needed to allow ourselves some proper time to grieve the loss of me ever having children that would be genetically mine. We went on a holiday to escape any and all fertility treatment talk, get grounded with just us two, and upon our return, we wept together and talked at great lengths about what felt right for us. After a few months, we both felt ready to move forward with using an egg donor. And let me clear something up here that you've misstated in your question (which is a very common mistake)....these children ARE mine biologically. They share my blood, my air, my everything while they grow within my womb. If you use an egg donor, the same would be true for you. There is a difference between BIOLOGICAL and GENETICS. Biological means same blood source. Genetically means different DNA make up. With that being said, it is an extremely personal decision for a woman to make. You must first grieve what will never be. You must have your heart and your mind in the "right" spot before moving forward, otherwise the resentment and/or bitterness will drive you mad. But let me say this: I know that for myself, as well as the other women I know that used an egg donor, the first time you see your baby's face on an ultrasound, you completely fall in love. Your ideas that this child is different than you completely melt away. And I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that whenever I feel my twin boys kicking and moving around inside of me that I am their mother. They are my sons. We are forever connected in a way that is special between child and mother. And I cannot hardly wait until they arrive, I hold them in my arms, and I look into their eyes. They are a part of me, no matter what our DNA says.

      I wish you the very best of luck on your journey, no matter what you choose. I do recommend highly that you either begin to attend a support group for infertility, or perhaps invest in seeing a therapist that specializes in infertility. It will help you to gain even more clarity, and for you to decide whatever is best for YOU.

      I welcome you to read my very personal online blog, which details my journey for the past year and half; especially about choosing to use an egg donor, how we found the "perfect" match of a donor for us, and what the process was like. I hope it not only helps to guide you, but also gives you some personal insight. http://wwww.roxysivfjourney.blogspot.com

  17. QUESTION:
    I am 33 years married woman with symptoms of premature menopause?
    My GP has told me last month that i can be hanving premature menopause as my symptoms are saying so.
    She has adviced me Menopace tablet and general calcium tablets. For last whole month i was taking this tablet and my symptoms were undercontrolled but now next week my period is due and yesterday i forgot to take that menopace tablet and today i am feeling lot of tiredness alongwith hypertension and fatigue , artheritic pain , and lost of temper problem what does these symptoms mean because it can be PMS or premature menopause can somebody help me in telling which are the blood tests to rule out menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is a stage in life when a woman stops having her monthly period.It is a normal part of aging, marking the end of a woman's reproductive years.Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  18. QUESTION:
    Isit possible to get alzheimers at age 18?
    I was diagnosed with premature ovarian failure(aka menopause at age 17) about a year and a half ago, i did more research and found that memory loss and alzheimers are related to it also, i am suffering from memory loss and am just wondering if it's possible to be in the early stages of alzheimers at age 18? i looked up the stages and what im experiencing is almost exactly the same as the mild stage of alzheimers.

    • ANSWER:
      I personally know plenty of people who have cured a number of different sickness with just nutrition!!! A deficiency in zinc, the essential fatty acids, and the B-vitamins can cause premature ovarian failure! google for more info. Google these superfoods for information about VERY nutrient-dense foods: maca powder, royal jelly, spirulina, chlorella, bee pollen, cocoa powder, etc... (if you have allergies, you shouldn't take bee pollen).

  19. QUESTION:
    What happens if a womans period stops once in for all at a young age.. Like late teens or early twenties?
    Now I am just a bit curious.
    And she is not sexually active in he first place.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the cause behind it. It can, and does, happen to many, many young girls, and some causes are reversable, whilst others are permanent.

      Bulimia, anorexia and rapid weight loss can cause interruptions in the menstruation cycle. Bulimia and anorexia, however, can cause so much damage to a young girl's body that her reproductive system is affected, and she becomes infertile(irreversable).

      Strenuous physical activity can cause interruptions in the menstruation cycle, but usually once the young girl stops the activity, her cycle should come back to normal.

      Drugs can affect the menstruation cycle, enough to render (g)you infertile. Accidents that happen to (g)your lower abdomin can leave (g)you infertile.

      Early menopause(happens before the age of 40, *not* premature menopause, where menopause happens before the age of 45) renders the woman infertile. It can happen to women between the ages of 15-45, and, unfortunatly, the cause isn't always easy to find.

      In all of these conditions, obviously the biggest factor is infertility. Then there are the mental effects, and the hormonal effects. Estrogen and progesterone are the hormones responsible for our(women's) sexual and reproductional function, so without them, there may be less of a desire to have sexual intercourse.

      They will also experience things such as hot flashes, headaches and mood swings.

      Amenorrhoea is a fancy word for ''abscence of menstrual period'' or ''no bleed at that time of the month''. This term can be used to decribe what happens during pregnancy, or during lactation(breast feeding). It is also used to describe what could happen when using birth control. It's also used when (g)your period has stopped due to the reasons mentioned above, except for early menopause.

      Best of luck, if I have missed anything, just let me know through additional details :- )

      This explains amenorrhoea >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenorrhoea <<.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there something a woman can do to get menopause, delayed?
    Like so women can get it at around age 50, instead of age 35.

    • ANSWER:
      The average age of menopause for American women is 51. Some a few years before, some a few years after. Menopause can occur earlier due to surgical removal of ovaries, radiation, chemotheraphy, treatment for childhood cancer.

      When early menopause or Premature Ovarian Function occurs there is some kind of anomally. See your GYN as there are hormone replacement options.

      Also visit http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide/premature-menopause

      http://www.earlymenopause.com/

  21. QUESTION:
    At what age can I expect to stop having hot flushes?
    I used HRT for 15 years but have been off for 5 and still having hot flushes. Any helpful advice out there?
    Incidentally I am 70

    • ANSWER:
      I am assuming that you had a premature menopause, either naturally or as a result of surgery. Unfortunately you don't give any details of what went on. Also very importantly you haven't given your current age. Please add this information and I will try and help.

      Thanks for adding your age, this coupled with the fact that you have been off HRT for 5 years is to say the least puzzling! It might be worth your GP investigating you for other causes of flushing such as an Phaeochromocytoma (adrenal adenoma,) hyperthyroidism, diabetes, Polycythemia vera and many more. I don't think it would be unreasonable to ask him to exclude these, though I know they are rare.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can you have kids if you hit menopause at 13?
    Ny friend went through menopause at 13, can that stop you from having kids?

    • ANSWER:
      Although it is *extremely rare* girls barely into puberty can experience "premature ovarian failure" - i.e. their ovaries fail to develop and this, in effect, leads to menopause at an extremely early age.

      I'll bet almost anything that your friend did not go through this. While it's theoretically possible, it's a one-in-several million occurrence. Unless your friend has gone through a HUGE battery of medical follow-up, it's virtually certain this did not happen.

      In the unlikely event that it DID happen, yes this would render her unable to have children. But, this would be the least of her problems. She will have a (shortened) lifetime of bone and joint problems, as well as a slew of other hormone-related problems.

  23. QUESTION:
    How long should I wait after cancer to have a baby?
    This really sucks cause my husband and I were planning to have our next baby about now when I got diagnosed with cancer. I am currently going for chemotherapy right now. After my chemo is done, how long is it recommended that I wait?
    Ya they told me that this chemo treatment I was getting can cause infertility after the IV was already in my vein. It upset me so much that they didn't tell me before it was too late to save any eggs. I'll just have to take my chances as soon as I am safely able

    • ANSWER:
      Chemotherapy can cause infertility in women by damaging the ovaries and affecting the levels of hormones produced by the ovaries. This can lead to irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea or even premature menopause. The menopause may be temporary or permanent.

      The risk of infertility from chemotherapy is generally dose-dependent. Among women, age may also be a risk factor for chemotherapy-induced infertility.

      Cancer survivors may need to wait six months to a year after the end of treatment before trying to conceive, to give enough time for fertility to recover and for any residual chemotherapy to reach subtherapeutic levels.

      There isn't a correct answer that anyone can give you here. This is something that ONLY your oncologist and gynecologist can answer for you. There are too many variables involved and without knowing type of cancer, length of treatment, dosage, gynecological history, etc. We couldn't even guess. It's a shame this wasn't brought up before treatment started.

      Good luck, wishing you a successful treatment and recovery. There are some options for future children so please discuss them with your doctors.

  24. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest people start goin threw menapause?
    I am 26 yrs old and I have 24 out of 36 symptoms already. I am having a lot of female problems and the doctor can't figure out why. I have talked to a lot of family members and they believe I am going threw the change already.

    • ANSWER:
      All the studies I have read state 45 is the average age but, they say there is a marked increase in women in their 20's showing peri-menopause signs. Smoking is an external factor that can cause some women to experience early menopause.

      Another big possiblity might be an autoimmune disorder. In this case the body’s own antibodies and immune system, normally employed to fight off diseases, to suddenly attack and destroy healthy tissues within the system. While a common trigger for premature menopause, the category of autoimmune disorders is a wide one and covers a variety of conditions, ranging from thyroid disease to lupus or Graves’ disease. Of all of these, hypothyroidism is perhaps the most common; a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone to keep the body’s metabolism running. It is believed that over 5 million Americans suffer from this condition and at least 10% of all women in the United States suffer from some degree of thyroid hormone deficiency. In many cases, people with hypothyroidism don’t even realize they have it until a condition, such as a premature menopause, draws attention to its presence.

      Genetics and defects in the chromosomes can also cause premature menopause. If a woman’s mother or sister has experienced menopause on or before the age of 40, there is a greater risk that she will also experience this condition. Chromosome defects can also cause problems, as in the case of women who are born without a second X chromosome (Turner’s syndrome). This causes the ovaries to form abnormally and prevents them from working properly, thereby triggering a premature menopause.

      In your specific case, it sounds like all has been normal until now so, I would bet it is auto-immune related. Has your Dr. done the auto-immune antibody titer blood test, looking for signs of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis? If you feel that you have hit a wall with your Dr. you might ask to be referred to an Endocrinologist. In my opinion they are so specialized in their field that they might get you to an answer quicker, especially if your problem is auto-immune related Hope this helps and you are able to find out & treat what the cause is for this hormone disruption.

  25. QUESTION:
    What is the youngest age a male could know that he has hypogonadism?

    • ANSWER:
      congenital, it can be seen at birth. upon develepmental stages it can be diagnosed later and up to age two. any concern of lack of dropping of testicles would be observed over period of time durring the first year.

      Deficiency of sex hormones can result in defective primary or secondary sexual development, or withdrawal effects (e.g., premature menopause) in adults.

      There are many possible types of hypogonadism and several ways to categorize them.

      [edit] by Congenital vs. acquired
      An example of congenital hypogonadism (present at birth) is Turner syndrome.
      An example of acquired hypogonadism (develops in childhood or adult life) is castration.

      [edit] by Hormones vs. fertility
      Hypogonadism can involve just hormone production or just fertility, but most commonly involves both.

      Examples of hypogonadism that affect hormone production more than fertility are hypopituitarism and Kallmann syndrome; in both cases, fertility is reduced until hormones are replaced but can be achieved solely with hormone replacement.
      Examples of hypogonadism that affect fertility more than hormone production are Klinefelter syndrome and Kartagener syndrome.

      [edit] by Affected system
      Hypogonadism is also categorized by endocrinologists by the level of the reproductive system that is defective.

      Hypogonadism resulting from defects of the gonads is traditionally referred to as primary hypogonadism. Examples include Klinefelter syndrome and Turner syndrome.
      Hypogonadism resulting from hypothalamic or pituitary defects are termed secondary hypogonadism or central hypogonadism (referring to the central nervous system).
      Examples of Hypothalamic defects include Kallmann syndrome.
      Examples of Pituitary defects include hypopituitarism.
      An example of a hypogonadism resulting from hormone response is androgen insensitivity syndrome.

      Low Testosterone can be identified through a simple blood test performed by a physician. Normal testosterone levels range from 298 - 1098 ng/dl.

      go get tested =)

  26. QUESTION:
    At what age do women stop getting their period?
    They can't have their period when they're 80-90 right? So at what age does it stop?

    • ANSWER:
      The average age of menopause is 51, but it really varies and usually occurs after age 40. There are people who have premature ovarian failure who could stop having periods in their 30s.

      On the other hand, vaginal bleeding (which might seem like a period) can occur even after menopause and would be reason for concern. Any vaginal bleeding that occurs > 6 months after menopause is abnormal and might be endometrial cancer.

  27. QUESTION:
    What kind procedures are done to stop having period at over age 50?
    I have heard that some people who are over age 50 and still having a heavy period can get some kind of "thing" in their uterus. So that would stop the period until they get their menopause..do you all know what that is exactly? and how does it work? any link regarding this would be a help too..thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a list of what can be done.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/menorrhagia/DS00394/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs
      Dilation and curettage (D and C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need additional D and C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using a variety of techniques, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have little or no menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. Surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed under anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause in younger women.

      A hysterectomy can be done but it doesn't mean the ovaries have to be removed with it and it should be the last resort because a hysterectomy is major surgery that involves major cutting and stitching. A woman who has a vaginal hysterectomy can have over 200 internal stitches and the minimum recovery is six weeks. The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus. If the ovaries are taken it's called a bilateral salpingo oopherectomy. When the entire uterus is taken it includes the cervix which is the neck or bottom of the uterus and is termed a total hysterectomy. It's possible to have a total hysterectomy and keep both ovaries. I had a TVH and kept both ovaries. There's also another procedure that may be able to be done in an outpatient setting but I think it's similar to ablation usually with all of them it's recommended that women don't have kids after them. While some may not be a guarantee it's also important to know the causes of heavy bleeding. Some cases may not respond to the other things and a hysterectomy would be the only choice which could work. If there's endometriosis or adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) a hysterectomy is the only cure.

      Edited: About what the previous responder Mike said about a hysterectomy not intended to stop periods...When the uterus and cervix are removed there shouldn't be any bleeding at all even if both ovaries are present. It's the linning of the uterus and sometimes the linning left in the cervix that builds up every month which causes bleeding. Women who have a tubal ligation simply don't pass the eggs into their uterus and they still have periods because of the uterine linning that builds up from hormones and such. Because I kept my ovaries with my total hysterectomy (see note at bottom for definition of total hysterctomy) my doctor said the eggs would just disinigrate into my body but because I don't have a uterus or cervix anymore I don't get anymore periods. I don't need any hormone replacement therapy because my ovaries are still providing enough hormones until I go into menopause. There have been women who have had both ovaries removed and still have the uterus although it's not as common to leave the uterus in when both ovaries are out and they still get periods or messed up cycles because of the unbalanced amount of hormones. It's the linning from the uterus that sheds every month.

      Here is a list of the different types of hysterectomies and please do not confuse the term partial and total hysterectomy.
      Note: The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus not the ovaries. A total hysterectomy is when the cervix is removed with the uterus which is the bottom part or neck of the uterus and is about the size of a coat button. It can still contain a linning and shed every month for women who opt to keep their cervix. Some women have had to go back in and have the cervix removed because it bled so much. One can have a total hysterectomy while keeping both ovaries and tubes.

      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/view_hysterectomy_defined.htm
      Total Hysterectomy
      A total hysterectomy is removal of the entire uterus which includes the cervix. A radical hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, the tissue on both sides of the cervix (parametrium), and the upper part of the vagina.

      Partial Hysterectomy
      A partial (or supracervical) hysterectomy is removal of just the upper portion of the uterus, leaving the cervix intact
      Removal of the ovaries and the fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo oopherectomy) may also be done at the same time.

      Hysterectomy Types
      A hysterectomy may be done through an abdominal incision - Abdominal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done through a vaginal incision - Vaginal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through laparoscopic incisions (small incisions on the abdomen -- Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through the use of a robotic surgical device through small incisions in the abdomen - da Vinci® Hysterectomy.

      Your physician will help you decide which type of hysterectomy is most appropriate for you, depending on your medical history and the reason for your surgery.

  28. QUESTION:
    when does medipos start, at what age? What are the signs that you are entering that stage in ones life?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  29. QUESTION:
    What causes women to be infertile or have fertility problems?
    What makes a lot of women not able to conceive? What are the main reasons for infertility? I'm just curious, I just had a daughter last week who I got pregnant with really fast, but my twin sister is having a hard time having a baby.

    • ANSWER:
      I am dealing with same problem and I think main reasons are No Ovulation,short leuteal phase,Blocked tubes or hormonal problem might make a woman infertile.

      Causes of female infertility

      The most common causes of female infertility include fallopian tube damage or blockage, endometriosis, ovulation disorders, elevated prolactin, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), early menopause, benign uterine fibroids and pelvic adhesions.

      ■Fallopian tube damage or blockage. Fallopian tube damage usually results from inflammation of the fallopian tube (salpingitis). Chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, is the most frequent cause. Tubal inflammation may go unnoticed or cause pain and fever. Tubal damage is the major risk factor of a pregnancy in which the fertilized egg is unable to make its way through the fallopian tube to implant in the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). One episode of tubal infection may cause fertility difficulties. The risk of ectopic pregnancy increases with each occurrence of tubal infection.
      ■Endometriosis. Endometriosis occurs when the uterine tissue implants and grows outside of the uterus — often affecting the function of the ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes. These implants respond to the hormonal cycle and grow, shed and bleed in sync with the lining of the uterus each month, which can lead to scarring and inflammation. Pelvic pain and infertility are common in women with endometriosis.
      ■Ovulation disorders. Some cases of female infertility are caused by ovulation disorders. Disruption in the part of the brain that regulates ovulation can cause low levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Even slight irregularities in the hormone system can affect ovulation. Specific causes of hypothalamic-pituitary disorders include injury, tumors, excessive exercise and starvation.
      ■Elevated prolactin (hyperprolactinemia). The hormone prolactin stimulates breast milk production. High levels in women who aren't pregnant or nursing may affect ovulation. An elevation in prolactin levels may also indicate the presence of a pituitary tumor. In addition, some drugs can elevate levels of prolactin. Milk flow not related to pregnancy or nursing can be a sign of high prolactin.
      ■Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In PCOS, your body produces too much androgen hormone, which affects ovulation. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and obesity.
      ■Early menopause (premature ovarian failure). Early menopause is the absence of menstruation and the early depletion of ovarian follicles before age 35. Although the cause is often unknown, certain conditions are associated with early menopause, including immune system diseases, radiation or chemotherapy treatment, and smoking.
      ■Benign uterine fibroids. Fibroids are benign tumors in the wall of the uterus and are common in women in their 30s. Occasionally they may cause infertility by blocking the fallopian tubes.
      ■Pelvic adhesions. Pelvic adhesions are bands of scar tissue that bind organs after pelvic infection, appendicitis, or abdominal or pelvic surgery. This scar tissue formation may impair fertility.
      Other causes. A number of other causes can lead to infertility in women:

      ■Medications. Temporary infertility may occur with the use of certain medications. In most cases, fertility is restored when the medication is stopped.
      ■Thyroid problems. Disorders of the thyroid gland, either too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism), can interrupt the menstrual cycle and cause infertility.
      ■Cancer and its treatment. Certain cancers — particularly female reproductive cancers — often severely impair female fertility. Both radiation and chemotherapy may affect a woman's ability to reproduce. Chemotherapy may impair reproductive function and fertility in men and women.
      ■Other medical conditions. Medical conditions associated with delayed puberty or amenorrhea, such as Cushing's disease, sickle cell disease, HIV/AIDS, kidney disease and diabetes, can affect a woman's fertility.
      ■Caffeine intake. Excessive caffeine consumption reduces fertility in the female.

  30. QUESTION:
    What symptoms would lead to fragile x testing?
    I just recently started reading information on Fragile X. Does anyone know what type of symptoms would lead to genetic testing?
    Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few excellent resources on the web I would suggest you visit. Fragile X, like autism, is a spectrum disorder, it could result in no symptoms, mild learning disability to severe learning disability.

      There MAY be a family history of autism or learning disabilities or there MAY NOT be a history, fragile X could silently lurk for generations before being diagnosed.

      According to the American College of Medical Genetics Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis of Fragile X all children with developmental delays, autism or cognitive impairment of an unknown origin should be tested for fragile X.

      Individuals with premature ovarian failure, early menopause, should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXPOI.

      Individuals who develop parkinson like symptoms, balance/gait problems, over the age of 50 should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXTAS.

  31. QUESTION:
    Can menopause start happening at the age of 36?

    • ANSWER:
      When menopause occurs prematurely, it isn't referred to as menopause. It is POF - premature ovarian failure.

      Please see your gynecologist for a workup to be sure you don't have an underlying health issue. For more info:
      http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/premature_menopause.jsp

  32. QUESTION:
    I want to start using a tanning bed this year?
    What do you do to prep your skin and what do you do after to keep the nicest looking tan?

    I assume you would want to bathe and exfoliate before.. then go straight to the salon and use tanning lotion?

    And should I go home a shower directly after?

    And does regular body lotion make my tan fade faster?

    • ANSWER:
      If I were you I wouldn't go tanning. It causes cancer. Skin cancer kills more women than breast cancer. Not only that, but it causes premature aging. Yea everyone looks great with a tan, but you will not reep the benefits once you hit menopause. Once women hit menopause, all your pigmentation problems from the sun and tanning and other radicals will start to show on the skin. Hyperpigmentation (dark spots) and hypopigmentation (white spots) are a few of the problems.

      I would seriously think twice about that if I were you -this is what leads to aging rapidly. If you want to tan, do a spray tan. Natural looking and better.

  33. QUESTION:
    Why do us females run out of eggs at middle age?
    Why do we run out of eggs when we are middle aged? Also is it possible to run out of eggs earlier than middle age? And if so what are the chances?

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Women do not "run out" of eggs. Even after menopause, most women still have thousands of left-over eggs.

      Some women do go through premature menopause, usually do to ovarian failure.

  34. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been diagnosed with ovarian failure?
    I am 40 years old and got diagnosed with premature ovarian failure. My FSH test came back at 79.4, which is totally out of range and my prolactin at 13 which in within normal rage.
    Ever since i stopped taking birth control pills, i have not gotten my period. Does this mean i have menopause and my ovaries have stopped completely ? has anyone taken any meds to lower their FSH?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through POF at the age of 21. There is no meds for lowering your FSH. I've been on birth control because the doctor told me I'm still young and need the estrogen. I'm 37 now. I'm sorry for the bad news. I know exactly how you feel.

      I do have 2 children through donor egg and invitro fertilization. Good Luck and God Bless!

  35. QUESTION:
    What health complications can develop as a result of having Turner syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      This is what I found...

      What are the primary characteristics of Turner syndrome?
      Short stature

      The most common feature of Turner syndrome is short stature. The average height of an adult TS woman who has received human growth hormone treatment is 4’8”. Individuals tend to be a little shorter at birth, averaging 18.5” compared to an average of 20” for all girls. Growth failure continues after birth, and most girls with TS fall below the normal female growth curve for height during early childhood. TS girls who are not treated with hormone replacement usually do not have a pubertal growth spurt; many will continue to grow at a slow rate until they are in their twenties. Many girls who undergo growth hormone treatment have been able to achieve adult height within the lower range of normal.

      Premature ovarian failure

      Most (90%) TS individuals will experience early ovarian failure. The ovaries produce eggs and hormones necessary for the development of secondary sexual characteristics. Estrogen replacement therapy is necessary for breast development, feminine body contours, menstruation and proper bone development. About a third of TS individuals will show some signs of breast development without estrogen treatment; however, many will not complete puberty, and those that do often have premature ovarian failure. Therefore, the majority of individuals will require estrogen from puberty until the normal age of menopause. Fertility without assisted reproduction therapy is rare (less than 1%).

      Physical features

      Many characteristic features are associated with Turner syndrome. Their presence and severity vary greatly from individual to individual.

      Narrow, high-arched palate (roof of the mouth)
      Retrognathia (receding lower jaw)
      Low-set ears
      Low hairline
      Webbed neck
      Slight droop to eyes
      Strabismus (lazy eye)
      Broad chest
      Cubitus valgus (arms that turn out slightly at the elbows)
      Scoliosis (curvature of the spine)
      Flat feet
      Small, narrow fingernails and toenails that turn up
      Short fourth metacarpals (the ends of these bones form the knuckles)
      Edema of hands and feet, especially at birth
      Intelligence - TS individuals are on average of normal overall intelligence with the same variance as the general population. They do, however, often have difficulty with spatial-temporal processing (imagining objects in relation to each other), nonverbal memory and attention. This may cause problems with math, sense of direction, manual dexterity and social skills. New and better ways to compensate for these problems, which fall under the general category of nonverbal learning disabilities, are being researched.
      What are the associated risks with Turner Syndrome?
      Several medical problems occur more frequently in individuals with Turner syndrome than in the general population. It is important that TS individuals are screened regularly to see if any of these problems exist. Most of these conditions can be managed successfully with good medical care.

      Heart

      Some form of cardiac abnormality occurs in approximately one-third of TS patients. Problems are primarily left-sided and may include coarctation (narrowing) of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve (a valve with two leaflets instead of the usual three). TS individuals are also at higher risk for hypertensionor high blood pressure. TS patients should receive an echocardiogram or MRI to evaluate the heart at the time of diagnosis regardless of age and have their heart re-evaluated periodically for aortic root enlargement. All individuals with TS should be aware of the symptoms of dissection of the aorta, an uncommon but life-threatening complication. These include sudden, severe, sharp, stabbing, tearing, or ripping chest pain, intense anxiety, rapid pulse, profuse sweating, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, fainting or shortness of breath.

      Kidney

      Thirty percent of TS individuals will have kidney abnormalities. Many of the abnormalities do not cause any medical problems; however, some may result in urinary tract infections and an increased risk of hypertension. It is recommended that TS individuals receive a renal ultrasound examination at the time of diagnosis.

      Thyroid

      Hypothyroidism (low level of thyroid hormone) caused by autoimmune thyroiditis (inflammation of thyroid gland) occurs frequently in individuals with TS. It can be diagnosed with a blood test and is easily treated with thyroid hormone.

      Ears

      Otitis media (ear infection) is extremely common in TS girls particularly in infancy and early childhood. Aggressive treatment of infections is appropriate. The majority (50-90%) of TS women will also develop early sensorineural (nerve) hearing loss and may require hearing aids earlier than the general population.

  36. QUESTION:
    has anyone gone through premature menopause or early menopause?
    My question is has anyone gone through premature natural menopause before the age of 40. Or early menopause, early 40's? I'm really afraid because I'm 39 and since the age of 33 I've on and off had hot flashes, light periods and then sometimes heavier. If you did go through this did this age you a lot? I'm really worried because I've read this produces less collagen in the skin and thins your hair. Especially when you go through menopause prematurely or early. If anyone has gone through menopause in this way, do you feel it has aged you a lot? And what do you do when you reach menopause that's healthy. Do you take anything or just do nothing?
    Please tell me your age or the age of someone you know that has gone through it young. Do they look really old?

    • ANSWER:
      My mom went through early menopause and she looks great for her age. It was rough for her at the time, but she made it through and you will too, but it didn't age her any more than normal.

  37. QUESTION:
    what is the reason for the women having bleeding at the age of 56years, after menopause ,?
    My wife is having slight bleeding at the age of 56 years , but after menopause she don't having any bleeding for more than 10 years, is it possible and normal, or any other reason ?

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding After Menopause

      Menopause is the transition phase in the life of a woman in which her ovaries stop producing eggs, body produces less progesterone, and estrogen, menstrual cycle becomes less frequent, and her period stopping altogether. Early Menopause symptoms also known as Premature menopause symptoms, may include irregular menstrual cycles, hot flashes, irritability, night sweats, and sleep deprivation. There are treatments for Menopause which includes hormone replace therapy, and herbal remedies. Herbal remedies may include natural supplements and foods made from soy.

      If you have bleeding after menopause, make sure to call your Doctor!
      A woman will be fully menopausal if she has gone at least 1 year or 365 days without having her period. If bleeding continues after being fully menopausal, it may be only confined to spotting, this is also known as post menopausal bleeding. It is not considered unusual for this to happen. There are situations when post menopausal bleeding maybe a sign of a more serious condition.
      Spotting may occur if you are undergoing therapy for hormone replacement HRT but it can also occur if you aren’t. Generally, spotting occurs due to the hormonal balances persisting after menopause. Breast tenderness in addition to spotting can be a sign that you’re experiencing an actual menstrual period. If this occurs, you will need to wait 1 full year from your last menstrual cycle to be fully menopausal.

      Estrogen levels need to remain stable or it can cause spotting. Having low estrogen levels can cause irregular spotting and high estrogen levels may cause a heavy menstrual cycle. Progesterone levels may also rise because the endometrial lining is atrophying.

      There are women who may develop Type II diabetes after experiencing menopause. Women who are insulin resistant have higher estrogen levels than women who aren’t diabetic. A woman who is insulin resistant can experience progesterone converting into estrogen, which can result in post menopausal bleeding that is unusual.

      Rapid weight loss can cause you to spot or bleed after experiencing menopause. Estrogen is stored in fat tissue in a woman’s body so when rapid weight loss occurs, the estrogen goes into her bloodstream, her hormones are disrupted, and she may spot or bleed.

      Although it maybe a benign condition, post menopausal bleeding should not be ignored. Make sure to bring this to your Physician’s attention due to the fact that it maybe a serious health issue. Post menopause bleeding may originate from the vagina which may have dried up and atrophied from lack of estrogen. May also come from lesions and cracks on the vulva, and can also occur from intercourse. Upper reproductive system bleeding can come from endometrial cancer, hormone replacement, cervical cancer or lesions, endometrial polyps, ovarian cancer, uterine tumors or from tumors that secret estrogen. Most common reason for post menopause bleeding is hormone replacement therapy also known as HRT.
      There are good remedies in Homeopathy too.

  38. QUESTION:
    Why have i not gotten my period in 4 months?
    I havent gotten my period in about 4 months, i have taken and pregnancy test and it comes up negative. Does anyone know what could be going wrong?
    my biggest problem is i have no health insurance. I also have not started any new excersice routines, or dieting. I have actually gained some weight.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amennorhea definition: You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row. You need to see a dr.

      Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      Pregnancy. Your tests may have been incorrect.

      Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera or Implanon, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.

      Breast-feeding.

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy, uterine bleeding; acne; and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but on rare occasions, it requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), cesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.
      Primary ovarian insufficiency. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. In some women, the ovarian supply of eggs diminishes before age 40, a condition known as primary ovarian insufficiency. The lack of ovarian function associated with this condition decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also referred to as premature menopause, may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      Go see your dr. to be sure.

  39. QUESTION:
    How to keep our heart healthy from diseases ?
    Suggest some vegetables, fruits which are good for heart. Also other ways

    • ANSWER:
      Myocardial infarction results from atherosclerosis. Risk factors for myocardial infarction include:
      * Age.
      * Gender: At any given age men are more at risk than women, particularly before the menopause, but because in general women live longer than men ischemic heart disease causes slightly more total deaths in women.
      * Diabetes mellitus type 1 or Diabetes mellitus type 2
      * High blood pressure.
      * Dyslipidemia/hypercholesterolemia (abnormal levels of lipoproteins in the blood), particularly high low-density lipoprotein, low high-density lipoprotein and high triglycerides.
      * Tobacco smoking, including secondhand smoke.
      * Short term exposure to air pollution including: carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide but not ozone.
      * Family history of ischaemic heart disease or myocardial infarction particularly if one has a first-degree relative (father, brother, mother, sister) who suffered a 'premature' myocardial infarction (defined as occurring at or younger than age 55 years (men) or 65 (women).
      * Obesity (defined by a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m², or alternatively by waist circumference or waist-hip ratio).
      * Lack of physical activity.
      * Psychosocial factors including, low socio-economic status, social isolation, negative emotions and stress increase the risk of myocardial infarction and are associated with worse outcomes after myocardial infarction. Socioeconomic factors such as a shorter education and lower income (particularly in women), and unmarried cohabitation are also correlated with a higher risk of MI.
      * Alcohol — Studies show that prolonged exposure to high quantities of alcohol can increase the risk of heart attack.
      * Oral contraceptive pill - women who use combined oral contraceptive pills have a modestly increased risk of myocardial infarction, especially in the presence of other risk factors, such as smoking.[39]
      * Hyperhomocysteinemia (high homocysteine)in homocysteinuria is associated with premature atherosclerosis, whether elevated homocysteine in the normal range is causal is contentious.

  40. QUESTION:
    I am just wondering if I have reached the menopause. My periods stopped completely when I was 40.?
    Apart from my periods stopping completely. I have had no further symptoms, like hot flushes etc. I am now 47. I thought it was normal to reach the menopause in your 50's. Am I too young, if so, will I be vunerable to any health problems later.

    Thank you so much.

    • ANSWER:
      My periods started to go wonky at the age of 39 and stopped completely when I was 42. Now, 18 months later, I have had the necessary hormone tests which confirmed that I have gone through the menopause. Like you I have had no symptoms other than cessation of periods. If indeed you have gone through the menopause, it will be classed as a premature menopause. You should talk with your doctor about possible treatments to prevent osteoporosis. There is HRT, which you would have to take for life, or if you prefer, as I do, you can get strong calcium supplements on prescription, together with alendronic acid, which helps to prevent bone loss. The alendronic acid is taken once weekly, and the calcium twice daily. Hope this helps.

  41. QUESTION:
    Why am I get my period 2 or 3 times a month?
    All times very light and they don't really seem like a period.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amenorrhea is much more common than primary amenorrhea. Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      * Pregnancy. In women of reproductive age, pregnancy is the most common cause of amenorrhea. When a fertilized egg is implanted in the lining of your uterus, the lining remains to nourish the fetus and isn't shed as menstruation.
      * Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.
      * Breast-feeding. Mothers who breast-feed often experience amenorrhea. Although ovulation may occur, menstruation may not. Pregnancy can result despite the lack of menstruation.
      * Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.
      * Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      * Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.
      * Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.
      * Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.
      * Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.
      * Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.
      * Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.
      * Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean sections, etc.
      * Premature menopause. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      When to seek medical advice

      Consult your doctor if:

      * You've never had a menstrual period, and you're age 16 or older
      * You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row

  42. QUESTION:
    Why does menstrual cycle has stopped all of a sudden?
    This question is regarding my wife, her menstrual cycle has stopped from last 3 months and she is 20 years old. We checked for the pregnancy using self test kit and it appears negative. i am going to take her to the doctor tomorrow in the morning, i just thought of posting this question to get and idea of what sort of things could cause these type of changes other than pregnancy?. or is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of reasons it could happen and the doctor will be able to determine the cause. Some are:

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs, and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      # Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating condition seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.

      Premature menopause. Menopause occurs at an average age of 51. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found..

  43. QUESTION:
    What could make me unable to conceive when I'm older?
    When I'm older I want to have kids but I've been wondering what things might make me unable to conceive. Like I know abortions can make you unable to conceive and that but is there anything else? Like skipping your period too much if you're on birth control as a teenager. Anything like that or at all?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of things that could make you unable to conceive.

      Some of them, like polycystic ovarian syndrome, premature menopause, hormonal or genetic problems, etc, you can't do anything about.

      As far as abortions go, they can cause infertility if something goes wrong. Uncomplicated abortions do not cause infertility. Also, IUDs can cause infertility if something goes wrong, but again, only if something goes wrong. If you use an IUD uneventfully, then your chances of conceiving are not reduced.

      And obviously, getting your tubes tied will cause infertility, but you wouldn't be considering that.

      Otherwise, the only other thing is STDs or bacterial vaginosis. If an STD or bacterial vaginosis is left untreated, the infection can spread deep into your reproductive organs, causing pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease can cause severe scarring of your reproductive organs, which can make it difficult or impossible to get and stay pregnant.

      Skipping your period while on the pill is safe and will not cause infertility. However, if you are using the pill to skip periods, you should be taking a low dose monophasic pill like Alesse. Low dose in order to reduce your risk of developing a blood clot and monophasic to reduce your risk of side effects. You will probably also have breakthrough bleeding, no matter what birth control pill you take, if you continually skip the period week.

      If you want to have children, the main thing you have to remember is not to wait too long. A lot of women spend time focusing on careers, thinking that they have until menopause (around age 50) to conceive. That isn't really the case. Despite the proliferation of women having children in their forties, many women will start having trouble conceiving naturally around age 35. Many women having children at ages older than that are using in vitro fertilization, which costs a fortune and doesn't always work. And pregnancy is riskier to the mother after age 35.

  44. QUESTION:
    What's the youngest age for an early premenopausal or early perimenopausal woman? Can stress cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      I go with the previous answer that it is premature before 35, although most people will say 40.

      Stress can foul up your hormones or your cycles big time. So if you are missing periods and you think you are too young for menopause, it could be stress affecting your cycle, and it might come back when the stress goes away.

      One thing that is known to cause early menopause is smoking.

      If you are wondering if it is menopause or stress, you can get your hormones checked.

  45. QUESTION:
    I had a sudden Hot flash, sweating, dizzy and shaking, What is it?
    I was at Wal-Mart yesterday and I suddenly felt very hot from the inside out, I started sweating, felt dizzy & shaking. I felt like I was gonna pass out, my heart was racing. It lasted for about 15 to 20 minutes, but it scared me. I've never felt like that before. I don't believe I'm diabetic, but I do have Endometriosis & Premature heart contractions. What is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be a few things, like menopause, anxiety, thyroid disorder, allergic reaction or even a pheochromocytoma.

      All depends on age, sex, other symptoms etc etc.

      Best to visit the doctor if it happens again and try to note if there was anything that triggered it.

      Best wishes.

  46. QUESTION:
    What is the average age for women to start menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 52, although women can experience the menopause in their 30s or 40s. In other countries, it is still around 50 years of age on average.
      If a woman experiences the menopause when she is under 45 years of age, it is known as a premature menopause. 

  47. QUESTION:
    what r the symptoms of menopause and how young can you be to start.?
    i am having irregular monthly periods and when they finally come, they come with a very heavy flow. I get it for 7 days and it will come back after week, but the flow is less. During this period i have a bad temper which i cant control, i also suffer from panic attacks.

    • ANSWER:
      bad temper is "normal PMT"

      some irregularity with heavier flows is quite common in your late 30's for some reason then they go normal again, menopause usually starts around 40 - 45 and takes 5 to 10 years before it all completely stops....it should be irregularity, not heavy, until after a while there is nothing. A few women get premature menopausae as young as 25 but it is rare.

      heavy for 7 days and more after a week is not right and not menopause, whatever your age. go see a doctor or a women's health clinic, as it could be thyroid problem or growths in the womb(benign ones)

  48. QUESTION:
    How do I stop my period forever?
    I'm gay, so, you know, I can't produce a baby regardless of how many times I have sex with my partner. Nor, do I have any desire to have kids, even with a sperm donor. NO DESIRE.

    So, how can I stop my period forever?

    If I get my ovaries removed or a hysterectomy or something, would I still produce the necessary hormones I need?

    I'm 18.

    • ANSWER:
      If you get your ovaries removed, you won't produce any hormones and you'll go into surgical menopause and stop having periods. You'll shorten your lifespan by about 10 years by doing so, and seriously negatively impact your health, risking certain osteoporosis, early dementia, perhaps frequent migraine headaches, complete loss of sex drive or ability to orgasm, premature aging, dry skin, hair, and eyes, depression related to neurotransmitter deficiencies, and many more problems, since the ovarian hormones perform over 200 functions in the body. So no, that wouldn't be a good idea.

      If you had a hysterectomy, you might see your ovaries fail shortly thereafter, putting you risk of all the problems I named above. But even if you didn't have that problem, you'd risk sexual dysfunction, vaginal dryness, incontinence, and abdominal weakness. You'd stop having your monthly bleeding but your ovaries would continue to produce a monthly cycle of hormones that would affect other things. So that's not good, either.

      If you want to stop your period, then I suggest you go on continuous birth control pills (Lybrel), or try the Mirena IUD.

  49. QUESTION:
    how do i find someone to buy me cigarettes?
    Im not actually old enough to smoke but i do. The person who ust to suppy for me moved so now idk who to ask. How do i find a way to get some?

    • ANSWER:
      Wake up kid, take control of your health. You may feel like you're invincible because you're young, but I'm here to tell you that you're not. It WILL catch up to you, and you have to be a moron to smoke cigarettes.

      Here's just a few of the problems they cause:

      Hair:

      Smell and staining

      Brain and Mental Effects:

      Stroke
      Addiction/nicotine withdrawal
      Altered brain chemistry
      Anxiety about harm caused by smoking

      Eyes:

      Eyes that sting, water and blink more
      Macular degeneration
      Cataracts

      Nose:

      Less sense of smell

      Thyroid

      Graves Disease
      Thyroid Disease

      Skin:

      Wrinkles
      Premature aging

      Teeth:

      Discoloration and stains
      Plaque
      Loose teeth
      Gum disease (gingivitis)

      Mouth and Throat:

      Cancers of the lips, mouth, throat and larynx
      Cancer of the esophagus
      Sore throat
      Reduced sense of taste
      Breath smells of smoke

      Hands:

      Poor circulation(cold fingers)
      Peripheral vascular disease
      Tar stained fingers

      Respiration and Lungs:

      Lung Cancer
      COPD (includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema)
      Cough and sputum
      Shortness of breath
      Colds and flu
      Pneumonia
      Asthma
      Complicates Tuberculosis

      Heart:

      Harms, blocks and weakens arteries of the heart
      Heart attack

      Liver:

      Cancer

      Abdomen:

      Stomach and duodenal ulcers
      Cancer of stomach, pancreas and colon
      Aortic aneurysm

      Kidneys and bladder:

      Kidney cancer
      Bladder cancer

      Bones:

      Osteoporosis
      Spine and hip fractures

      Spine:

      Degenerative Disc Disease

      Male reproduction:

      Sperm: deformity, loss of motility, reduced number
      Infertility
      Impotence

      Female reproduction:

      Period pains
      Earlier menopause
      Cancer of cervix
      Infertility and delay in conception

      Blood:

      Leukemia

      Legs and Feet:

      Gangrene
      Peripheral vascular disease
      Beurger Disease

      Immune System:

      Weakened immune system

  50. QUESTION:
    Anyone have or know about POF? (premature menopause) Also, Addison's disease?
    I'm experiencing premature menopause and i'm in my early 20's. I would like to know more about it or hear people's experiences. From the hormonal imbalance i also have Addison's disease and i'd like to hear about that too if possible.

    • ANSWER:
      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that arent functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the bodys functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isnt so bad in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

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premature menopause age

Menopause Diagnosis

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can the symptoms of menopause start in your early thirties?
    I am experiencing hot flashes at night, especially, and wondering how likely it is that I am in peri-menopause? ( pre menopause) I heard you can get symptoms years before you turn barren.

    • ANSWER:
      you can experience this even in your 20's. I would check with your doc for proper diagnosis.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have a white discharge when using Replens for vaginal dryness?
    I have had a bad case of vaginitus for about two weeks now. I am in menopause and my vaginal area has been very red and itchy (but no discharge like a yeast infection.) So I did some research and decided to try Replens for dryness. I used for the first time yesterday and it immediatly soothing. Then last night I had a lot of itching on the outside and noticed this morning a white clumpy discharge. So not sure if this is typical with Replens and should just give it a few days or assume that this now might be a yeast infection and try to treat that. Any advice other than go to the doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal discharge, itching, and burning are common symptoms of the various forms of vaginitis. Although the symptoms of these infections can be very similar, there are some differences to look for in the color and smell of the discharge.

      Some vaginal discharge is quite common and normal for women of childbearing age. Normally, cervical glands produce a clear mucous secretion that drains downward, mixing with bacteria, discarded vaginal cells, and Bartholin gland secretions at the opening of the vagina. These substances may (depending on how much mucus there is) turn the mucus a whitish color, and the discharge turns yellowish when exposed to air. There are times throughout the menstrual cycle that the cervical glands produce more mucus than others, depending on the amount of estrogen produced. This is normal.

      Sexual excitement and emotional stress have both been associated with a normal vaginal discharge. This discharge is a clear, mucus–like secretion.

      If your vaginal discharge is abnormal in color such as green, has a foul smell, changes consistency, or is significantly increased or decreased in amount, you may be developing a form of vaginitis.

      Bacterial vaginosis (bacterial vaginosis) causes an abnormal vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor. Some women report a strong fishlike smell, especially after intercourse. The discharge is usually white or gray, it can be thin. You may also have burning during urination or itching around the outside of the vagina, or both. Some women with bacterial vaginosis have no symptoms at all.
      Yeast infections or candidiasis cause a thick, whitish–gray "cottage cheese" type of vaginal discharge and may be itchy. You may have intense itching in your genitals. Painful urination and intercourse are common. You may not always have a vaginal discharge. Men with genital candidiasis may have an itchy rash on the penis. Most male partners of women with yeast infection do not experience any symptoms of the infection.

      Trichomoniasis causes a frothy vaginal discharge that may be yellow–green or gray, itching and irritation of the genitals, burning with urination (sometimes confused with a urinary tract infection), discomfort during intercourse, and a foul smell. Because trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease, symptoms may appear within 4–20 days after exposure. Men rarely have symptoms, but if they do, they may have a thin, whitish discharge from the penis and painful or difficult urination.

      Pain itself is not a frequent symptom (except for the itching) and should prompt you to see your health care provider.
      If you have a condition called vulvodynia, you may have burning, stinging, irritation, or rawness of your genitalia but no infection or skin disease of the vulva or vagina. You may have pain, off and on. This is a different condition that requires further diagnosis with your health care provider.

      I strongly advise you to visit the following site for comprehensive information on vaginal problems and streatments.

      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/vaginal_i...

      All the best!/

  3. QUESTION:
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in th?
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in the subordinate group? Or did physicians simply see women as an easy target for success? Also, what may have been some of the unintended consequences that came out of this widespread medicalization? And by "medicalization" I mean, the process by which human conditions and problems come to be defined and treated as medical conditions, and thus become the subject of medical study, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. Thanks for any thoughts or ideas!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Female bodies are overmedicalized. Menarche is not a medical issue, yet menopause is.

      Pregnancy can become life-threatening. But in general, we approach this natural passage as if some crisis were imminent.

      Men's bodies could use a bit more medical attention. Rather than look at erectile dysfunction as a symbol of waning masculinity and prescribing a pill, they should consider it as a symptom of perhaps a larger systemic problem.

      Not a doctor but still ... I do see what you are saying.

      No I do not think that there is some conspiracy to keep women down. I think it is the opposite. I think that too many women died in the past of childbirth, and they are over cautious.

      Yes, there is also a massive industry surrounding women's bodies and women's health products. Absolutely there is. From Insurance policies, to publishers, to baby accessories, to bras, tampax ... you bet!

  4. QUESTION:
    Why would my feet hurt and feel stiff without having an injury and continue to feel worse over the last month?
    My feet started feeling stiff going down stairs in the mornings some months ago. My right foot now feels like it's been injured - it hasn't and is painful to bend and hurts in the arch area. My toes are stiff to bend and my feet ache even when they are resting and not weight bearing. I am a relatively fit woman of 50, going through menopause and am about 10 kilos overweight. I like walking and am continuing to do so as I can't bear not to!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Helen,

      Arch pain is the term used to describe symptoms that occur under the arch of the foot. When a patient has arch pain they usually have inflammation of the tissues within the midfoot. The arch of the foot is formed by a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes.
      This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics and transfer of weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful.

      Plantar Fasciitis
      The most common cause of arch pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is the name that describes inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain early in the morning and pain with long walks or prolonged standing.
      Arch pain early in the morning is due to the plantar fascia becoming contracted and tight as you sleep through the night. When awakening and walking in the morning, the fascia is still tight and prone to irritation when stretched. When walking or standing for long periods, the plantar fascia becomes inflamed and painful.

      Treatment of plantar fasciitis is best accomplished with some simple stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications, and inserts for your shoes.
      ___________________________________________________________________________________
      Ankle pain is an extremely common complaint with many causes. It is important to accurately diagnose the cause of your symptoms so you can get appropriate treatment. If you have ankle pain, some common causes include:

      •Arthritis
      Arthritis causing ankle pain is much less common than degenerative changes in other joints. However, ankle cartilage can wear away and is often quite painful. Ankle arthritis is most common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or in patients with a previous injury to the ankle joint.

      •Sprains
      Ankle sprains cause an injury to the ligaments around the ankle. Sprains can cause significant ankle pain, as well as swelling and a feeling as though the joint may 'give-out.'
      •High Ankle Sprain A high ankle sprain is a specific type of ligament injury to the ankle. In a high ankle sprain, the ligaments on top of the joint are injured. The treatment and rehabilitation from a high ankle sprain is different from a usual sprain.

      •Tendonitis
      Tendonitis can occur in any of the tendons around the joint and cause ankle pain. Tendonitis occurs when the tendons, the attachments of muscles to the bone, become irritated and inflamed.
      •Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
      Posterior tibial tendonitis cause ankle pain on the inside part of the joint. If left untreated, posterior tibial tendonitis can lead to significant walking problems.

      •Achilles Tendonitis
      Achilles tendonitis causes ankle pain in the back of the joint. Achilles tendonitis is the most common type of tendonitis around the ankle joint.

      •Fractures
      Ankle fractures are a common type of broken bone. However, there any many different types of ankle fractures and each of these must be treated individually. Some ankle fractures can be treated like sprains, and others require surgery.

      •Cartilage Damage
      The cartilage of the ankle joint is susceptible to injury if you sustain an ankle sprain, fracture, or other traumatic injury. Cartilage injuries can run the spectrum from a limited area of damage to more widespread ankle arthritis.

      •Gout
      Gout is an uncommon cause of ankle pain. However, in patients who have a diagnosis of gout, it must be considered as a cause for new ankle pain.

      YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO CHECK INTO THE POSSIBILITY OF THIS BEING SIGNS OF DIABETES.

      Take care! Mama Bear

  5. QUESTION:
    I have symptoms of both anxiety panic attacks and premenopause. How can i figure out which one i have?
    my symptoms are: anxiety, not being able to sleep late at night, nausea, wanting to be outside in the fresh air, rational thoughts. Has anybody ever heard lydia pinkham herbal tablets (they say it's good for menstruation and menopause?) By the way I am 37 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      You can talk to your doctor for a proper diagnosis. I had my first panic attack when I was 37. It scared the crap out of me! I didn't know what was happening, but I thought I was dying. Both my general practitioner and ob/gyn diagnosed anxiety attacks. Both said that it is very commom at this age. I found relief in zoloft. It has been over 4 years, and I still take it. The side effects were temporary, and completely tolerable. I work full time, and am able to enjoy a normal life with my husband and children. I have never tried those tablets, but I have tried self help books, tapes, tea, etc. I have found that exercise really helps me. When I feel an onsetof an attack, I will do tasks like clean floors, fold clothes, re-arrange drawers, or anything that doesn't require a lot of concentration until it subsides.

  6. QUESTION:
    Does anyone else get really irritated with this?
    Whenever any post mentions moodiness or mood swings, a bunch of people respond, 'bipolar'. Moods and mood swings are normal. Bigger swings during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause are normal. Mood swings caused by various medical conditions is normal. Big mood swings are tied to various mental disorders. Mood swings by the hour, day or week are typically due to a personality disorder (or puberty, pregnancy, or menopause). Bipolar is rare.

    Anybody else get irritated with the number of 'bipolar' answers that just don't make real sense?

    • ANSWER:
      Yep! When I went to the first doc about my depression/anxiety, he said...in a real annoying voice..."Sounds like your bi-polar". After that diagnosis, I was just waiting for the voices to come...Well, I am perimenopausal, which cause hormonal nuttiness, I like to call it. And I have G.A.D. (generalized anxiety disorder.) Dumb name, but I suppose better than sounding like I have a disorder that stemmed from an iceberg in Alaska!

  7. QUESTION:
    My mum has osteoporosis and takes calcium tablets. Is there anything she can do to relieve the symptoms?
    She is 45 years old and experiencing the menopause as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Osteoporosis per se does not produce any symptoms, until a fracture occurs. Calcium does not treat osteoporosis, but it is important to have a good calcium intake ( which few people do) if you do suffer from the condition. Bisphosphonates are useually given to all patients with a proven diagnosis of osteoporosis, but the still need the calcium.

  8. QUESTION:
    Why do I have recurring bouts with Bacterial Vaginosis?
    I have been diagnosis with BV for about the fourth time now. I haven't had sex in two years, my personal hygiene is excellent, and I don't wear tight fitting pants. Is it my diet? Why do I keep getting BV? Am HIV negative and STDs free. Am pretty much a healthy person.

    • ANSWER:

      Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is a very common infection and many women get this infection as some point in their life. BV occurs when the bacteria becomes unbalanced in the vagina. Although BV is treatable and curable, the symptoms are usually unpleasant. If you have bacterial vaginosis at least 4 times a year, then this is called recurring bacterial vaginosis infections. It is important to see your doctor if you are having recurring BV infections. Luckily, there are a few things that you can do to stop recurring bacterial vaginosis infections.

      Things You’ll Need:
      Health evaluation
      Physical examination
      Pelvic exam
      Lab tests
      Appropriate treatment method (antibiotics, hormonal therapy, etc.)
      RepHresh vaginal gel

      Step1 Schedule an appointment with your doctor. In order to stop recurring bacterial vaginosis infections, it is important to visit your doctor in order to find out the specific reason for the infections. There are different reasons why a woman may get bacterial vaginosis, such as hormonal imbalances due to pregnancy, menopause and menstruation, using feminine hygiene products, having multiple sexual partners (or a new sex partner), stress, a weakened immune system from an illness such as diabetes or HIV, douching too often and using scented panty liners, pads or tampons.

      Step2 Discuss the test results and treatment options with your doctor. Your doctor informs you of your test results and lets you know how you can best treat the recurring bacterial vaginosis infections. Your doctor may first prescribe you an oral antibiotic (metronidazole or clindamycin) or a vaginal cream or gel to cure the BV infection. He then proceeds to treat the underlying cause for the recurring bacterial vaginosis infections which may involve additional medications, hormonal therapy, or suggesting certain changes to your diet or lifestyle behavior.

      Step3 Use RepHresh vaginal gel to help prevent recurring BV infections. RepHresh is an over-the-counter product that helps to keep the pH level balanced in the vagina, which reduces your chances of getting recurring bacterial vaginosis infections. You can use this product once every 3 days at anytime of the day (especially after having your menstrual cycle or having sexual intercourse). Visit rephresh.com for more information about this product.

      Step4 Follow a well-balanced diet plan. Be sure to eat healthy food and nutritional meals everyday. Try to avoid eating sugary food, soy sauce, cheese and chocolate and refrain from drinking soda, coffee or alcohol, because these types of food products puts you at a higher risk of developing recurring bacterial vaginosis infections.

      Step5 Clean your vaginal area each day. Try taking showers instead of baths and be sure to properly clean the vaginal area with soap and water everyday, to help stop bacterial vaginosis infections.

  9. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had problems with their thyroid & what kind of questions should I ask my doctor?
    I'm going to see a specialist soon regarding my thyroid. My OB/GYN has been monitoring the gland for a year now. My youngest child (I have 3) is 19 mo and I'm 40 yrs old. Menopause comes somewhat early in my family as well. I've been having problems w/ my period for a while & feeling tired all the time. My GYN said that tests showed that my thyroid is producing what my body needs but is working too hard to do it. My sister had 1/2 of hers removed in 2005. What should I make sure I discuss w/ my doctor? Please share your experiences with me.

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism are pretty much the same symptoms one has going through menopause. That's why its important to test the thyroid to rule it out. Chances are if your GYN has been monitoring your thyroid levels you are either borderline or are hypothyroid. The reason I say are hypothyroid is because your GYN may be going by outdated lab ranges because most doctors are. In 2002, AACE changed the range for TSH to 0.3 to 3.0, yet most labs will still have the range at 0.3 to 5.5. If your TSH is a 4.5, your GYN may think its normal, but high normal so he/she is watching it. Whenever you test thyroid, test in the morning only. Testing in the afternoon could stop a diagnosis because TSH is at its lowest in the afternoon. Next time you test, ask for a morning TSH, Free T4, Free T3, and an antibody test. For some reason, (probably because of the TSH) it is difficult getting a thyroid diagnosis. You have to read up on hypothyroidism and know what your levels are and what they should be. Basically a TSH over 2.0 will present symptoms. I have put links below for you to read before you see the doctor again. Your regular family doctor can probably treat you. The only reason you'd need to see a specialist was if you had nodules on your thyroid, cancer, or hyperthyroidism.

  10. QUESTION:
    Could Hashimoto Thyroiditis cause similar symptoms to premenopause?
    I'm 21 years old, and I am going to be tested in the next week or so for Hashimoto's.

    Because I am showing all symptoms of this disease, I also got thinking if one of my other problems could be connected to this: hot flashes, and no periods.

    For about three years, I had my period without a break in between cycles (yes, three years of constant bleeding) and doctors were unable to figure out why. For about two years now, I have been suffering from very long breaks during my periods along with very intense hot flashes. My mother, who is going to menopause, has similar symptoms.

    Has anyone with Hashimoto's ever had menopause-like hot flashes?

    In case this helps, I am adopted but do know that my biological mother had ovarian cancer in her late 20's. Could this be a sign of that?

    • ANSWER:
      It is odd for someone to skip over HypOthyroidism & go straight to Hashi's. It is, however, the main cause of HypO. Yes, there can be hot flashes. Likely to be cancer? NO!

      Thyroid disease is missed more than found. Three reasons: 1) not checking for antibodies; 2) going by wrong TSH 'normal' range; and, 3) not listening to symptoms.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning [different antibodies]).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb for Hashi’s] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  11. QUESTION:
    With a fibrocystic breast, can your breast feel like it has a small bb feel to it?
    I hope this makes sense. I went to my doc today and he found a very small "bb" or hard pebble in my left breast. I am going to get a mammogram on Monday and was just wondering. Of course, I am scared shitless that the diagnosis could be more than just that. Please, no mean answers- just looking for some honesty.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibrocystic breast syndrome, as it is now called as it is not a disease, is largely also just lumpy, painful breasts. The lumps often feel like grains of hard rice. The breasts are more painful during certain times of the menstrual cycle. After menopause, the symptoms disappear.

      Not knowing your age, I believe a mammogram is prudent. It may be some other form of a benign "lump", so don't hit the panic button. If you are very young, you may also need an ultrasound of the breast.

      Good luck ... and don't worry!

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the early signs and symptoms of cervical cancer?
    I lost my dear mum due to late diagnosis of the disease

    • ANSWER:
      Early cervical cancer generally produces no signs or symptoms. As the cancer progresses, these signs and symptoms may appear:

      Vaginal bleeding after intercourse, between periods or after menopause
      Watery, bloody vaginal discharge that may be heavy and have a foul odor
      Pelvic pain or pain during intercourse

      Risk factors

      These factors increase your risk of cervical cancer:

      Many sexual partners. The greater your number of sexual partners — and the greater your partner's number of sexual partners — the greater your chance of acquiring HPV.
      Early sexual activity. Having sex before age 18 increases your risk of HPV. Immature cells seem to be more susceptible to the precancerous changes that HPV can cause.
      Other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). If you have other STDs — such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis or HIV/AIDS — you have a greater chance of also having acquired HPV.
      A weak immune system. Most women who are infected with HPV never develop cervical cancer. However, if you have an HPV infection and your immune system is weakened by another health condition, you may be more likely to develop cervical cancer.
      Cigarette smoking. The exact mechanism that links cigarette smoking to cervical cancer isn't known, but tobacco use increases the risk of precancerous changes as well as cancer of the cervix

  13. QUESTION:
    im gunna buy clomid online what mg should i start taking 1st?
    hi i have gone through early menopause and the docs have said theres no hope in me having a baby, but i believe in faith, i will not give up. im gunna try clomid to see if it helps me have a period and get pregnant, but im unsure of what mg to start taking and for how long please help, im 24 raremenopausee ovulation failure

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry about your diagnosis. You should join www.ipofa.org , which is a website with support group for women with premature ovarian failure such as yourself.

  14. QUESTION:
    What causes headache, brown vaginal discharge, and nausea?
    I've had these symptoms for a couple days and every time i go on a symptom diagnosis thing, it tells me im going through menopause, but im only 14?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone irregularities will cause that. It's the kind of adjustments you go through when you first start getting your period.

  15. QUESTION:
    Please help me analyse my pap smear report?
    I am 49 year old woman and I recently got my Pap smear test done. My report said: smears show blood containing inflammatory and mucoid background. Many parabasal, few intermediate and metaplastic squamous cells are present. Several clusters of endocervical columnar cells are noted. Some bare nuclei also seen.
    Diagnosis:
    Atrophic smear
    Negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy
    Please guide as to what this means.

    • ANSWER:
      negative for malignancy means you do not have cervical cancer atrophic smear means there are changes due to menopause and they may want you to try an estrogen cream and then redo the test. This is because atrophic smears are difficult to analyse and a repeat Pap smear will ensure the most accurate result for you. The presence of endocervical cells on a Pap smear is an indication that the smear included sampling of the cervical canal, that just means they got a good sample, sometimes they do not get high enough in the cervical canal but in your case they did,

  16. QUESTION:
    What causes the ears and face get red and hot. I am feeling this for a while but no diagnosis from the docs.?
    I got my stomach, throat, ears, skin carotid checked and everything is mormal. It is really anoying me because starts slowly in the morning and as the day progress it gets worse like I am burning 150 degrees of fever and very tired.

    • ANSWER:
      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Flushing. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Everyday causes of minor facial flushing:
      Embarrassment (see Society problems)
      Blushing
      Anger
      Stress
      Anxiety
      Guilt
      Strong emotion
      Rosacea
      Exercise
      Alcohol
      Alcohol intolerance (see Alcohol use) - may cause flushing after only a single alcoholic drink.
      Spicy food
      Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
      Pregnancy
      Menopause
      Hot flash - see also causes of hot flashes
      Hyperthyroidism
      Fever - see also causes of fever
      Heatstroke
      Sunburn
      Dehydration
      Circulatory disorders
      Lung disorders
      Chronic bronchitis
      Emphysema
      Diabetes
      Heart conditions
      Certain medications

  17. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the chances of my children having autism?
    If my wife and her sister are autistic (the rest of the family is fine) , what are the chances that our children will be autistic? Is it true that autistic people often have normal children?

    • ANSWER:
      Do they actually have a diagnosis of autism, if so have genetics been ruled out. Old school (remember there is a great deal of on-going research) with a history of autism in the family there was an 10% increased risk.

      If there is a genetic condition that results in a diagnosis of autism or if it results in the individual having numerous characteristics of autism the odds could change drastically. A visit to a genetic counselor might not be a bad idea - rule out conditions such as Angelman, Fragile X or Rett Syndrome.

      If there are female relatives with a history of early menopause, or older relatives with a history of Parkinson Disease or balance/gait problems with dementia I'd make Fragile X a priority to rule out (these are conditions more prevalent in the fragile X carrier population.) Females with Fragile X (carrier or full-mutation) have a 50/50 chance of passing it on with each pregnancy.

      Anyone can have "normal" children and keep in mind we might all define "normal" differently.

  19. QUESTION:
    What are the best treatments and products for endometriosis?
    Does anybody know of anyone who was cured by a specific treatment, product, or diet that had endometriosis? Or does anybody have any advice that would be helpful? Anything that can at least minimize or stop the pain? Please let me know, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      When I was diagnosed with Endometriosis many years ago, it was already so bad that my ovaries were on the verge of rupturing so I had to have emergency surgery. The doctor removed one ovary and left the other teeny partial ovary so I wouldn't go into menopause at such an early age. He also removed massive endometrial tissue from my uterus and almost every other internal organ. Before the surgery Naproxen (Alleve) really helped but it was prescription strength back then.

      I remember hearing back then that a pregnancy would "cure" it but I don't know anyone (including myself) that would choose that option and I am sure it involves much more along with the pregnancy.

      My daughter was diagnosed too and had a laproscopy done to see how far along the disease was and it so bad that she had to have a total hysterectomy at age 27.

      It is a scary thing to go through but just like many other health issues, an early diagnosis helps a lot! Talk with your doctor about your questions and concerns because there may be other treatments out there now that weren't available when it happened to me or to my daughter. Good luck to you and please find out all that you can before the major worry sets in!

  20. QUESTION:
    What are the statistics for surviving ovarian cancer?
    Would appreciate it if you could provide sources to accompany your responses. Also, would appreciate hearing stories of recovery. I have a friend who is going in for surgery on Thursday to remove a large (soccer ball sized) tumour. How common is this size of tumour? What are her chances?

    • ANSWER:
      Check out www.ovariancancer.com this site provides info.. I have included some here for you.
      One woman out of every fifty-five (approximately 1.8%) will develop ovarian cancer some time in her life time.

      In 2003, approximately 25,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Approximately 14,500 women will die of the disease.

      Over 70% of all women with ovarian cancer will not be diagnosed until the disease has spread beyond the ovary. This is because the symptoms of early ovarian cancer are often vague and can mimic other common medical problems.

      Ovarian cancer is most common in women who have already gone through menopause. The average age for developing ovarian cancer is 61 years old.

      For the small number of women who are fortunate enough to have their cancer diagnosed before it has spread beyond the ovary, the chance for cure is 85 to 90%. However, for the majority of women in whom the disease has spread beyond the ovary, the chance of living for five years after the diagnosis is between 20 and 25%.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I be sure I am going through menopause?
    Some symptoms I have are eye swelling, frequent urination, cramping, bloating, sinus difficulties, sleep disturbances, weakness, and weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      You don't mention your age, which might be helpful. You also don't mention one common, frequent symptom of perimenopause, which is irregular periods that are heavier or lighter than usual.

      Perimenopause is the transition between menstruation and menopause, and it can last for several years. True menopause is defined as being amenorrheic (no periods) for one year.

      Read about perimenopause at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/perimenopause/DS00554

      Some of your symptoms may indicate perimenopause. Some may indicate a digestive disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome. Some may indicate an endocrine disorder such as hypothyroidism.

      Only a physician can tell you whether you're in perimenopause (a simple blood test for FSH, or follicle-stimulating hormone, may be helpful). The physician can also rule out other causes of your signs/symptoms.

      As your symptoms are so varied, you may want to see your physician for evaluation and diagnosis. Us older ladies (I'm 46 and in perimenopause) often have many small complaints besides perimenopause and you shouldn't suffer your symptoms needlessly.

  22. QUESTION:
    What do you do to prevent yourself from getting cancer?
    My mother passed away in year 2000 because of breast cancer, after 11 years of survival. Actually, in the depth of my heart, I am very much worried about the cancer that often said to be genetic. Does anyone have similar life experience with me? What do you do to stop your mind from worrying and to prevent yourself from getting cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry to hear about your mother. Do you know whether the type of breast cancer she had could be genetically passed on? Only 5– 10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors; my oncologist was able to assure me me mine wasn't. It may be that your mother's was random like mine and the majority of cases.

      If it was hereditary then you need to see your doctor about being tested for the faulty gene that is responsible, if you haven't already. Even if you have the gene, it doesn't mean you will definitely get breast cancer.

      The other known risk factors for breast cancer are:

      Getting older. This is the greatest risk factor - approximately 80% of breast cancers occur in post-menopausal women (women aged over 50 years).

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      These are only risk factors though; ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors.

      As for diet etc, there is no evidence that any product or food is linked to breast cancer, but some evidence that a low fat diet may help in prevention. All the other talk on here about diet is speculation - I was a vegan who ate organic, juiced exercised, never smoked - and I got grade 3 breast cancer.

      Find out if you're at risk genetically; check your breasts regularly and try not to worry otherwise.

      Sorry again about your mum; you never really get over it do you?

  23. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when someone havea retroverted uterus?
    What are the side effects of having a retroverted uterus? Can I still get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      From http://www.womens-health.co.uk/retrover.asp

      A retroverted uterus is the name given to a uterus that is tilted backwards inside of the pelvis. Normally, women are born with a uterus that is located in a straight up and down position inside of the pelvis, or with a uterus that tips slightly forwards, towards the stomach. However, some women have a uterus that tilts backwards, pointing towards the spine. Commonly referred to as a tipped uterus, this condition affects more than 20% of women worldwide. Generally associated with no health complications, a retroverted uterus can occasionally cause painful symptoms or signal an underlying health disorder.

      What Causes a Retroverted Uterus?

      In the vast majority of women with retroverted uteruses, causes are completely genetic. Many women are simply born with a uterus that is tipped in this position, and this is entirely normal. However, certain factors can cause a uterus that is in a normal placement to become retroverted. These causes include:

      Pregnancy: During pregnancy, the uterus becomes enlarged and the ligaments that hold the uterus in place become weakened. As a result, many women find that their uterus becomes retroverted after they have delivered their babies.
      Menopause: During menopause, estrogen levels drop rapidly in women. As with pregnancy, this can cause the ligaments that hold the uterus in place to weaken, allowing it to slip into a retroverted position.
      Reproductive Health Problems: Certain reproductive health issues, including pelvic inflammatory disease and endometriosis, can cause the uterus to tilt backwards. This is because these illnesses can lead to scar tissue formation on the inside of the abdomen, forcing the uterus out of position.

      What are the Symptoms of a Retroverted Uterus?

      Generally, the majority of women suffering from a retroverted uterus experience no symptoms. However, if symptoms do present, the two most commonly-occurring symptoms include:

      pain during sexual intercourse, particularly vaginal intercourse (dyspareunia)
      pain during menstruation (dysmenorrhea)

      This pain and discomfort is the result of pressure that the retroverted uterus places on the rectum and the ligaments around the tailbone.

      Rare symptoms associated with a retroverted uterus include:

      lower back pain
      increased number of urinary tract infections
      incontinence
      pain while using tampons
      fertility difficulties

      Diagnosing a Retroverted Uterus

      If you are experiencing symptoms of a retroverted uterus, you may want to make an appointment with your health care provider for an examination. By performing a few simple tests, your health care provider can easily diagnose the condition. Diagnosis usually consists of:

      a pelvic exam
      an abdominal ultrasound

      Occasionally, it is difficult to differentiate a retroverted uterus from a pelvic tumor. In this case, your health care provider may have to perform a rectovaginal exam.

      Are There Any Health Complications Associated with a Retroverted Uterus?

      Few women with retroverted uteruses experience health complications as a result of their condition. However, sometimes a retroverted uterus can be a warning sign of another underlying reproductive issue, including pelvic inflammatory disease or endometriosis. Be sure to contact your health care provider if you are experiencing:

      severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      irregular menstrual periods
      irregular ovulation or infertility

      If left untreated, these conditions can have dangerous effects on your reproductive organs and overall health.

      Will A Retroverted Uterus Affect Fertility?

      Many women who have a retroverted uterus worry that it will affect their future fertility. However, this condition does not appear to affect conception in any way, and most women with retroverted uteruses will go on to experience healthy pregnancies. If you are experiencing difficulties getting pregnant, it could be a sign of an underlying reproductive problem. Be sure to contact your health care provider for assistance.

      Treatment for A Retroverted Uterus

      If your retroverted uterus is causing you a lot of pain or discomfort, you may want to consider treatment for the condition. Treatment options include:

      Exercises: Women can perform knee-to-chest exercise in order to encourage the uterus to slip back into its proper place. Unfortunately, this tends to be a temporary solution for the problem.
      Pessaries: A pessary is a plastic device that is worn inside of the vagina. It helps to support the uterus in the proper position. However, these devices can only be worn in the short term because of the risk for developing a vaginal infection.
      Surgery: Surgery for a retroverted uterus is available. Known as the UPLIFT procedure, this procedure works to reposition the uterus by cutting and shortening the ligaments that support it. UPLIFT is a laparoscopic surgery that is performed with the aid of a small camera.

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I decrease the chances of getting breast cancer?
    I really just dont want to get it. It scares me. Are there vitamines that decrease the chances of getting breast cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately nobody knows what causes breast cancer, so nobody can say what will prevent it.

      No particular diet or food has been shown to cause, prevent, treat or cure it. I once thought my healthy organic vegan diet would protect me against breast cancer, but it didn't.

      While nobody knows the cause, there are recognised risk factors for breast cancer, some preventable, some out of your control. Getting older is the biggest risk factor - 80% of those diagnosed with it are over 50.

      The other risk factors are:

      Genetic – but only 5-10% of breast cancers are genetic/hereditary

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breastfeeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      Remember these are only risk factors - someone may tick all of these boxes, and never get cancer, and someone with none of them may still get breast cancer.

      I'd advise you to try not to worry about it and enjoy your life; I was diagnosed at 50, and I'm glad I didn't spend much of my life before that worrying about it.

  25. QUESTION:
    What symptoms would lead to fragile x testing?
    I just recently started reading information on Fragile X. Does anyone know what type of symptoms would lead to genetic testing?
    Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few excellent resources on the web I would suggest you visit. Fragile X, like autism, is a spectrum disorder, it could result in no symptoms, mild learning disability to severe learning disability.

      There MAY be a family history of autism or learning disabilities or there MAY NOT be a history, fragile X could silently lurk for generations before being diagnosed.

      According to the American College of Medical Genetics Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis of Fragile X all children with developmental delays, autism or cognitive impairment of an unknown origin should be tested for fragile X.

      Individuals with premature ovarian failure, early menopause, should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXPOI.

      Individuals who develop parkinson like symptoms, balance/gait problems, over the age of 50 should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXTAS.

  26. QUESTION:
    Has anyone with endometriosis had a good experience with Lupron?
    I have had two laparoscopies in the past three years and I'm having pain again. The doctor suggested this instead since I don't want to get pregnant right now. Any input would be great! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Lupron is a horrendous drug. The manufacturer reports the following possible side effects, including but certainly not limited to:

      Asthenia, General pain, Headache, Hot flashes/sweats, Nausea/vomiting, GI disturbances, Edema, Weight gain/loss, Acne, Hirsutism, Joint disorder, Myalgia, Decreased libido, Depression/emotional lability, Dizziness, Nervousness, Neuromuscular disorders, Paresthesias, Skin reactions at injection site, Breast changes/tenderness/pain, Vaginitis, Flu-like symptoms, Heart palpitations, Syncope, Tachycardia, Appetite changes, Dry mouth, Thirst, Ecchymosis, Lymphadenopathy, Anxiety, Insomnia/Sleep disorders, Delusions, Memory disorder, Personality disorders, Rhinitis, Alopecia, Hair disorder, Nail disorder, Conjunctivitis, Ophthalmologic disorders, Taste perversion, and Dysuria.

      Typically, users of Lupron also experience what is known as Clinical Flare, which is an exacerbation of side effects and symptoms during the first 2 injections or so. Addback therapy, much touted by prescribing physicians, does little to mitigate these effects.

      It is unfortunate that all the patients suffering the long-term negative effects of this drug are disbelieved by others, including the medical industry. The PR and marketing monster known as Takeda Abbott Pharmaceuticals (the drug's maker) spends billions of dollars advertising and marketing this drug every year, as well as providing enticing incentives to docs to Rx it to their patients (this is a FACT; TAP paid a record 5million fine for just that about 4 years ago). So it's hard for the patient who is suffering from long-term negative effects to be heard.

      That "EndoKnow" site and the "Lupron1" website and all others of a similar nature, which masquerade as helpful communication tools on how to talk to your doc and effectively treat your disease are little more than thinly disguised direct-to-consumer marketing tools paid for by TAP, which take your private contact info and disseminate them to the manufacturer. Beware also editorial materials bought and paid for by TAP, such as those featured through the Endo Association. One has to ask, if it's paid for, what slant does it have to give?? Look for unbiased materials.

      Most docs don't look past the one tiny study put out by PAID ADVISORS to the Lupron manufacturer that indicates Lupron is a "safe, cost-effective" way of treating Endo. I see nothing safe or cost-effective about inducing significantly negative, long lasting side effects in women who are already suffering with an insidious disease. Read both of these papers (even if already diagnosed):

      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/surgery%20vs.%20gnrh.pdf
      Surgery versus the Use of Lupron Depot as Treatment

      http://www.endocenter.org/pdf/PreDiagnosisGnRH.pdf
      Use of Lupron Depot Prior to Surgical Diagnosis

      You really need to have your disease excised, which confers the most successful and long-term relief of symptoms. See www.endometriosistreatment.org and www.centerforendo.com for info on excision and why it is superior to vaporization, ablation, medical therapies like Lupron, etc.

      Pregnancy and Lupron are not cures for Endometriosis, nor is pregnancy a "treatment" that can be "prescribed" any more than menopause or hysterectomy can. There is no absolute cure, but physicians specializing in the disease who use modern concepts for treatment instead of old wive's tales and biased literature from the manufacturer have higher and longer-term success rates than those who put their patients on the treatment merry go round over and over.

      Don't take my word for it...I also recommend speaking to people here:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/erc
      http://www.geocities.com/lupronfacts/facts.html
      http://www.redflagsweekly.com/letters/letters5.htm
      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lupron/
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LupronVictims/

      For feedback on actual experiences.

      Good luck and think long and hard about your options. You DO have choices and another doctor who has dedicated their life to treating only Endo can offer you the best resources.

      Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    How many women in the US are in high rist having breast cancer?
    Looking for statistics regarding women who are in high risk to have breast cancer in the US.

    • ANSWER:
      Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are those who carry one of the rare inherited genes known to be responsible for hereditary breast cancer.

      Hereditary breast cancer accounts for 5 - 10% of all breast cancer cases.

      If someone has inherited one of the BRCA genes from one of their parents, each of their children has a 50% chance of inheriting that gene.

      A female inheriting the gene has a 50 - 80% chance of developing breast cancer. A male inheriting the gene has in increased, though still very low, risk of breast cancer.

      Women carrying the BRCA gene are the only ones who can be considered at high risk of breast cancer. For all other women in the US, the chance of developing breast cancer is one in eight if they live into their late 70s/80s ( 80% of breast cancers occur in women over the age of 50).

      There are known risk factors for breast cancer; but none of them can be described as making someone 'high risk'; they are just things that increase an individual's risk of breast cancer occuring, and most people who have one, two or even all the risk factors don't get breast cancer.

      The greatest risk factor is being female; over 99% of those diagnosed are women.

      The second greatest is age - 80% of those diagnosed are over 50, only 5% are under 40, fewer than 0.1% are under 30 and it's almost unheard of in under 25s.

      Genetic – but only 5-10% of breast cancers are genetic/hereditary

      Other recognised risk factors are:

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breastfeeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      These are only risk factors though; ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors.

  28. QUESTION:
    What are the strangest things you heard that can cause breast cancer?
    I 'm doing a report for health class. My topic is "strange myths about the risk of breast cancer" If you know anything that seems strange or stupid that people think can give them breast cancer, let me know. And if you know it's true or false, please send me Links if you have any. The only thing I can find is on antiperspirants, i need some more strange ideas. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There are so many, most of which are repeated here on YA regularly

      You are right, anti-perspirant and deodorant don't cause breast cancer:
      http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/healthyliving/cancercontroversies/deodorants/
      http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/bc_myths/antipersp.jsp

      Another rmyth is that blows, bumps or pinches to the breast cause it:
      http://www.netwellness.org/question.cfm/11349.htm
      http://www.swedish.org/17384.cfm

      A link between abortion and breast cancer is a myth; junk science and propaganda from the anti-choice lobby. The broad scientific consensus is that no such link exists.

      This excellent article gives the facts:
      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1374/is_2_62/ai_83794478
      also
      http://www.nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/abortion-miscarriage

      Frequently on this board there are questions about bras and breast cancer - sleeping in a bra or wearing an ill-fitting, underwired or padded bra are common myths and NOT causes of breast cancer.

      There have been recent bogus scares about water in plastic bottles - frozen, left in cars etc - causing bc; all nonsense:
      http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/medical/a/bottled-water.htm
      http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/petbottles.asp

      Someone asked on here yesterday if french fries caused breast cancer!

      I often see people saying on here that breast cancer is largely, mainly or entirely genetic. It isn't; only 5 -10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors.

      There is currently a common belief that dairy products cause breast cancer, mainly because of the book 'Your Life in Your Hands' by Jane Plant, which made the claim. There is no real scientific evidence that this is true, and in fact I offer myself as evidence that it isn't - I had been vegan for over 8 years when i was diagnosed with bc.

      In fact, if you are discussing myths about breast cancer you may want to include all claims about diet and lifestyle. There is no evidence that any food contributes to any cancer. Any claim that it does is speculation and reflects the fears and prejudices of the person making the claim. It's often less scary for someone who hasn't had cancer to 'blame the victim' - put cancer down to avoidable life style factors like diet, stress, lack of exercise etc - than it is for them to accept that cancer is a largely random disease that can strike any of us at any time.

      The causes of breast cancer aren't known; there are known risk factors, but these ARE risk factors not causes - ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors other than the first and/or second.

      The greatest risk factor for breast cancer is being female -over 99% of those diagnosed are women.

      The second greatest is getting older - 80% of those diagnosed are over 50.

      5-10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors.

      The other known risk factors are:

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)

      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      Thanks for the interesting question. If I remember any more myths as the day goes on, I'll add them

  29. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?
    I had a smear test booked for this Tuesday, but I had to cancel it as I came on. I'm bleeding very heavily every two weeks, plus I have all the risk factors for cervical cancer. Please help as I am very concerned.

    • ANSWER:
      | health information | health factsheets

      Print-friendly version

      Cervical cancer
      Published by Bupa's health information team, February 2009.

      This factsheet is for women who have cervical cancer, or who would like information about it.

      Cervical cancer develops if the cells of the cervix (the neck of the womb) become abnormal and grow out of control.

      Animation - How cancer develops
      About cervical cancer
      Types of cervical cancer
      Symptoms of cervical cancer
      Causes of cervical cancer
      Diagnosis of cervical cancer
      Treatment of cervical cancer
      Prevention of cervical cancer
      Help and support
      Questions and answers
      Related topics
      Related Bupa products and services
      Further information
      Sources
      How cancer develops
      A Flash plug-in is required to view this animation.

      Legal notices

      About cervical cancer
      In 2005, around 2,800 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in the UK.

      Deaths from cervical cancer in the UK have fallen over the last 20 years. This reduction is mainly because of the NHS cervical screening programme which may detect changes in the cells of the cervix at a pre-cancerous stage. If abnormal cells are caught early, cancer can be prevented or treated.

      The changes can be detected by a laboratory test on a small sample of cells. The cells are taken from an area called the transformation zone on the surface of your cervix, and preserved using a procedure called liquid-based cytology.

      The cervix and transformation zone

      Types of cervical cancer
      There are two main types of cervical cancer - squamous cell cancer (the most common) and adenocarcinoma, although they are often mixed. They are named after the types of cell that become cancerous. Squamous cells are flat cells covering your cervix; adenomatous cells are found in the passageway from your cervix to your womb. Other rarer cancers of the cervix include small cell cancer.

      Symptoms of cervical cancer
      Abnormal cells found on the cervix during a cervical screening test are usually at an early pre-cancer stage, and don't cause any symptoms. Treating the abnormal cells prevents cancer developing.

      If abnormal cells do develop into cervical cancer, you may have the following symptoms:

      abnormal vaginal bleeding, for example between periods or after sex
      smelly vaginal discharge
      discomfort during sex
      vaginal bleeding after the menopause

      These symptoms aren't always due to cervical cancer, but if you have them, you should visit your GP.

  30. QUESTION:
    I am just turned 51 years old, I am still having periods is this normal. They are very, very irregular.?
    I have had irregular periods for about two years now, hot flushes two or three a day and headaches occassionaly and tired a lot of the time. Could this be the menopause starting, shouldn't it have been finished with at about 45, please advice. I am needle phobic so a blood test is out of the question.

    • ANSWER:
      Actually in terms of age you are spot on, the average age of menopause is currently 51 years! Blood tests are often checked, but in fact when you are in the menopause, often called the peri-menopausal state, they are not too helpful anyway, and good news for you, with your needle phobia, the diagnosis is usually made clinically on history alone anyway.

      You really have given enough history such that coupled with your age I would not hesitate to make the diagnosis.

      Now what?? The duration of this peri-menopausal state is very variable, some women are lucky they almost switch off overnight, there periods stop and they have no other symptoms. You are not going to be one of these, worst scenario these symptoms can last for 5 years.

      Management is aimed at relieving symptoms. Go see your GP if they are troublesome and don't jump to discard the possibility of short term HRT, it is still the most efficient drug for dealing with the symptoms.

  31. QUESTION:
    Any psychologists or psychiatrists out there? What is your diagnosis?
    Someone I know has suffered from OCD all her life [she's now 56] and recently she has shown signs of paranoia. It seems that she has transferred her obsessive fear of germs to immigrants, particularly Muslims, and to terrorists, although she's never experienced any harm from any of these groups. She's irrational about them and you can't persuade her that most migrants and most Muslims are just ordinary people, and no more dangerous than any other group of people.

    She used to wash things compulsively to rid them of germs; now she seems to think that our country must be rid of these people. She has also convinced herself of other things with no basis in reality, and I suspect she has a secret fantasy world.

    This is a genuine question and I am not interested in reading answers about people's political or religious prejudices. Thank you.
    EDITS: 1. This is NOT A POLITICAL QUESTION!! I AM NOT A RACIST!! These views really belong to this person I know - I do NOT share them!! I have very positive dealings with Muslims and migrants of all kinds.

    2. She has seen many doctors and tried several kinds of anti-depressant medication. My point is that I think she is suffering from more than just depression.

    • ANSWER:
      Zuccinis, it sounds like your friend needs some more intensive care than she is currently receiving from her doc.

      Perhaps the medication she is on is reacting negatively? This can happen, even if it worked well to begin with, especially if she is experiencing hormonal imbalances due to menopause.

      Without knowing your friend or anything about her, could I suggest that a re-evaluation of her condition at this time might be useful, even if it means a residential stay for a couple of days so the docs can keep her under observation.

      She may have some old issues resurfacing, or just need some adjustment to her meds.

      Leaving it go won't be helpful. Is there a spouse or kids you can convey your concerns to, and who will pay attention?

      Otherwise, you will need t talk with her.

      Good luck and best wishes with this ~ it's a hard one for a caring friend! :-)

  32. QUESTION:
    What percent of women that get breast cancer are obese?
    I've noticed that a majority of women who get breast cancer are obese.
    Denise: It is just something I noticed during breast cancer month. I noticed most women who have the 'i am a survivor tshirt' were obese. Just on observation, so I thought I would see what % of women who have breast cancer were obese.
    aburn's rush...did I offend you with this question...should I have said 'plus size' instead? No need for your foul language.
    denise, also there is a strong correlation between fat peopel and diseases. This specific question is directed at obese women.
    my guess is from the lack of answers that most of the women on this board that have been belittling me are obese

    • ANSWER:
      Overweight after the menopause slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Overweight is also linked to some other types of cancer; for example, some studies indicate that obese men are at greater risk of dying from prostate cancer and some studies show that being overweight causes a small increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer.

      I wondered initially how you came to have seen the 'majority' of women who had or have had breast cancer; thanks for the clarification - you saw some obese women wearing breast cancer survivor t shirts. I see.

      Cancer treatments can cause weight gain; it is very common now for people receiving chemotherapy to gain weight as a result of the steroids given with it, and breast cancer patients are no exception.

      In addition, as Chemo angel has pointed out, many women with oestrogen positive breast cancers (and that's the overwhelming majority) are required to take hormone therapy treatments for five yeas after diagnosis and treatment. They do it so as not to die, and so the fact that a very common side effect is weight gain, while distressing for many, is viewed preferable to recurrence.

      I haven't seen the majority of breast cancer patients and survivors, but I have known hundreds and they have been of all shapes and sizes, the majority being of average weight. I can't give you all their names, but it may be interesting for you to contemplate a short list of people who've had breast cancer some of whom you might have heard of (you can look up the ones you haven't). How many cases of obesity can you spot?

      Kylie Minogue, Sheryl Crow, Martina Navrataloa, Christina Applegate, Olivia Newton John, Linda McCartney, Jill Ireland, Edie Falco, Melissa Etheridge , Gloria Steinem, Kate Jackson, Dihann Carroll, Suzanne Somers, Carly Simon, Jaclyn Smith, Peggy Fleming (olympic ice skating champ).

      And in answer to another question you asked re physical exercise and breast cancer, note the presence of two world class athletes among that very short list...

  33. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to decrease your chances of getting breast cancer ?
    I want to get a head start so maybe I won't have breast cancer. Any tips?

    • ANSWER:
      The thing is, nobody knows what causes breast cancer, so nobody can tell you how to prevent it.

      There isn't a scrap of evidence that diet or certain foods will help.

      Breast cancer is sometimes hereditary, but this is rare - only 5-10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary.

      There are recognised risk factors, but they ARE only risk factors, not causes. Most people who have all these risk factors don't get breast cancer.

      The biggest risk factor is getting older; breast cancer is mainly a disease of ageing, and 80% othose diagnosed with it are over 50.

      The other known risk factors are:

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feedinghelps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)

      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      Again, these are only risk factors, not causes.; ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors.

      I'm guessing from your Q&A - and forgive me if I'm wrong - that you're quite young. The American Cancer Society and other cancer organisations recommend that women start breast self-examination at the age of 20. Being aware of how your breasts usually are and reporting any changes to your doctor is the best thing you can do as you get older.

      Other than that there's not much you can do; try to enjoy your life and not worry too much about cancer. I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 50 - I'm glad I didn't waste any of those 50 years worrying about getting it

  34. QUESTION:
    Is there any range of people that are easily affected to breast cancer?
    If in the family tree,nobody have gotten breast cancer before will there be a range of people getting breast cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      In fact only a very small number of breast cancer cases(5-10%) are due to inherited factors.

      For most people, increasing age is the greatest risk factor. Most cases (approximately 80%) of breast cancers occur in post-menopausal women (women aged over 50 years).

      Other known risk factors for breast cancer are:

      Having children at at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      These are only risk factors though, and by no means everyone who ticks one or even all boxes will develop breast cancer.

      Breast cancer causes more than 12,500 deaths each year in the UK. That’s around 33 a day.

  35. QUESTION:
    Where can I find a list of meds associated with causing breast cancer?
    Could anyone please give me the links to some medical pages listing prescription medications that have been proven to heighten risk of breast cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think you'll find a reliable list. These articles may be of interest: http://www.ionchannels.org/showabstract.php?pmid=17487555
      http://www.prozactruth.com/cancer.htm

      The known risk factors for breast cancer are:

      Increasing age - this is the greatest risk factor. Most cases (approximately 80%) of breast cancers occur in post-menopausal women (women aged over 50 years).

      Having children at at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      Hereditary factors account for 5 - 10% of cases.

  36. QUESTION:
    How common is it for a woman to only ovulate every other month?
    If we have the cramps every other month does this mean we are only ovulating those months or is it possible to ovulate w/out those cramps?

    • ANSWER:
      First, you need to see your gynecologist, or family practice physician. Here are some web sites I found for you I hope it might be of help, please let me know.
      Are you ovulating? Are you sure? How can you best track your fertility and deal with out-of-sync cycles? Amos Grunebaum, MD, medical director of the WebMD Fertility Center, joined us to talk about understanding and charting your ovulation, as well as the causes of and treatments for ovulation problems.

      The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only.

      Member question: I am TTC. I haven't had a period since December. The first day of my last real period was 12/17/03. Since then on the day my cycle was due again I had spotting, and bleeding, but not my normal period. This happened again the day that I thought I was supposed to ovulate on Jan. 29. I had spotting until last night. Nothing today. Is there a chance that I am not ovulating, or that I am pregnant? I really can't tell if and when I ovulate.

      Dr. Amos: What you are describing is among one of the most common concerns on our fertility web site. The medical diagnosis when you miss your period is 'amenorrhea,' not getting your period. There are only a few possibilities why a woman won't get her period:

      The first is pregnancy, and a pregnancy test should be positive if you miss your period because of being pregnant.
      The next possibility is menopause, which happens eventually to all women, and is likely the cause when it happens when you are well past 40-45. A blood test in your doctor's office should tell you if it's menopause of not.
      The next frequent reason for not getting a period is 'anovulation,' not ovulating. A regular menstrual comes about 14 days after ovulation, and if you don't ovulate then your period won't come, or it could be very irregular, and you may have some spotting on and off.
      If you want to get pregnant then you obviously need to ovulate, and your doctor can try finding out why you do not ovulate. In many cases your doctor can induce bleeding with medications and then give you certain medicines to induce ovulation and help you get pregnant.

      Member question: Does being overweight make it hard to detect ovulation?

      Dr. Amos: That all depends how you want to detect ovulation. If your menstrual cycles are regular then you pretty much know you are ovulating. Another way to detect ovulation is keeping a temperature chart in our fertility center; this should not be influenced by being obese. And then you can test your urine with ovulation predictor kits before ovulation or do blood tests a week later.

      Member question: Is it possible to only ovulate every other month? Maybe only from one ovary? I ask because I usually feel ovulation on my right side, but not my left.

      Dr. Amos: It's highly unusual to only ovulate from one ovary and not the other. If your cycles are regular (are they?) then you should ovulate every month. Your "feeling" of ovulation does not necessarily mean it's just from that side.

      Member question: Is ovulation the same time every month? In midcycle?

      Dr. Amos: The time period between ovulation and the next period is constant, usually around 14 days. The period between the first day of bleeding/your cycle can vary. In a 28-day cycle, ovulation happens in the middle around CD 14 (28-14). But in a 35-day cycle ovulation happens on CD 21 (35-14 = 21) and on CD 10 in a 24-day cycle (24-14 = 10).

      Member question: Are there symptoms of ovulation, such as swollen breasts, tender nipples and/or water retention? Every month about midcycle I get these symptoms and cannot figure out why.

      Dr. Amos: These may be symptoms of ovulation, but they are not enough to make the diagnosis with sufficient evidence. Regular periods, BBT curves, OPK, cervical mucus changes, and/or elevated progesterone levels seven days later are the reliable methods of tracking ovulation.

      Member question: Do things such as Vitex, Dong Quai, or Fertility Blend help with ovulating in any way?

      Dr. Amos: No they do not, at least not from a scientific point of view. There are no clear scientific studies that these over-the-counter herbal medications work in inducing ovulation. And there are not enough studies showing that they are safe. When you do not ovulate, you should have your doctor do some tests. For example, a low thyroid condition can affect ovulation. None of the above medications are likely to affect the thyroid. So the best is to see your doctor to find out what if anything is going on, and then find out how to treat it.

      Member question: Dr. G I have been on Clomid for four cycles now, being monitored by my ob-gyn. I ovulate around CD 18 or so. How common is it for the ovulation pain to be a little more severe with the Clomid?

      Dr. Amos: Many women report more ovarian discomfort on Clomid than without it. That is because Clomid stimulates the ovaries. In response, many more follicles than usual start growing. They distend the capsule of the ovary and that can create pain, more than usual.

      Member question: Is it possible to ovulate the day after you stop bleeding?

      Dr. Amos: It is possible to ovulate any time in your cycle, even the day after you stop bleeding. Most women usually ovulate around CD 14 or so, but much earlier and much later ovulations are possible.

      Member question: How many times a day should you have sex before ovulation to get pregnant? One time a day, every 48 hours, two times a day?

      Dr. Amos: Once a day, every day during the fertile days is optimal. In addition you should make love regularly 2 to 3 times a week every week. This information is based on several scientific studies, which also show that making love every other day is OK too.

      Member question: According to the WebMD ovulation calendar I was ovulating from 1/25-1/31 and my DH and I have been BD since 1/24 up until 1/31. I have a 33-day cycle and my last period was 1/10. If you BD like crazy how come there is only a 10% chance of you getting pregnant?

      Dr. Amos: Let me first correct something. You ovulate only on one day of your cycle, not six days. You can get pregnant from making love during the five days before the day of ovulation and the day of ovulation. I am not sure what you mean by "BD like crazy." Making love more than once a day is not suggested, because the sperms have not enough time to recover. So once a day, every day is OK, even every other day is fine. If he has enough sperm then there is an about 20%-25% chance getting pregnant each month (not 10%).

      Member question: I starting charting this month and have had temps that go up and down! I don't think that I have ovulated and I am getting frustrated. I have had no EWCM or any CM for that matter! Is there any other way to know if I ovulated besides buying ovulation predictor kits? Thanks (P.S. I am on CD20).

      Dr. Amos: On CD 20 it may be a little too early to see if you are ovulating. You may want to keep charting at the WebMD Fertility Center. We can check your chart there and have it evaluated by one of our experts It's very difficult to interpret a chart yourself and getting some help will make you understand better what's going on.

      Member question: Dr. I am 41 and TTC and was pregnant, but had mc (Downs) in second month. I have been TTC since then -- one year ago. I have painful periods for just that day they start. I am using ovulation predictor kit and can ovulate anywhere from day 12-22. LH tests OK. I went to a fertility doctor and my levels were fine -- LH FSH etc. I am wondering if this variance in ovulation intervals is OK.

      Dr. Amos: It is not OK to have such irregular ovulation. This may be a sign that there could be a problem. It also makes your cycles very irregular, and that makes it difficult to estimate when/if ovulation happens. You should discuss as soon as possible with your infertility doctor (is it a reproductive endocrinologist?) what to do next. At 41 you should not lose extremely valuable time, and start going on the quickest path to pregnancy.

      Member question: My H/B and I have been trying for about a year now. It's been 10 months no contraception, six months seriously trying. My menstrual cycles are 28 days exactly. At first we were only using a calendar and my mucus changes as a guide. The past two months I've used an ovulation predictor kit. Still no luck. I'm 31 and my H/B is 41. Should we have fertility testing done?

      Dr. Amos: Yes, you should. The first step is usually the sperm count. I suggest to each and every of my patients to start off with the sperm count. Only when you have established that it's normal can you move on to the next tests. The majority of infertility problems in women who ovulate regularly are that his sperms are not OK. Then the next test is to check your fallopian tubes. This is usually done with a hysterosalpingogram or a laparoscopy.

      Member question: I track my temperatures every morning. The first part of my cycles the temperatures are low (ranging from 97 degrees to 97.5 degrees) and the last part of my cycle my temperatures are high (ranging from 97.7 degrees to 98.3 degrees). Does this for sure mean I am ovulating?

      Dr. Amos: It sounds as if you are ovulating. But to be sure, you may want to have someone else look at the chart. Only by directly taking a close look can an expert make sure that you do ovulate. And you can keep your chart at the WebMD Fertility Center, where experts can review the charts and comment.

      Member question: Is there anything that increases the chance of ovulation? Also, how well do ovulation kits work?

      Dr. Amos: Ovulation kits work fairly well but have disadvantages. In certain conditions like PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) they can be false positive, and sometimes they can be false negative. If you do not ovulate then only seeing a doctor can help you find out what the problem is. Taking over-the-counter medications is useless without knowing exactly what it is that you are treating.

      Member question: Can you still have a 28-day cycle and ovulate earlier/later than CD 14?

      Dr. Amos: If your cycles are very regular then ovulation usually happens about 14 days prior to the next cycle. That would be about 14 days plus/minus one to two days.

      Member question: The first day I used OPKs I had no idea what CD I was on because I am very irregular, but the line was really dark, then the lines became lighter and lighter the next four days. Do you think I was o'ing that first day?

      Dr. Amos: Impossible to say if the OPK was positive the first day. This is how OPKs work: OPKs test for the LH hormone, which rises shortly before ovulation. So when you are not about to ovulate the OPK is negative. When it first (emphasis on FIRST) turns positive then ovulation is likely to happen within the next 12-36 hours, emphasis on WITHIN. Ovulation can happen in 12 or 36 hours. The OPK can stay positive for several days, and if you test only on a day when it's already positive and you do not have a negative the previous day then it's impossible to know exactly when ovulation happened.

      Member question: After having a D&E how long does it usually take before you ovulate?

      Dr. Amos: The time after D&E is similar to the time after a miscarriage. It can take two to eight weeks for ovulation to happen after a D&E. If it hasn't happened two to three months later then you should talk to your doctor.

      Member question: While taking Clomid is it OK to perform OPKs and not chart, or do you feel that it's best have intercourse every couple days and not track ovulation so closely?

      Dr. Amos: OPKs can be incorrect for several days after you stop Clomid. Taking a temperature curve while on Clomid provides you with reassurance that you doing the right thing.

      Member question: Is it true that when I do ovulate I get an egg-white consistency discharge?

      Dr. Amos: Yes, it's true. At the time of ovulation there is an increase in the estrogen hormone. This hormone increases as ovulation approaches and it changes the cervical mucus from a thick consistency to first a thin consistency, and this consistency becomes 'stretchy', called 'spinnbarkeit.' When you touch this mucus with two fingers and pull it apart, you can extend it for several inches.

      Member question: At age 41 with three children, the youngest is youngest 10, what chance do I have for normal ovulation now?

      Dr. Amos: With regular menstrual cycles your chance of ovulating is excellent. The question is whether the eggs are still of high quality. Your doctor can do a blood test on CD 3 to confirm the quality of the eggs.

      Moderator: Thanks to Dr. Grunebaum and everyone who came today. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of the excellent questions. Please be sure to visit Dr. G on his message board TTC: Trying to Conceive and visit our other TTC message boards.

      And, as Dr. Amos mentioned in some of his answers, now you can learn even more about getting pregnant by joining the WebMD Fertility Center. Sign up for support, expert chart review, and tons of great TTC information. You'll learn everything you need to know about increasing your chances of conceiving. Go to fertility.webmd.com for more info.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=54668
      http://www.obgyn.net/women/women.asp?page=/yw/ATE_0500_periods

  37. QUESTION:
    What do those menopause testing kits cost from the chemist?

    • ANSWER:
      The menopause is actually a clinical diagnosis. During the peri-menopause, the bit where you get symptoms, hormone levels vary from day to day, this results in even formal lab tests being very inaccurate. Better to chat with your GP than waste money on a very dubious test kit.

  38. QUESTION:
    What happens during a nervous breakdown?
    What causes it, what happens, how do doctors treat it, can it happen more than twice?

    • ANSWER:
      A breakdown is used to describe a stressful situation in which someone becomes temporarily unable to function normally in day-to-day life.

      Breakdowns usually stem from a change in a major life event such as a broken relationship, death of a loved one, a demanding job or financial difficulties. Stress, depression, alcohol and drug abuse, family history, coexisting medical conditions (such as vitamin deficiencies, thyroid disorders, movement disorders, skin and limb problems, etc), and anxiety surrounding major life changes or disorders( such as pregnancy/after birth/labor, menopause) can all be risk factors.

      There is no standard cure. Choosing the right one depends on the diagnosis of the individual case. There are ways to prevent a nervous breakdown, conventional treatments, natural remedies, nutritional supplements and many other therapies to choose from.

      And yes it can happen more than once.

  39. QUESTION:
    What are the other reasons for light period?
    Okay so I had sex with my boyfriend last april 11 and after a few hours i got my period. May 9 i had light period. I do not think i am pregnant, is it because of stress or something? Do anybody know why is it like that? Thank you
    And yes we had protection when we did it.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      If you get it once in a while, then you may not require any treatment. However, other cases, require thorough investigation by your gynecologist. They conduct physical examination, blood test and Pap test to ascertain the cause. They may also conduct a pregnancy test, if required. Your lifestyle and medical history is also taken into account. The treatment then depends on the reasons for light periods. Change in diet and lifestyle is recommended in most cases. Stress reduction is also important to keep the menstrual flow normal. When strenuous physical activities causes this problem, the doctor may suggest you to cut down on your training sessions. Ovarian cysts are often treated with birth control pills and other medicines containing synthetic hormones. Women who have high levels of testosterone may have to undergo androgen therapy.

      If you suspect that something is wrong, there's no need to press the panic button unnecessarily. Visit a gynecologist for check up. Conditions that lead to light periods are treatable and are not always an indication of some major gynecological problem. However, to avoid any further complications, it is best to seek medical help as soon as you sense something is wrong.

  40. QUESTION:
    Does having your tubes tied have an age limit and how does it work?
    I have a son and I'd like another baby in the future but I might want to have my tubes tied after that. Is there an age limit? Does the insurance cover this surgery? How safe is it? (I know 1 person who had a baby even though her tubes had been tied.)

    • ANSWER:
      back in the old days they used to actually tie the tubes, now they cauterize the ends it is still possible to become pregnant with this procedure although very unlikely. I do not believe there is an age limit, but once you have gone through menopause there is no real reason to have it done. Some insurances will cover it, some view it as a form of birth control and will not. If you talk to you doctor sometimes they will just do it as a favor, or they can code your diagnosis in such a way that your insurance will cover it. It is quite safe and can be done as an outpatient or same day procedure.

  41. QUESTION:
    How do you prevent breast cancer or other breast diseases from happening?
    Pls. answer my question. because i have homework. I'll submit it in 2 days. PLEEEEAAAASE!!! it requires Paragraph.

    • ANSWER:
      Nobody knows what causes breast cancer - cancer researchers don't, so nobody here will. So nobody knows how to prevent it.

      It is a lot easier and less scary for people who haven't had cancer to 'blame the victim' by putting an individual's cancer down to lifestyle factors like diet than it is for them to accept that cancer is a largely random disease that can strike any of us at any time.

      I once thought that my organic vegan diet would protect me against cancer. It didn't.

      There ARE recognised risk factors for cancer, some preventable, some not. They're only rik factors though, and most women ticking one or all of the boxes don't get breast cancer and some women who have none of these risk factors do get breast cancer.

      The risk factors are:

      Genetic – but only 5-10% of breast cancers are genetic/hereditary

      Getting older - the greatest risk factor; 80% of those diagnosed with breast cancer are over 50

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breastfeeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      As I said though, someone may tick all of these boxes, and never get cancer.

  42. QUESTION:
    What are some signs that tell you that you have breast cancer?
    besides the lump?

    & are there any ways to prevent it from happening?

    • ANSWER:
      First, just to correct some misinformation - MOST cancerous breast lumps are not painful, but they can be - mine was.

      Early breast cancer usually has no symptoms at all. The signs and symptoms of possible breast cancer are:

      change in size - one breast may have become noticeably larger or lower

      nipple change - if it becomes inverted (pulled in) or changes its position or shape

      rash - on or around the nipple

      discharge - from one or both nipples

      puckering or dimpling - around nipple

      swelling – in your armpit or around your collarbone (from lymph nodes)

      lump or thickening - that feels different from the rest of the breast tissue - but remember that most breast lumps are not cancerous

      As for prevention - I'm afraid obody knows what causes breast cancer - cancer researchers don't, so nobody here will. So nobody knows how to prevent it.

      It is a lot easier and less scary for people who haven't had cancer to 'blame the victim' by putting an individual's cancer down to lifestyle factors like diet than it is for them to accept that cancer is a largely random disease that can strike any of us at any time.

      I once thought that my organic vegan diet would protect me against cancer. It didn't.

      There ARE recognised risk factors for breast cancer, some preventable, some not. They're only risk factors though, and most women ticking one or all of the boxes don't get breast cancer and some women who have none of these risk factors do get breast cancer.

      The risk factors are:

      Genetic – but only 5-10% of breast cancers are genetic/hereditary

      Getting older - the greatest risk factor; 80% of those diagnosed with breast cancer are over 50

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breastfeeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      As I said though, someone may tick all of these boxes, and never get cancer.

  43. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have legit depression for sure?
    First off, I've been feeling super sad all the time. I can't really pinpoint why exactly, but even during class I want to cry. Maybe because everything I'm trying to learn just doesn't come to me and it stresses me out. I can't concentrate either. I have a really high IQ but my grade average is a 75%. Up until 3rd grade, I was known to be "gifted" before all this stuff went wrong in my head. No head injury or traumatic things happened. My mind just crashed. (Error 404: Tzipora's mind cannot be found.)

    I also feel like doing nothing and sleeping all the time because I feel tired and overwhelmed, like I have been through something exhausting/intense/tough and deserve rest. But I know I don't deserve it. I feel like I can't deserve to be happy because I don't do anything. And I don't do anything so I can be happy but it doesn't work.

    I've lost interest in a lot of things too. I loved working out and playing Skyrim, watching Netflix, reading Game of Thrones and Narnia, and writing, but now I can't. I just find them so boring and pointless. I can't get into anything new either or stay committed to an activity. I have no motivation to do anything whatsoever. All my thoughts have ended in "What's the point?"

    Lately, I've been thinking about death in general. It's been in my few conversations often. For example, "If I lost my arms I would find a way to kill myself." and under what circumstances would it be acceptable and understandable to kill yourself? And I've been intensely wondering about what happens after you die.

    It isn't just psychological and emotional. It's physical, too. I've been feeling sick nearly every day for the last year or so (headaches, nausea, digestive problems, fatigue). But I don't have any disease or condition. I have been to the doctors so many times and been tested and cleared for IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) premature menopause, many crazy things. But even though I've been to a sleep study, an ultrasound, and tons and tons of blood work, nothing is wrong.

    Does it seem like I have depression? Can I personally know for sure? And can it get worse? Develop into something horrible? Because it feels like it has gotten terribly worse over the last few months. I don't want to be regarded as crazy...
    I have been cutting, too. I started about half a year ago and can't seem to stop.

    And another thing. The only wrong thing in my home life is my father. He doesn't abuse me or neglect me, he's just unsupportive. If I look at the big picture, it seems like there should be nothing wrong because so many people have it way worse than me with divorce, abuse, and financial/medical troubles. Me, I don't have any of that. PLEASE HELP.

    • ANSWER:
      You are the embodiment of the information you choose to accept and act upon. To change your circumstances you need to change your thinking and subsequent actions. You sound like a smart girl. if indeed you are, I am sure that you are aware of the side effects and general life quality that accompanies a medical diagnosis of depression and a lifetime of being dependant on meds. Anti depressant meds alter the chemistry of your brain in unnatural and therefore negative way. Before you go the whole medically diganosed depression route please exahaust every other possible way to improve your situation. Your mind in scientifically proven to be the most powerful part of your existance. Thoughts affect every aspect of your health in ways you never imagined. If your mind is sick then your body will also be sick, when your mind is right then your body will be right. Your mind can be your worst enemy or your greatest ally. You are in controll

  44. QUESTION:
    The early warning sighns of menopause,what are they?
    I'm in my 30's & would like to know of starting sighns of menopause.When is the typical age it starts to happen? What should I keep my eye out for?

    • ANSWER:
      Many women have irregular periods and other problems of "pre-menopause" for years. It's not easy to predict when menopause begins, although doctors agree it is complete when a woman has not had a period for a year. Eight out of every 100 women stop menstruating before age 40. At the other end of the spectrum, five out of every 100 continue to have periods until they are almost 60. The average age of menopause is 51.

      There's no mathematical formula to figure out when the ovaries will begin to scale back either, but a woman can get a general idea based on her family history, body type, and lifestyle. Women who began menstruating early will not necessarily stop having periods early as well. It is true that a woman will likely enter menopause at about the same age as her mother. Menopause may occur later than average among smokers.
      The most common symptom of menopause is a change in the menstrual cycle, but there are a variety of other symptoms as well, including:

      hot flashes

      night sweats

      insomnia

      mood swings/irritability

      memory or concentration problems

      vaginal dryness

      heavy bleeding

      fatigue

      depression

      hair changes

      headaches

      heart palpitations

      sexual disinterest

      urinary changes

      weight gain

      Diagnosis

      The clearest indication of menopause is the absence of a period for one year. It is also possible to diagnose menopause by testing hormone levels. One important test measures the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) that steadily as a woman ages.

      However, as a woman first enters menopause, her hormones often fluctuate wildly from day to day. For example, if a woman's estrogen levels are high and progesterone is low, she may have mood swings, irritability, and other symptoms similar to premenstrual syndrome (PMS). As hormone levels shift and estrogen level falls, hot flashes occur. Because of these fluctuations, a normal hormone level when the blood is tested may not necessarily mean the levels were normal the day before or will be the day after.

      If it has been at least three months since a woman's last period, an FSH test might be more helpful in determining whether menopause has occurred. Most doctors believe that the FSH test alone can't be used as proof that a woman has entered early menopause. A better measure of menopause is a test that checks the levels of estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and other hormones at mid-cycle, in addition to FSH.

  45. QUESTION:
    I have these strange symptons for the last four years and no doctor find the cause?
    Since may 2005 I have started feeling a sensation of tingling all over my body. It started suddenly and last about 10 minutes ( I had four of these episodes until present) the rest of the time I feel all over my body like tickling specially in my arms, legs and trunk. What could it be? I have visited many specialist ( cardiologist,allergist,neurologist, internal medicine even naturologist) and no one find the cause.

    • ANSWER:
      Low levels or deficiency of vitamin B12 affect the nerves...have folate checked as well. Both cause tingling sensations. Good link to check out of others with your symptoms who were found to have low vitamin B12 levels>>> http://www.steadyhealth.com/Pins_and_Needles_All_Over_My_Body__t101425.html

      As vitamin B12 is quite easy to misdiagnose, two tests should be performed - a serum B12 test - over 800pg/ml or 600pmol/l is optimal and a urinary methylmalonic acid test (UMMA) which is more accurate and aids in diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 in sublingual (under the tongue) form is very effective in boosting vitamin B12 levels. In one clinical trial, it concluded that oral B12 may be superior to B12 injections.

      Vitamin D deficiency can cause tingling all over as well in some people. Test to request - 25(OH)D - optimal vitamin D level - 80ng/ml or 200nmol/l. 5000IU daily is recommended by the vitamin D council.

      Magnesium deficiency symptoms include tingling sensations all over the body but is listed as a more severe symptom and usually you would have muscle spasms as well.

      Long lasting or recurring paresthesia causes >>>

      * Brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerve disorders: trauma, stroke, intra-cerebral hemorrhage, multiple sclerosis, tumors, encephalitis, meningitis, herniated disc, cervical spondylosis, pressure on the nerve (carpal tunnel syndrome, sciatica), repetitive motion or prolonged vibration, neuralgia

      * Circulatory (heart and vessels) disorders: angina pectoris, atherosclerosis, acute arterial occlusion, vasculitis, Raynaud disease, vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders

      * Metabolic and hormonal disorders: diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, hypoaldosteronism (Conn syndrome), menopause, abnormal blood levels of calcium, potassium or sodium, uremia, porphyria

      * Infections and post-infection syndromes: infection with Herpes simplex virus, Herpes zoster virus, arbovirus; canker sores, Lyme disease, AIDS (HIV), leprosy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, rabies, syphilis

      * Connective tissue and autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren’s syndrome, pernicious anaemia, diabetes

      * Blood disorders: thrombosis, polycythemia, thrombocytosis, leukemia

      * Bones and joints disorders: arthritis, osteomalacia, osteoporosis

      * Fibromyalgia

      * Nutrient deficiency: vitamin B1 deficiency (beriberi), vitamin B5 and B12 deficiency

      * Malignancies

      * Skin disorders: burns, frostbite, Ito syndrome, acrodynia, acroparesthesia

      * Migraine

      * Psychological disorders: anxiety, panic attack, psychiatric disease

      * Medications: anti-convulsant drugs, lomotil, SSRI withdrawal, amiodarone, colistimethate, digoxin, dimercaprol, mefloquine, riluzole , tetrodotoxin, thallium, topiramate, overdose of lidocain or vitamin B6

      * Alcohol, tobacco, illegal drugs

      * Poisoning: heavy metals (arzenic, lead, mercury), long term exposure to nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ciguatera poisoning, snake bites

      * Radiation exposure, chemotherapy

      * Hereditary diseases: Refsum syndrome, Fabry disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (a hereditary disorder that causes wasting of the leg muscles), porphyria, Denny-Brown’s syndrome (a hereditary disorder of the nerve root), ataxia-teleangiectasia

      * Immune deficiency

      More information >>>

      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/symptoms/tingling/causes.htm
      http://www.healthhype.com/causes-of-tingling-and-numbness-paresthesia.html
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peripheral_neuropathy
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paresthesia
      http://www.steadyhealth.com/about/symptoms_of_magnesium_deficiency_in_humans.html
      http://www.easy-immune-health.com/can-vitamin-d-deficiency-cause-tingling-all-over.html

  46. QUESTION:
    Can a CT scan tell if a meningioma is benign?
    I recently had a CT scan (headaches) and my neurologist said I have 2 small benign meningiomas in my right frontal lobe. How can he look just at the scan and tell they are benign without running any kind of tests? Is that possible?

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with a golf ball sized tuberculum sellae meningioma 3 years ago and had surgery 2 weeks after diagnosis. All of my tumor was removed and I have had no regrowth.

      The only way to know for sure the grade (benign or malignant) of any tumor, or to even identify the type of tumor definitely is by running pathology tests on the tumor tissue, which can only be done after surgical removal of all or part of the tumor.

      A CT scan or MRI can give a "probable" diagnosis. My CT scan was read by one radiologist who diagnosed my "lesion" as an aneurysm. I had the same CT scan read by another radiologist who said it was a "probable meningioma". I then had an MRI done and had a more precise diagnosis of a meningioma, but still it was not definite until after surgery.

      Approximately 80% of meningiomas are classified as benign, 10-20% are atypical (benign but showing aggressive growth), only 1-2% of meningiomas are malignant.

      Since most of them are benign, that is not to say they don't cause health issues. My meningioma was attached to my optic nerves and was wrapped around the internal carotid artery. If it had not been discovered and surgically removed, I would have gone blind and it would have slowly cut off the blood supply to my brain.

      The first answerer made a valid point about hormones. Hormonal fluctuations can cause meningiomas to grow, but only IF the tumor has hormone receptors. Again that is only determined by pathology testing. My tumor did not have hormone receptors and would have continued to grow, regardless of my age. His comment that meningiomas shrink after menopause is a joke I hope. I have been in contact with about 150 other meningioma survivors and 3 people who have died from the affects of meningiomas in the last three years. I have never heard of a meningioma shrinking, except through some form of radiation treatment.

      I would suggest that you consult with a neurosurgeon to get another opinion whether you need surgery or not. The best chance of having complete surgical removal is to have it when the tumor is smaller and not causing neurological problems. Frontal lobe tumors are known to cause seizures and other symptoms.

      http://www.abta.org/siteFiles/SitePages/1411809F1680108B31F43BBC86A81F3B.pdf
      This is a link to American Brain Tumor Assoc. literature on meningiomas.

      http://www.meningiomamommas.com/
      This is a link to a wonderful online support group for people affected by meningiomas.

      Good luck. Please email me if you have any questions for me.

  47. QUESTION:
    what's the phsyical criteria you have to meet to be diagnosed with anorexia?
    i'm anorexic but i'm not sure if i could be diagnosed. i'm 5'8.5 and 105 pounds
    i know that anorexia is a mental illness, and i know all the mental problems that come with it.

    what i was asking is what is the PHYSICAL things that a psychiatrist would look for in order to diagnose anorexia nervosa?

    • ANSWER:
      You are definitely underweight....

      To be diagnosed as having anorexia nervosa, according to the DSM-IV-TR, a person must display:

      Refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height (e.g., weight loss leading to maintenance of body weight less than 85% of that expected; or failure to make expected weight gain during period of growth, leading to body weight less than 85% of that expected).
      Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese.
      Disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight.
      The absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles (amenorrhea), in women who have had their first menstrual period but have not yet gone through menopause (postmenarcheal, premenopausal females).
      Or other eating related disorders.

      "Individuals with anorexia do not worry about their weight loss. Therefore, they generally do not seek professional help. Parents, other relatives, or friends are often responsible for getting the necessary help for the family member suffering from anorexia.

      The diagnosis of anorexia is made when the anorexic either loses fifteen percent (15%) of their weight or when the growing child fails to acquire eighty-five percent (85%) of the minimal weight for their particular age and height. As mentioned above, young people with anorexia do not see themselves as overly thin, and they gain a great sense of achievement by keeping themselves trim. A history of excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, and the overuse of laxatives or diuretics helps the mental health professional make a diagnosis of anorexia."

  48. QUESTION:
    How Long does Herpes take to Appear?
    I haven't had sex in about seven years. I imagine if I have herpes they would have shown some sort of sign by now correct?

    • ANSWER:
      While most obvious first outbreaks occur in 2-14 days after exposure, it is not impossible for them to show much later. For most people who exhibit typical symptoms, the first outbreak is hard to miss. There is usually itching, burning, or other similar symptoms that get your attention. If there is something new in your system such as an illness, menopause, or extreme stress, it is possible to have an existing infection suddenly display more severe symptoms. It is also possible that you missed your first outbreak by thinking it was something else. I do not know your gender, but most women think that their symptoms are a result of yeast, irritation, change in detergent or something along those lines. Men often think they have jock itch or irritation. Later they discover that they have herpes. They do not recall having an outbreak because they thought it was something else.

      Since 90% of those with genital herpes are unaware of their status, it is always a good idea to get checked. Request a blood test from your doctor even if they do not believe the symptoms are a result of herpes. Often a visual diagnosis by a doctor is wrong, so it is best to confirm your status with a test.

      Chances are it is not herpes, but it is always best to know for sure!

  49. QUESTION:
    What are my risks of developing Breast Cancer? How can I reduce the risk?
    My great grandma's, one of my great aunts, and two of my aunts Have had breast cancer. allot of them had it in there 30's and 40's. My grandma did not have breast cancer, but had ovarian cancer. My mom has been tested, but luckily came negative so far.
    Sorry, only one of my great gandmas had it.

    • ANSWER:
      Only 5-10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors, the rest are random.

      You say that your mother has been tested and found negative - do you mean she has been tested for one of the faulty BRCA genes that are the cause of hereditary cancer?

      Although most cases aren't hereditary, with your family history, and particularly with most of the family members being young when they got it, it does sound as if you might be at increased risk - unless your mother has tested negative for the faulty genes, in which case I think I'm right in saying you won't have the gene.

      That's the first thing you need to know; your mother may already know whether your relatives' cancer was hereditary.

      Other than hereditary factors, nobody knows what causes breast cancer, and so nobody knows how to prevent it. No foods or diets have been shown to have any effect. I used to think my organic vegan diet would protect me from cancer, but it didn't.

      There are known risk factors, some avoidable and some not, but they ARE only risk factors; having one, some or all of them does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many, many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors. They are:

      Genetic – but only 5-10% of breast cancers are genetic/hereditary

      Getting older - the greatest risk factor

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breastfeeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      As I said though, someone may tick all of these boxes, and never get cancer.

  50. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get pregnant with pcos?
    Ok so after I had my son (7 years ago) I was diagnosed with pcos. My obgyn told me that is was HIGHLY unlikely I would conceive again without drugs. Well I had I was not sexually active until 3 years ago when I met my husband. We never use protection because I was told pcos=no more babies, which was fine with me. Anyways, the past 2 years I started getting periods again, at first they were far apart but for the last 2 months they've been coming the same time every month. So I am or was convinced I'm starting menopause at 32. I am now late for my period. I had 2 nights of hot flashes. And yesterday I got extremely light headed for a few minutes. I have been feeling extremely wet down there expecting my period, but nothing except wet mucus. My question is, would it be far fetched to think that this is something other than premenopausal symptoms? Only reason why I ask is because I was trying to do research online and I found threads of women with pcos getting pregnant without aid. Wth, that's news to me! So, sorry for sounding dumb but should I go and pee on one of those sticks! The only thing I remember being pregnant with my son was sore breasts. I have no breasts tenderness at all which leans me more towards menopause. Any ladies have any opinions. And if it is menopause what can I do to relieve any of those symptoms if they come back? I did make a Dr apt but just wanted some input

    • ANSWER:
      Plenty of women with PCOS get pregnant. You had PCOS before your diagnosis, but still got pregnant. Your doctor was too absolute in his statement that you can't get pregnant. It is unlikely to be menopause, but it could be perimenopause--a time of changing hormones.

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menopause diagnosis

Menopause Vitamins

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    My mother was given One A Day® Menopause vitamins as a gift BUT!?
    She's 42, and she has not physically reached menopause, but she said she needed vitamins. So my aunt got her a supply of the One-A-Day Menopause vitamins and she's afraid it'll mess with her insides. I tried to look this up, and to no answers. Help me out please?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't worry, vitamins are vitamins. The rest is 99% marketing spin. So long as she doesn't exceed the recommended dose (as with any vitamins, because some can actually poison you if you take too much) then nothing bad can come of it. I checked the content of the one-a-day menopause vitamins, they are just regular multi vitamins, and there is nothing in there that is going to mess with her insides :)

      As to whether she needs vitamins or not, that's another question. But these can not cause any harm, and can only be beneficial. So let her take them.

  2. QUESTION:
    Suggestions for a healthy diet for menopause including vitamins?
    Suggestions for a diet plan for menopause would be so helpful also. Would like to hear from women that have made theirselves feel better with natural progesterone. (What Type) of natural herbs and foods for menopause that you have used?

    • ANSWER:
      I used natural progesterone in the beginning of my pre-menopause. It eliminated my migraines, stabilized my moods and helped me sleep better. It is known for helping with hot flashes, but I didn't have hot flashes until later, and it hasn't helped me with those.

      I've also used several herbs to help with hot flashes, sleep and stress. Motherwort is good for all three. I've also taken vervain, scullcap and Siberian ginseng, among others.

      The diet that is working best for me is from "The Carbohydrate Addict's Life Span Program", by Drs Richard and Rachael Heller. It's the only program I have found that I can lose weight with, mostly because it minimizes cravings and hunger. It also works better with my digestion, which has gone crazy since entering pre-menopause.

      I am eating more vegetables and less grains and sweets, because I feel better eating this way. For more info on diet (and herbs and progesterone cream), you can visit http://www.natural-approaches-to-menopause.com/menopause-diets.html

  3. QUESTION:
    Why are some vitamins for women advertised as without iron and iodine?
    Are the vitamins without iron for women past menopause? Why would the vitamins be without iodine? What purpose does that serve?

    • ANSWER:
      iron and iodine can cause post menopausal women to experience similar symptoms of menopause, which is why its recommended that they not take these unless they are deficient.
      it can also interact with hormone replacement that may be prescribed after menopause

  4. QUESTION:
    Any suggestions on how to deal with anemia related to menopause?
    The doctor has prescribed vitamins. I was wondering if anyone else knew of a good website to get info or has anyone else dealt with this. I would prefer to treat this as naturally as possible.
    Peace.

    • ANSWER:
      You can take xtra iron. Take it with a meal so it doesn't upset your stomach. It helps to also include vitamin C which helps to absorb iron. Your MD should be able to give you some medication to slow the blood loss to minimize the anemia. Might be something to consider. Some women become very tired and don't feel well. More related to the anemia than menopause. I prefer natural too; but sometimes drugs is the way to go for awhile. Won't be forever.
      Don't know about your preferred diet, but if you are vegetarian, you are more likely to become anemic. Red meat is a good source of iron.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are essential vitamin supplements for women to take?
    I have heard from dr.'s that a muti-vitamin is not necessary. I have heard to take a calcium supplement and a few other vitamins. I forgot what they were though! Can any smart people out there help me out with the essential daily vitamin supplements that women around 25 should take?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      People, including doctors are still divided over whether we should take vitamins. I believe we should and you’re at the perfect age to start. Our bodies are designed to self heal (and stay healthy) and they do that perfectly well when they receive the necessary amounts of micro nutrients they need daily. Most people today don’t take in the right amount of nutrients hence the every increasing rates of degenerative disease at earlier and earlier ages (cancer, heart disease, diabetes etc etc) not to mention all the environmental stressors that negatively impact on our bodies.

      A person your age should take a quality multi ingredient health supplement as an ongoing preventative health-care measure (investment in your health) but make sure the amounts of vitamins and minerals are in small doses - not the ridiculous over the top doses contained in almost all supplements in the market, including the market leaders.

      Vitamins/minerals are the cheapest ingredients in supplements- providing a lot of profit to the manufacturers (I know because I worked in the supplement industry). What you really want in a (science-based) supplement are lots of high potency phytonutrients and herbal extracts with proven disease fighting/preventing capabilities and minimal amounts of vitamins and minerals along with some amino acids, female support nutrients, enzymes and some important specialty nutrients like L- Glutathione etc (i.e. a balanced full spectrum of micronutrients).

      Do not take calcium unless you have been diagnosed with a deficiency. If so buy it on its own – calcium is cheap. Same applies for iron.

      Do not take other vitamins in isolation – this is unwise and can be dangerous. Buy a supplement formulated by a qualified bioscientist – then you know everything is in the right amounts and balanced correctly with appropriate cofactors to ensure high efficacy.

      Menstruation, pregnancy and menopause play an important role in determining what nutrients women need. Hormonal balance is integral for well-being in women. The safest way to re-balance a women’s body is to provide it with specialized nutrients in the form of hormonal precursors.

      5 key hormone precursors are: Black Cohosh , Red Clover , Dong Quai , Wild Yam and Isoflavones. These should be in your vitamin supplement.

      For more info view this resource page about vitamins for women:

  6. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  7. QUESTION:
    What vitamins/supplements do you take and why?
    I take quite a few vitamins, mostly recommended by my doctor -- calcium, vitamin C & E capsule, evening primrose supplement, and a multiple. Plus a probiotic.

    But I have heard fairly frequently that all vitamins really do is give you very expensive urine! ;-)

    Yet I can definitely tell a difference in how I feel when I stop taking the supplements -- especially the calcium and evening primrose.

    Your experiences and thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      I have taken suppliments for many years, especially star flower, which I used for side effects of the menopause with out the suppliments I felt tired ,dizzy and i sweated a great deal, especially when anxious, I know you should not take them all the time and every now and then you should have a week or tow break from taking them as they work better that way, there are many people who do not believe in herbal medicatione, but they forget that most medication the doctor gives you comes fronm herbs, plants etc.

      Your doctor is right, if they work for you, then carry on.

  8. QUESTION:
    What should a woman eat during the menopause period?
    i know they need vitamin D but wat should they eat and wat else does the body need?

    • ANSWER:
      Difficulty: ModerateInstructionsThings You'll Need:
      Bottled Water
      Calcium Supplement
      Fiber Supplements
      Step 1Watch your caloric intake: A 55-year-old woman needs only 1700 calories/day. Understand that if you eat more than you need, these excess calories will end up as fat.

      Step 2Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg of calcium a day, as does a post-menopausal woman on hormone replacement therapy. Those not on HRT need 1500 mg. of calcium/day.

      Step 3Talk to your doctor about taking a daily calcium supplement tablet, since it's difficult to get all the calcium you need through food.

      Step 4Eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, which contain an abundance of vitamins B6, B12, folic acid and certain antioxidants, which can help women through menopause and ease the aging process.

      Step 5Choose foods high in phytoestrogens - yams, eggs, soy products, potatoes, oats, tomatos, eggplant, apples, pomegranates, dates and cherries. Intestinal bacteria can transform these foods into sexual hormones your body can use to offset menopausal-related hormonal depletions.

      Step 6Let complex carbohydrates account for 60-80% of your daily calories. Such foods include whole grain breads and cereals, pasta and rice.

      Step 7Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes.

      Step 8Consume plenty of fiber to insure regular bowels movement. A daily regular movement is integral for a feeling of well-being.

      Step 9Drink 8-12 glasses of water a day. Good hydration keeps the body in homeostasis.

      For Reference :-http://www.ehow.com/how_12655_eat-during-menopause.html

  9. QUESTION:
    How effective is a vitamin B complex in prevention of miscarriage?
    They say to take a vitamin B complex and folic acid when trying to get pregnant and to continue after pregnant and this helps in the prevention of miscarriage. Is this true? How effective is it? Also, where can I get progesterone cream? Does it need to be prescribed? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I've taken B complex and a Multi with Folic Acid for several years. Folic Acid is a B vitamin btw...so you'll get plenty with just those two. I've had miscarriages and a very healthy pregancy in a 2 year time frame.

      Here is my take: there is no foolproof way of preventing miscarriage. I would def. recommend taking care of yourself, eating healthy, and taking your vitamins. But miscarriages may still happen, because not every egg/sperm combo is going to be healthy enough to produce a baby. Sometimes there are genetic glitches that won't work no matter what vitamins you are taking, and so a miscarriage is your body's natural way of starting over. But you should be very aware of your progesterone levels before you begin trying to concieve.

      I'd ask the Dr. about your progesterone levels, and using cream to boost to them if necessary. Progesterone is not just a pregnancy hormone, it's the one that regulates the thickness of your womb's lining every month. If you have very light periods, then more than likely, you have low progesterone. Many women aren't aware that chemical forms of birth control intentionally supress your progestrone levels to prevent implantation if fertilization occurs. (totally true! ask your Dr.) Even after coming off of chemical birth control, your body may not 'bounce back' with healthy progesterone levels. So what happens is that if the egg does get fertilized, there is not enough lining there for the baby to attach to and to sustain life.

      My progesterone experience: I followed my Dr.'s advice an had a DNC after getting pregnant with an IUD (it was in position and in place for over a year when I got pregnant with it in...I lost the baby). After the DNC, my periods were very light. I got pregnant again, and lost that baby because my lining was too thin to support life. I opted to miscarry naturally that time. My periods returned to a healthy flow, and I was able to quickly get pregnant and had a very healthy pregnancy that time.

      My Mom orders progesterone cream from a natual foods website for her menopause symptoms...so if you confirm with your doctor that you want to use progesterone, then that may be less expensive than getting a prescription.

      Best of luck!

  10. QUESTION:
    I just turned 40 and am experiencing hot flashes, is it menopause?
    I had a partial hysterectomy at the age of 28 for fibroid tumors. I already had 4 kids, and had been suffering for a couple of years. I turned 40 just 2 months ago, and have been having hot flashes for about 6 weeks, is it menopause or something else? We don't have medical insurance, so going to the doctor to run the normal test for menopause is not an option.

    • ANSWER:
      It just may.Take 800 or 1,000 IU of Vitamin E a day. See if it works, after a few days.Good luck

  11. QUESTION:
    Why would they prescribe her vitamin D after hysterectomy?
    My mother had a hysterectomy a while ago and the doctors prescribed her a high dosage ( 50,000IU) of vitamin D and she suffering from some side effects and i was wondering whats going on? What can she do to get off of these meds? Does anybody else suffer from this?

    • ANSWER:
      She needs to tell the doctor about the problem. Is she suffering from side effects related to too much vitamin D (unusual) or side effects of surgical menopause (more likely)?

  12. QUESTION:
    Should you take calcium supplements and your multi vitamin at the same time?
    I've heard that you shouldn't take your extra calcium and Vit D at the same time you take your multi vitamin. True or False?

    • ANSWER:
      I've been taking 1000mg of calcium with my mulit vitamin with my SlimFast shake, every morning for 40 some odd years. After menopause, I added another 1000 mg at bed time.
      Add to that A, B, C, D, E,...and a very select variety of others....soy, cranberry, bilberry....

      Want to know the secret to the 'fountain of youth'? The oils...
      Omega 3 fatty acid...1000mg,
      Cod Liver Oil...1000mg,
      Flaxseed Oil...1000mg.

      Makes sense to me to oil the body from the inside...no arthritis, smooth skin, healthy hair and nails.....oh ya, we're 'great grandparents'....68 and 71. People are shocked, they think we're in our 50's.

      After many years studying nutrition, I set up a program that's amazing. Absolutely nothing strange or weird, just common sense. The entire program equals only 1/3 of the daily MDR. Not expensive, either. Runs us less than a dollar a day each.

      The proof, I take absolutely NO drugs of any kind <:O)

  13. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to take a mix of these two vitamins?
    I want to start taking Evening Primrose vitamins PLUS the Hair, Nails, and Skin Vitamins. I read on the internet it says to take 1000mg of EveningPrimrose a day and the bottle of Hair, Nails, and Skin vitamins says to take them three times a day as well. Would it be safe to mix the too? Anybody else take both of these?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it would be ok to take both. Evening Primose is a natural supplement for PMS or Menopause. The hair, nails and, skin vitamin should not interfere with each other.But, just to be certain, ask your Pharmacist, since he/she has more in-depth knowledge. I hope that this helped some.

  14. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between evening primose oil and Vitamin B6?
    I was just wondering about the difference between evening primose oil and Vitamin B6 because i have been taking evening primose oil and saw Vitamin B6 in boots and they both say 'helps to maintain a hormonal balance' or something similar...but i dont see any difference
    is there a difference, if so what is it??

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is important for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine and for myelin formation. Pyridoxine deficiency in adults principally affects the peripheral nerves, skin, mucous membranes, and the circulatory (blood cell) system. In children, the central nervous system (CNS) is also affected. Deficiency can occur in people with uremia, alcoholism, cirrhosis, hyperthyroidism, malabsorption syndromes, and congestive heart failure (CHF), and in those taking certain medications.

      The oil of evening primrose is very rich in polysaturated comega-6 fatty acids, which are necessary fatty acids that body needs to complete numerous functions including insulin absorption, regulating the heart, and regulating mood. The body does not manufacture these fatty acids on its own, so they have to be taken as food or food supplements. Aside from the omega-6 fatty acids, evening primrose oil has linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid (“GLA”). Both of these acids are very important and very beneficial to general well-being. Linoleic acid is thought to help the body make use of insulin, regulate weight, and prevent cancer and heart disease. GLA is thought to reduce swelling or irritation. Because of the high GLA content of evening primrose, it is recommended to help treat inflammatory ailments like asthma or arthritis. Research also indicates that evening primrose could benefit sufferers of chronic fatigue syndrome, but little is understood about chronic fatigue syndrome and further studies are needed.

      Evening primrose oil is used to treat the symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome, menopause, and the soreness of the breasts that often accompanies menstruation. GLA is often recommended to help ease the discomforts of PMS, and evening primrose has high levels of GLA.

  15. QUESTION:
    How soon is too soon to start taking preventative vitamins?
    That is to say; Could a woman in her 20s reasonably start taking vitamins to help combat the effects of aging (IE: calcium and vitamin D, red rice yeast, etc.)?

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely, yes. It's much more likely that, even at this age, you have a deficiency of these things, so you will benefit from taking them. However, with something like calcium, there is a recommended daily amount for women of your age, and then a higher amount recommended for menopausal women. So you'll want to take the lower amount. But taking it when young helps lay down a foundation of health that will serve you well when you are older. Something like vitamin D can always be useful--taking it lowers one's risk of breast cancer, for example. But don't take things that are recommended to deal with menopause, obviously, because they will compete with your normal level of hormones.

  16. QUESTION:
    How do we know when we have our menopause?
    I'm 43 and I would like to know what will tell me that I am entering the "wonderful world" of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is a stressful time for woman. It usually occurs when women reach the age of around 50. So it is easily understandable that women face this only one in life and forever.
      As it is not a common phenomenon, most of women cannot understand whether their menopausal period has started or not, though they can diagnose themselves easily. But there remains some confusion. It is always best to go to doctor and check for this problem. It is the best way to understand whether menopause has started or not.
      As mentioned earlier that menopause occurs when women turn the age of around 50, but some may experience it between the age of 46 and 55. It is a natural phenomenon. So women should be positive. Certainly this is a fearful or uncomfortable matter for women. Here is a matter for thinking. They should realize that though it is a great grief, they need to think of it as natural event. They should educate their mind. Menopause happens to all women around the age of 50, so every woman at this age face this trouble. So challenges should be taken and learned from others who have passed that time. Discussion is very necessary here. Thus they can feel and take it easier and can continue their daily life.
      Discovering menopausal symptoms in the body does not mean menopause has started. Actually when any woman’s period is missing for about a year, then she experience menopausal period.

      To prevent this mentally, education is so very important. Education brings light. So women should know and learn much about menopause. Thus light will clear all of the grief. It is notable that superstition is not education and believing superstition is harmful. Education can also help them to prepare mentally. This brings a change to the life. With menopause, some menopausal symptom may come as painful and disgusting. But changing the mind to feel happy is great. However menopausal symptoms can be cured. So they need not worry about that. They should take all hormonal changes as easy and natural.

      Women should take care of their health. Too much worrying reduces defense system of the body as a result diseases can easily attack. Thus they become sick. To make this period easy, they can look for some helpful things such as a natural progesterone cream made from natural element can improve their symptom. But they must remain conscious of the usages rule. It is better to check whether that product is appropriate for them or not.

      Some herbs are very useful. The herb red clover brings many benefits. It contains vitamin B and Gamma oryzenol.

      Let’s not think about it too much. If any problems occur, nutritionists and doctors can help them a lot. But they should look for a qualified person.

      Eventually it is clear that there is no factor for women passing menopausal periods to fear. There is lot of women, who have passed that time and with a lot of natural elements near at hands. Now is the time for understanding these.

  17. QUESTION:
    How many omega-3 vitamins can I take? Plus how much vitamin d can i take too?
    I just bought the kids omega-3 because it is much cheaper and wow they taste great

    and I bought vitamin d with 5000 iu in each

    I am only 43 and post-menopause and the vitamin d will be nice

    I do take 2 calium a day and 1 multi-vitamin too
    forgot to add the omega-3's each have 227mg fish oil and 70mg omega-3 fatty acids each

    • ANSWER:
      My husband took 50,000iu but not for long because there are side effects
      http://www.livestrong.com/article/291180-prescription-strength-vitamin-d-side-effects/

      It is good for you
      I suggest you ask your doctor before taking anything
      best to ask your gyno tho

  18. QUESTION:
    My Mom's menopause symptoms are driving our family crazy?
    Is there anything she can take like vitamins etc to calm her nerves & moodiness? She doesn't wanna take hormones & we don't want her to either because we heard it can higher her risk for cancer.
    @Matthew I don't live with my Mom.

    • ANSWER:
      On Dr Oz show, Siberian rhubarb extract was recommended for relieving menopausal symptoms. You can find this extract in the dietary supplement, Estrovera.

  19. QUESTION:
    what vitamin can I take for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis?
    I don't have Osteoporosis, but I want to prevent it. It doesn't run in my family. What vitamin can I take to help prevent it.

    • ANSWER:
      If you don't drink or eat much dairy products then Take Calcium and Vitamin D. You need the Vitamin D to make the Calcium work. I don't know how old you are so I will give you the requirements for each age.
      Children--Most children get enough calcium and vitamin D from milk If they don't they should be taking children's vitamins,

      Teens and adults--1000 mg calcium and 1000IU vitamin D
      Seniors and those with Osteo--1500 MG Calciun and 2000IU vitamin D. You need the Vitamin D to make the Calcium work. You can take it in food or supplements

      Food highest in Calcium--
      milk including chocolate and skim--8oz. glass 300 Mg
      8 oz. yogurt--200MG--400 Mg in asana
      Cheese--1 1/4 inch cube--it varies with different kinds 200 to250 MG
      Salmon with bones--1/2 can--240MG
      sardines with bones--1/2 can--200 Mg
      Fortified orange juice--8 oz glass 300 Mg
      Almonds--1/2 cup--95 Mg
      Lesser amounts in Broccoli whole wheat bread and muffins.

      If you have a family history of Osteo then You should have a full bone scan-- not a heel or finger one-- before you head into menopause to get a base line. Your best option for avoiding Osteoporosis is to have strong bones before you enter menopause and really start to lose bone. Even if you get it there are meds to deal with it. Don't believe all the crap you hear about them. I have been on them for almosr 9 years with no side effects except my bones have gotten stronger than they ever were.

  20. QUESTION:
    I want to start taking prenatal vitamins for my skin?
    I break out like a freak, im a girl and i love makeup and having acne just ruins alot! I have a mild cleanser and drink alot of water and clean my hands and im still breaking out!!!

    please help i hear prenatal vitamins can help, what brand should i take? personal experience? someone help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Women can break out because of puberty or periodical menstrual cycle that can last until menopause. These phases makes your hormone out of whack --> hyperactive oil glands --> more oil --> more acne. Prenatal vitamins does not help. If you prefer an oral route for acne, your relevant choices are: antibiotic (like tetracycline) OR hormone blocker OR birth control pills OR accutane (isotretinoin). Birth control ill and hormone blocker regulate hormone production ---> less oil --> less breakouts. Isotretinoin shrinks oil glands --> no more oily skin --> no more blackheads or acne. I think isotretinoin gives you long-term or even permanent "normal" skin after the treatment, but some people need 2 or 3 trials.

      -- Cleansers – removes dirty, oil, makeup, dead skin cells and any other residuals built up over time

      Boots Expert Anti-Blemish Cleansing Foam OR Olay Foaming Face Wash, Sensitive OR CeraVe Foaming Cleanser is great options. All three contain no fragrance or colorant (nFoC).

      -- Exfoliant – Unglues dead skin cell | stimulate collagen over time | even out skin tone

      Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Stress Control 3-in-1 Hydrating Acne Treatment with 2% salicylic acid (SA; pH ~ 3.4). This product does contain fragrance and coloring additives, but they are in minute amounts. If you have sensitivity to those ingredients, then try Paula’s Choice 2% beta hydroxy acid “gel” or “liquid” version (pH 3.2-6); either one is good. SA acts as a triple threat: an antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and an oil-soluble exfoliant. Its solubility allows it to exfoliate the pore lining to dislodge any clog to permit a better flow of oil. If you are allergic to aspirin, then avoid SA. Your alternative is a glycolic acid or lactic acid-based product such as Paula’s Choice 8% Alpha Hydrox Acid with glycolic acid (pH f 3.5-8) with nFoC. If you have sensitivity to any acids, you probably want to stick with a physical scrub such as Neutrogena Fresh Foaming Scrub with round polyethylene beads as the scrubbing agent. The efficacy of exfoliation of scrubs is not on par with chemical exfoliation. But before you go for the scrub, try ease up the application of chemical exfoliant if you have low tolerance for it at first. For example, try to apply it every other night, or every third night, or once a week and gradually increase application frequency. Or, you can apply the chemical exfoliant for 5-10 minutes and rinse it off; do this for a week and increase leave-on application as you achieve higher tolerance for the acid.

      -- Acne Medication – oxidizing agent that destroy acne bacteria

      Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is the gold-standard acne treatment. The FDA and declared it to be safe and effective. Acne bacteria cannot develop resistance to benzoyl peroxide. Research has shown that a 2.5% BP is just as effective as 5% or 10% BP without the irritation (peeling, burning, redness, etc). However, if your skin has a more aggressive form of acne, you may just want to try a higher concentration of BP. If you prefer an organized system that takes the guess work out for you, then try Proactiv. Acne.org also offers a system and it is cheaper because you get for product per dollar. The drugstore has a few good options. Oxy Clinical Clearing Treatment has 5% BP while Clean and Clear Persa-Gel contain 10% BP. If you have sensitive to BP, an alternative may be sulfur-containing product such as Clearasil Adult Acne Treatment Cream, Tinted with 8% sulfur and 2% resorcinol; however, this product can be “strong” so do a patch test to be on the safe side. If you have tolerance issue, try the methods I proposed above in the exfoliant section. You can try tea tree oil too, but I cannot find a product anywhere on the market (as of now) of the appropriate concentration to work effective and gently, that is, 2.5% or 5% tea tree oil. You can buy tea tree oil yourself and try to make it yourself at your own risk. Research has shown that benzoyl peroxide works better than tea tree oil.

      -- Sunscreen – UV protection

      Sunscreen is absolutely important for any skin type. Sun UV-rays are detrimental to the health of your skin. UVB is the burning ray whereas UV-A is the aging ray. Neutrogena Age Shield SPF 55 has nFoC. If you are very oil, then try Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Liquid Sunblock SPF 55 (low amount of fragrance); its liquid consistency and mineral silica leave a matte finish. The duration of the matte effect depends how active your oil glands are, so you may want to blot throughout the day ( a tissue paper is just fine). If you have sensitivity to synthetic sunscreen agent, then your alternative has to be sun product with just titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide. They provide board-spectrum product with high safety profile and almost no irritation potential because of their inert nature. Neutrogena Pure & Free Liquid Sunblock SPF 50 with 5% titanium dioxide and 3% zinc oxide has nFoC.

      Best wishes.

  21. QUESTION:
    Is there a test to find out if menopause will come early?
    My Mom had it early and my 33 year old sister is going through early menopause.

    Now I'm terrified that I will run out of time to have more babies.

    Is there a test to find out if you carry the gene for early menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      There are tests (also, Home Tests) that test for Follicle Stimulating Hormone in your urine to determine whether or not you're in menopause. Also, there are genetic tests which predict the start of menopause. They say that it's relatively inexpensive.

      Smoking cigarettes tends to send a woman into menopause earlier, as well as genes. Good health and eating right tends to delay menopause. Also, childbirth may delay menopause. I have also noticed in my Googling to answer your question that taking Vitamin D and Calcium may delay menopause. You may also bring this up to your doctor at your next Well Woman Checkup.

      Glad to help! It was fun to do a little bit of research to answer your question.

  22. QUESTION:
    How can I ease my menopausal symptoms naturally?
    I have menopause symptoms and they are full blown. Its driving my crazy trying to deal with it everyday. Also I have a milk allergy which doesn't help. Can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      There are natural and herbal remedies to help deal with the symptoms of menopause.

      Here are a few other suggestions for easing the transition…

      1. Add soy to your nutritional plan.
      2. Eat a diet rich in leafy green vegetables as well as more fruits.
      3. Get adequate amounts of daily exercise including
      both cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.
      (See more under Osteoporosis prevention)
      4. Add vitamins and minerals to your daily diet. Calcium, Vitamin D
      and Magnesium aid in strengthening your bones and
      preventing Osteoporosis.

      Fore more information for natural menopause relief I suggest you visit this site.

      http://bestproducts.awardspace.com/menopauserelief.html

  23. QUESTION:
    What natural remedy can I take for hot flushes?
    I have reluctantly given in to the menopause and have started to get hot flushes (though I tell other women I don't get them). Can any of you ladies recommed a tried a tested natural remedy or do I have to go to my GP.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Sue, regular physical exercise is necessary to protect against bone loss. Exercise has many other benefits as well.

      A diet that is low in saturated fats and cholesterol and high in complex carbohydrates, such as grains, fruits and vegetables is important.2

      Vitamin E supplementation may reduce symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, palpitations, fatigue, and breathing difficulties.,,

      Calcium is important in maintaining bone mass.

      Magnesium intake is often low in women with osteoporosis. Low magnesium intake is associated with low bone mineral content (BMC).

      Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption.

      Boron reduces urinary calcium loss and increases serum levels of 17 estradiol (estrogen).

      Essential fatty acids can help prevent dryness of the hair, skin and vaginal tissues.

      Soy supplementation has been suggested as a possible alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Soy isoflavones act as estrogen-like compounds. Forty-five grams of dietary soy, per day for 12 weeks was shown to decrease post-menopausal hot flashes.

      Certain herbs such as black cohosh, chasteberry, licorice and dong quai have shown to have a beneficial effect in managing many of the menopause symptoms.
      Jason Homan

  24. QUESTION:
    Has any women had endometrosis and ? can u skip the injections for menopause and just have a hysterectomy?
    had the surgery where they put the gas and telscopic thing in my belly, but still having pain.... next step would be injections for menopause. DO NOT want to do that.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep, had the laparascopy when I was 15, started the Lupron (menopause) shots last year (age 17). I would much rather have a hysterectomy, I honestly don't give a flying fuck about my fertility. The Lupron always gives me breakthrough bleeding, not to mention hotflashes, nightsweats, and calcium deficiency (TAKE YOUR VITAMINS). Not to mention that the needle is *literally* about 3 inches long, leaving your butt extremely sore for about a week.

  25. QUESTION:
    What vitamins do i take for pre menopausal?
    I'm 40yrs old and think i may be starting the menopause.Night sweats,irritability and the list goes on.Can anyone recommend any vitamins or hormone tablets to help, Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      About pre menopausal can be read in http://health-schools.blogspot.com/?q=pre%20menopausal

  26. QUESTION:
    Can a multivitamin help with female hair thinning, or do I need a specific vitamin for this?
    I have noticed I can see my scalp on the very front of my head, I always had thin hair but not this bad. I am not in menopause or anywhere close to this so that is not the cause, is there a vitamin supplement that can help?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamins won't help. Check with your family doctor first as some conditions like low thyroid can cause hair thinning. Do you use curling irons, flattening irons, hot blow dryers? They can cause hair damage and thinning. The most common cause is inherited female pattern balding, for which their is no treatment.

  27. QUESTION:
    what natural vitamins or OTC medicines can a woman take to reduce/relieve symptoms of menopause(cramps, flashe?
    my mother-in-law is going through menopause and she doesn't have very much money to spare, and she asked me to find out some stuff about it menopause and what she can take to help.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause with no side effects.

      Key ingredients are: Black Cohosh, Soy Isoflavones, Flaxseed, and a blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. Has no artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      A friend of mine has been taking it for some time and is very pleased with the results.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  28. QUESTION:
    how can i lose weight while going through menopause?
    im 46, about 80 lbs overweight, on anti depressants, (prozac, well butrin) seroquel and ambien to sleep at night, anyways, im going through menopause, have no doctor, only medi-cal so the only place i can go is to an emergency room, which is pathetic, but that's our government for ya, want to find out what type of pills i could take to help me lose weight and get me through this menopause stuff.

    • ANSWER:
      i can relate. im only 32 but had to have an emergency hysterectomy about 3 years ago, therefore sending me into early mental-pause as i call it LOL i too was about 90 pounds overweight. here is what u can do. first, eat right, and i dont mean here and there.. take calcium pills, and you wil have more joint and bone pain and suffer bone loss during this time. i take oscal. also take a multi vitamin to help with fatigue. next.. and this is the real bitch.. you MUST exercise.. stretching, swimming, walking.. all those are GREAT exercises. i prefer swimming becaise of joint pain that i have. doc told me theo only way to actually lose weight is to be on a 1000 calorie diet or less, which is crap.. i starved on it.. but i found that i can survive on about 1300 calories IF i exercise one hour a day... everything is starting to sag and things just arent where they used to be anymore.. and the moodiness.. OMG i cried if i got a lump in my gravy! Things do slowly get better.. oh and take lots of fish oil too! u can also get natural remedies from a company called "Shaklee" you can find them on the internet.. i usually dont do those gimicks.. but shaklee really does work.. it only took me about a month before i noted changes. I too am also on prozac.. which makes u gain weight. welbutrin gave me violent tendencies though.. so i couldnt take that. and to sleep.. i drin k two beers before bed.. thats all i need... it also keeps the blood thin! no worried about clots or strokes! (doc gave me that advice after suffering 2 strokes at the age of 24 and 28!) start your asprin a day and next time you go into the ER, tell then your situation.. they can get you with someone who can answer all your questions and help you out for FREE! i dunno where you are, but here we have lots of ways to help you pay. the HILL-BURTON act is one of them.. another is called "CHARITY CARE" through the hospital. if u can get assistance through your hospital, ask which doctor participates in that program.. The hospitals have their own doctors who see patients like you, in your situation.. like me :) good luck and hope i helped you! :))

  29. QUESTION:
    How did i get spider veins and how can i get rid of them without surgery?
    i cant believe i have spider legs...im a 18 year old male and i work out alot...ive never even come close to being fat it doesnt make sense...but recently i noticed i have spider veins on my sides...how can i get rid of them without surgery? would rubbing vitamin e cream do the trick? Also, is it true that getting a tan makes them much less visible?

    • ANSWER:
      Heres the causes...if you go to the site it will show all different treatments for them

      "What causes varicose veins and spider veins?
      The heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients to the whole body. Arteries carry blood from the heart towards the body parts. Veins carry oxygen-poor blood from the body back to the heart.

      The squeezing of leg muscles pumps blood back to the heart from the lower body. Veins have valves that act as one-way flaps. These valves prevent the blood from flowing backwards as it moves up the legs. If the one-way valves become weak, blood can leak back into the vein and collect there. This problem is called venous insufficiency. Pooled blood enlarges the vein and it becomes varicose. Spider veins can also be caused by the backup of blood. Hormone changes, inherited factors, and exposure to the sun can also cause spider veins.

      How common are abnormal leg veins?
      About 50 to 55% of American women and 40 to 45% of American men suffer from some form of vein problem. Varicose veins affect 1 out of 2 people age 50 and older.

      Who usually has varicose veins and spider veins?
      Many factors increase a person's chances of developing varicose or spider veins. These include:

      * Increasing Age
      * Having family members with vein problems or being born with weak vein valves
      * Hormonal changes. These occur during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause. Taking birth control pills and other medicines containing estrogen and progesterone also increase the risk of varicose or spider veins
      * Pregnancy. During pregnancy there is a huge increase in the amount of blood in the body. This can cause veins to enlarge. The expanding uterus also puts pressure on the veins. Varicose veins usually improve within 3 months after delivery. A growing number of abnormal veins usually appear with each additional pregnancy
      * Obesity, leg injury, prolonged standing and other things that weaken vein valves
      * Sun exposure, which can cause spider veins on the cheeks or nose of a fair-skinned person"

  30. QUESTION:
    For hot flashes and getting the feeling back of wanting to have sex again, what can I use that is natural?
    I am now in menopause. I get warm at night time and need a fan on. But, I don't get that feeling of wanting to have sex. Is there something more natural to take. I don't want to take estrogen. I need something more for the love making feeling to come back. I can deal with being warm and having to have a fan on me.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to check out www.antioxidants.mypharmanex.com excellent tested and pure LifePak woman -cheaper when you order on automatic monthly delivery, and check out the Estera line - pure and natural & safe. When ordered with the LifePak it is significantly cheaper...these are extremely high quality products pure and free of toxins, have pure natural ingredients added to the vitamin suppliments to also boost your antioxidant levels - which is a really good thing. Also if you are a smoker, stop. Woman to woman...this can positively change your life and even slow down significantly the aging process.

  31. QUESTION:
    what would be an approperate age to take the DIM supplement by Natures way?
    I am 16 years old, and I was recommended this vitamin because my emotional issues. Would this vitamin be healthy for me to take considering it alters my estrogen levels?

    • ANSWER:
      Since it is a supplement recommended for the symptoms of menopause, you should probably look for something else. Ask a pharmacist or a doctor about this.

      http://www.ehow.com/about_5194919_dim-supplement-side-effects.html

  32. QUESTION:
    Are mild cramps common or normal after Menopause?
    I am 52 and have not had a period for 2 or 3 years. Probably 2 out of 7 days a week I have mild cramping on and off. Never any spotting. Since I still have a roller coaster of emotions and other menopause symptoms, it seems to me it might be normal.
    Thank you in advance for your wisdom!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      Its a normal. Many women faces the same and got worried. So Don't worry. Take a proper diet food include lots of vitamins into it. Do regular exercise. This will help you to take relief from cramps.

  33. QUESTION:
    What could be causing my hair to fall out so much like it's not attached to my scalp?
    I'm a 30 yr old female and I've been on synthroid for 6 yrs now for an under active thyroid. I know a person sheds so many hairs a day but mine is coming out to much especially at night because I wake up with my bed cover in hair. My doctor keeps saying it's not from my thyroid or from taking the same medicine for so long because my levels are always normal.

    I've tried different shampoos and tips I've read on the internet but nothing is helping. I'm about to go insane over the hair all over my house and I can't get rid of it. I'd take vitamins if I knew it would help but I don't know what kind to take. I guess I'm going to have to find another doctor who can help me.

    If anyone can give me some advice or tips on how to stop my hair from shedding so bad than please contact me?

    • ANSWER:
      Hair loss can be due to many different factors, and really only a Dermatologist or your doctor could evaluate that for sure.

      Here are some possible reasons I am aware of:
      1. Hormonal changes such as pregnancy and menopause.
      2. Stress.
      3. Diet. Not eating enough healthy foods such as fruits, and especially vegetables.
      4. Not taking good vitamins daily.
      5. Washing your hair every day, which depletes the hair of its natural oils.
      6. Blow drying your hair daily, especially on a hot setting, and using the blower too close to your hair.
      7. Not using gentle shampoos. Alternating your shampoos is good to do regularly to prevent build up.
      8. Using the wrong hairbrush that is pulling and splitting your hair.
      9. Heredity.
      10. Perhaps a scalp condition. This is where possibly a Dermatologist could be beneficial.
      10. Age.

      I don't know if you live in California, but there is a company I believe called Regenix, that makes products to help people combat hair loss. I believe their website is regenix.com. They sound like they may be pretty legit, and can possibly help you or perhaps guide you in the right direction.
      My hair is also thinning, and I am very self-conscious of it. I think for me, it's part of Menopause. I just try to be extra careful when I brush and comb it.
      I wish you the best, and I hope I have helped you.

  34. QUESTION:
    Any women out there gave birth after 35 and did everything go ok?
    I'll be 38. I realize the risk. I'm healthy with no health issue. I don't smoke or drink or take any medications except vitamins. However, I do drink at least 2 cups of coffee a day.

    Anybody have success story or bad story?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no reason why it wouldn't be ok. My mom was about that age when she had my little brother who is now 9 and has always been healthy. We even went to kings island and road every roller coaster about 3 times each a couple days before she found out. She also drank and smoked till she found out
      (she had no clue she was prego btw she thought it might have been menopause because the lady's in our family have always started that early). There was never any problems with her pregnancy she never had health issues from it. Her labor was perfect and right on time. My little brother came out just fine and he was 7 lbs 14 ounces. I dont think there is any reason for you to worry. Also my mom is a big coffee drinker she used to drink almost a pot a day and cut down to 2 cups when she was prego, so once again i dont see any issues there wither. Hope this makes you feel better.

  35. QUESTION:
    What are the benefits of being a vegetarian? What are it's downfalls?
    I was wondering about this.

    So far, I've heard it's good for the skin and that it gives you more strength/ energy. But, the diet keeps you from vitamins and other things you can only get from meat.

    Is this true?

    Also, are there any other benefits and downfalls I should know about?

    Is it better to be mostly vegetarian and eat once in a while?

    Thanks if you answer!

    • ANSWER:
      A well done vegetarian is healthier then an omnivore diet, and much healthier then the Standard American diet (the FDA released a study stating that 90% of Americans need a better diet.) There is nothing you can only get from meat and no reason to eat it 'once in a while' (

      A vegetarian diet is:

      Lower cholesterol.
      Lower risk of heart disease (the number 1 killer in the US)
      Lower risk of some forms of cancer.
      Lower risk of developing diabetes type 2, and better ability to control it if you do get it.
      Lower risk of obesity.
      Less hormones, less unneeded antibiotics, no arsenic (which is in 70% of the chickens you eat)
      Lower need for calcium (too much protein strips your bones of calcium)
      Lower risk of kidney problems (too much protein damages the kidneys)

      The average American is deficent in folic acid, vitamin C, magnesuim, fiber, and vitamin A, among others. All of these are found in vegetarian food in abundance.

      Iron deficiency, on the other hand, is no more common in vegetarians then it is in omnivores. In both groups it is a concern for women pre menopause

      Protein deficiency, despite the uneducated comments you will hear from people, is not something a vegetarian has to worry about unless they're eating junk food only. Everything has protein - vegetables, beans, fruits, nuts, seeds, bread, grains, pastas, etc. There is not a single nutrient in meat that we need - everything can be found from a vegetarian source.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it unhealthy for your period to come every 19 days instead of once a month?
    I just did a lot of blood work and nothing is wrong with me except a vitamin D deficiency so I don't know why my periods are so irregular! I'm puzzled as to what's going on.

    • ANSWER:
      actually every 19 days is very regular, just a short cycle
      unless you are getting anemic I would not worry about it
      cycles can change over your life span
      mine went from 30 to 28 to anything from 22 to 29, but usually around 26
      I was happy to get menopause even if it meant a year of unpredictable spotting before things finally ended

  37. QUESTION:
    Any good ideas to boost metabolism for middle age female?
    I am beginning menopause and having a terrible time losing weight, it's coming off a pound a week but GAWD I'm working for that! Has anyone had any success with a metabolism accelerator actually working? Not looking for a pill to take, more along natural lines of diet or herbal supplements. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      i had better luck losing weight when i did an early morning workout. Vitamin b6 supports your metabolism i take it but i didn't notice a difference in weight but it does give you more energy.
      good luck and please stay away from things that can raise your heart rate such as stuff with caffiene or ephydrine.

  38. QUESTION:
    Im 52 years old and 2 of my teeth cracked and needs fillings, is this normal when you get older?
    Ive had to have two fillings done in the last two months from cracked teeth. Do I need some kind of mineral? Is this normal with aging? Im a post menopause women of 13 year too. Any advise or knowledge would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      well, are you drinking fluoridated water? chances are your tap water and bottled water (which is from tap) contains fluoride in it...the industrial type.

      So...i recommend you to stop drinking that, and look up the harmful effects of fluoride. Get a filter that can remove chlorine, and fluoride. and for your teeth, try to avoid eating processed food (cereal,pop tart, cookies, junk) , sodas, and eat natural stuff that can be found growing on the earth.

      Fluoride should not be ingested but if you must.....get the toothpaste with fluoride although the body has its own way of replenishing the materials. also the toothpaste should not contain SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) or else you will get canker sores quite often.

      since you have menopause...you might want to take some vitamin D pills, and try to do something outside the house from 7am to 11am to get the good sunlight during those hours to produce vitamin D from your skin. Also... I hope you got composite fillings, not amalgrams (silver fillings aka fillings with mercury).

      and one last thing, a sign of cracked teeth means you're not eating right or not taking good care of yourself, try to brush your teeth with a good toothpaste (w/o fluoride and w/o SLS) often , maybe get the phillips sonic toothbrush and also try to look up Colloidal silver. It boosts your immune system, which could help with your body repairing awry things in your body like cracked teeth. Check out healthfreedomusa.org or camping survival.com for the colloidal silver, (this can also be made but for novice people , they should buy it first)

  39. QUESTION:
    What kind of vitamins can i take that will give me energy?
    I am going thru menopause and i wanta natural way to get energy~ so i need to know what vitamins are good for that. thank you

    • ANSWER:
      B-12 you can drink green tea or get green tea extract and put it in your coffee. or you can take wheat grass shots at jamba juice or do a detox or you could eat more healthfully or you could excercize in the morning to start off your day energized

  40. QUESTION:
    Any old time remedy for menopause?
    A friend of mine has lost her ovaries to cancer recently. She is young, but due to this mishap, she is going through menopause. Any old time remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      She has lost a large percentage of ovary production by losing her ovaries. Now all the burden lies in the adrenal glands which normally produce 15% of the body's ovaries when the ovaries are still doing its job. So the adrenal glands need more support than ever. Vitamin C helps to support the adrenals as well as flaxseed oil, blackcurrant seed oil, Drenamin (from Standard Process Inc) has the best adrenal support supplement. Avoid things that weaken the adrenals: dairy products, caffeine, sugars, processed grain, sugar-free products, etc. Good luck to her!

  41. QUESTION:
    what is the best brand for multivitamins for women over 50?
    Is an all natural vitamin better or not? How high is Centrum Silver rated?
    Are natural vitamins better? Do they absorb better?

    • ANSWER:
      One a day has a good one I can't remember the exact title of it right now, but its specifically for women over 50 and going through menopause and all that. Check it out at the drugstore. I'm sure centrum silver is a great multi vitamin as well.

  42. QUESTION:
    Why would a woman take prenatal vitamins?
    For a woman that is near menopause or post menopause, why would a woman of that age need/want to take a multivitamin that is designed for women who are pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Honestly there for pregnant women or women trying to get pregnant my mom took them when she was going threw the life chance because it help balance the body hormone changes

  43. QUESTION:
    How Baldness on my head can be resolved?
    Hi,

    I lost so much hair and i have consulted many doctors every body writes vitamin tablets but no use.I tried to contact Dr Batras but their fees is too high as middle class people like me couldn't consult.So please let me know the other doctors who can avoid my hair fall and reduce my scalp

    Thanks & Regards,
    Sudheer

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamins are waste of money, and people are spending a fortune on them, billions of them in fact!

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Find the 'cause' and eliminate them and your baldness might improve. It took years to get in your system (whatever it was) it will take years to get them out, so don't expect miracles.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  44. QUESTION:
    can the menopause be helped by good living alone?
    I was wondering if eating well and exercise also relaxation can help menopause symptoms. My friend seems to have started the menopause and she is one of those persons who avoid taking anything but she is a little cranky etc and I should like to help her. Can anyone give me some tips via the fruit and veg and exercise route please. I don't think she will even go for supplemented vitamins. Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      hi
      its like with anything good living can help but but from what ive read most woman need some type of hormone replacement therapy, ive enclosed a website to read up on this, nice to know she has a caring friend like you.
      http://www.amarantmenopausetrust.org.uk/faq.php

  45. QUESTION:
    What hormones need to be replaced to help lose weight and regain the libido?
    What hormones are needed to help lost weight and regain your libido during menopause

    • ANSWER:
      Hormones don't help lose weight. A proper diet and the proper physical exercise does. Visit a personal trainer for the plan to best suit your needs based on your weight and active levels.

      As far as regaining libido during menopause, estrogen re-uptake would be your best option here. I recommend looking into vitamins, most commonly labeled as Premarin or Cenestin. These vitamins will greatly aid during menopause. Please consult with your family physician for more information.

      Best of luck.

  46. QUESTION:
    How does one increase bone density after menopause?
    Other than calcium and Vitamin D intake and exercise, any other ways?

    • ANSWER:
      The Plant Sterols found in Wild Yam have also been suggested, by some published studies, to help the body to improve bone density recovery. This is partly because these nutrients seem to support the production of the hormone calcitonin which is a transport molecule for calcium to the living cells that make up the bones.

      It's important to understand that the bones are made from living cells. We all loose about 20% of our bone cells, and the calcium they encapsulate each year. However, we also rebuild about 20% of the bone cells, along with new calcium structures. This means that things are supposed to be in balance. So bone density loss is really a net bone density loss and is an indication that something is biologically out of balance in the body.

      The bone density loss we've been told is "normal" in aging is nearly unheard of in many other countries, including our neighbors to the South. One of the dietary characteristics is that they have a diet which contains more unprocessed fruits, vegetables and green leafy vegetables (which is where a cow gets all the calcium she needs to grow to 1,000+ pounds) and drink very little milk. Milk actually contains a protein that hinders the human ability to absorb calcium which makes milk a very dubious source for usable calcium in adults.

      The point of this is: the source of your calcium is very important. It has been shown, through biochemical analysis, that the net calcium benefit of green vegetables exceeds that of the calcium benefit in milk. So continue to learn and make the best choices you can to support the raw material needs of your body.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is hair loss a symptom of menopause?
    I turned 49 in August. I've had noticeable hair loss for at least the last 6 months. Wondering if this is a symptom of menopause or if I need to consult my doctor about this.

    • ANSWER:
      it is hard to say! it will be better if you will visit your doctor!!

      anyway as we know hair loss can be caused by many different reasons! There are many causes of loss of hair such as stress, poor nutrition ,medications, thyroid dysfunctions, illness, fungal infections ,hormonal problems, to mention a few.

      year ago I suffered very much from dandruff and hair loss too and I started trying everything you can imagine to stop my hair loss.
      the things that really worked for me was:

      1) Vitamin A - an anti-oxidant which promotes healthy production of sebum in the scalp;

      2) Vitamin E stimulates circulation. Good blood circulation in the scalp is important in keeping hair follicles productive. The 'B' vitamins contribute to melanin, which gives hair its healthy color and also stimulates blood circulation;

      3) massage is also beneficial. Massage stimulates circulation. As already noted, good circulation in the scalp keeps hair follicles active. Experts suggest a few minutes of daily head massage by hand. Circulation through massage may be improved by using a few drops of lavender or bay essential oil in an almond or sesame oil base with massage;

      4) Try rubbing your scalp with garlic juice, Onion Juice or Ginger Juice(you can either of one out of three, Do not mix any of two or three);

      5) also he used herbal treatment - TrichoZed or Provillus (do not use Rogaine - it will not work!)
      Those are a good products that helps prevent hair loss and contains Biotin and the clinically tested ingredients approved by the FDA to help re-grow your hair.! I think it is very important!

      It worked and still works for me!

      I do not know if any pharmacies carry TrichoZed but I do know that you should purchase it directly from the manufacturer and read more about the product here

      http://www.trichozed.info/ingredients.php

      (TrichoZed™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 30 to 45 days. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within 6 months. Further use shall maintain optimal health of your hair.)

      and here

      http://www.provilluss.info

      (Provillus™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 40. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within ~5 months.)

      It enhances hair growth by blocking DHT (Dihydrotestostrone) - a major cause of hair loss!

      Also Informative video about Provillus - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ydvCHhbRkk

      good luck!

      not only my own personal experience + working as a family physician

  48. QUESTION:
    what is the best Vitamin for a diabetic and mood swing?
    I have been going through pre menopause,diabetic, depression so what is the best vitamin for me

    • ANSWER:
      You might find this YouTube video helpful, it's called, 'Self-management' and it's about diabetes.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7e5sFW1D7Y

  49. QUESTION:
    My mom is 54 years young and is experiencing menopause fatigue, can anyone give me advice to tell her?
    Are there vitamins/minerals out there to take to reduce fatigue due to menopause? Anything she can do to reduce the fatigue? Any information will be of great help. Thank you very much! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Make sure your mom sips water frequently, eats plenty of fruit and veg, and finds some gentle exercise to do. A relaxation course is helpful, it's best to avoid giving in and "resting" on the couch or whatever, as this will add to the problem by her losing muscle tone.
      All the best, you sound a caring person.

  50. QUESTION:
    Why would my mom have prenatal vitamins?
    I recently found them in our medicine cabinet. They are new and couldn't have been for my little sister because she is twelve and we have moved several times. She wouldn't use them to grow her hair or nails. She has been taking "One A Day: Woman's Vitamins" so i wouldn't think she'd need extra vitamins. She has gained a little weight, but it isn't her diet. And she has been exercising regularly. My mom is turning forty soon, and hasn't gone through menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a chance that she may be pregnant. But I've also known lots of women who take prenatal vitamins even when they aren't pregnant. Best bet is to ask her why she changed her vitamins.

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menopause vitamins

Hair Loss Menopause

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can I reduce the chance of hair loss like how women reduce the chance of wrinkles?
    I read about a year ago women can reduce their chances of facial wrinkles by applying cream early before the wrinkles starts to develop.
    Can this apply to men too in terms of hair loss?
    Would any damage be done if I used products from Hair Club for Men right now to reduce the chances of hair loss later on?
    Does the Hair Club for Men work and is it obvious that a person is using their products?

    • ANSWER:
      You can! Find out what, when, why and HOW and your hair will improve by eliminating the 'cause'.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

  2. QUESTION:
    How many hairs lost in a day would mean you have 'hair loss'?
    Im approaching the menopause and Im sure my hair is thinning a bit. It seems finer also and there are about 6-8 hairs that come loose after hair washing or styling. Do I have hair loss???? If so what can I do about it.

    • ANSWER:
      6 - 8 hairs a day is not significant. However if this is a change from what is normal to you there are things you can do. I am a 44 year old woman and am peri-menopausal. I began losing a significant amount of hair each morning when I showered. I don't know how many but I know it was a change from what was normal for me. I began taking Macafem (maca root), biotin, and MSM supllements, and I switched to Organix coconut milk shampoo and conditioner. Once a week I do a pure coconut oil treatment on my hair (leave oil on for one hour & wash out) I started these changes about a month ago and have noticed a decrease in hair loss and also have new hair growth. Hope this helps

  3. QUESTION:
    Is there any hair care specialist in Malaysia which could prevent hair loss and regrow hair?
    Im 24 male and have severe hair loss. I also have patches (areas on my head where hair does not grow anymore). My parents and grandparents have good hair so its not genetics problem. Can someone please a solution or where can I seek for help ?

    • ANSWER:
      You can prevent those yourself, find the 'cause' and eliminate them, and your hair will improve.
      Hair specialists, sometimes causes hair loss, (see below) since I don't have a clue how you've taken care of your hair.
      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have female pattern hair loss with new growth?
    I've started losing my hair (breakage) due to a bad perm. On the sides of my head and in top. At first I thought it was female pattern hair loss, but then I have lots of new growth. Can you have female pattern hair loss and new growth at the same time? Oh and by the way, I'm also thinking of trying aphogee hair products. If anyone has heard of it, let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      A hair grows from its follicle at an average rate of about 1/2 inch per month. Each hair grows for 2 to 6 years, then rests, and then falls out. A new hair soon begins growing in its place. At any time, about 85% of the hair is growing and 15% is resting.

      Baldness occurs when hair falls out but new hair does not grow in its place. The cause of the failure to grow new hair in female pattern baldness is not well understood, but it is associated with genetic predisposition, aging, and levels of endocrine hormones (particularly androgens, the male sex hormones).

      Changes in the levels of androgens can affect hair production. For example, after the hormonal changes of menopause, many women find that the hair on the head is thinned, while facial hair is coarser. Although new hair is not produced, follicles remain alive, suggesting the possibility of new hair growth.

      Female pattern baldness is usually different from that of male pattern baldness. The hair thins all over the head, but the frontal hairline is maintained. There may be a moderate loss of hair on the crown, but this rarely progresses to total or near baldness as it may in men.

      Hair loss can occur in women for reasons other than female pattern baldness, including the following:

      Temporary shedding of hair (telogen effluvium)
      Breaking of hair (from such things as styling treatments and twisting or pulling of hair)
      Patchy areas of total hair loss (alopecia areata -- an immune disorder causing temporary hair loss)
      Medications
      Certain skin diseases
      Hormonal abnormalities
      Iron deficiency
      Underactive thyroid
      Vitamin deficiency
      Symptoms Return to top

      Thinning of hair over the entire head
      Hair loss at the crown or hairline, mild to moderate
      Exams and Tests Return to top

      Female pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the appearance and pattern of hair loss and by ruling out other causes of hair loss.

      A skin biopsy or other procedures may be used to diagnose medical disorders that cause loss of hair.

      Analysis of the hair itself is not accurate for diagnosing nutritional or similar causes of hair loss, although it may reveal substances such as arsenic or lead.

      Treatment Return to top

      The hair loss of female pattern baldness is permanent. In most cases, it is mild to moderate. No treatment is required if the person is comfortable with her appearance.

      The only drug or medication approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat female pattern baldness is minoxidil, used on the scalp. For women, the 2% concentration is recommended. Minoxidil may help hair to grow in 20% to 25% of the female population, and in the majority it may slow or stop the loss of hair. Treatment is expensive, however, and hair loss starts again when minoxidil use is stopped.

      Hair transplants consist of removal of tiny plugs of hair from areas where the hair is continuing to grow and placing them in areas that are balding. This can cause minor scarring in the donor areas and carries a modest risk for skin infection. The procedure usually requires multiple transplantation sessions and may be expensive. Results, however, are often excellent and permanent.

      The use of hair implants made of artificial fibers was banned by the FDA because of the high rate of infection.

      Stitching (suturing) hair pieces to the scalp is not recommended. It can result in scars, infections, and abscess of the scalp.

      Hair weaving, hairpieces, or change of hairstyle may disguise hair loss and improve cosmetic appearance. This is often the least expensive and safest method of dealing with female pattern baldness.

      Outlook (Prognosis) Return to top

      Female pattern baldness is of cosmetic importance only and does not indicate a medical disorder, but it may affect self-esteem or cause anxiety. The hair loss is usually permanent.

      Possible Complications Return to top

      Complications are psychological stress and a loss of self-esteem due to change in appearance.

      When to Contact a Medical Professional Return to top

      Call your health care provider if hair loss occurs and persists, especially if there is itching, skin irritation, or other symptoms. There might be a treatable medical cause for the loss of hair.

      Prevention Return to top

      There is no known prevention for female pattern baldness.

  5. QUESTION:
    Is hair loss a symptom of menopause?
    I turned 49 in August. I've had noticeable hair loss for at least the last 6 months. Wondering if this is a symptom of menopause or if I need to consult my doctor about this.

    • ANSWER:
      it is hard to say! it will be better if you will visit your doctor!!

      anyway as we know hair loss can be caused by many different reasons! There are many causes of loss of hair such as stress, poor nutrition ,medications, thyroid dysfunctions, illness, fungal infections ,hormonal problems, to mention a few.

      year ago I suffered very much from dandruff and hair loss too and I started trying everything you can imagine to stop my hair loss.
      the things that really worked for me was:

      1) Vitamin A - an anti-oxidant which promotes healthy production of sebum in the scalp;

      2) Vitamin E stimulates circulation. Good blood circulation in the scalp is important in keeping hair follicles productive. The 'B' vitamins contribute to melanin, which gives hair its healthy color and also stimulates blood circulation;

      3) massage is also beneficial. Massage stimulates circulation. As already noted, good circulation in the scalp keeps hair follicles active. Experts suggest a few minutes of daily head massage by hand. Circulation through massage may be improved by using a few drops of lavender or bay essential oil in an almond or sesame oil base with massage;

      4) Try rubbing your scalp with garlic juice, Onion Juice or Ginger Juice(you can either of one out of three, Do not mix any of two or three);

      5) also he used herbal treatment - TrichoZed or Provillus (do not use Rogaine - it will not work!)
      Those are a good products that helps prevent hair loss and contains Biotin and the clinically tested ingredients approved by the FDA to help re-grow your hair.! I think it is very important!

      It worked and still works for me!

      I do not know if any pharmacies carry TrichoZed but I do know that you should purchase it directly from the manufacturer and read more about the product here

      http://www.trichozed.info/ingredients.php

      (TrichoZed™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 30 to 45 days. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within 6 months. Further use shall maintain optimal health of your hair.)

      and here

      http://www.provilluss.info

      (Provillus™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 40. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within ~5 months.)

      It enhances hair growth by blocking DHT (Dihydrotestostrone) - a major cause of hair loss!

      Also Informative video about Provillus - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ydvCHhbRkk

      good luck!

      not only my own personal experience + working as a family physician

  6. QUESTION:
    How much hair loss is considered going bald?
    I'm a 16 year old girl. And the medication I'm on (Methotrexate, for arthritis) is causing LOTS of hair loss for me. I have very thin hair. It's not falling out in clumps, only strands. Anyways I'm curious on how much hair I would have to lose for it to become noticeable or be considered "balding"?

    • ANSWER:
      They say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take. I guess that must be normal~

      Are you sure you're not mixing other things to cause your hair to fall out in clumps? Ex:
      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are possibilities surrounding my hair loss?
    I'm a 20 yr old female and for the past about 2-3 weeks I've been experiencing excessive hair loss. No matter what time through the day, whether I just get out of the shower or have dry hair I can constantly brush out a whole brush clump of hair plus some. I usually have thick, full hair, and lately its so thinned out and only getting thinner. Any opinions? I'm so worried I'm gonna loose all my hair :(

    • ANSWER:
      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      Dove hairfall facts
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it. Eliminate them and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary.

      Source(s):
      I know hair. I have over 4 decades of hair know-how. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy hair down to my knees. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing in the 80's & 90's. I've known people in their 30's whose hair stopped growing from ironing their hair in the 70's.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can hair loss treatment such as Rogaine be used to help facial hair growth?
    I am a 22 year old man and my facial hair is still fine and patchy. I only have to shave about once or twice a week. Could rubbing a hair loss treatment for baldness onto the face every day cause my facial grow to grow out thicker and faster? If so, how long until the effect is noticeable? Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Like menopause, the story of unwanted facial hair is often all about estrogen, or to be more precise, the relationship between levels of estrogen and testosterone. Since rogaine will take over on the hormonal imbalance that it happening on your body it will likely cause some unwanted hair to grow. But typically, any rubbing treatment that was originally made for scalp care won't be effective if it will be use on some facial purposes.

  9. QUESTION:
    In order to determine the effects of a new pill that is supposed to reduce hair loss, a researcher conducts?
    In order to determine the effects of a new pill that is supposed to reduce hair loss, a researcher conducts a study. Five hundred volunteer subjects (300 men and 200 women) all of which suffer some degree of hair loss are selected to participate in the study. The researcher gives the women the real pill and the men a sugar pill, but only the researcher knows this.
    In the experiment, which is the placebo group?

    the 200 women
    the 300 men
    the subjects that responded to the treatment
    There is no placebo group.
    none of these

    • ANSWER:
      Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss.

      Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control.

      Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis.

      In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced.

      In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent.

      Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation.

      One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur.

      Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels.

      An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher.

      Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment.

      As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her.

      Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly.

      Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart!

  10. QUESTION:
    What are ithe best products for hair loss ?
    can you tell mi what are the best products for hair loss ?

    • ANSWER:
      Find the cause before you find solution by ELIMINATING them your hair will improve. You DON'T need products.
      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  11. QUESTION:
    WIll using a different brand of dye lessen my hair loss?
    Ive been using clairol natural instincts and im losing a TON OF HAIR. i feel like im balding. will using a different brand lessen the hair loss, or is it just that my hair cant take being dyed in general?

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible you could be allergic to the hair dye, and it doesn't matter if it's Clairol or Revlon, or products not tested on animals, because they still do.

      It is also possible that your hair loss is caused by:
      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, perming, straightening, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your body is crying for help!

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.

  12. QUESTION:
    Will birth control make your hair fall out?
    I have been on birth control for a year now, ever since I have exsperienced alot of hair loss while in th shower. It seems like it started after I had my son witch is the same time I started the pill. Does anyone know if the pill can cause this or is it just my hormones after having my son? Will it go away? Can I do anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      Please ignore the other two replies. Birth Control pills ARE hormones yes, but did you know irregular hormones are the ROOT CAUSE of hair loss in women? That is why you will see women who are pregnant or just given birth complaining of hair loss. When your hormone levels change drastically for whatever reason ( pill, pregnancy, menopause) Hair loss IS a side effect. The pill is almost 100% to blame for this. I know this because I have just been to my own doctor (yesterday) with the exact same complaint. I first started noticing A LOT of hair loss while in the shower, then combing it out afterwards. Then I started seeing it all over my shirts ( I have black hair so it's very noticeable) My white bathroom floor is COVERED in my hair after I blow dry mt hair, and my brush is filling up fast. My ponytail is about half the usual thickness! It is scary isn't it? I have NEVER been pregnant, and was scared something may be wrong. The doctor has taken me OFF the pill, and has recommended taking a vitamin for "hair and nails" sold at GNC. I have taken several brands of BC pills and the two that most noticeably caused hair loss were YASMIN and ORTHO-TRICYCLEN. The doctor told me that MOST side effects go away after being on a pill 3 months, ( your hormones level out in that time ) Hair will grow back (SLOWLY! ) but if the pill you are on is causing hair loss, don't expect it to stop. You should see your doctor, perhaps the pill you are on is not the right balance of hormones for you. AS for DEPO PROVERA...stay away! It is hormones just like the pill, and causes all of the same side effects but generally they appear in a more extreme and dramatic fashion. If you lose hair on the pill, you will lose more faster on depo. If you gain weight on the pill, you will gain weight faster on Depo. See your doctor about a new birth control option, even if it is another combination pill. Congrats on the birth of your son:)

  13. QUESTION:
    Which is the best herbal hair oil for hair growth?
    I am Anamika. I am 22 years old. My hair is very short and I have a serious hair fall problem. Pls suggest me a good herbal hair oil to prevent hair loss and also to grow long hair. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Oil doesn't make hair grow, they are a form to help keep hair moisturized. You don't put oil on plants in order for them to have fruits & flowers, same with hair products. You apply fertilizers to their roots.

      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took months even years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons for hair falls:

      Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs), steroids, hereditary, hair dyes, perming/relaxers, straightening (have read many on YA HAIR, and have responded to them since 2009), diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php

      Source(s):
      Hair DX, FDA http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ProtectYourself/HealthFraud/default.htm
      , CNN Health Supplements Library, Slate.com, MSN "Vitamins can do more harm than good", Consumer Reports, Vogue Dec. 2010.
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  14. QUESTION:
    What are the exact causes of hair loss?
    Please recommend a hair loss product that has good consumer reputation.

    • ANSWER:
      Men are more likely to experience baldness than women; some men may even begin to notice signs of hair loss during their teenage years. But what really causes you to loose your hair? Is it determined by gender? Or is it caused by hereditary factors? In fact, there are many different causes of hair loss, a few of which are examined here.

      Medications

      Certain prescription medications have the unfortunate side effect of causing the scalp hair to fall out. The most common culprits are chemotherapy and steroids. Chemotherapy patients generally begin to lose their hair within the first three weeks of treatment; fortunately, this condition is reversible, and new hair should begin to grow when the drug therapy is complete.

      Anabolic steroids have many dangerous side effects, and these powerful drugs are well-known for increasing androgen levels; these hormones impede proper follicle function, often resulting in the loss of hair.

      In addition, medications used in treating high blood pressure, arthritis and even depression may also cause temporary loss of hair.

      Hair Growth Cycle

      Under normal circumstances, an individual hair has a growth cycle of about 2 to 6 years. After the growth cycle ends, the hair falls out, and the process begins over again. At any given time, about 90% of the hair is in the growth stage, while 10% of the follicles are in a resting stage.

      It is normal for some hair to fall out when you comb, brush, shampoo, dry, or even just rub your hair. Normally, about 50-100 hair strands may fall out on a daily basis. It is possible to lose as much as 40% of your hair before the thinning or balding becomes noticeable to others.

      Abnormal Hormone Levels

      Pattern baldness, or androgenic alopecia, is caused by excessive levels of the male hormone testosterone. While this is ordinarily considered to be a men's issue, women can also experience hereditary scalp hair loss. This common problem is caused when testosterone produces high levels of DHT, an androgen that signals the follicles to stop working.

      Other hormone imbalances can also lead to hair loss. Thyroid disease and the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy and menopause can cause thinning or balding on the scalp.

      Psychological Factors in Hair Loss

      Depression, anxiety, and major stressful events can contribute to hair thinning and permanent hair loss. If stress or emotional issues are affecting hair growth, it can be difficult to diagnose the problem. If you have symptoms of an emotional disorder such as depression or anxiety, you should seek medical attention. Your doctor will be able to help you treat the underlying problem, as well as advise you on the course of treatment most appropriate for your hair loss issue.

      The good news for hair loss sufferers is that there are many options for treating hair loss. Whatever the reason that your hair is thinning or balding, there is a treatment that can help. Talk to your doctor and find out which choices are available, and which one is best for you.

      Click on the link below for a product that has helped me with my hair problems.

  15. QUESTION:
    What can be done about perimenopause related hairloss?
    My hair has been thinning for the last 5 years. At the time the cause was atrributed to stress. Stress reduction had little effect. Thyroid was tested with normal results. Cycles are now becoming more rapid (22 days) and scantier. I do not know age of menopause in my mother or grandmother due to hysterectomy. I will be 40 soon.

    However, my hair loss has become noticeable to others. Hairs break or shed and seems not to grow back very quickly.

    Please suggest what I should investigate further.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I'm a doctor. Use premarin. I think that you want to get more info about it. Please go to ----> http://med40.notlong.com/3AAVCt6

  16. QUESTION:
    Hair Loss Caused By Stress, What can i do to combat it?
    My mother has had a great deal of anxiety for the past months to the point where she is suffering from hair loss. Is there anything i can do to help her grow hair back or stop it from progressing?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm an 18 year old female that has been suffering from hair loss since the age of 15. i first seen a dermatologist when i noticed the unusually big gobs of hair falling out, she said that it looked fine and sent me out of there, did not do tests or anything. The doctors and such all treated me the same for the next 3 years, but eventually it loosened up, it gets bad occasionally.

      your mother may be going through menopause depending on her age. low iron levels are a major cause of hair loss in women who are pre-menopausal. she should see a doctor and get all possible blood tests done that would cause hair loss, like under active or over active thyroid, low iron levels, etc.

      women also lose iron throughout the menstrual cycle as iron travels throughout the blood.

      if she has been through a traumatic stress period the hair loss could very well be caused from that. it can occur up to 3 months after the event. surgery could have caused it.

      i would just do research and make sure she gets to a doctor.

      to promote healthy hair growth she should be taking all B vitamins, biotin, omega 3 fatty acids ( which stimulates blood circulation and supports other health benefits)

      Shampoos that advertise to promote good hair growth are a myth, vitamins in shampoos will do nothing since the hair cannot absorb nutrients because it is dead, the only way to promote good hair growth is the right diet and nutrients (as said above).

  17. QUESTION:
    Hello. Can anyone recommend an effective hair loss treatment for a female?
    Hi. I am a 55 year old female with thinning hair and some hair loss. Even before the menopause my hair was nothing fantastic but now of course it is much worse. I suspect it is genetic so I am not expecting miracles but I would be very grateful indeed if anyone can recommend something that is effective. I feel really desperate! Many thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You have some good answers here and I just want to add to them. Hair loss, as I found out, can be caused by so many things. You definitely need to talk to a doctor to make sure you don't have thyroid issues, low iron, low B12, or your hormones are out of whack,,,,just to name a few things you need to check on.
      It can be your diet, so if you are not eating a well balanced diet, you would need to start. You may want to start a multivitamin (senior formula since you are menopausal). It can be genetic and there really is nothing you can do except check into transplants, or good hair pieces.
      There are many types of alopecia--traction (from pulling your hair back), androgenic (from having too much DHT), telegen effluvium (all over hair loss),,,the list goes on. I had a scalp biopsy to try to help me figure out which battle I am fighting. I am waiting on the results. Gotta tell you, that kind of hurts, but it could be worth it.
      As far as shampoo, you can buy Nizoral in walmart, it is a bit more affordable than Nioxin and has the ketoconazole that is a mild DHT suppressant. But that will only work if DHT is the culprit. You can also try Mens forumla Rogaine (or walmart equivalent!!). I know they say its not for women, but my derm and many other derms have said its just fine and more effective. Its kind of oily but if you apply it at night, then rinse your hair out in the morning, and then later in the day, you can apply more, and wash your hair before you go to bed. It has to be on for 4 hrs to be effective.
      If you can determine any kind of nutritional deficiency, like iron, B12, B6, Biotin etc, then you might be on to something. You could try B12 sublingual (not the regular kind) to see if you notice a change. It this is the cause then you should notice your hair loss slowly rather quickly.
      I know if frustrating. I am 41 and suffering. I am desperate, I had pretty hair one time. I have considered, and that is a big CONSIDERED, bioidentical hormones, but it is so expensive, insurance does not cover it and I don't know if it would work, or make things worse. I hope you can find a resolution. Good luck!!!!

  18. QUESTION:
    Nisim hair loss products - have you tried them - did it work for you?
    Has anyone used Nisim hair loss products (shampoo, conditioner and hair stimulating extract)? If so have they worked for you? I understand they did a clinical study on men and had success. Would be especially interested in hearing from any women who have tried it. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You need to understand WHY you experienced hair loss, before you can treat it.

      If you have cavities or teeth falling out, do you change toothpaste? Shouldn't you figure it out why they fell or what causes your teeth to hurt? Same with hair.

      You can eliminate the 'cause' and the condition of your hair will improve.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  19. QUESTION:
    does putting hair products in your hair lead to hair loss?
    i was wondering if putting things like hair wax, hair spray, blow drying and hair straightening will lead to hair loss? cos there was this person and everyday he soaks his hair, blow drys it, then styles it with wax, then hair sprays it.. people said things like' when your 30 you'll be skinhead. i think that means that he have hair loss. well, is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      I've responded to many girls (guys now too) under 15 experiencing in hair loss since 2009, due to hair straightening, relaxers and hair dyes. Women 60-90 have those same symptoms but it took them years to get there. But for 15 & under, giving advice here? They can't predict the future of their hairs, until they're in their 30's, but 15 & under with hair loss? C'mon! I've responded 7 in 2 hours 9-3-10 alone. Hair protectant doesn't protect hair 100%. Like using sunscreens, you still get sunburned. Same with hair. When it does that, it is too late to do anything about it. That's another reason why the hair industry is a billion dollar business, their main job is to make tons of money and they do not give money back guarantee for damaged hair or hair loss, due to 'abuse'.

      Otherwise the rest of other hair products NO.

      Other causes for hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything.

  20. QUESTION:
    Has anyone got any good NATURAL remedies for hair loss?
    I'm looking for something that will naturally help me keep my hair. I'm not interested in products from the shop etc, I'm talking about herbal things that I can use and techniques I can use without purchasing any "hair loss cures". For example, I heard castor oil is good?

    • ANSWER:
      You found a solution, but do you know the cause? Eliminate them and your hair will improve.
      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  21. QUESTION:
    What options are available to fix Hair Loss for Older Women?
    I am a 50yr old women and I am losing hair in a few spots in my head and I wanted to know what are some great products or treatments available to help me with new growth in those affected areas. I am trying to avoid wigs.

    • ANSWER:
      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took months even years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons for hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.About 23-25 if I shampooed/brush my hair, which is every 4th day.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing from girls under 15. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  22. QUESTION:
    does biolage anti hair loss tonic really work?
    i am suffering from really bad hair loss, and i was recommended anti biolage hair loss tonic by some one.. but im not sure, has anyone here used it? does it really work?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you want a suggestion from someone, or from someone who is a Top Contributor and have read & heard enough?

      Save your money instead of buying hair growth products or supplements. Vogue Dec. 2010, Vogue Feb. 2011 issue has a section on biotin, supplements, fish oil, etc. . Fish oil for example: Read the labels if they state that it contains: "one or more of the following: Cod, English Whiting, Shark."

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t have to approve supplements — no agency in the United States does. Because of inadequate quality control and inspection, supplements contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs have been sold to unsuspecting consumers. And FDA rules covering manufacturing quality don’t apply to the companies that supply herbs, vitamins, and other raw ingredients.
      Beginning in February 2008, they experienced one symptom after another: diarrhea, joint pain, hair loss, lung problems, and fingernails and toenails that fell off. FDA has received numerous reports of harm associated with the use of these products, including stroke, liver injury, kidney failure, heart palpitations, and death. 3-15-11

      Google: MSN "Vitamins Can Do More Harm Than Good."
      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds). THEN Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life!
      Google: Hair growth caused other men nationwide in class-action lawsuits. About 1,640,000 results (0.10 second.

      Reasons why hair loss might have happened:

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.

      You NEED to find the 'cause' why, then eliminate them, and your hair will improve.

  23. QUESTION:
    Does any hair loss treatment work?
    I am 22, and my hair is very thin. Did anyone use a thinning hair/ Hair loss treatment that worked?

    • ANSWER:
      The commonest cause of thinning hair is hormonal, and whether you suffer from female pattern baldness which is hereditary or not, the main culprit is a hormone called DHT and any quality hair loss treatment for women should be able to block it.

      DHT is a by-product of testosterone which women have as well as men, and it attaches itself to the follicles, causing it to gradually get smaller until the hair falls out, and no new growth can occur.

      This is particularly common after the menopause as estrogen levels which effectively keep the DHT in check fall rapidly, leading to an excess of DHT.
      Minoxidil 2% is the only topical medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for female-pattern hair loss.While Minoxidil does not grow new hair, it works by blocking the DHT and prolonging the growth phase of hair - providing more time for hair to grow out to its full density and returning your full head of hair.

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I reduce my natural hair loss?
    I am worried about my hairs. I am loosing my hairs very rapidly. I wanna make my hairs very strong and healthy. Front side of my hairs is almost lost. I want to do some easy way to start growing my hairs. Please help me friends. Thanx

    • ANSWER:
      When you start losing teeth, due to 'abuse or poor dental hygiene' you don't start changing toothpaste.

      You can eliminate the 'cause' and the condition of your hair will improve.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  25. QUESTION:
    Can you suggest some good lotions for body/face and also products for hair loss?
    I was looking for some good body and face lotions/creams/moisturizers. Also, my hair is thinning as it falls almost everyday.Can you please suggest some good products for both? Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Vaseline Intensive Lotion or Cetaphil. For face, Oil of Olay, the orig. pink bottle.

      For hair loss, find the cause, before you find solution. Eliminate them and your hair will improve.
      Find the cause before you find solution. Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.
      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  26. QUESTION:
    Can an increase in metabolism cause hair loss?
    If your body's metabolism suddenly or slowly increases, can you experience hair fall, or to be more specific Telogen Effluvium?

    • ANSWER:
      hi friend, because hair is primarily made up of protein, hair loss can be caused by insufficient protein in your diet. If you're troubled by hair loss, it might be helpful to increase the protein in your diet. In genetically susceptible people, certain sex hormones trigger a particular pattern of permanent hair loss. Most common in men, this type of hair thinning can begin as early as puberty. Hormonal changes and imbalances can also cause temporary hair loss. This could be due to pregnancy, childbirth, discontinuation of birth control pills or the onset of menopause.

  27. QUESTION:
    How can a women stop hair loss?
    I am 68 and really looseing my hair I have short in front and long in back but my brush is always full of hair afer i brush

    • ANSWER:
      Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss.

      Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control.

      Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis.

      In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced.

      In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent.

      Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation.

      One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur.

      Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels.

      An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher.

      Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment.

      As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her.

      Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly.

      Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart!

  28. QUESTION:
    Who to see for hair loss and growth?
    I have been experiencing for a long time now hair fall. My hair used to be super thick and straight, now it is curly and thinned way out. When I am stressed, hair falls more than when I am not. So, what I want to know is if a dermatologist is the right doctor to see for these issues. If anyone has any suggestions for products I can use at home or some sort of home treatment please feel free to suggest some.

    • ANSWER:
      PROVILLUS: A PREVENTIVE CURE FOR HAIR LOSS

      To prevent hair loss from occurring Provillus, an all natural supplement has a positive outcome. Provillus is a supplement built to block the DHT(Dihydrotestoterone) in the body. Provillus contains compound ingredients such as, biotin, gotu kola, magnesium stearatern Muria Puania, pumpkin extract, Saw Palmetto, silicon dioxide, vitamin B6, and zinc.

      These compound ingredients help prevent thinning hair follicles form becoming thinner-leading to baldness. The nourishing blend of nutrients in Provillus helps the hair become thick. Provillus hair loss treatment is FDA-approved. No prescription is needed because it is stored as a supplement; therefore, it can be bought from over-the-counter from a local drug store.Provillus was created by the Ultra Herbal Company. It is a natural treatment for men and women suffering from hair loss, also known as Androgenetic alopecia. With men hair loss is caused by hormone testosterone.

      When DHT(Dihydrotestoterone) enters the body the hair follicles thins and cuts off the blood flow in the body. The more DHT in the body the more the man is at risk of experiencing baldness. In the United Stated two out of eight women experience hair loss. There is no pattern for hair loss in women. Few women experience hair loss at a young age, but it mostly occurs in older women. Unbalanced hormones, thyroid disease, and menopause are common risk factors of hair loss in women.

      Child birth is also a common risk factor for hair loss in women. However, hair loss in women is far more harder to deal with than for men experiencing hair loss.An effective cure for men and women who experience hair loss is Provillus. Not only will Provillus prevent hair loss from happening-it will also regrow the hair. With only being on the market for less than five years, Provillus has been rated the number #1 treatment for hair loss prevention. The topical ingredients in Provillus are FDA-approved and guaranteed to get hair back to being strong and healthy. No side effects have been reported from users of Provillus. Before using Provillus you should read the information provided carefully. You should also consult a doctor if any problems occur after usage.

  29. QUESTION:
    What something good that can be used for hair loss?
    I'm 17 and I've recently noticed that I've been losing a lot of hair. Is there pills or a shampoo that can help prevent from happening anymore?? help!

    • ANSWER:
      Find the 'cause' before you can find solution.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary,hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      You can eliminate the 'cause' and the condition of your hair will improve.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.

  30. QUESTION:
    I want to grow my hair really long but suffer from hair loss. What can i do?
    I'm an 18 year old female and I want to grow out my hair. The only problem is that my hair seems to shed a lot. Is there a solution to this problem?

    • ANSWER:
      You can eliminate the 'cause' and the condition of your hair will improve.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Foods for Healthy Hair - the website had moved, just type it out.
      http://health.yahoo.com/experts/healthie…

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  31. QUESTION:
    What causes ridges in nails(vertical) and hair loss?
    I recently started loosing my hair and I've had vertical ridges in my nails for about 6 mos. What could possibly be causing this?

    • ANSWER:
      Ridges or (corruguations) in nails occur when nail growth is uneven, usually because of illness or injury. Gentle buffing can minimize ridges. Try a Ridge Filler to help level the nail surface, making shallow ridges and other imperfections practically disappear while conditioning with Calcium and Pro-Vitamin B5.

      As for hair loss everyone loses between 40 & 120 strands a day, depending on how much hair you have, your age & your hair's growth cycle. People with fine hair tend to have more of it & therefore will lose more of it than their thicker-haired sisters & brothers. Your hair also thins as you get older, particularly after menopause for women, but the thinning will stop & not continue as it will for men.

      Here are some factors to take into consideration for common hairloss:

      1. Seasonality. You'll lose the most hair in the fall -- typically November and December when hair reaches maturity in its growth cycle.

      2. Diet. Hair loss can occur through poor dieting, tight ponytails, even with age.

      3. Pregnancy Some women experience hair loss with pregnancy or as part of post-pregnancy hormonal changes. Other women experience hair loss when going on or off (usually off) the birth control pill.

      4. Illness Sometimes it happens as a result of illness. Even stress, excessive weight loss, iron deficiency & thyroid problems can cause hair loss.

      If you're really worried, ask your doctor.

      Hope this helps! ~Bon

  32. QUESTION:
    Suspect I have early menopausal or underactive thyroid symptoms, is this difficult to detect from blood tests?
    Over the past 2-3 years I've had 2 lots of blood tests taken by my GP, both came back normal.

    They told me that it can be difficult to accurately test hormone levels, and also that, at 39, I'm too young to be experiencing any menopausal symptoms (although I've read that some people can experience perimenopause for up to 10 years before the actual menopause).

    I was also tested for thyroid problems, but understand that they don't do all the tests available to check for problems.

    Basically, my periods started becoming irregular 3 years ago. At one point I had one that lasted for 3 weeks. Sometimes they would settle down, but now I'm having one every 2 weeks.

    I also started having a lot of hair loss about 2 years ago. My hair is now so thin (and is probably the main reason why I'm trying to find out what is causing this).

    Apart from physical problems, my mood these days is very low. I have no motivation at all, and my memory is terrible.

    I'm due to see an endocrinologist (hopefully soon), and I'm wondering how accurate their tests will be.
    Thanks for you answer. I had my iron levels checked, and nothing abnormal, so probably not anaemia.

    Not on the pill, not losing weight, and my mum hasn't experienced any hair loss.

    ' You have to kinda be your own advocate with the doctors and ask a lot of questions.' Totally agree, that's why I'm trying to gain as much info as I can, beforehand, so that I don't just get fobbed off with 'your results are negative' again. :)

    • ANSWER:
      If you are having a full blown period every two weeks chances are good you are anemic. You have to kinda be your own advocate with the doctors and ask a lot of questions. Did they do a pelvic exam and check for fibroids? What about an ultrasound of your pelvis? Are you on the pill?

      They can tell a ton from blood work but they don't check for everything unless the doctor orders it. They can check your thyroid from it, and it is accurate...if they do the right tests. Are you losing weight?

      My hair started thinning when I turned about 40, 41. Peri-menopause can happen around your age.

      I hope you get it figured out soon.
      Just a thought, if your mom is alive or any other woman relative ask if they started losing hair at your age. Sometimes that is hereditary.

  33. QUESTION:
    What kind of product should one uses to stop her hair from falling off because of aging?
    This is for older women whose hair start to fall off. Any recommendation on good brand of Shampoos and Hair Treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many reason for hair loss.. in old age also the reason are related to hormones . Ladies might exp hair loss after menopause..

      there are some very successful product out there which have proven there effectiveness even in old age.. check out the links below

  34. QUESTION:
    Beauty simplified on sunrise tv hair loss?
    Anybody seen any remedies on beauty simplified on sunrise tv that may work for hair loss. Been extremley poorly ( had h1n1 swine flu injection caused arthritis had bad hair loss any ideas please geniuene ones please. I don't have sunrise tv but maybe someone has seen something tested it and it worked for them ????

    • ANSWER:
      Beauty simplified on sunrise TV hair loss? That's a brand new one. Never in my life have I ever heard of it. Another propaganda sounds like, money making thing.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary,hair dyes perming, straightening, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your body is crying for help!

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      Beauty salons compliment my hair for it is silky, shiny, healthy hair and it feels like hair, not hay.

  35. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever experienced hair loss out of the nowhere and then it just stopped?
    How long did you hair fall off for?
    I'm loasing hair and this has never occured to me before!

    • ANSWER:
      I have low thyroid, I also have more stress for 4 people put together, and no hair loss here.

      Reasons why that might have happened:

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Another 10% why you have hair falls.

      Eliminate them and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss. Change your diet. Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in.
      Your hair may be the fastest-growing tissue in the body but, unlike the skin, it cannot repair itself. That is why getting the right balance of vitamins and proteins is imperative. Don't expect to look like you've stepped out of a hair commercial the day after you've changed your diet. It is likely to take at least three months before you actually see tangible results.

      Source(s):
      I know hair. I have over 4 decades of hair know-how. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy hair down to my knees. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing in the 80's & 90's. I've known people in their 30's whose hair stopped growing from ironing their hair in the 70's.

  36. QUESTION:
    How do you get your hair to grow longer faster?
    Easy stuff to do that is okay and wont damage hair. But it isn't for hair lose or anything My hair is shortish and i wont it to be long like around waist length right now it is about shoulder length please answer this and fast!! Thanks if you do !

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Hair Loss in Women

      Causes of Hair Loss in Women: Help! I Don’t Have to Tear My Hair Out Anymore – It’s All Over My Sink!We lose hair everyday, 100-150 strands actually, simply from brushing and manipulating. If you have long hair, this can look like a lot, but, considering the amount of hair on a head, it’s a tiny amount. If hair is coming out in clumps, or you notice circular patches of balding spots, however, there is definitely a problem, and treatment will be based upon the specific cause.The following causes should be investigated if you are experiencing more-than-normal hair loss:1.Diet: An unbalanced diet, especially one without enough protein, can cause temporary hair loss. Women who are anemic often experience loss.2.Menopause: Because of the change in hormones during this period, hair loss can escalate, and, unfortunately, this can be permanent. 3.Frequent Shampooing: Shampoos contain a lathering ingredient called surfactant. This can be irritating to the scalp and cause itching and scratching, thus increased hair loss.4.Improper Care: If you manipulate your hair too much, color and treat too much, blow dry and heat with curling irons and hot rollers too much, you will see increased hair loss. You need only to look at your bathroom floor, sink and countertops to notice this. Slow down!5.Psychological/Physiological Stress: Increased hair loss can occur with pregnancies, major surgery, or a major life event, such as a death or divorce. These causes are temporary and hair growth will return to normal eventually.6.Heredity: Heredity plays a part and comes from both sides of the family.7.Other Health Conditions: Thyroid problems, lupus, and diabetes can accelerate hair loss. Obviously, these need to be diagnosed by a physician.8.Alopecia Areata: This is an autoimmune condition characterized by circular patches of baldness. Basically, the body is attacking the hair follicles. Cortisone shots in the affected areas are required, and the earlier the better.Take heart. There’s a lot of research going on which may soon resolve most of the causes of hair loss in women. However, there is a great product that has been proven effective. It is called Provillus. Provillus is an oral supplement, which works to block DHT, a form oftestosterone that is responsible for 95 percent of hair loss. It also works to stimulate the scalp and bring dead follicles back to life. You can use Provillus as a preventative tool, starting the program before hair loss becomes severe, or you can use it after DHT has already begun to take hold of your hair and scalp. You can get it at
      http://www.onlinsolutions.com

  37. QUESTION:
    What can i do to stop my hair from falling out and to make it thicker?
    My hair falls off, I'm not knowing why, I have a lot of stress problems in general, and but does that affect thee heirr? I am just uber confused and need to ghett answers, answer pleese.

    • ANSWER:
      Stress alone is not reason for hair to fall out.
      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary,hair dyes perming, straightening, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxics found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your body is crying for help!

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX

  38. QUESTION:
    which of the following is a typical sign or symptom of menopause?
    A. hot flashes
    B. heavy perspiration,particularly when sleeping.
    C hair loss.
    D. vaginal dryness
    E. all of these are correct.

    • ANSWER:
      E

  39. QUESTION:
    How can I reduce the amount of hair that fall out of my head?
    I seem to be losing a lot of hair. I have no medical problem because I've been in for a lot of testing and everything was normal but I stress too much.

    I lose about 15-20 hair whenever I brush them where as before only like 4 came out. What can I do to reduce the amount of hair falling out? I know it's normal to lose 100 a day but do have any tips to decrease the amount of hair falling out?

    • ANSWER:
      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  40. QUESTION:
    How much is too much hair blow drying to the point of baldness?
    I'm a Male. Between the ages of 13.5(5 months before 14)-14, i used to blow dry my hair every weekday and sometimes on weekends. I'd blow dry it to dry the Hair-Jel that I'd put on before I would go to school. I would put the hair dyer close to my forehead to dry the hair Jel on my hair.
    Can blow drying that much cause baldness? How much is too much?
    Can putting on Hair Jel cause baldness?

    • ANSWER:
      No, but the gel you're using if it contained alcohol will.

      When your hair is falling out too much - you'd know when that is - that's when you know you've gone too far, and it's not only getting better your hair is crying out for help, and that's when it is too late to do anything about it.

      Causes for hair loss: Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything.

      My mom had cancer, and her hair didn't even give an indication she had cancer, but she had bloody noses for over 50 years. Mom permed her hair often. My sister had double mastectomy by age 35, and the only symptom she had was her eyebrow hair never came back when she shaved them. She did dyed & permed her hair much longer than me.

  41. QUESTION:
    I have been massaging my scalp and notice that even with a gentle tug several hairs fall out.?
    Is this normal? What can I do about hair loss? It is abut 50 hairs a day and only when I massage my scalp.

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      I get one or none when I do that!

      You massage your scalp when you shampoo your hair. After shampooing or brushing my hair I get 7 or less per day, about 70 a week.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  42. QUESTION:
    Is himalaya protein shampoo with conditioner good for hair?
    I am facing lot of hair fall these days. I have tried so many shampoos(VLCC, Pantene etc.) but still facing the hair fall. My hair gets dirty every second day and becomes very dry. Is himalaya protein shampoo with conditioner good for hair?

    • ANSWER:
      No. Do you know what's IN THE PROTEIN SHAMPOO WITH CONDITIONER?
      If I bottled all my tips & suggestion & charged each, would someone buy it? Of course not! I'm a nobody! But you get them all FREE ON YA HAIR.

      Shampoos are meant to clean. Google it. Conditioner is for curly/wavy, permed or chemically treated hair. None is better than the other. You get your protein from all your healthy foods you eat daily. Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/feature…
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair…

      When you're facing hair falls, it's because of an allergic reaction to chemicals, hair and beauty products. Other reasons why that happens:
      Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs), steroids, hereditary, hair dyes, perming/relaxers, straightening (have read many on YA HAIR, and have responded to them since 2009), diet, having babies (yes I read twice it happened to them), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, & anti-acne. Find the 'cause' and eliminate them, and your hair will improve. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpres…

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products or hair loss growth can not reverse the problem. They are all billion dollar business.

      Save your money instead of buying hair growth products or supplements. Vogue Dec. 2010 issue has a section on biotin, supplements, etc. .
      The FDA don't even approve of them. Because of inadequate quality control and inspection, supplements contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs have been sold to unsuspecting consumers. And FDA rules covering manufacturing quality don’t apply to the companies that supply herbs, vitamins, and other raw ingredients.
      Beginning in February 2008, they experienced one symptom after another: diarrhea, joint pain, hair loss, lung problems, and fingernails and toenails that fell off.
      http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/Consumer…
      MSN
      http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16655168/wid…
      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements.

      Growing healthy hair doesn't come from a bottle or pills and hair products do not speed hair growth. Any hair oil, is another form to keep hair moisturized, nothing more. If you're in HS, your hair & nails should be growing normally, and as healthily as possible, since you're eating healthy foods. But when hair isn't growing as fast, it's because they've been tempered with: chemicals, hair straightening, etc. . . My hair grew from bob to waist length in 3 1/2 - 4 years in HS.

  43. QUESTION:
    How to prevent or stop hair loss?
    Ok so I'm 13 and I hava serious problem with my hair. Help please. Oh and natrual cheep remedies please

    • ANSWER:
      Find the cause before you find solution. Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Traction alopecia is hair loss that occurs as a result of continuous pulling of the hair. Pulling may occur from hairstyles such as tight cornrows, plaits or braids with or without extensions, weaves, ponytails or even hair rollers or curlers. Natural hairstyles can also lead to traction alopecia as well. Long heavy locks and tightly coiled twists can lead to traction alopecia. The hair loss associated with traction alopecia typically occurs at the frontal hairline, at the temples or the area of the scalp above the ears. It may also occur at the posterior hairline.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

  44. QUESTION:
    What causes sudden hair loss in women and what helps stop it?
    Normal hair until middle age. Could beginning of menopause have something to do with it?

    • ANSWER:
      yes. that among other things. depression, stress, nerves. maybe even hair products that you are using for your hair.

  45. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to re-nourish my hair?
    My hair used to be straight, a bit wavy and healthy, then I shaved it off and when it regrew it was frizzy and dry. I've tried shampoos which claim to calm frizz such as John Frieda and Aussie. I use conditioners but nothing seems to work.

    Do I need to buy shampoos from highstreet hair salons?

    • ANSWER:
      Hair Problems!?!?!??!
      Check this ouT!!!

      Take good care of your hair! It will add to your charm - who can resist a person with lovely, silky hair? So do try out the tips! Hope these little tips have been useful! :)

      GoOD lUCK!

      Tips To Stop Hair Loss & Keep Healthy Hair Here are some hair care tips that you can use to help stop hair loss and keep your existing hair healthy and looking great. Please don't take these tips lightly. They are very important . The only thing they require is your time and commitment.

      - Massage your scalp with your fingertips (not your nails) daily to stimulate and promote circulation to your scalp and reduce excess fallout. Invert your head while you shampoo & massage your scalp. This helps promote blood circulation to the head.

      - Essential oils & tea . To stimulate scalp circulation, massage the scalp with rosemary essential oil or rinse hair with tea made from sage.

      - Comb or brush your hair and scalp gently in the morning and at night. This helps break up hardened oils (sebum) that are clogging your hair follicles. Doing this alone has produced new hair growth. Do not over do combing or brushing.

      - keep a distance from dryer's heat. When using blow dryers, always keep the heat a good distance from your scalp and hair. Avoid heating the scalp and hair excessively. Excessive heat will increase hair loss, and excess fallout.

      - Avoid getting hair creams, lotions, styling gels and sprays directly on the scalp as they will clog your hair follicles. Use a light hold spray if you must.

      - After swimming in a pool, shampoo your hair as soon as possible to remove any chlorine residue. Chlorine is extremely damaging to the hair and scalp.

      - Avoid over-exposing your hair and scalp to the wind and sun. Good hair care over a long period really makes a difference!

      - Avoid tight hats and caps as they contribute to poor circulation, depriving the hair of proper nutrition and stunting new hair growth. The sweat, dirt and grime around the rim inhibit follicle health and contribute to build-up.

      - Always consult your health care provider for extreme causes of excess fallout and thinning. A medical condition or medication could be causing hair loss side-effects.

      - Strive for balance and harmony in both your personal and professional lifestyle. High stress factors can cause your body to react by fluctuating hormone levels. This in turn causes excessive oil secretion (sebum) which results in hair loss.

      - Pregnancy, nursing, menopause, and even birth control medication can cause constant changing factors on your nutritional needs and hormonal levels which contribute to hair loss and excess fallout.

      - Avoid "crash and fad" diets. Proper nutritious meals along with vitamin and mineral supplements are a key factor for healthy hair and skin.

      - Good hair care starts with awareness. These hair care tips, if followed consistently, will reduce excess fallout, hair loss, and promote new hair growth.

      - Reduce hair loss effects by increasing your intake of vitamin C found in fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruit and juices, parsley, broccoli, green peppers and black currants. Take a vitamin B complex everyday or brewers yeast. Increase your intake of protein found in meat, fish, liver, wheat germ, dried cooked beans and peas, tofu, cheese, milk and eggs.

      - Take dietary supplements such as Vitamin B6, zinc & saw palmetto. Supplements are useful when you can't get enough from natural food sources.

      - The Chinese believe that hair is nourished by the blood, and therefore influenced by the kidney & liver. Treatment is aimed at these organs using fleece flower root, wolfberry fruit or mulberry fruit.

      - Eliminate stress or else it can be disastrous to your precious hair!

      - Get enough sleep. Sleeping well is essential for the health of your hair as well as for the rest of your body.

      There are ways you can help stop the grease from appearing but you have to work at it.

      Do not wash everyday. The cleaner your hair is the more it can seep into your glands and harder it is to get rid of. When you do wash make sure you are washing with a cleaning shampoo and scrubbing the build up off. Take in mind that you also have to have a ph-balanced mild shampoo and lite scrubbing is recommended. Try to avoid conditioner at the roots, apply in the middle or on the ends.

      Try to avoid oil in your daily food intake. And do eat more vegetables. You could visit your doctor but only after you check and consider your diet, drugs, alcohol, and your fatty food intake. Let's face it we see what McDonalds can do to your heart in a month, can you image your hair. You would be dripping everywhere.

      Maybe it's time to change your shampoo. Ask your stylist what she or he would recommend. Avoid using shine products at all costs. Keep away from two-in-one shampoos and conditioners and any frizz serums.

      To fix at the moment, rub a little Talcum Powder on your dried hair at the roots. Just make sure you wash it out. I wish they would event that magic product, but this will help until they do.

      Here are 10 tips for to keep your hair strong, smooth, shiny and beautiful!

      1. Keep your diet balanced, and eat protein and calcium rich foods. Stay away from junk foods! This is essential for healthy hair.

      2. Foods and supplements to nourish your hair:

      * Beans
      * Yogurt
      * Almonds
      * Vitamin B
      * Fish
      * And of course, the magic potion for beauty - WATER

      3. Before washing your hair, comb it well to make sure all knots has been loosened from your hair.

      4. Before applying shampoo, use warm water (35 to 38 degrees Celsius) to run through your hair to rinse and wet it thoroughly.

      5. When applying shampoo or conditioner, don't use your fingernails to scrape through your hair. Instead, use your palm and fingertips to massage your scalp and hair gently, in circular motions. This will help the circulation and also help to keep your hair shiny and smooth.

      6. After rinsing away all the shampoo, run water over your hair for at least another half a minute (3 minutes is best) to ensure there are no remains of shampoo remaining in your hair, since this will cause a great deal of damage to your scalp.

      7. When applying hair treatment products, do so just after you have washed your hair, so that your hair can absorb all the good stuff while it is half wet. This will be the best time for it to absorb nourishment.

      8. NEVER go to bed with your hair wet! Hair that is half wet is most easily broken, and if you sleep during this time, your hair will be rubbing against each other, damaging your hair in the most terrible way.

      9. Too much pressure may lead to hair loss! Relax... try some good relaxation methods such as soaking in a nice scented bath, listening to music, and eating healthy comfort foods such as strawberries and grapes.

      10. Perming and coloring seriously damages your hair. Avoid it as much as possible. Also, when using hair setting products such as gel or putty, use as little as possible, because they hurt your scalp and hair. Wash them out thoroughly afterwards with a shampoo specially created for removing styling products.

  46. QUESTION:
    Do you lose more hair and does it start earlier if it's genetic baldness? If so, is there any treatment to it?
    I'm 17 and I've noticed my hair is thinning. I'm starting to get like the widow's peak thing going also. I was wondering if that was because of genetic baldness because it started so early. Also, when I'm in the shower a lot of hair comes out from my head. Does shampooing increase baldness or any water to the head?

    • ANSWER:
      Shampooing doesn't cause baldness.

      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons why you have hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  47. QUESTION:
    I have a vitamin D deficiency and i was wondering if i take vitamin d everyday will my hair start growin back?
    I am 19 year old girl i used to have super thick hair and its been falling out alot and i went to the doctors and they told me i had a deficiency of vit.D and i was wondering if i keep taking it will my hair grow back eventually?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin D is NOT THE only reason why hair grows. You need: Zinc, Cooper, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Biotin, and Folic Acid.

      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php
      Fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains all supply B-complex vitamins, like biotin, folic acid and vitamin B12, as well as vitamin A, copper and zinc, which are all necessary for remedying dry, brittle hair and nourishing a healthy scalp. Some prime examples of foods that contain these nutrients for healthy hair include:
      ·                     Folic Acid - asparagus, beets, broccoli, avocados, Brussels sprouts, beans, chickpeas, soybeans, lentils, oranges, fresh peas, turkey and spinach.
      ·                     Biotin - cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast, and soy flour. Keep in mind that biotin content is reduced when food is cooked or preserved.
      ·                     Vitamin B12 - foods rich in vitamin B12 include animal protein (such as beef, lamb, and veal), clams and oysters, liver, fish, milk, and egg yolks.
      ·                     Vitamin A - butter, egg yolks, fish, fortified milk, organ meats (such as
      liver), and dark green, orange, red, and yellow fruits (persimmons) and vegetables, which all
      contain beta-carotene.
      . Copper - oysters and other shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes and organ meats are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such
      as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet.
      •  Zinc – beef, eggs, liver, pork, poultry, and oysters. Also is also abundant in other high-protein foods, like cheese, legumes and nuts.
      If having a lush, beautiful mane of healthy hair is important to you, don’t just look to hot oil treatments and shine emollients. Eat these foods for healthy hair and say “bye-bye” to bad hair days.

      BUT . . . .It may grow very slowly or none at all if you've straightened your hair in the past.

      DID YOU SAY they have been falling out alot? Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons for hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!

      Doctors don't know everything, they will just prescribe you a white little pill and everything are OK then they go to their next patient. My mother had suffered for 21 years, and they didn't even told her she's got cancer, until we rushed her to ER, then they did more testing, but by then she's got 3 months to live.

      Sources:
      I know hair. I have 4 decades of hair know-how. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy hair down to my knees. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing in the 80's & 90's. I've known people in their 30's whose hair stopped growing from ironing their hair in the 70's.

  48. QUESTION:
    What doctor should I see about thinning hair?
    I've noticed for the past month now that the front area of my hair seems to be getting thinner. I saw myself in a mirror outside today and it looked considerably different. Now I'm starting to freak out and want to see someone about this.

    I'm only 19 so thats why I'm so concerned.

    • ANSWER:
      Your primary doctor, will recommend you a doctor to see. He may even know what is wrong, he knows more about you than we do.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 3,350,000,000 results results (0.13 seconds).  Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 230,000,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia, 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.
      For women: A simple blood test can reveal the root of the problem. Unfortunately, those who do see a physician right away make the mistake of going to a dermatologist rather than their primary care physician. Most dermatologists will review the physical signs of hair loss and diagnose it as female pattern baldness.  Your primary care physician will run tests to diagnose the problem so you can take steps to correct it.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

      Negative experienced: Advance Hair Studio - Fraud Company posted 1-8-12 & others.

  49. QUESTION:
    What is the safest baby shampoo I can buy for my hair?
    Whenever I use Shampoo with conditioner, my hair starts to fall out. I heard that using baby shampoo isn't as strong as regular shampoo, but I want to make sure that it's safe for a 19 year old male.

    • ANSWER:
      Shampoo is shampoo, they're meant to clean.

      Baby shampoo is milder, but it will not prevent your hair from falling out, if they're falling out from OTHER CAUSES like:
      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      When your teeth falls or get cavities, do you blame the toothpaste?

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Find the 'cause' and eliminate them, and your hair will improve. You don't need conditioner if your hair is not dyed, permed or straightened.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here! I only shampoo my hair, and it's down to my knees every 4th day.

  50. QUESTION:
    How to thicken hair/stop from falling out?
    My hair has been falling out so much lately and has gotten tremendously thinner! I don't know if it's from being cold outside, or hormones. BUT i need a cure before it gets too thin. Any recommendations for a good thickening shampoo or other products?

    • ANSWER:
      Shampoos are meant to clean (Google it), whatever they say on their labels: smoother, shinier, volumizer, thickening, etc. . . . are all part of marketing gimmicks.

      If your hair is falling out and had gotten tremendously thinner, your hair is crying out for help, and no hair product can fix that. It's probably an allergic reaction, how you style your hair, what tools you use to style your hair with.

      During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductandIngredientSafety/ProductInformation/ucm127988.htm
      http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/ucm118527.htm
      Those are 75% the reason why.

      Have you been taking supplements? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs) Another 5% why.

      Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Another 10% why.

      Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Another 10% why you have hair falls.

      Eliminate them and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that look to start the hair loss.
      Save your money instead of buying hair growth products or supplements. Vogue Dec. 2010 issue has a section on biotin, supplements, etc. .

      The FDA don't even approve of them. Because of inadequate quality control and inspection, supplements contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs have been sold to unsuspecting consumers. And FDA rules covering manufacturing quality don’t apply to the companies that supply herbs, vitamins, and other raw ingredients.
      Beginning in February 2008, they experienced one symptom after another: diarrhea, joint pain, hair loss, lung problems, and fingernails and toenails that fell off.
      http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/Consumer…
      MSN "Vitamins Can Do More Harm Than Good."
      http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16655168/wid…
      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements.

      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/feature…
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair…

      Growing healthy hair doesn't come from a bottle or pills and hair products do not speed hair growth. Any hair oil, is another form to keep hair moisturized, nothing more. If you're in HS, your hair & nails should be growing normally, and as healthily as possible, since you're eating healthy foods. But when hair isn't growing as fast, it's because they've been tempered with: chemicals, hair straightening, etc. . .

      Source(s):
      I know hair. I have over 4 decades of hair know-how. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy hair down to my knees. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing in the 80's & 90's. I've known people in their 30's whose hair stopped growing from ironing their hair in the 70's.

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hair loss menopause

Headaches And Menopause

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What excuses have your heard over the years for your partners lack of sex drive?
    Over the last 5 years, i think i've heard it all: headaches, menopause, tired, insomnia, apnea, too hot, too cold, hungry, not hungy, you name it.
    the most recent of which was this: " well, you going to the bathroom 20 minutes ago totally turned me off..." WTF? this was the same woman that used to oral back there...

    What whoppers have you heard and why do they do this?

    • ANSWER:
      Too tired, too wired, not enough sleep, too much sleep.
      I don't feel worthy of you (i laughed in his face on that one...)
      my balls hurt (to which i got check for STD's from my doc..)
      I have cramps (thought that was a womans line...)
      you look too good to eat. (to which i said: 'fine, then i guess i'll find someone whose hungry enough.)

      Screw excuses! You wind up with partners that spend more time coming up with bs excuses than it would take to spend 1 hour a week in bed with someone they 'claim' they love.

  2. QUESTION:
    My sister is going through menopause and is 40 years old. Do the usual symptoms include nausea?
    She felt faint the other day and has been having a lot of headaches, chills and sweats. Are these menopausal symptoms too?

    • ANSWER:
      The headaches, chills, and sweats could be symptoms of menopause but I have not heard of nausea being a symptom of menopause. I would recommend that she check with her doctor for further evaluation of the situation.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is a migraine headache just a really strong headache or is it a totally different ailment?
    I'd like to know because I have been getting super strong headaches in the last year that only migraine medications are effective on.

    • ANSWER:
      Migraines are different from ordinary headaches. Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.

      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.

      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can produce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke, can also trigger migraines.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraine attacks in some individuals, as can jet lag.

      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.

      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.

      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines.

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some of the symptoms of menopause?
    I'm 44 and my periods are irregular. I have new hair growing around my hairline and bad headaches. Are these symptoms that menopause is starting?

    • ANSWER:
      hot flashes, night sweats, and mood fluctuations are common syptoms of menopause,but usually menopause starts around 50 but has been known to start sooner.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with women going thru menopause?
    I'm pretty sure my mom is going through menopause right now because she is really irritable and moody and she's giving my dad the silent treatment because he got mad at her. Today was her birthday but she didn't even want to eat the cake we got her. I'm really pis$ed off about this and I want my family back. Anything I can do or do I just have to wait it out?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is the period marked by the natural and permanent cessation of menstruation. A woman begins to see changes in her menstrual cycles usually between the ages of 45 and 55. It's the time in a woman's life that the function of her ovaries begins to cease. Most people recognize this as the "turning point".

      Some women may have few or no first signs of menopause, while others experience multiple psychological and physical symptoms. The symptoms and severity of them varies significantly from woman to woman.

      Every woman's experience will be different but some of the common first signs of menopause are:

      -Irregular Periods -Hot Flashes -Problems with the Vagina and Bladder -Loss of Sex Drive -Fatigue -Mood Changes -Headaches -Sleep Problems -Water Retention

      Can you imagine having to deal with all that and nobody understands what you’re going through?

      Spend some time and talk to her about your concerns (Your Mom’s Health and Well Being). Show empathy for her. The more you can learn on your own about this change, the more your mom will open up to you about it.

      This could help tremendously.

  6. QUESTION:
    My wife will be going through menopause soon what should I expect?
    Because of Cancer treatment and a hysterectomy after that my wife will be going through menopause, pretty soon. The cancer treatment gave me a preview but the hysterectomy will be the full on thing. What should I expect? How can I be supportive?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause typically occurs in women between the ages of 45 and 55 year old. Symptoms include irregular periods, heavy bleeding, hot flashes, disrupted sleep, headaches, dry eyes, vaginal changes (dryness), hair loss, weight gain and a loss of interest in sex. Someone women may also experience extreme emotional distress. Some women also have short term memory loss, lack of focus and irritability. Some women describe feelings of “fuzzy thinking” and the inability to multi-task. Some also experience increased feelings of anxiety, fatigue and depression. Also, women should be cautious of extreme or drastic mood swings.

  7. QUESTION:
    Menopause:would like to email anyone who is going through it. Are bioidenticals safe?
    I am taking high blood pressure tablets and find that if I take hormone supplements I feel a lot better and happier but I get a headache every day. It is not with me 24hours a day. Can anyone suggest what foods I should be eating?

    • ANSWER:
      Are you using oral estrogen? If so, then that's probably the reason you get a headache every day. What happens is that with oral estrogen, you get a big dose of estrogen hitting your bloodstream at one time, and then your body uses it all up gradually throughout the day. When it starts to run out, you get a headache. To avoid this, I suggest you use an estrogen patch. That keeps the estrogen level constant almost all the time.

      Bioidenticals are no safer than the non-bioidenticals. The proponents of them say they're safer based on their own logic but it's not based on any tests, and there are faults to their logic. But some of the non-bioidenticals may be more dangerous than others. I wouldn't take Provera if I were you. And if you are determined to take bioidenticals, then keep in mind that the estrogen patch I just recommended is the most bioidentical thing you can get--it's what your body makes, and it's delivered in a way most like what your body did.

  8. QUESTION:
    Why do I keep getting instant headaches?
    Straight to the point: I get headaches everyday. I've BEEN having headaches everyday. Some aspirin used to make it go away. But now, that doesn't work and when I get headaches I now feel weak and I feel like throwing up. Sometimes I even see blurry. Why? It happens almost everyday. Sometimes I even wake up with these headaches. Someone please help? I have a headache now, so I'd like some serious answers.

    • ANSWER:
      A migraine headache can cause intense throbbing or pulsing in one area of the head and is commonly accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Migraine attacks can cause significant pain for hours to days and be so severe that all you can think about is finding a dark, quiet place to lie down.

      Some migraines are preceded or accompanied by sensory warning symptoms (aura), such as flashes of light, blind spots or tingling in your arm or leg.

      Medications can help reduce the frequency and severity of migraines. If treatment hasn't worked for you in the past, talk to your doctor about trying a different migraine headache medication. The right medicines, combined with self-help remedies and lifestyle changes, may make a tremendous difference.
      (CAUSES:)Although much about the cause of migraines isn't understood, genetics and environmental factors seem to both play a role.

      Migraines may be caused by changes in the brain stem and its interactions with the trigeminal nerve, a major pain pathway. Imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin — which helps regulate pain in your nervous system — also may be involved.

      Serotonin levels drop during migraine attacks. This may trigger your trigeminal system to release substances called neuropeptides, which travel to your brain's outer covering (meninges). The result is headache pain
      (TRIGGERS) Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.
      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraine attacks.
      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.
      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can induce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke — can also trigger migraines.
      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraines in some individuals, as can jet lag.
      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.
      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.
      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines, especially oral contraceptives and vasodilators, such as nitroglycerin.

  9. QUESTION:
    Will I go through early menopause if I get one ovary removed?
    I recently found out that I have a huge ovarian cyst on my left side and that I am going to need surgery ASAP! My gynecologist wants to remove the whole ovary because there is a very small chance that it could be malignant. Is there any possibility that it would cause me to go into early menopause if I keep the right ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Jesus_is.., So sorry for your Medical condition and hope you will feel better soon. that said as to your question Your doctor may conduct an ovary removal, or oophorectomy, as part of a hysterectomy or if you have an abnormal growth. This surgery is often performed by laparoscopy so you can go home the same day or the following day.An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both your ovaries (female reproductive structure responsible for producing eggs and generating hormones). When one ovary is removed, the procedure is called a unilateral oophorectomy, and when both ovaries...Surgical menopause is the removal of a woman's ovaries during surgery. Only the ovaries may be removed, or the woman may have a partial or total hysterectomy. Removing the uterus and fallopian tubes will not cause surgical menopause, only the...If only one ovary is removed, the woman will not go through surgical menopause because there is still another ovary producing hormones.Know Who Needs Surgical Menopause, Women who have ovarian cancer may have their ovaries removed during surgery. Women who suffer from painful fibroid tumors may also opt to have the ovaries surgically removed. Some women who are genetically predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer opt to have their ovaries removed, especially if their sisters or mother have developed breast or ovarian cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a high risk for breast or ovarian cancer. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, get genetic testing to find out if you have the mutation.All surgeries have risks that are serious considerations for you. Excessive blood loss, infection and complications from anesthesia are just some of the risks of all surgery. Other complications for removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy) include unintentional injury to other internal organs during surgery and intestinal blockages.Predicting Hot Flashes, Yes! You will have all the symptoms of natural menopause after surgery to remove the ovaries. You may experience one or all of these symptoms immediately after surgery including hot flashes, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, night sweats, vaginal dryness, diminished sex drive and fatigue, unless you start on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) right away. HRT can be in the form of a pill, gel or a patch prescribed in the lowest possible dosage,Understand Hormone Replacement Therapy ,Estrogen Therapy alone does increase the risk of uterine cancer, so most women are given a combination of estrogen and progestin, called Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or Hormone Therapy. If you've had a total hysterectomy and the uterus has been removed, you no longer have to worry about uterine cancer. Progestin protects the uterus from cancer, which is why it's combined with estrogen to provide protection against cancer in HRT. Most doctors agree that women should remain on HRT for no more than 5 years. Side effects of HRT can include headaches and breast pain. Some women temporarily gain water weight. More serious side effects of HRT include bleeding, cancer, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Go for regular check ups while you're on HRT, and contact your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects. I hope all these information helped you with more knowledge which will take you from Zero to hero. Good luck best wishes hope you get better soon. Sorry for your problems but you will get better dear hope for the best.

  10. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  11. QUESTION:
    What causes headache, brown vaginal discharge, and nausea?
    I've had these symptoms for a couple days and every time i go on a symptom diagnosis thing, it tells me im going through menopause, but im only 14?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone irregularities will cause that. It's the kind of adjustments you go through when you first start getting your period.

  12. QUESTION:
    if im going through menopause and having headaches what can i take to relieve them?
    i think im going throught menoupause and have a headache most every day not every day what i can take to relieve them.

    • ANSWER:
      HEADACHE

      There are several types of headaches, several potential causes, including Infection, dental problems, stress, or allergies.
      certain foods such as (aged cheese, red wine), fasting or skipping meal too much or too little sleep, emotional changes (stress, anxiety, anger, excitement), and environmental changes (noise, bright lights, triggers headaches. it varies from person to person and can operate at different times. Studies suggest that hormones has a role in headaches. Women at increased risk for hormonal headaches during menopause.
      what you can do is...
      you need a lot of sleep, avoid stressors, eat a well balanced diet and relax.
      ping me at pea_ester if you want to ask about pms. i am writing a book about that.

  13. QUESTION:
    How Can I help my Wife through Perimenopause?
    My wife is having a rough time with perimenopause. Headaches, can't sleep, cranky. I am not sure what I can do to help her. Ladies any suggestions would be most appriciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there,

      I wrote a book called Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness, a purse-sized guide on perimenopause and menopause (I call it PM&M) that both you and your wife would find very helpful (you can find it on Amazon)! It has a detailed description of each of the 34 symptoms, a symptoms chart to help women track their patterns, a list and breakdown of the tests your wife should ask her doctor about, and funny, heartfelt stories that will bring a little light to the experience.

      I've been on Rachael Ray, The Doctors, NPR, Sirius XM Radio Ch. 107 "Broadminded," Doctor Radio, Oprah Radio, Fox 5 San Diego Morning News, Good Morning America, and many more.

      My site, Shmirshky.com, has a doctor directory comprised of doctors recommended by women who have found hormone happiness, and you can search for one by location. We also have a free weekly Menopause Mondays newsletter with the latest menopause resources and interesting blogs, which you can sign up for on the site. We're always updating Facebook and Twitter, too, with the latest and greatest!

      You're a great husband for seeking help for your wife! PM&M is not fun, but she CAN find hormone happiness!

      Hope this helps!
      Hugs,

      E

  14. QUESTION:
    Why does my sister get headache during her periods?
    My sister gets mild headache just before her mensturation. And it lasts for 2-3 days, every month. It has started after she gave birth to a kid who is 3 and half years old now. It was a cesarean operation.

    • ANSWER:
      Migraine symptoms in women can be triggered by changes in estrogen that occur during menarche, menstruation and menopause.1 The term "menstrual migraine" specifically refers to a migraine that occurs near the start of the menstrual cycle, in response to falling levels of estrogen. Oral contraception, hormone replacement therapy, and pregnancy can all affect migraine patterns

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best thing to help my menopause??
    Everymonth I struggle with hot flashes and migraine headaches. Sometimes worse than other times. This month was the worst. I really suffered and I felt so nausiated. I really need help understanding this because this is all new to me.
    If i was married I would have plenty of love making.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is a stage in life when a woman stops having her monthly period.It is a normal part of aging, marking the end of a woman's reproductive years.Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  16. QUESTION:
    Why is Menopause worse than having periods?
    I thought Menopause means no periods so that means girls can be better than when they were having periods?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, yes, at the end of menopause a woman no longer has periods, but it doesn't happen overnight. Over the course of several years (it varies) a woman's body will start 'preparing' for menopause, go through it, and then finish it. Symptoms of menopause may include hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, vaginal dryness, aching joints and muscle problems, anxiety, irritability, depression and mental fatigue. Decreased libido, headaches, migraines, heart palpitations, urinary tract infections, weight gain, hair loss and incontinence are also symptoms of menopause.

      If you survive that intact then you're on a roll. No periods will be great, but it also means the body isn't producing enough estrogen or progesterone, they are female hormones and effectively they are what makes us female (in essence!). Any woman who has premature menopause is then at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis - estrogen, among other things, is very important in maintaining bone density and preventing bone loss.

      Of course, there'shormone replacement therapy which helps combat the symptoms of menopause, but that in itself comes with risks of blood clots, cancers etc.

      My mum developed breast after being on HRT for 20 years - she had premature menopause and needed to go on HRT.

      Being a woman isn't always a barrel of laughs - there's a lot of shit that can happen!

  17. QUESTION:
    What is the the best treatment for pre-menapause symptoms apart from hormone replacement therapy?
    I am a lady, 44 years of age and am going through the pre-menapause symptoms especially headaches, hot flashes, irregular periods and digestive disorders. Ive been to my GP and said he can only prescribe HRT if my symptoms get worse and only gave me some pain killers. I understood clearly the reasons why the GP could not prescribe the HRT and i would like to go through the process without them. I have done some browsing on the internet and im trying a few things which are not giving me an immediate relief i need as i have to work almost daily. If there is someone who knows what i am talking about, can they share their experiences so i can learn from them.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.nutrihealth.org/pages/menopause.html

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the early symptoms of cancer?
    I've been taking for ct scans. I get headaches often especially from running and I get light headed easy. But my headaches are on my forehead or in randome spots? My mood has changed and it's hard to concitrate or stay happy- is this a symptom? What are the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Early Symptoms of Cervical Cancer

      Changes in pre-cancerous or early stage cancer does not cause pain or other symptoms. However, advisable not to wait for the new first symptoms to symptoms such as unifying:

      Abnormal vaginal bleeding
      Bleeding between the 2 time periods
      Bleeding after sexual intercourse
      Periods of longer duration or more than usual
      Bleeding after menopause
      Foul-smelling vaginal discharge and blood mixed
      Pelvic pain
      Pain during intercourse.

      Such symptoms can also occur in other health disorders other than cancer. This must be confirmed by examination by a doctor.

  19. QUESTION:
    What are the black spots on both of my eyeballs?
    Okay, I get headaches/migraines a LOT! The other day i was putting on mascara when I noticed these black spots under my upper eyelid on my eyeball. Also, my neck is always hurting me and I've read that sometimes neck alignment causes headaches. Is that true? How can I prevent these head aches and make the black spots go away?

    • ANSWER:
      With the migraines it might help if you can identify your triggers. Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.

      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.

      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can produce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke, can also trigger migraines.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraine attacks in some individuals, as can jet lag.

      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.

      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.

      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines.

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.headaches.org/educational_modules/completeguide/migraine2.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/headache/article.htm
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes

      The black spots might be just skin pigmentation and if so you cannot really get rid of them. Or they might be broken blood vessels and if so they will gradually disappear. If they do not disappear ask the doctor about them the next time you are there.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can Medical Marijuana Help My Migraine Headaches?
    I have suffered with Migraine Headaches for many years, Can cannabis help?

    • ANSWER:
      Migraine headaches can be extremely severe and debilitating. Scientists and doctors are not sure exactly why some people get migraines but it appears that genetics and environmental factors both play a role. About 15% of the population suffer with migraines. They are more common in women. About 80% of people who have migraines have a family member who also has migraines.

      Migraines are possibly caused by changes in the trigeminal nerve, a major pain pathway. Imbalances in brain chemicals also may be the culprit. One of our neurotransmitters, serotonin — which helps regulate pain in the nervous system — also may be involved.

      There are a number of factors that can be the starting cause of migraines; these are called triggers. Some well known triggers for migraines are hormonal changes (menstruation, menopause, pregnancy), certain foods (MSG, chocolate, cheese, nuts, alcohol), missing a meal, change in weather, or very commonly, stress.

      About 20% of migraine sufferers have an aura (usually a visual disturbance) before the onset of pain. More often there is just the onset of pain which becomes severe and debilitating. Although migraine pain usually appears on one side of the head, 30-40% of migraineurs have them on both sides. One can have nausea, vomiting, light-sensitivity and sound sensitivity. Migraines can last anywhere from 4 hours to 3 days.

      Many of the medications currently used for migraine headaches have significant side effects and often do not prevent or relieve all of the symptoms. Marijuana was used to treat migraine headaches for many years in the nineteenth century, however due to the political climate and attitude towards marijuana in the twentieth century, it was not researched or promoted as an effective treatment for migraines. Many people who suffer from migraines found on their own that marijuana either prevented or lessened the intolerable pain from this condition. Recent research has shown that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, inhibits the release of serotonin from the blood of migraine sufferers during an acute attack, thereby reducing symptoms of pain.

      Although further scientific research is needed, many patients are using medical marijuana safely and effectively to prevent and treat their migraine headaches. Many patients have found that they no longer need prescription medications with adverse side effects in order to treat their migraines. Others have found that the other benefits of medical marijuana, like improved sleep and less stress and anxiety, reduce the frequency of their migraines. Overall, medical marijuana patients who have migraine headaches find that their quality of life is improved with this treatment.

  21. QUESTION:
    What would be causing constant headaches?
    My wife who is 24 has been having headaches for the past three weeks now. Each day they seem to be getting worse. She is slightly sensitive to light and sound, but not enough to where we would diagnose it as a migraine. The past few days she has been getting nauseated but has not thrown up yet. She also has motion sickness which is common with her but lately it has been getting worse. Tylenol and Excedrin Migraine help for a while but it keeps coming back. We would appreciate any ideas as to what she should do.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be tension headaches. If the headaches last more than 15 days a month for several months, they could be chronic tension headaches.

      Some causes can be:
      * Stress
      * Depression and anxiety
      * Lack of sleep or changes in sleep routine
      * Skipping meals
      * Poor posture
      * Working in awkward positions or holding one position for a long time
      * Lack of physical activity
      * Occasionally, hormonal changes related to menstruation, pregnancy, menopause or hormone use
      * Medications used for other conditions, such as depression or high blood pressure
      * Overuse of headache medication

      Stress is the most common. If any of these sound like they could be a cause, try to fix that problem and see if it helps the headaches. In any case I recommend seeing your doctor; I'm no expert, but maybe this website will help, it's where I got this information:

      http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/DS/00304.html

      It's a long article to read, but it gives very thorough information on causes and symptoms, how to treat or prevent headaches, and important things you can do before you visit the doctor to help them diagnose your wife's head pain:
      Get a good description of your pain: "Your doctor can learn a lot about your headaches from your description of the type of pain, including its severity, location, frequency and duration, and other symptoms you may have."

      Keep a headache calendar: "One of the most helpful things you can do is keep a headache calendar for at least two months. Each time you get a headache, jot down a description of the pain, including how severe it is, where it's located and how long it lasts. Also note any medications you take. A headache calendar can offer valuable clues that may help your doctor diagnose your particular kind of headache and discover possible headache triggers."

      I hope this helps!

  22. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of a migraine?
    Im 15 years old and I get migraines or very bad headaches at least more than one time a week. I've taken Excedrin Migraine, Aleve, Tylenol, and Advil Migraine. Sometimes they help but not all the time. They are usually located on the top of my head. I've been to the doctor and she thinks that I have allergies, but I don't agree. Please let me know if you have and suggestions on what to do. At this time I'm pretty much desperate. =] Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      You might ask your doctor for a referral to a neurologist, particularly one who is familiar with migraines.

      Also, while over-the-counter (OTC) drugs can help mild migraines, they don't always, and they can, if taken too often, cause something called "rebound headaches"...which means they're something you should be careful with. Many drugs that can help migraines can do this. These can happen when using any of these as infrequently as 5-10 times a month.

      Something you might want to do is to start watching for what might trigger your migraines. Keep a migraine journal (to record what you've eaten or done that could be a trigger). Maybe do an elimination diet (same principle).

      For the most part, when you get a migraine, it's triggered by...something. It can be a trigger food that is specific to migraines. It can be other types of triggers.

      Just as each person is different, each migraine is, too, so your triggers are bound to be different from mine. But there are common triggers (possibilities) you might want to look out for... Not every one of these may have an effect on you. SOME of them may only affect you in combination. There are primary triggers (things that, all by themselves, will set you off), and then there are triggers that build up (things that combine with other things to trip you into a migraine state). Some things you can avoid...some you can't.

      While the following are common triggers, they are by no means all of the triggers that are around:

      Aged cheese
      Eggs
      Tomatoes
      Citrus fruits
      Wheat products
      Alcohol
      MSG
      Chocolate
      Caffeine (this can be a bad OR a good thing, btw)
      Nitrites (hot dogs, bacon, lunch meat, etc.)
      Sulfites
      Avocado
      Fermented or pickled foods
      Yeast, protein extracts, freshly baked yeast products
      Onions
      Nuts, peanut butter
      Dairy products, yogurt, sour cream
      Aspartame
      Mold/mildew
      Bright lights/loud noises
      Perfumes and strong scents
      Skipping or delaying meals
      Missing sleep
      Hormonal Changes (period/menopause)
      Oral contraceptives/hormone replacement therapy
      Weather conditions, barometric changes, cold and/or dry weather
      High altitude
      Time or time zone changes/jet lag

      Stress is not a trigger exactly, but in the same way that stress won't =cause= a cold, if you're stressed, it can often be a contributing factor.

      There are a lot of different medications that will help to prevent migraines. You and your doctor can work together to find the right single medication or combination of meds that will help. Or, unfortunately, there may not be anything that will prevent your migraines totally (this happens to be how it works with me).

      There are also "abortive" drugs called triptans - seven in all. Imitrex, which is all over the television, is one of them. Different ones will often work for different people. If they work for you, they'll kick in at the beginning of a migraine, like magic, and like the commercials say, pretty much stop a migraine in its tracks. They work better for some than for others. They are NOT for some types of migraines (I can NOT use them myself, darnitall!) There are other types of abortive drugs that work well for other people. Not all abortives work for everyone, but, again, they're worth talking with your doctor about.

      As a last effort, there are pain meds, what I call my "rescue" meds or my "big guns". Mine are narcotic. Not all pain medications are. If you absolutely need them, they are a lifesaver - and as you've noticed, we know that there are definitely times that Excedrin Migraine and the like just do not cut it! *rueful grin*

      Exercise (the kind that suits you - not going out and going nuts), stress management and relaxation, getting plenty of sleep (form good sleeping habits), avoid missing meals, and (this is a big one!) discontinue smoking - will all help. Basically all those thing people talk about as healthy measures...as taking care of YOU!

      If you'd like to try vitamin supplements, they may well help as preventatives. Many migraineurs (folks who get migraines) take:

      Magnesium Oxide
      Vitamin B2
      Coenzyme Q10
      Calcium + Vitamin D
      (when taking supplemental magnesium, it's necessary to take extra calcium to keep them balanced)

      While the migraine is raging, you'll need to try things to see what best works for you. I see a lot of folks talk about cold cloths on their head or neck - I'll kill anyone that brings cold close to me, but it does help others. So cold OR WARMTH to the head or neck. Showers (sometimes - but others, no - the water hitting the head can be a problem other times). Soaky baths. A dark room. Soothing music or absolute silence.

      An urgent care clinic, if you get to the point you need pain medication, is better than an ER. You'll get seen faster, and you're more likely to be taken more seriously (I read a study in a National Headache Foundation newsletter a few years back about this, as so many of us are viewed as drug seekers, when all we're looking for

  23. QUESTION:
    Can a CT scan tell if a meningioma is benign?
    I recently had a CT scan (headaches) and my neurologist said I have 2 small benign meningiomas in my right frontal lobe. How can he look just at the scan and tell they are benign without running any kind of tests? Is that possible?

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with a golf ball sized tuberculum sellae meningioma 3 years ago and had surgery 2 weeks after diagnosis. All of my tumor was removed and I have had no regrowth.

      The only way to know for sure the grade (benign or malignant) of any tumor, or to even identify the type of tumor definitely is by running pathology tests on the tumor tissue, which can only be done after surgical removal of all or part of the tumor.

      A CT scan or MRI can give a "probable" diagnosis. My CT scan was read by one radiologist who diagnosed my "lesion" as an aneurysm. I had the same CT scan read by another radiologist who said it was a "probable meningioma". I then had an MRI done and had a more precise diagnosis of a meningioma, but still it was not definite until after surgery.

      Approximately 80% of meningiomas are classified as benign, 10-20% are atypical (benign but showing aggressive growth), only 1-2% of meningiomas are malignant.

      Since most of them are benign, that is not to say they don't cause health issues. My meningioma was attached to my optic nerves and was wrapped around the internal carotid artery. If it had not been discovered and surgically removed, I would have gone blind and it would have slowly cut off the blood supply to my brain.

      The first answerer made a valid point about hormones. Hormonal fluctuations can cause meningiomas to grow, but only IF the tumor has hormone receptors. Again that is only determined by pathology testing. My tumor did not have hormone receptors and would have continued to grow, regardless of my age. His comment that meningiomas shrink after menopause is a joke I hope. I have been in contact with about 150 other meningioma survivors and 3 people who have died from the affects of meningiomas in the last three years. I have never heard of a meningioma shrinking, except through some form of radiation treatment.

      I would suggest that you consult with a neurosurgeon to get another opinion whether you need surgery or not. The best chance of having complete surgical removal is to have it when the tumor is smaller and not causing neurological problems. Frontal lobe tumors are known to cause seizures and other symptoms.

      http://www.abta.org/siteFiles/SitePages/1411809F1680108B31F43BBC86A81F3B.pdf
      This is a link to American Brain Tumor Assoc. literature on meningiomas.

      http://www.meningiomamommas.com/
      This is a link to a wonderful online support group for people affected by meningiomas.

      Good luck. Please email me if you have any questions for me.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for me(teenager) to go through menopause?
    I have all the symptoms:
    No periods(only got 3 periods in my entire life) havent had one in 10 months
    Headaches almost every morning
    Night sweats
    Nausea almost every day
    No appetite
    Mood swings( lots of sadness and irritability)
    Feeling cold all the time
    Weakness
    Exhaustion(after doing very little exercise)

    • ANSWER:
      I know a woman who went into menopause in her late 20's after having 4 children. That was a very odd circumstance.
      I don't know what your diet is, but malnutrition can cause you to not have periods.
      Some of these symptoms also sound like it could be depression ( mood swings, no appetite, exhaustion)
      What you need to do is go and see your doctor. They know you and can help you with your health questions.
      As an outright answer to your question: No, I do not think that you are going through menopause.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to feel tired before getting your period?
    I get different kinds of symptoms before my period starts all the time. I got it when I was 13. When I was 14 or 15 I started getting cramps before it, then when I was 17 I started to get headaches before it too.

    I just started feeling sleepy. Is that because of my period or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Can be, Fatigue is a typical PMS symptom. I sleep really deep right before my cycle and dream really vividly. Go figure. You can also get headaches, as you said, fluid retention, irritability, swollen glands, night sweats-no wait, that's menopause. Wait til your 40's. Best of both worlds, sigh!
      Anyway pick up a box of those menstrual relief products at your local drugstore and read what it says it relieves. That will give you a pretty good list of PMS symptoms.

  26. QUESTION:
    My doctor just told me that I tested positive for meopause what next?
    I am only 39 but tested positive for menopause (as in done with it), are there any extra health concerns I will have b/c I am younger than normal?
    Actually, I have already been through all of those for several years, my doctor said judginf by the levels from my blood test I am done with the whole process.

    • ANSWER:
      no, there is no higher chance that you could get any illnesses/diseases etc, because puberty/menstrual cycle/menopause uses its own set of hormones - oestrogen, progesterone, LH and FSH.
      anyway, there are no higher chances or higher health risks.

      however, you will start seeing some symptoms of menopause such as headaches, periods stopping, hot flushes, fatigue, swetaing, nausea etc. but its is just the menopause.

      xxx

  27. QUESTION:
    Now I need to find out numerous symptoms on menopause. So what are 10 symptoms of menopause?
    I need 10 symtoms of menopause and what they do to the body.

    Thanks Lori

    • ANSWER:
      There is a site with 35 (!!!) symptoms of menopause:

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling (see note)
      2. Irregular heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido (see note)
      8. Dry vagina (see note)
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      15. Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression (see note)
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain (see note)
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odor
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      30. Tingling in the extremities (see note)
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, change in breath odor
      33. Osteoporosis (after several years)
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing,' buzzing etc.

      Do I get extra credit LOL?

  28. QUESTION:
    Can menopause hormonal changes cause warts and can they be cancerous?
    I have had increasing hot flashes, arm pain in both arms, slight headache and nausea. Suddenly a wart appeared on my toe. It appears to be a verucca. It is being removed next week but it continues to grow. The doc took an xray and it is not boney material and is not attached to the bone thank goodness

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it can!

      Good luck!

  29. QUESTION:
    I have frequent migraines and get 10mg of Nubian and 25mg of phenegrin shots. Is this bad for my body? ?
    I have these migraines often and I feel that the shots are the only thing that really knocks the headache. What are these shots doing to my body? Is this harmful in some way, vs. Imitrex or Maxalt?
    At home I have Lorcet, phengrin (pills and suppositories) Maxalt, and treximet. Are the shots better or worse than the pills?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Chick,

      Migraines are absolutely a pain! Which of the remedies you are using seems most helpful to you?

      My migraines stopped about the time of menopause. Before then I took Imitrex, which I understand can deaden your memory. I also took ativan, to keep calm and avoid triggering a migraine. That too can cause memory problems.

      Other things that helped me were walking, sleeping, warm baths, magnesium, and eating a potato or two plain.

      I've heard that the supplement shake Reliv gets rid of migraines within about five weeks. You can email me about this if you like.

      Best wishes to you and your mom!

  30. QUESTION:
    Can frequent headaches be a premenopausal symptom?
    In the last 3-4 years I have gotten headaches around the time I ovulate. This symptom went away obviously while I was pregnant and now that I am done breast feeding my daughter the headaches have come back with a vengeance. I do plan on asking my doctor about them....but I was just wondering...is this a premenopausal symptom?

    • ANSWER:
      Its very difficult to answer such a question. Headaches are not usually connected to menopause, but symptoms are very individual. In any case I would suggest seeing a neurologist about these headaches they might indicate a totally different medical problem, at least you will find out if it is something to worry about or not.

  31. QUESTION:
    what are some reasons for a lingering menstrual cycle?
    The last few months my cycle has been off.It will start and stop several times I am now going on day 11 of this stopping and starting (36 yrs old) Is this possibly the start of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends if it is just spotting or actually bleeding as to what it is. The main cause of spotting is blood coming from the cervix due to cervical erosion or a polyp. Neither of these things are dangerous, but can be easily sorted at the hospital in about 15 minutes under local anaesthetic.

      If it was the menopause you would likely have other symptoms reflecting the hormonal change such as vaginal dryness, hot flushes, even headaches.

      Any bleeding of this sort in a woman who has gone through puberty needs checking out so I think the best thing you can do is book and appointment with your GP/Gynie/Clinic and have a full check-up.

      Hope that helps and you get some answers soon!

  32. QUESTION:
    Heavy sweating in the middle of the night and headaches in the day?
    Lately I've been waking up twice in the middle of the night to find my bedsheets wet and my back and head drenched with sweat. And just like now, in the day, I have headaches and a very sore throat.

    Does anyone know what these symptoms could be?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Several things besides the temperature of your bedroom can spark night sweats. Make sure your doctor has rules out the most common cause chronic infections such as tuberculosis, an infected heart valve, or AIDS; and tumors such as lymphomas and kidney or liver cancer. But not all causes are that serious. Using alcohol, aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen before bedtime can trigger sweating. (In women, night sweats are a common symptom of menopause.)

      People with tension headaches commonly report these symptoms:

      Pain is mild to moderate, constant band-like pain, pressure or throbbing.
      Pain affects the front, top, or sides of the head.
      Pain usually begins gradually, and often occurs in the middle of the day.
      Pain may last from 30 minutes to several days.

      Associated symptoms of tension headaches include:

      Headache upon awakening

      Difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep

      Chronic fatigue

      Irritability

      Disturbed concentration

      Mild sensitivity to light or noise

      General muscle aching

      All of the usual over-the-counter drugs (acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen) are quite effective in relieving headache.
      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

  33. QUESTION:
    Why are females more prone to headaches?
    A lot of girls I know are prone to headaches and carry Advil in their bags. I don't get why. I know a lot of guys don't really get headaches. is their a scientific explanation for why females are more prone to headaches than males? Or is this idea false and female and males are both equally prone to headaches?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormones.

      A bad headache is very common in the immediate pre-menstrual period - even migraines.

      Many women who get severe migraines find that they disappear after menopause.

      Ain't it great being a woman! Sometimes I think we keep the Midol and Advi people in business, just on a monthly bases!

  34. QUESTION:
    My periods lately are much lighter than I usually experience. Is this perimenopause?
    I have noticed that the past few months my periods are a little bit irregular as they sometimes start a few days earlier than anticipated, they are lighter, and last shorter than what I usually have. I also have been noticing more irritable moods and some brief blurry vision from out of nowhere. I'm wondering if I'm starting the transition into menopause...I'm 41 in case you're wondering.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.
      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  35. QUESTION:
    Why is it that when I get a headache and dizzy I also feel hot?
    Why is it that when I am dizzy and have a headache at the same time that I feel hot? i hate the dizziness the worst but don't know why i get hot also.

    • ANSWER:
      Can I assume from your avatar that you are a male, Tom? Depending on your age, you may be going through what is called male menopause. Don't be afraid. Menopause is commonly known as a process that happens to middle-aged women, however, it is very real that men will also go through the hormonal changes once they reach an older age. What you may be experiencing are called hot flashes. It is temporary. Don't worry. Be aware that there are also cases of pre-mature menopause, where one can encounter menopause at a very young age.

      The more likely answer is probably a fever or lack of hydration. If it doesn't stop, go see a doctor. Really. Best way to find out.

  36. QUESTION:
    What could cause a sudden burst of headaches ?
    I've never been a person to have headaches. I couldn't even remember the last time I had one up to about 2 weeks ago when I started getting them every day or every other day. Its a pretty common thing, right? I'm just wondering why all of a sudden this is happening. Any ideas? I'm not stressed about anything, either.. except maybe worried about this :P Haha

    thanks !! :)
    - ac♥

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes these could be caused by a sinus infection which may only present as head aches... these types are common with new allergies.

      If you are having any vision troubles that can always cause a head ache. Other things that could are large spikes in blood glucose, hormonal changes like pregnancy, breastfeeding or menopause, dental problems which have the pain shoot as a head ache rather than the teeth (very common), awkward sleep patterns and bad nutritional habits.

      For almost all headaches, the best thing to treat them with is to rub a fresh cut lime on your forehead. Limes contain an enzym which act much like the ingredients in that head on stuff. Either of these two things will get rid of the pain with out having to take a pill.

  37. QUESTION:
    Getting periods after one year at the age of 49 is normal during menupause?
    I am getting periods every month for three to four days and bleeding is neither very heavy nor very light. It's been three months after one years no periods. I feel normal but light headache one day before my periods. Is there anything serious that i need to check with DR.soon.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause does crazy things to your periods. This is one of the first signs of menopause. You may skip periods or they may occur closer together. Your flow may be lighter or heavier than usual. It's normal for menopause to occur any time from age 40 to 59.

  38. QUESTION:
    I have been menopasal for 3 years and I still get Migraines, Why?
    I have been menopausal for 3 years and still I get migraines! I read in many articles that when a women reah menopause their migraine decreases , I still get as before Why is that?

    • ANSWER:
      Long … but well worth the reading.

      Make the connection!

      I am a nurse with over 25 years experience in this area and I have seen a lot of people with various illnesses caused from chemicals and fragranced products as well as VOC’s in their homes, schools and workplace. This problem is growing as more and more chemicals are being introduced into the market and used on a daily basis.

      We are now seeing more and more children and adults with Chronic Headaches, Migraines, Asthma, Allergies, Hives, Eczema, sinus / respiratory illnesses and Hormone related disorders. I can not emphasize how important it is to educate yourself about MCS (do a web search for MCS) and the harm you may be doing to your health by using chemicals and fragranced products.

      If you or a loved one suffers from Asthma, Allergies, Autism, chronic headaches, reproductive problems, Migraines, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lupus or Fibromyalgia, you need to read further and learn about the signs and symptoms of MCS - Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

      Most doctors will not inform you about this because patients as a whole like to walk out of a doctors office with a prescription for some magical medicine and they do not want to be told that their expensive new perfume or newly installed carpet may be the culprit. So, the doctor will give you medications and many of these meds either do not work or cause other health problems.

      Chemicals and fragranced products are often the root of all evil when it comes to your health. Many of the below mentioned items are common triggers to sinus, asthma, itching, headaches, Migraines and allergy problems amongst other health issues. Get rid of them and your lungs will thank you and you will breathe easier.

      And, it is not only personal body or cleaning products causing havoc on your health….many people become ill after wearing brand new clothing, dry-cleaned clothes, installing new carpet, painting, buying a new mattress or after home renovations because of the Flame Retardants, Benzenes, Formaldehydes, etc. used in these products. So the answer is NO, you are not imagining that 2 weeks after your home, office or classroom got renovated you started to become ill, get dizzy or have headaches. This is happening more and more these days and adults as well as children are becoming sicker and sicker.

      Unfortunately, too many doctors compound the problem by prescribing chemical medications to try to alleviate the symptoms of an already chemical overloaded body and they rarely tell the patient to eliminate the chemical offenders. How many times have I seen people in the grocery store with Bounce, Glade Plug-Ins and Febreeze in their shopping cart along with a bottle of Benadryl , Migraine Excedrin and a box of Allergy Tablets ? Why don’t they make the connection?

      Keep in mind that your skin is the largest organ of your body and what you put on your skin gets absorbed into your body. Then ... well... then it has to be filtered by your organs which are already working real hard.

      BIG NO-NO’s ---- I would SERIOUSLY recommend removing all of the below from your living / working area.

      No Bounce or dryer sheets - these are VERY toxic
      No Febreeze - your pets will even thank you for this
      No Glade Plug-ins - VERY toxic
      No Scented candles
      No Scented Dish Detergents
      No Fragranced Products on Body, Hair or Clothing
      No Smoke
      No Newspapers and Magazines - The ink is a huge irritant.
      No Dander
      No Sprays
      No Sharpies (marker pens)
      New Cartpeting, mattresses, paint, contain toxins that can trigger severe respiratory disorders as well as headaches and Asthma flare-ups.

      You will certainly want to read this article on how chemicals and fragrances affect your health.
      http://members.aol.com/enviroknow/perfume/EHPscents.htm

      And remember, it is NOT the smell it is the Chemicals that make up the smell. So, even if something is "Fragrance Free" these products often mask the smell with another chemical ! There are plenty of safe healthy products out there that work well and do not have added chemical fragrances. Look on MCS sites if you need help finding them.

      More and more workplaces & schools are creating “Fragrance Free Zones”… why do you think this is? Make the connection, your lungs , immune system and your general health will thank you.

      Are you wondering why you get Migraines or headaches?
      Look here.
      Here is a Brain Spect Scan Before and after a whiff of perfume: http://www.ourlittleplace.com/spect.html

  39. QUESTION:
    I need an answer for menopausal dizziness?
    I am 50 years old and am suffering terribly with dizziness a muffled head, nausea and headaches. I can live with them all apart from the dizziness. It is starting to effect my job and life. I have spoken to the doctor several times about it but to no avail. I have been on HRT for 6 months.

    • ANSWER:
      You are probably on the wrong form of HRT for you. I suffered terribly during 2010 to the point where I thought I was either going mad or had some sort of incurable brain disease. I changed my GP in June last year and then in August and September I had a succession of bladder infections and memory problems that came to a head when I made a mistake and lost an important contract (I am self employed). My sister and her daughter told me to go to my GP and ask for a referral to a good gyanecologist (if you are in the UK it is Mr Ruperelia at Droitwich Spa Hospital) who specialises in menopause. He changed my HRT also prescribed a vaginal oestrogen cream and I have never looked back, the difference is incredible. I have had to pay private fees to see him as he is retired from NHS work but it has been worth every penny as I now have my life back.

      Go back to your GP and insist on a referral.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have so many period-related aches and pains when you are in your 40's?
    During the week before my period starts, my whole body just feels terrible. I have migraines, joint pain, pains all over the place, on the left abdomen and right abdomen, pain where my ovaries probably are, pain down the middle of my abdomen - don't know whether that's my colon or my uterus, back pain, other muscle pain, headaches, I feel extremely fatiqued, etc. I am so tired of having all these pains all over the place and I can't pinpoint their causes. I am 43 years old, I have three pretty big fibroids, and extremely bad periods. I also have carpal tunnel, which gets worse during this time too. Right now I don't have any insurance, so I can't go to a doctor unless it's the ER. That just makes any problem I have feel so much worse, because I just imagine what's going on in there and get worried. I graduate from college next winter and hopefully will get a job quickly and then have insurance. Am I being a mid-life hypochondriac? Are there any herbal remedies for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Welcome to the wild world of peri-menopause! There could be something seriously wrong with you, but you may have trouble getting a doctor to investigate if you just provide the above list. It sounds all too normal to me! I'm almost 46 and the last few years have been worse than adolescence. I have two suggestions for you.

      1. Try to find out if the fact that you are miserable for the 1.5 weeks around your period, but ok the rest of the time (?), makes it more or less likely that there is something seriously wrong.

      2. In case it is perimenopause, get a book! The one that worked for a friend of mine, and helped me as well, is Menopause Without Medicine. My friend read it cover to cover and the herbal remedies and diet really helped her. I read parts of it and it helped me, also, though not as dramatically as her.

      Good luck, hope you feel better and "grow" out of it. That's what I'm hoping for!!!

  41. QUESTION:
    Does having 2 migraines mean you will have them for the rest of your life?
    I'm 16 years old, never had a problem with headaches or my health until a month and a half ago, when I had my first migraine. I got another one earlier this week but I have no family history of migraines at all. Why did they start now? And what are the chances I'll have them for the rest of my life?

    • ANSWER:
      You may not ever have another one, or you may continue to get them. It depends what your trigger is. You should check with a doctor if you get another one.

      Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.

      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.

      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can produce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke, can also trigger migraines.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraine attacks in some individuals, as can jet lag.

      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.

      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.

      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines.

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes

  42. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of a migraine?
    I've been to my doctor about migraines before, but I don't have insurance and can't afford the medicine.

    What are some good home rememdies for it?

    I've tried lying in the dark, quiet, with a cool cloth over my eyes. I have now had this particular headache for four days.

    Please help!
    I guess I forgot to say that I have tried Extra Strength Tylenol, Excedrin Migraine, Aleve, Advil, and Ibuprofen. None of these work. They only dull the headache for few hours.

    I have also tried sleep. I stayed in bed all day yesterday. When I wake the headache is still there.

    Come on PPL I said HOME remedies, not other meds. Read the question plz!
    OH and one more thing, I've had migraines since the age of 6. I can go a full year without one, and then go a whole month with one. ITs very strange.

    • ANSWER:
      I feel your pain..literally. I have had migraines for nearly 40 years. I know the meds are expensive but they are the only thing that will stop one dead in its tracks. Maybe you can check out free clinics or ask the doctors office for samples. If you can recognize the onset and get to a dark, quiet room immediately you may stop or reduce one. Also submerging your hands in as hot a bowl of water as you can stand without burns can help. It causes the blood to rush to the hands and away from the head, keep your hands submerged up to the wrists for as long as possible. Also try a 'migraine log'. write down everything you ate or did immediately before a headache starts. That may help you to recognize triggers to avoid. And be sure to ask the doctor about samples or free Rx from the drug company programs. Good luck. If you are a female, one good thing about getting older is the migraines do decrease after menopause...lol....

  43. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have a headache even when you are asleep? could it be a symptom of menopause?
    I am 44, could I be going through menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok these other people have been a little rude but what I want to know is how do you know you have a headache if you are asleep? If you are having abnormal headaches enough to concern you talk to your doctor.

  44. QUESTION:
    I am 26 years old and for the last 3 months i have been getting constant hotflashes , blurred vision, headache
    dizzyness, extreme fatigue, depression, and breast tenderness. I have been on yasmin 28 for years and recently switched to seasonique ( which is a 3 month treatment with menstrual cycles every 3 months.) But what is puzzling is the symptoms were occurring way before my switching the pills. Is there a possibility that i am going through menopause? What is wrong with my body>? Are there certain vitamins or herbals or even other meds that can cause these uncomfortable side effects or maybe some that might even help diminish them>?

    • ANSWER:
      Women can go on the menopause as early as 16, so go see your doctor to see what is up. It is more likely to be something else causing this. Maybe a problem with your hormones, perhaps you're pregnant, or there is something wrong with your ovaries and so you are not getting enough oestrogen. See your doctor!

  45. QUESTION:
    I have headaches sometimes right when I start to eat and it doesn't go away after I finished the meal.?
    It is becoming more frequent. I had pasta with veggies and garlic bread and cheese. And I'm not allergic to anything. The headaches like I said mostly start right when I begin to eat and usually don't go away till I fall asleep. What's wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      The headaches could be migraines. You may not have an allergy, but there could be foods that are triggering your headaches. Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.

      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.

      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can produce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke, can also trigger migraines.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraine attacks in some individuals, as can jet lag.

      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.

      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.

      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines.

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes
      http://www.headaches.org/educational_modules/completeguide/migraine2.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/headache/article.htm
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes

  46. QUESTION:
    Am i just getting continous headaches or is something wrong?
    I get headaches 4-5 days a week. The mild normal headaches are in the back lower part of my head. The ones that hurt really bad and make me very light and noise sensitive are on the left side of my head above my ear. It used to just be really bad headaches but now there is a continuos pain there, It doesnt hurt really bad but is ccnsisently painful and never goes away. Anyone know if this is just a headache or migraine? Thank you very much!.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like a migraine. Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes in women. Fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, when they have a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications — such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy — also may worsen migraines, though some women find it's beneficial to take them.

      Foods. Some migraines appear to be triggered by certain foods. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; aged cheeses; chocolate; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; salty foods; and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. Stress at work or home can instigate migraines.

      Sensory stimuli. Bright lights and sun glare can produce migraines, as can loud sounds. Unusual smells — including pleasant scents, such as perfume, and unpleasant odors, such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke, can also trigger migraines.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern. Either missing sleep or getting too much sleep may serve as a trigger for migraine attacks in some individuals, as can jet lag.

      Physical factors. Intense physical exertion, including sexual activity, may provoke migraines.

      Changes in the environment. A change of weather or barometric pressure can prompt a migraine.

      Medications. Certain medications can aggravate migraines.

      Check here for more information.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/migraine-headache/DS00120/DSECTION=causes

  47. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest that women starts to go through the?
    change of life. I am 36. I think I might be going through it. I guess other people call it menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  48. QUESTION:
    does pre menopause cause migraines and fatigue?
    I am 43 years old and recently have begun to have headaches before and during my cycle. I am also having hot flashes nightly and I am always tired.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it can. My wife started getting migraines when she started into menopause.

  49. QUESTION:
    How to help migraine headaches?
    My mom has had headaches since she was 13. he's been to the doctors and specialists, but no one knows whats causing them. She's tried those little needle things all over her body, and a whole bunch of other stuff.
    I was wondering if anyone knew of anything that would help calm them down or take them away for a while.

    no cutting off her head isn't a suggestion.
    She has a headache every day. food has nothing to do with it. we've tried that.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had migraines since i was 14. Mine are not caused by food either. Mostly they are menstrual but other things trigger them i have learned as well. Stress is a major trigger as well as too much alcohol. A major factor you mother should have checked possibly is menopause.

      Currently i am being treated with a beta-blocker i take daily (75mg of Atenolol) and for onset of a migrain i take Frova. It's in the family of tripitan's. There are other preventative medications out now that are excellent and preventing them before they start...like Topamax. I agree with the member that suggested a Neurologist. They will help her get on the right path with medications and help her maintain her success and pain management.

      The medications i take do not knock me out. They help squash the migraine before it gets bad and i can go on about my day without being effected.

      I hope this helps your mother!!

  50. QUESTION:
    Why do I get PMS feelings even though I am Menopausal at 55 yrs. old . What to do to stop this?
    Every month I get the PMS headaches and feeling of coming on a period, even though I don't bleed. What is up? Will this ever end. I need to hear from people out there with similar concerns. My head is heavy now.

    • ANSWER:
      It is about your menopause and you low hormones, maybe due to your body going crazy of the decrease of hormones, you have a very low level of prostaglandines, giving you this sympthoms. Prostaglandines are the guilty one for pms and period pains.
      Don´t worry, it is normal and you dont´have to go to your doctor for it.
      -Eat tofu it is has progesterone that can help you.
      -Exercise
      -Try to take few red meat
      -Take flaxx seed everyday it has omegas that help you with postaglandines, it lows the levels.

      Herbs
      There is growing evidence that some herbal remedies may help alleviate menopausal symptoms. The most commonly used herbal remedies for menopausal symptoms are black cohosh, St.-John's-wort, valerian, ginseng, dong quai, and evening primrose oil.

      Reducing your intake of caffeine helps in menopause relief as well. Herbal teas, and using onion, garlic and lemon instead of salt should help as well. One study at UCLA noted that garlic halted the advance of heart disease in post-menopausal women

      Flax Seed's Benefits Contribute to Menopause Symptom Relief
      A flood of recent flax seed research underscores the benefits flax seed has on healthful living. The idea isn't new. Specifically, scientists, nutritionists and physicians studying menopause have determined that the high fiber and lignan content of flax seed products can offer natural menopause treatment. Products supplied by North American Nutrition can have a large impact on menopause, along with a preventative role concerning certain cancers.

      Good luck! ;D

      Good luck! ;D


headaches and menopause

Menopause And Anger

[STARTPOSTCONTENT][POSTCONTENT][ENDPOSTCONTENT]

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How old were you when you went through menopause?
    How old were you when you went through menopause, how long did it last for, and what emotional & physical effects did you experience?

    • ANSWER:
      I was 48 when I went through menopause. I did my best with her and shrugged off a lot of things she said in anger. Luckily I had quick reflexes and when she threw a planter at me I was able to sidestep it as it smashed into the floor. Fortunately I have no physical effects but she sure tried to give me a few. It only lasted a couple of years for me. It may have lasted longer but she died from emphysema and that ended my menopause problems.

  2. QUESTION:
    My friend is being irrational and attacked me. How do I deal with it? - Might be menopause?
    My best friend is an older lady (52) who is likely to be going through menopause.
    Last night she attacked me for absolutely no reason and I don't know how to deal with it now.

    She has menopause symptoms in general but has not been told (by any doctor) she's experiencing it.

    I can't find any logical explanation for her behavior so I need to know what to do.
    If it's menopause she can't help it and I guess I need to be patient.
    I can't be 100% sure that's the problem though and it doesn't change the fact that she has (and probably will) attack me irrationally.

    It's like I have lost (or am losing) my best friend and that's really hard for me to deal with.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be menopause, or it could be something else stressful or traumatic in her life at the moment that you don't know about. Obviously you shouldn't put up with any abuse so try not to put yourself in a position where she could do something that you both regret. Maybe limiting the amount of time you see her for would help, make it say 20 mins before she has the chance to build up any steam/anger, hopefully she will miss your company and act more rationally when you start spending more time together again :)

  3. QUESTION:
    menopause question were you prescribed anti depressants during the menopause?
    were you depressed? or was it just a case that depression is a symptom of the menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      There are as many symptoms or ramifications of menopause as there are for periods, none of which are good and of which depression is but one. Others include chronic insomnia, hot flushes, hair loss, vaginal dryness, amorphia (extreme skin itchiness because you feel like you've got ants crawling all over you), memory retention problems, panic attacks, severe mood swings and extreme anger/agression, etc. etc.

      I deeply envy those fortunate women who breeze through menopause without a single problem.

      Many women do suffer from severe depression during menopause and there's certainly nothing wrong with properly prescribed anti-depressants to get you through the worst. The problem with these though is that they can literally become a habit that you simply can't live without, even when menopause if over (they don't call them "happy pills" for nothing!).

      Instead of anti-depressants, HRT (hormone replacement therapy) is worth serious consideration (unless of course you are simply not able to take this because of breast cancer, etc.).

      Is there any reason why you don't take HRT? Have you talked to your doctor about this, and in particular, canvassed with him or her the possible benefits to you of HRT? A lot of doctors (particularly males ... funny thing that!) simply don't believe or really accept that menopause symptoms can be so severe and debilitating that they take over your life and make you crazy (after all, having even only a couple of the symptoms listed above is enough to make you chronically depressed!). Hence, many don't believe in the value of HRT and won't prescribe it. They also tend to give you lots of scary statistics about increased risks of breast/cervical cancer, heart attack, stroke, etc. to put you off wanting it.

      Whilst it's true that taking HRT does VERY SLIGHTLY increase these types of risks, the value you may get from it in terms of getting the quality of your life back can make it very worthwhile despite the risks.

      How do I know all this? Because I've been there and done that (and I mean every single one of those nasty symptoms listed above - yes, I had all of them!). HRT gave me back my life and continues to do so because I'm still on it. I even went off it once last year but within a week, all the symptoms started to return, so I very quickly went back to my doctor and told her I just had to have it back. She agreed - thank God!

      If HRT interests you, do some research before you visit your doctor to discuss it so that you can present a truly informed front to him/her. If you don't get a sympathetic hearing, find yourself another doctor.

      The bottom line here is that for 98% of women, there is absolutely no reason these days why they should have to suffer through menopause when there are therapies out there to help.

      Whatever you do, hope it works well for you.

  4. QUESTION:
    at what age can a woman start menopause?
    I am 43 years of age, my period hasn't started yet after my fourth daughter was born 13 months ago. I have over the past year or so having outbursts of anger and getting very frustrated with things, life etc and now over the past several weeks having these bouts of being hot. Can anyone help, explain what is happening to me please?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe you can actually start menopause as early as your late twenties, so at 43 its a definitely possibility. Did you breastfeed? That will delay your period. But with the hot flashes it sounds like menopause. Go to Amazon.com and look up books on the subject, check the reviews and read up on it. Then talk to you GYN. My doctor has a link with some info see below.

  5. QUESTION:
    Why does my mother continually become angry at the slightest difference in her kitchen?
    My mother's anger always seems to be over the edge when it comes to any mistakes made in the kitchen. She also seems to be hot all the time, turning down heaters. What is wrong with her?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't Know. There are a number of options but the most common and likely cause is the menopause.

  6. QUESTION:
    Do you feel like you are going crazy when you start menopause?
    What are some of the thing that help with menopause. My test came back that I was in menopause. And oh boy do I have anger and crying and feelings of going crazy. I also have anxiety disorder. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Just live your life as normal but extra sleep or naps in the afternoon it takes away anxiety and anger. Think of the joy you will feel never having your monthly tormentor again :-)

  7. QUESTION:
    Do you feel healthier once perimenopause is over and menopause is complete?
    Or is it even worse after menopause? (As far as mood swings, body aches, energy levels, anger at people). Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It's great! No mood swings, health good. Only left over problem is that I now live at a higher temperature than I did before - so I don't feel cold in winter! Get plenty of exercise, to ensure bones stay strong.

  8. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my mom with menopause?
    My mom is going through menopause and she is depressed and very irritable. I have a very bad temper and can't control my anger and can't help but show that I'm annoyed when she's miserable and cynical all the time. I know it's a hard time for her and I want to help her.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing. Hormones can't be controled during these times. Just be at her side, and listen and talk with her to maybe calm her down a bit?

  9. QUESTION:
    How do you put up with a woman going through menopause and already has anger issues?
    Okay my mother always has anger issues, but she will never admit it or try to control that. She's far too prideful for that. What's worse is she is going through menopause, and her mood swings are every day. I am in college now and decided to come home for the Thanksgiving break as I do not have class on Wednesday, and my professors of my Monday and Tuesday classes allowed us to submit any work online so we may come home early.

    I come home happy to see the family and my dad comes home from his merchant marine deployment. My mom and dad don't get along as they are going through some marital issues and so my mom takes it out on everyone else. She also does stupid things like blame her marital issues on my sister even though it is not my sister's marriage and my sister is not the one who is unwilling to talk things out with my dad. This morning for example, I was finishing up an online quiz, then she comes in kicks my door to make me open it even though it wasn't locked, then throws the laundry basket at me, takes my drink and pours it down the sink in the bathroom and tells me to straighten up my stuff. I told her I will but I just need to finish like three more questions as it was a timed quiz. She freaks out, tells us she disowns us and drives away. She normally yells but never does this. My aunt who is a nurse tells me she is going through her "menopausal rage stage".

    On the bright side maybe she won't be as irritable every month once this passes, but still, I am not tolerating this. If she was a man, and not my family I would have hit her in the throat by now. I am sick of her rage and I have been ever since I was a child.

    HOW DO YOU PUT UP WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS ANGER ISSUES AND GOING THROUGH MENOPAUSE?

    • ANSWER:
      I hate to say it, and you will not do it...nice you go home for the holidays...I think I would spend my holidays either alone or with friends..this is suppose to be a NICE time, if she asks you why you did not come over...tell her!!!!!! Say Mom you may not be aware of how angry you seem to be, I want to be there but, you make it kind of difficult, love you but...I can't take the emotional roller coaster.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do women get such drastic mood changes when their hormones change?
    My brother and his now ex-wife were using IVF and it messed up his wife's hormones and she became horrible to him and divorced him. The marriage was not great as it was, but her abuse came out when her hormones were changed. I have heard the same happens with menopause.
    Just curious as I am a guy and don't want to be bitter at a woman if she is being abusive through no fault of her own due to hormonal problems.
    Also, do hormonal problems cause mental illness?
    I certainly don't mean this as a sexist question or anything but just honestly wonder with my brother's divorce and with knowing menopause can cause this.

    • ANSWER:
      Well, the best way I can think to describe it, is if you have ever taken a mood alterng drug. Things that make you sleepy, or excited. You just can't handle an overdose of a hormone. Like dopamine is a happy hormone. Imagine an overload in your brain from this. Your brain will act differently because of this. Same with depression or anger. With a hormone overload, or even lack there of, it just becomes so difficult to sort out whats right or wrong.

      Like if you are sick, things tend to agitate you more. Loud noises hurt your ears, bright lights hurt your eyes, and so forth. Same with hormone changes. Things can just get out of control if it is sever enough. This will usually happen with women during menstraul cycle, menopause and pregnancy. All these add hormones to the body that can effect a womans emotions and moods

      I hope this answered your question! I'm sure it is very hard to ask a curious question without feeling like it is rude

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you know if your depressed?
    Everything makes me mad, i can't sleep at night, i have no appetite, i hate being around other people, and noises and sounds trigger my anger quickly.

    • ANSWER:
      The only real way to find out if you are really depressed is by going to a doctor and being diagnosed. But you do have symptoms of depresson. I'm slowly getting over depression and I can't sleep for more than 5 hours a night, only eat when I'm starving, I cry a lot and I feel like there's no hope.
      Those are just my symptoms; According to Mayo Clinic, these are their symptoms:
      ■Feelings of sadness or unhappiness
      ■Irritability or frustration, even over small matters
      ■Loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities
      ■Reduced sex drive
      ■Insomnia or excessive sleeping
      ■Changes in appetite — depression often causes decreased appetite and weight loss, but in some people it causes increased cravings for food and weight gain
      ■Agitation or restlessness — for example, pacing, hand-wringing or an inability to sit still
      ■Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements
      ■Indecisiveness, distractibility and decreased concentration
      ■Fatigue, tiredness and loss of energy — even small tasks may seem to require a lot of effort
      ■Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures or blaming yourself when things aren't going right
      ■Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things
      ■Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide
      ■Crying spells for no apparent reason
      ■Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches
      For some people, depression symptoms are so severe that it's obvious something isn't right. Others people feel generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why.

      Depression affects each person in different ways, so depression symptoms vary from person to person. Inherited traits, age, gender and cultural background all play a role in how depression may affect you.

      The causes could be:
      ■Biological differences. People with depression appear to have physical changes in their brains. The significance of these changes is still uncertain but may eventually help pinpoint causes.
      ■Neurotransmitters. These naturally occurring brain chemicals linked to mood are thought to play a direct role in depression.
      ■Hormones. Changes in the body's balance of hormones may be involved in causing or triggering depression. Hormone changes can result from thyroid problems, menopause and a number of other conditions.
      ■Inherited traits. Depression is more common in people whose biological family members also have the condition. Researchers are trying to find genes that may be involved in causing depression.
      ■Life events. Events such as the death or loss of a loved one, financial problems and high stress can trigger depression in some people.
      ■Early childhood trauma. Traumatic events during childhood, such as abuse or loss of a parent, may cause permanent changes in the brain that make you more susceptible to depression.

      And maybe, because you said everything makes you mad you might have Bi Polar Disorder.
      Symptoms of Bi-Polar are:
      ■Bipolar I disorder. Mood swings with bipolar I cause significant difficulty in your job, school or relationships. Manic episodes can be severe and dangerous.
      ■Bipolar II disorder. Bipolar II is less severe than bipolar I. You may have an elevated mood, irritability and some changes in your functioning, but generally you can carry on with your normal daily routine. Instead of full-blown mania, you have hypomania — a less severe form of mania. In bipolar II, periods of depression typically last longer than periods of hypomania.
      ■Cyclothymia. Cyclothymia is a mild form of bipolar disorder. With cyclothymia, hypomania and depression can be disruptive, but the highs and lows are not as severe as they are with other types of bipolar disorder.

      Bipolar disorder symptoms reflect a range of moods.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      The exact symptoms of bipolar disorder vary from person to person. For some people, depression causes the most problems; for other people manic symptoms are the main concern. Symptoms of depression and symptoms of mania or hypomania may also occur together. This is known as a mixed episode.

      Manic phase of bipolar disorder
      Signs and symptoms of the manic or hypomanic phase of bipolar disorder can include:

      ■Euphoria
      ■Extreme optimism
      ■Inflated self-esteem
      ■Poor judgment
      ■Rapid speech
      ■Racing thoughts
      ■Aggressive behavior
      ■Agitation or irritation
      ■Increased physical activity
      ■Risky behavior
      ■Spending sprees or unwise financial choices
      ■Increased drive to perform or achieve goals
      ■Increased sex drive
      ■Decreased need for sleep
      ■Inability to concentrate
      ■Careless or dangerous use of drugs or alcohol
      ■Frequent absences from work or school
      ■Delusions or a break from reality (psychosis)
      ■Poor performance at work or school
      Depressive phase of bipolar disorder
      Signs and symptoms of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder can include:

      ■Sadness
      ■Hopelessness
      ■Suicidal thoughts or behavior
      ■Anxiety
      ■Guilt
      ■Sleep problems
      ■Low appetite o

  12. QUESTION:
    Can anyone figure out what can cause these symptoms?
    Frequent mood swings, depression, lack of interest in most things, frequent bouts of uncharacteristic anger, aggressive thoughts, strong sense of hopelessness.

    I've got a lot of stress going on (My girlfriend is going through a lot of psychological problems right now, I'm rather unhappy at work, I'm saving up money to move across the country within the next few months to live with said girlfriend, I've overweight, and have minor blood pressure problems.) so I imagine that could be contributing all this, but I want to get a second opinion (Other than my own.)

    I also don't have insurance, otherwise I'd try to talk to a professional about it. Does anyone know what all those symptoms may be a sign of (If anything)?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Stress, depression and perhaps a hormonal imbalance - sounds like menopause to me - oh, wait, those are my issues....

      Just kidding. Your symptoms do sound like they are stress induced. Since you don't have any insurance you may want to start an exercise regimin - try walking for 1/2 an hour every morning. The exercise will not only help you get in shape, contribute to improving your blood pressure, but it also makes subtle changes to your body chemistry. You start to think more clearly and your disposition improves. Get an adequate amount of sleep too. Being sleep deprived makes you eat more and can make you moody and irritable.
      Take good care of yourself so you can take good care of her - which brings us to another subject. Are you positive you want to move?

  13. QUESTION:
    Why dont most doctors or employers understand about endo and how do people cope with work and home life?
    Anyone out there who has endo + is in MEGA pain 90% of the month will understand this.I am being put on different medication every couple of months + having side affects to them and then taking more medication for the side affects.u go in to the doctors + say you need stronger pain killers + they ask u to lay on the bed while they poke at your abdominal area.Where it hurts anyway + they make it worse.They give u pain killers + send u packing.These pain killers more aless knock u out + then u have to go to work.A full time job that u need to pay ur bills.Then u walk in + ur employer says u look ill but they wont let u go home cause u have already had previous days off due to being so tired.u sit at ur desk in pain + some how manage to get through the day.Its home time u get home it takes double the time to get home due to pain or being drugged up + then u are to tired to eat or do anything + then just sleep.does any1 know of a endo specialist in the SE. Sorry about the anger.

    • ANSWER:
      Re: the above...masturbation does not help Endometriosis in any way; neither does orgasm, use of tampons, pregnancy, intercourse during menses, hysterectomy, or menopause. Those are misguided notions.

      In any event, moving on to your post. I totally understand your frustration and pain, and you are not alone with this disease. The first thing to do is find a support network, as suggested above. There is a phenomenal group of over 3,000 others from around the globe located at http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/erc. You can also find local, in person groups under the umbrella of the free research, education and support organization listed above (http://www.endocenter.org).

      The key to managing Endo successfully is to have it truly removed. Not just laser ablated or vaporized or suppressed temporarily by Lupron and other hormonal ilk, but truly removed through excision. To learn about excision, visit http://www.centerforendo.com, http://www.endometriosistreatment.org, http://www.drcook.com and http://www.endoexcision.com. Maybe one of those specialty treatment centers for Endo will be close enough for you to travel to for treatment, as is often necessary with this poorly understood and debilitatingly painful disease.

      Good luck and remember you are not alone.

  14. QUESTION:
    49 and I am 11 days late with my periods?
    I am not sexually involved with men so I am not pregnant.What are some things that could be causing this.
    People say not to stress out about it but I have things to do and just cant do them do to bloating,pain,anger,irritable and so on.
    Is this what I have to look forward to at my age : ( Anything I can do to induce them.
    Thanks in advance.
    Also energy level way down.I could sleep all day if I let myself.

    • ANSWER:
      You could be getting close to meopause? Or if you stress a lot, it might cause the delayed period, or a combination of the two.
      If it bothers you so much, I think you should see your doctor, irregular period at your age is not healty, unless it is in fact menopause.

      Good luck:)

  15. QUESTION:
    What engineers ANGER in the history of human ANATOMY and what are the relevant remedies?
    Anwers with elaborate explaination needed please.

    • ANSWER:
      Anger is an emotional response to a grievance; real or imagined; past, present or future. Rage refers to an extreme degree of anger associated with a loss of calmness or discipline (in the case of human conduct).

      Often based in a sensation or perception of threat, anger can be considered an emotional component in the increased threat response (part of the broader "stress response") whereby the charged emotional state produces physiological effects (increased adrenaline, cortisol), thereby producing behavioural effect of heightened stress and aggression.

      Anger may be "provoked" (or triggered) by perceived threats, like conflict, or by abstract concepts such as injustice.

      There are many physical conditions that increase the potential for one to become angry. Common contributors to irritability include fatigue, hunger, being in pain, sexual frustration, recovery from an illness, or the use of certain drugs. Other causes are hormonal changes, such as those associated with PMS, giving birth, and menopause, physical withdrawal, and bipolar disorder. Research also shows that some individuals can be genetically predisposed to higher levels of anger.

      A practical explanation of the components of anger:

      The behavior that manifests and the physiological state (or sequence of physiological events that occur) when (1) An individual attributes to another person/organization/object a source of pain/deprivation (present or anticipated), and (2) Chooses behaviors (physical or cognitive) to stop or oppose it.

      The key here is the choice to oppose the source of the pain. Without opposition, we would be left with fear behaviors (running away in the face of pain, for example). The pain/deprivation does not have to be a physical pain/threat, it can be emotional pain or abstract (i.e. being lied to, or political, such as the compromise of democratic values).

      The source of pain can be directed at objects (i.e., the Universe, God, a low hanging branch). Because there is pain, however, does not mean anger is necessarily present (for example, bumping a nose into a glass pane, and feeling embarrassed).

      The 'opposition' to pain does not have to be physically visible. The person can simply think "I want this to stop," or "I am against this." An example of an observable behavioral measure could be attempts to verbally communicate one's pain (often in a loud voice).

      Humans often exhibit anger behaviors empathically. For example, reading an article about a minority experiencing racism. We are not the victim, per se.

      Anger is usually magnified and extended in time when a cognitive decision is made about the intent of the individual (or organization or object) attributed to causing the pain. In other words, if we decide the pain/deprivation was intentional, "deliberate," the emotion is usually more intense.

  16. QUESTION:
    How can someone be Anti-Gay Marriage but Pro-Divorce?
    If marriage is so sacred why should anyone be allowed to end one. Wouldn't that greatly anger God?

    • ANSWER:
      If people were truly concerned about "the sanctity of marriage", they would press for laws against adultery and divorce--say 4 months in jail for each instance of philandery and two years for a divorce.

      If marriage were truly about childbearing and -rearing, women past menopause wouldn't be permitted to marry, and fertility tests would be required before a license could be issued.

      Since nobody is pressing for such regulations, I submit that those are not the real reasons that so many oppose gay marriage.

      Perhaps there is another reason that nobody wants to bring up in debate....

  17. QUESTION:
    if im going through menopause and having headaches what can i take to relieve them?
    i think im going throught menoupause and have a headache most every day not every day what i can take to relieve them.

    • ANSWER:
      HEADACHE

      There are several types of headaches, several potential causes, including Infection, dental problems, stress, or allergies.
      certain foods such as (aged cheese, red wine), fasting or skipping meal too much or too little sleep, emotional changes (stress, anxiety, anger, excitement), and environmental changes (noise, bright lights, triggers headaches. it varies from person to person and can operate at different times. Studies suggest that hormones has a role in headaches. Women at increased risk for hormonal headaches during menopause.
      what you can do is...
      you need a lot of sleep, avoid stressors, eat a well balanced diet and relax.
      ping me at pea_ester if you want to ask about pms. i am writing a book about that.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are some ways you get rid of depression?
    I have been depressed lately. That is not usually like me. I was wondering what advice you could give me to get rid of it without medication.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There are many ways you can overcome depression that work very well. The most important thing to remember is that you can control your thoughts and feelings. You can learn to change habitual thoughts and feelings that bring on the moods of depression.

      One of the best ways to combat depression is to stay active. Find activities that you enjoy and seek out new interest. People are usually depressed when they have nothing to do. Get active in your community, join a bowling league, take a class at your local community college, volunteer your time to an organization, or take up a new hobby such as stamp collecting or crocheting. Busy yourself with things you enjoy doing.

      Be positive! When life lets you down, make a list of the good things in your life. Even the small ones count. The list can include such things as your family, your friends, your job, your back yard, your health, and even your ability to grill or cook. List items that you are good at doing. You may think grilling a steak to perfection is no big deal, but I have no idea how to grill a steak without it being leather. So, that is a feat to be proud of. On this list put every little thing. Now, when you feel depression coming on, take out this list and read it over and over again. This may help you with your self worth.

      Do not let others cause your depression! You can allow others to hurt your emotions, or anger you and this can also bring on depression. Remember the person that is negative is not you! Do not let their moods influence your emotions. So, what they don't like your shirt, they don't like the way you cooked breakfast, or they have some other complaint. You like your shirt, you enjoyed breakfast, and their complaints are just that, complaints without any merit. I am not saying to ignore others, but don't let them drag you down.

      Don't sit around by yourself! Being alone and idle can bring on major bouts of depression. Everyone enjoys having others around whether in a small group, one on one, or big social functions. Get out in the world. Find like minded friends and family to occupy those times.

      If you are still having problems with depression and just can't seem to rid your life of these feelings it would be advisable to visit your doctor. There could be a medical reason that is causing your depression such as prescribed medicines, menopause, or other illnesses.

      GOOD LUCK TO YOU!!

  19. QUESTION:
    when do the mood swings start after the operation in the age of 35?
    hot flashes, anger, short of temper

    • ANSWER:
      I don't have any medical background - my answer is based on having 5 sisters, all in various stages of menopause, a partner Sassy who recently came off hormone replacement therapy, and my having wrestled a bit with night sweats - so we've tried a few remedies.

      For what it's worth, Sassy found a silver bullet for her hot flashes & mood swings - venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor). It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms; many doctors aren't even aware of that use for the drug. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may work for you too. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary (it caused a dry mouth as a side effect for Sassy) - or it may not work at all.

      Herbs are another way to treat symptoms, but note that herbs come in two flavors when it comes to treating the symptoms of menopause, phytoestrogenic and non-estrogenic. This answer is already getting a bit long, so rather than copying and pasting the entire bit, I'll just refer you to the web site below. There's also information there about small fans (regular and misting), wicking pajamas & bedsheets for night sweats, etc. - other ways to treat the hot flashes.

      BTW, you wrote about having had an operation. You may find a chuckle if you go to the web site below and read the humorous story linked to "head trauma" ;-) Hope you find relief!

  20. QUESTION:
    What causes a girl to act the way they do when they go through their period?
    im just wondering, im a boy and i have no expierence. Im just curios.

    • ANSWER:
      Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) refers to uncomfortable physical and mental symptoms that occur before the onset of the woman’s menstrual period. Estimates of affected women range from 40 to 80%. About 5% of women experience symptoms that cause them severe impairment. PMS may start at any time during the years that a woman menstruates. The peak occurrence is in the 20s and 30s. Once PMS begins, the symptoms often continue until menopause.

      About 150 separate symptoms have been documented, but it is unlikely that any one woman will have all of them. The symptoms can be divided into three general categories.

      Changes in Mood or Anxiety

      Depression
      Irritability
      Anger
      Tearfulness
      Increased emotional reactivity
      Changes in sexual desire
      Anxiety
      Exacerbation of existing psychiatric condition

      Changes in Attention

      Forgetfulness
      Confusion
      Difficulty staying on task
      Prone to accidents

      Physical Changes

      Breast tenderness
      Feeling bloated
      Swelling in arms and legs
      Migraine
      Back pain
      Difficulty sleeping
      Changes in energy level
      Nausea

  21. QUESTION:
    How can my hair go from straight o curly?
    Okay I have loooong dark thick hair & its naturally straight and never gets frizzy or anything, doesnt curl or nothing like that..
    But over the summer my hair become like really really curly & it now gets frizzy right after I get outta the shower..
    How could this have happen?
    I did not get any kind of perm

    • ANSWER:
      hmmmmm i know that when my hair when from stick straight to the damn frizzy fro that I currently get straigthen it was because of a hormone shift in my body. But that happened for me in puberty....so unless you are a teenager surging with a new influx of hormones or an older woman going through menopause it might be a good idea to talk with your doctor about any possible problems. Of course, if you have started taking a medication with hormones in it that could also be the problem.

      Then there is the train of thought that somehow you have angered the "gods" somehow and this is the way they have chosen to punish you (lol that is a joke btw)

  22. QUESTION:
    How can one deal with PMS and people?
    I am already short tempered but near that time of the month my anger intensifies....my close friend has a thing for incessantly talking about her self (her views, her days, her adventures, blah blah blah). And she claims she's a "good listener." Sh'es also pretentious, thus we clash. I do admit she's very smart. Its overdoing it that's the problem.
    I come very close to erupting in swearing words.
    I also get more self-deprecative due to the bloating

    Any suggestions
    No, I'm into raising backyard poultry
    I also get jittery/negetive/confused/teary
    that fuels panic attacks

    • ANSWER:
      Uhm...go see your gyno. it sounds like you have pmdd not pms. Its common before menopause but my younger sister (16) has pmdd

      http://healthyplace.net/communities/depression/pmdd.asp

  23. QUESTION:
    What are normal Quit Smoking Symptoms after 4 months?
    I am 31 years old and after smoking for 17 years, I quit 4 months ago. Since then, I have had a sore throat, horseness, and it is very hard to breathe. I never had a problem with any of this before quitting. When does this end and is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Enzyme PhytoNutrient (EPN) complex is a patent-pending Enzyme PhytoNutrient from a plant source that provides Enzyme and saccharides necessary for optimal cellular communication. No combination of vitamins, minerals, amino acids or herbals can replace the necessary saccharides found in EPN. We believe that EPN will provide total Enzyme Supplementation.
      Protein and carbohydrates are chief components of the human body. For all of history, food has provided these building blocks; however, scientists are still learning the functions that specific nutritional food components play in this process. As recently as this century, benefits of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and phytochemicals were discovered.
      Enzyme-PhytoNutrients have been demonstrated to be effective in supporting the immune system. Studies were conducted to determine what the effects of PhytoNutrient dietary supplementation had on a variety of infections.
      There is evidence to suggest the PhytoNutrients molecules mediate most of the communication that occurs between the 100 trillion or so cells of the human body. Incomplete or poorly formed PhytoNutrient molecules can result in defective cell messages, which may have implications for immunity. Breast-fed infants are known to have an increased resistance to middle ear infections as well as other childhood illnesses. While human milk contains high concentrations of PhytoNutrients, animal milks vary in the combinations and amounts present. PhytoNutrients have been tested in:
      •Alcohol Craving
      •Anger Control
      •Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
      •Autistic Children
      •Behavior Modification
      •Benign Mucous Membrane Pemphigus
      •Candida Albicans
      •Canker Sores (Aphthous stomatitis)
      •Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
      •Cold Sores or Fever Blisters (Herpes labialis)
      •Coxsackle Viruses
      •Decrease the need for Medications
      •Depression
      •Diabetes Mellitus
      •Dyslexia (learning difficulties)
      •Enhanced Glutathione Levels
      •Fibromyalgia
      •Hepatitis C
      •Immune Function
      •Inflammation
      •Inflammatory Diseases of the Heart & Pancreas
      •Liver Enzyme Serum Changes
      •Lupus
      •Menopause
      •Myofacial Pain Syndrome
      •Oral Mucosal Disease
      •Osteo-Arthritis
      •Periodontal Disease (tooth loss)
      •Positive Outlook
      •Protection from Chemically-Initiated Glutathione Depletion
      •Respiratory Air Flow in Asthmatics
      •Rheumatoid Arthritis
      •Tay-Sachs Disease
      •Temper
      •Tissue Disorders
      EPN is created through a unique, fourteen-day process. Because this manufacturing process resembles human digestion, soy seeds are completely assimilated into basic nutrients and natural sweeteners. Through this proprietary process, nutrient enzymes are produced along with a phyto-sweetener resembling human colostrum (found in mother’s breast milk). Therefore, EPN is an all-in-one combination of healthful enzymes and a phyto-sweetener. Due to the fact that the creation process is digestive in nature, there is no residual, unassimilated soy matter remaining.

      http://www.phpure.com/nutrition_products/angstrom_minerals.htm

      Also look at iron on the same page. Wait until you reach 6 months and everything goes away.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is it okay to cry to every Taylor Swift song?
    I'm an elderly woman going through menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      it's fine as long as it's not one of the upbeat, fueled by anger songs like picture to burn or better than revenge

  25. QUESTION:
    Since feminists claim superiority because women can have children, what do they think of post-menopausal women?
    Feminists, when confronted with the demonstrable facts that men are smarter, more accomplished and physically stronger than women, inevitably fall back on a woman's childbearing capability as evidence of their superiority. But what about those women that are barren because of age or even medical condition? Do feminists see these women as inferior to men?
    Jade196: Virtually every metric shows greater male accomplishment. For example, even though more women now go to college, men receive 5 times as many patents as women.

    • ANSWER:
      Freedom from "Gods divine punishment" for outstanding service in the Estrogen and Progesterone department is what I think of Post Menopausal women. It's like retirement with a huge 401k full of emotional plateaus (after it kicks in fully).

      Whether you can successfully bear a child or you cant bear a child its just about as painful. Either physically, emotionally or both. I miscarried at 8 weeks and emotionally- it ripped me apart. My sister had early onset menopause when she was 20. She cant have a child either and I might have a condition that will prevent me from carrying a pregnancy to term and the medical treatment was painful and emotionally traumatizing.

      Now, some women do persecute other women about childbearing. There is anger, jealousy, depression and raging hormones. I've been on the bump.com and looked at those message boards and those women are vicious. Are they feminists? No. A feminist will not discount a woman because of a natural disability. If they do, then they're not a feminist- they're a persecutor and they are intolerant of the gender they claim to support.

      The grass is always greener on the other side. It's just as hard being unable to do what you were born to do and sometimes harder than just 9 months of being pregnant. It's the same as a man being infertile or his manhood isn't large enough to successfully reach the cervix making conception harder (not sure if it's true, but John Gosslin had Kate + 8 because of rumors of his small penis size being unable to fertilize her egg which is how John and Kate wound up with 8. He had the swimmers but not the conduit- it's just as hard for a man and makes him feel emasculated just like women that cant conceive feel like they're not a "real" woman).

      Either way. Women face a lot of pain and because we have a lot of emotions and they tend to control us and sometimes make us feel bad is all the reason why I think we're not superior to men, but we're emotional warriors. Men tend to be afraid of their emotions- we aren't. We battle them. Men hide them. Men are physical warriors and protectors.

      I think feminism has a lot to do with lashing out about oppression and rights and not who is better than who. Just like Martin Luther King, a true civil rights leader does not persecute the people who persecute them. Martin Luther King was a peaceful man and did not show disrespect to Whites he reasonably showed disagreement and protested in an orderly fashion. He was so successful because of his compassion and objectivity and peace. Not because he told White people that his race was more superior. You attract more flies with honey and not vinegar as the saying goes...

      Of course this is just my opinion, I don't want to offend anyone else if they think differently. I respect everyones opinion on an issue. There's more than one way to look at things. I think thats why I like Yahoo Answers so much.

  26. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a natural food or supplement to overcome kind of depression?
    but more so just a lot of anger and being very short with people. Then I feel guilty and am more depressed and short with people. I have used B12 which works to a degree but I don't want to take more than 2 of them a day. I still get "cranky" and need something before my husband "kills me". LOL

    • ANSWER:
      There are a number of things a vitamin therapy of 10000 mg of vitamin A, 3000 mg of vitamin C time released, 5000 mcg of sub-lingual B 12, 4000 mg of Omega 3, 2000 mg of CLA, 2000 mg of no flush niacin and 6 tablets of cal-mag by Schiff brand. At least the first five if you can't do anything else. Here's a list of other foods. There is a better way!

      complex carbohydrates (boosts serotonin activity in the brain):Broccoli, Rice, brown, Potatoes, Blackberries, Pasta, wheat, Squash, winter

      folic acid (deficient in people who are depressed): Asparagus, Beets, Spinach, Avocados, Brussels sprouts, Bok choy, Cabbage, Savoy, Beans, dried, Chick-peas, Soybeans, Lentils, Oranges, Peas, fresh, Turkey, Broccoli

      magnesium (acts as a muscle relaxant): Spinach, Chocolate, Pumpkin seeds, Oysters, Sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, Amaranth, Buckwheat, Avocados, Quinoa, Almonds, Barley

      niacin (nerve cell function, relieving depression as well as feelings of anxiety and panic): Rice, brown, Chicken, Pomegranates, Tuna, Lamb, Wheat, Turkey

      omega-3 fatty acids (a building block of human brain tissue): Salmon, Trout, Tuna, walnuts, flax-seeds, macadamia nuts

      Avocado
      The avocado is high in fat, but most of the fat is the heart-healthy monounsaturated kind. We know the avocado tastes great, but outside of an occasional guacamole dip, few of us reach for this high-fiber food for salads or as a great side dish.

      You'll also get protein, a good dose of vitamins A and E, some B vitamins, lots of potassium and a dollop of copper. The rich and creamy avocado has been called the "chocolate" of fruits.

      Sweet potato
      At Thanksgiving, we dash for sweet potatoes as if they're available just once a year. But you can bake or microwave these tubers anytime for a super dose of vitamin A — five times the daily value (DV) the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends.

      Sweet potatoes also offer some vitamin C and a significant helping of important minerals, including calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and iron. And this tasty fat-free combo of nutrients brightens your plate.

      Soybeans
      The FDA recently added soy to the list of foods that can make health claims because of its value in reducing the risk of heart disease. Soy is high in protein — one cup of beans can fill 40 percent of the DV for protein — and the bean also serves up generous helpings of fiber, calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorus and magnesium. How you eat this versatile food is up to you — cooked and mixed in salads or casseroles, roasted for snacks, or in tofu, tempeh or soy milk. Soy has some fat, but very little saturated fat.

      The use of soy products to treat symptoms of menopause is controversial. While it may improve symptoms for some women, the phytoestrogens (plant estrogens) that may help relieve hot flashes may also increase the risk of breast cancer.

      Dried figs
      Tasty as Fig Newton cookies are, figs stand on their own. They provide high-fiber, topped with some B vitamins and iron, finished off with abundant potassium and calcium. Five figs give you as much calcium as half a glass of milk.

      What to do with a fig? Pop a few in your mouth, sneak them into casseroles or replace raisins with them in a salad.

      Lentils
      We never think of this legume unless it's in our soup. But put lentils in rice or casseroles and you've added one of the highest-protein and highest-fiber foods around.

      A cup of lentils supplies about 40 percent of the DV for protein and about 65 percent of the DV for fiber. The lentil is high in potassium, calcium and iron, and a good source of B vitamins, phosphorus and copper. The fat content? Zero.

      Kale
      Dark, leafy green vegetables are an acquired taste. Maybe now's the time to see if your taste buds have matured to accommodate this no-fat, low-calorie, super-high-vitamin-A food.

      One cup of kale (boiled, but not overcooked) gives you double the DV for vitamin A. You'll also get some vitamin C, a small amount of B vitamins and a generous amount of calcium. Look for kale's healthy but ignored cousins: Swiss chard, mustard greens and collards.

      Barley
      Here's another soup secret we tend to forget despite its claim to protein, fiber, potassium, phosphorus and iron. One cup supplies 25 percent of the DV for fiber.

      Eat pearled barley as a side dish instead of rice, use it for a hearty casserole, or boil it to create a unique base for a stir-fry meal. And look at the high nutritional content of some other forgotten but powerful grains, like quinoa and amaranth.

      Food does affect your mood, and what you eat -- and when -- can impact depression. Sugar and caffeine give you a quick lift -- but can leave you feeling down when their effects wear off. This meal plan reduces sugar and caffeine intake because feelings of depression often improve when their consumption is minimized. Complex carbs act as tranquilizers by increasing your amount of serotonin, the neurotransmitter that calms, in your brain. This meal plan contains lots of fruits and whole-wheat foods to increase your complex carb intake. Turkey contains tryptophan which has a calming affect on the brain. Chamomile, peppermint or goyah tea, for your morning and evening mojo has a calming effect on the brain. Chronic dehydration -- however slight -- can cause feelings of anxiety. That's why this diet includes plenty of water, often with some drops of apple or grape juice added to liven it up. Golden raisins are high in vitamin B6 and can be added to any meal or eaten as a snack.

      Even marginal vitamin deficiencies that don't result in clinical symptoms can negatively affect your mood. This diet, when paired with a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement, will help ensure adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals (especially the B vitamins and folic acid. Steady blood sugar levels help keep you on an even keel. This meal plan includes complex carbohydrates in every meal and encourages eating small meals spaced evenly throughout the day to help normalize blood sugar levels. ie, vitamin D, magnesium, selenium, and calcium).
      sample
      BREAKFAST

      option one
      calcium-fortified orange juice or no sugar added apple juice or grape juice
      fiber capsules or fiber drink
      soy/whey protein drink
      vitamin therapy

      option two
      1/2 cup egg scramble
      slice of whole-wheat toast
      peach slices
      fiber therapy
      herbal tea
      vitamin therapy

      LUNCH
      option one
      spinach and tuna salad
      herbal tea

      option two
      smoked salmon on whole-wheat bagel with tomato and red onion
      sliced pear
      herbal tea

      option three
      black bean, lentil or vegetable soup
      mixed green salad
      herbal tea

      DINNER
      option one
      chicken or turkey salad
      spinach salad (high in folic acid)
      walnuts and dates
      water

      option two
      salmon or tuna
      asparagus
      another vegetable from the list
      herbal tea or water

      option three
      vegetable or lentil soup
      sliced tomatoes
      herbal tea or water

      SNACKS (in between meals)
      Choose two or three each day:
      whole-grain crackers with almond butter
      handful of fresh nuts and dried fruit
      soy protein smoothie
      small fruit
      apple slices and fat-free cheese

      Healthy Dos and Don'ts

      Here are a few eating tips to keep in mind when you're dealing with depression.

      Do:
      Take a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement see vitamin therapy.
      Get regular, vigorous exercise daily The endorphins produced make you feel relaxed, plus exercises reduces muscle tension and blood pressure
      Take a multivitamin supplement that includes B and sublingual B12. Even undetectable malnutrition can lead to feelings of anxiety and depression
      * Drink plenty of water or other fluids like herb tea

      Don't:
      Consume caffeine
      Drink alcohol
      Load up on simple sugars and simple carbohydrates

      The Lighthouse of Halo

  27. QUESTION:
    Could the guy I've been seeing be going through male menopause?
    I've noticed that the guy I've been seeing casually for the past 2 years has undergone some changes. He's over twenty years older than me, and I think he's starting to turn into an old man now. He's put on some weight and has man boobs, and his voice sounds higher than it used to. Are these changes due to increased level of estrogen? Does this normally happen when a man ages? I've found myself less attracted to him.

    • ANSWER:
      Passing the age of 35 to 40 and entering early 50s can cause various physical changes in a man as well as psychological changes. Technically, male menopause is referred to as andropause, which is associated to the gradual declination of the levels of testosterone in a man’s body.

      Here are some symptoms:

      * loss of libido or sexual drive.
      * fatigue and tiredness
      * forgetfulness
      * Feeling of worthlessness, anger, anxiety, depression and hopelessness -- this is important for you to know. As a partner, be sensitive to what he'll feel. He might feel down, being a supportive and encouraging partner will help a lot.
      * Frequent sleep interruption and insomnia
      * confusion, indecisiveness and lack of confidence -- if you really love him, you need to reassure him all the time.
      * excessive sweating at night and hot flashes

      I hope this helped.

  28. QUESTION:
    how do i start my song? it's on the natural disasters like floods, storms, tornado and earthquakes.?
    I have to write a song on effects of natural hazards on candian cities. it's my final summative project. it's worth 20% of my final mark. it has to be 3 min long. please give me a start and some ideas about wht to put after. thank you very much.

    • ANSWER:
      Mother Nature in menopause,
      Heating up making volcanoes cause,
      tornadoes and earthquakes,
      don't cut your wrath,
      all I want to do is get out of your path!

      Come on Mama Nature balance us out,
      Come on Mama Nature don't twist and shout!

      All of your children from China to Maine,
      Are feeling your anger crying your name!
      You burn us and drown us and cover us up,
      You rattle us around like we're in a dice cup!

      Come on Mama Nature balance us out,
      Come on Mama Nature don't twist and shout!

      You can write as many verses as you want to...

  29. QUESTION:
    What causes the ears and face get red and hot. I am feeling this for a while but no diagnosis from the docs.?
    I got my stomach, throat, ears, skin carotid checked and everything is mormal. It is really anoying me because starts slowly in the morning and as the day progress it gets worse like I am burning 150 degrees of fever and very tired.

    • ANSWER:
      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Flushing. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Everyday causes of minor facial flushing:
      Embarrassment (see Society problems)
      Blushing
      Anger
      Stress
      Anxiety
      Guilt
      Strong emotion
      Rosacea
      Exercise
      Alcohol
      Alcohol intolerance (see Alcohol use) - may cause flushing after only a single alcoholic drink.
      Spicy food
      Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
      Pregnancy
      Menopause
      Hot flash - see also causes of hot flashes
      Hyperthyroidism
      Fever - see also causes of fever
      Heatstroke
      Sunburn
      Dehydration
      Circulatory disorders
      Lung disorders
      Chronic bronchitis
      Emphysema
      Diabetes
      Heart conditions
      Certain medications

  30. QUESTION:
    What causes insomnia when one is tired at night?
    I dont drink coffee or eat any caffeine in any form.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many causes, but they can include:

      1. Emotional Distress
      More particularly when it is from internalized anxiety or anger, emotional problems can easily trigger this sleep disorder.

      2. Substance Abuse
      Drinking too much coffee, colas or other "energy-upper drinks" is known to cause insomnia. Caffeine from these drinks is the main reason. Chain smokers can also be easy victims of insomnia because of the nicotine that cigarettes contain.

      Herbal remedies, alcohol and other medications can also make one prone to becoming an insomniac. Some may think that alcohol, when consumed, can make one feel drowsy. But little did they know that in the long run, when the alcohol gets metabolized, sudden wakefulness will follow.

      3. Biological Clock Disturbance.
      Also known as circadian rhythm, one's body clock, when altered, can damage the amount of sleep one can peacefully enjoy. This body clock disturbance can be caused by an irregular slumber schedule because of too much siesta or partying too late at night.

      It can also be jetlag or body clock disturbance due to traveling by plane to some place where there is a different time zone. Other causes may be the grave yard schedules of workers and cramming review season for students induced by exams.

      4. Environmental Factors
      Extreme temperatures can disrupt one's sleeping patterns. Noise and bright lights can have the same effect too. Homesickness or when one is forced to sleep in an unfamiliar place is also one reason behind getting into the habit of not having enough sleep.

      5. Health Problems
      Health disorders such as diabetes, heart failure, hyperthyroidism, ulcers, and Parkinson's disease can also induce insomnia. Asthma may also be one health problem that makes one prone to insomnia because of an asthmatic's shortness of breath.

      Frequent urination, heartburn, and chronic pain from leg cramps, tooth ache and arthritis can also cause insomnia.

      Psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression are also possible culprits for insomnia. Snoring with prolonged pauses in breathing while at sleep, also known as sleep apnea can also cause insomnia.

      Periodic arm and leg movements during sleep causing the muscles to twitch excessively is one underlying cause of this sleep disorder. Another cause is narcolepsy or one's lack of control on whether to stay awake or to fall asleep, is another cause of this sleep disorder.

      6. Pre-bedtime Activities
      Engaging to vigorous activities such as exercise just right before bedtime can deprive one of a good night's sleep. Consuming large meals when one is just about to sleep can also make one experience this sleeping disorder. This is because when metabolism is at its most active thus the body prompts one to stay awake.

      Risk Factors:
      Reports have it that 90% of people can acquire transient insomnia at some point in their lives. While an estimate of 30% suffers from its chronic form.

      a. Women are said to be more at risk in acquiring insomnia because of the following reasons:

      - Pre-menstrual syndrome with symptoms of irritability, depression and anxiety, and bloating due to menstruation disturbs a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Menopause can also change a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Pregnancy makes sleeplessness one common thing to happen.

      b. Elderly people are also prone to getting insomnia because ageing alters one's sleeping patterns.

      c. Depressed people have lighter slumbers compared to those who don't feel this psychological condition.

      d. Students or younger ones who are conscious with their grades (because of cramming) can easily become insomniacs too.

      With that vast information on what causes insomnia and who are at risk with this sleeping disorder, one can easily ward off this annoying condition.

      Prevention:

      Balance and perspective:
      At certain times, insomnia may result from stress.
      Massage techniques can ease tense necks, aching shoulders and upright torsos, and face massage can be an instant calmer.

      Some stress is an inevitable part of life, but when you need to achieve a state of inner calm, a range of meditation and visualization techniques can help you work through your insecurities, worries and anxieties.

      With practice, stress can be diminished so that it is no longer a cause of sleepless nights.

      A calm environment:
      Lack of sleep can also be exacerbated by external factors such as noise, a “busy” atmosphere in the bedroom, or simply the wrong type of mattress.

      By making the best of your physical environment, you can reduce or remove many of these detrimental factors.

      Following the principles of feng shui you can arrange your bedroom space to best effect and remove clutter that can clog free-flowing “chi” or energy.

      Choosing a calming room décor and lighting scheme can soothe the senses, while establishing a bed-time ritual can make sleep a pleasant and comforting experience to look forward to.

      Pampering treatments:
      In view of the many demands made by daily life, it is essential to find time to switch off from cares and worries in the evening, and indulge in some personal quality time.

      However busy you are, you should take time to wind down before trying to go to sleep, otherwise your mind will still be buzzing with the concerns of the day.

      Surrounding yourself with gentle candlelight and sinking into a hot bath laced with aromatherapy oils or herbal sachets can go a long way to soothe and prepare your body for sleep.

      Essential oils such as lavender and clary sage added to the water help to diminish tension headaches and muscular aches, while bath bags or bath salts made with chamomile help to ease stress.

      You can also use the natural energies from flowers and herbs as a base for warming foot baths, soporific sleep pillows and effective sleep tinctures.

      Bedtime snacks:
      You ate dinner at 6pm; it’s now 11.30pm and you’re ready to go to bed, but now you’re feeling hungry and thirsty again.

      What do you do? Instead of raiding the refrigerator for a substantial and perhaps indigestible meal, it is better to opt for a light snack, such as toast with a topping and perhaps a hot, comforting beverage.

      Try to avoid tea and coffee as they are stimulants and will tend to keep you awake if you drink them late in the day.

      Instead, herbal teas prepared for their sedative properties may be sipped in the evening, while warm, milky drinks are ideal for consumption before bed – milk contains peptides that calm the system.

      The occasional hot toddy can also provide a delicious way to wind down, and this is particularly good on a cold winter’s evening, especially if you are suffering from a cold.

      Calming the psyche:
      Sometimes it is difficult to sleep due to excessive emotions, such as fear, excitement or anxiety. Crystal therapy can help to calm heartache; choosing the right stones can also calm restlessness and anxiety, and help to regulate sleep patterns.

      Crystals can be helpful when bad dreams and nightmares are keeping you awake, as can techniques such as visualizing a guardian angel or spiritual protector. When you have perplexing or mystifying dreams, it can be very helpful to write down what happened before you forget, so that you can ponder and try to analyze them later on.

      Working towards an understanding of your dreams adds an enjoyable richness to what can be the fascinating pageant of sleep.

      Exercise to relax:
      Keeping the body moving is essential for good sleep – without exercise, you 3will not be physically tired enough to rest at night. Aerobic activities such as walking and cycling exercise the heart and tone the muscles, while some specific yoga techniques provide an excellent way to stretch and relax.

      This free ebook downlod explains Insomnia causes and how to fix it naturally with home remedies and behaviour modification

      http://www.thehealthsuccesssite.com/Sleep-disorders-free-health-book-download.html

  31. QUESTION:
    Question about menopause and irritable bear syndrome?
    Can someone clarify for me exactly when a grown woman's hormones STOP acting up? Before, during, or after menopause?

    Or are they just constant b#tches
    I am not the menopausal one in this sitchyation

    • ANSWER:
      Mine stopped acting up after a hysterectomy at age 46, 10 years of hormone replacement therapy, then withdrawal from that. Now my keel is rather even most of the time.

      Have you ever heard of the irritable male syndrome:

      Feeling anxious? Irritable, too? Has the stamina that used to fuel days and burn up the nights hit the road? ...

      Check your engines, gentlemen. There are thousands of males out there in the same sorry state, but now — thanks to a research scientist in Scotland — the condition has a name.

      "Irritable Male Syndrome," that state of hypersensitivity, frustration and anger is now used to describe men who suffer from testosterone deficiency. And while the condition may have been around for ages, the diagnosis suggests that men may be just as vulnerable to the complexities of biology as women. "This is very common," said Dr. Philip Aliotta. "Low levels of testosterone manifest in irritability, depression, weak muscles, loss of self-esteem. Men have no interest in the joys of life. Their libido has dropped. Their interest in intimacy is declining. Sexual function diminishes. Work performance suffers. Oftentimes they are misdiagnosed as being depressed.

      Maybe the problem is actually yours and not hers all this time!

      good luck..

  32. QUESTION:
    How does being skinny or underweight affect pregnancy?
    I've been married for a yr and my husband and I decided to start thinking of having a baby. My in laws were bugging us all abt it but we told them we will wait a little. But now theyre sayin we should not have a baby now bcuz they think I'm too skinny and the baby will suffer and will not be healthy. In our culture (I'm Egyptian) fat is healthy.. I am not a food fan and I eat very little just so I would stay alive. they all love food but eat waaaay too much. I'm 23 and I weight 112 lbs,my height is 5.2 is it really not healthy for me to have a baby right now even though I plan to change my diet and eat more than i usually do when im pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      It could harm both you and the baby. The better your nutrition, the healthier the pregnancy. Before you start trying to get pregnant, start taking Folic acid (prevents birth defects in babies), a prenatal vitamin, and add a Super Food (based on seaweed) that has superior nutritional suplementation.
      I used The American Botanical Pharmacy's Superfood.
      http://www.herbdoc.com/p14.asp

      "Every patient that walked into my clinic was nutritionally depleted. A lack of nutrition in your blood can cause everything from low energy and a weak immune system to virtually any disease. Your speed and ability to recover are greatly reduced when you are nutritionally depleted. Nutrition is what builds every cell, every organ and every metabolic chemical in your body. Nutrition is what builds your body; it’s what YOU are made of. Having a rich supply of nutrition in your blood gives you energy, vitality, strength, protects you from disease and illness, and if you get sick, speeds up your recovery dramatically."

      He also sells Female Balance herbs that increase fertility.
      http://www.herbdoc.com/p42.asp

      "While running my clinic I have seen many women who became incapable of normal functioning, both physically and emotionally, because of puberty, PMS, menopause and hormonal imbalance. This formula has been a lifesaver for them. Besides the obvious health benefits of hormonal balancing, many saved their marriages, their families, their careers and their sanity by using this formula.
      I used this herbal formula in my clinic with tremendous success. It regulates and balances female hormones during puberty, PMS and menopause and alleviates symptoms such as menstrual cramps, headaches, sensitive breasts, mood swings, anxiety, insomnia, irritability, depression, anger, nervousness, water retention/bloating, weight gain, hot flashes, hair loss and dry vaginal tissue.
      It regulates and normalizes the menstrual cycle and relieves associated menstrual problems. It increases fertility and sexual desire and calms the nerves. It is a powerfully effective overall female tonic."

      I don't mean to sound like a commercial...his stuff really works!
      I was able to shrink an ovarian tumor using the Female Balance Plus, and I'm sold on his herbs!!

  33. QUESTION:
    Why do some people have severe mood swings ?
    One minute they are speaking to you, asking you questions about your life, the next they are yelling at you, verbally aggressively attacking you, giving you glares etc. What is wrong with this person? This is in minutes and days

    • ANSWER:
      Severe mood swings can affect us all. The effects are harsh and disruptive to one's life pattern. They are generally associated with Bipolar Disorder (Manic Depression) and therapy is usually needed to curb the condition. There are several factors that contribute to their existence

      Hormonal Imbalance

      During puberty, menstruation, and menopause, the hormones shift, triggering a variety of reactions. Irritability and anger are two. Example: For no apparent reason, you are angry and irritable over issues you probably would have normally dismissed. Everything is a big deal now. Hormonal imbalance is cited to be the number one cause of severe mood swings.

      Stress

      Stress comes from many sources: money, work, home and society --- to name a few. Stress is a common reason for severe mood swings. Example: At work you're having serious issues with a coworker and your boss refuses to hear your complaints. So you go home and have an argument with your spouse. How can your mind rest after that? Before you know it, you're highly stressed out.

      Loss

      When you suffer a devastating loss, you feel alone. Only time or the support of family and friends can heal the wound. The adverse effects of this loss can overtake your mind, spawning severe mood swings. Loss can come in the form of losing a treasured job or home, or the loss of a family member. During this period the effects of your loss fluctuate. One minute you're over it --- the next, you're swamped in misery again. Controlling these mood swings is an uphill battle.

      Anxiety

      "Did I just ace that interview? Or did I undoubtedly flunk?" This is an example of what can incite a mood swing. You're sure you did well, but then again, you're not so sure. Then you begin to over-analyze, which breeds worry and skepticism, hence severe mood swings. Ruminating over and over about a particular issue makes you positive and negative, no in-between.

      Fear

      We all fear something. However, some fear to the point of paranoia. thinking someone is out to get them all the time. Fearing everything saps the self-esteem and triggers depression, which causes severe mood swings. Fear can materialize as jealousy, possessiveness, and uncertainty of the unknown.

  34. QUESTION:
    Why do people think making fun/jokes out of certain topics?
    takes the stigma away, and I mean such things as terrorism or racism sexism etc?

    • ANSWER:
      You will love this joke- by the way. I'm not sexist or racist. But I can laugh at absurdity.

      Take all American women who are within five years of menopause. Train us for a few weeks, outfit us with automatic weapons, grenades, gas masks, moisturizer with SPF15, Prozac, hormones, chocolate, and canned tuna - drop us (parachuted, preferably) across the landscape of Afghanistan, and let us do what comes naturally.

      Think about it. Our anger quotient alone, even when doing standard stuff like grocery shopping and paying bills, is formidable enough to make even armed men in turbans tremble.

      We've had our children, we would gladly suffer or die to protect them and their future.

      We'd like to get away from our husbands, if they haven't left already. And for those of us who are single, the prospect of finding a good man with whom to share life is about as likely as being struck by lightning. We have nothing to lose.

      We've survived the water diet, the protein diet, the carbohydrate diet, and the grapefruit diet in gyms and saunas across America and never lost a pound We can easily survive months in the hostile terrain of Afghanistan with no food at all!

      We've spent years tracking down our husbands or lovers in bars, hardware stores, or sporting events...finding bin Laden in some cave will be no problem.

      Uniting all the warring tribes of Afghanistan in a new government? Oh, please ... we've planned the seating arrangements for in-laws and extended families at Thanksgiving dinners for years ... we understand tribal warfare.

      Between us, we've divorced enough husbands to know every trick there is for how they hide, launder, or cover up bank accounts and money sources. We know how to find that money and we know how to seize it ... with or without the government's help!

      Let us go and fight. The Taliban hates women. Imagine their terror as we crawl like ants with hot-flashes over their godforsaken terrain.

  35. QUESTION:
    what remedies or natural medications is there for hot flashes?
    I am looking for natural supplements not prescirbed medications I try to avoid that as much as possible

    • ANSWER:
      Women experience a variety of symptoms of menopause, but the hot flash is the one most discussed. During menopause the body produces less estrogen and progesterone. As a result, the thermostat in our brain, the hypothalamus, gets mixed signals: is it hot or cold? It is as if it cannot decide between these states. This oscillation causes our blood vessels to expand and contract on an irregular and unpredictable basis. With an increased blood flow in the body, a feeling of heat and a flush starts on the face, the neck, and continues to the chest. Some women perspire, others really sweat! Sometimes a chill follows a hot flash.

      Clothes made of natural fibers (cotton, wool, silk) can disperse heat away from the body. It is more practical to dress in layers so that clothing can be removed and added as needed.

      Hot flashes deplete our bodies of the B vitamins, vitamin C, and magnesium and potassium, so it is helpful to increase our consumption of these nutrients [don't forget Calcium].

      Triggers for hot flashes include spicy food, hot drinks, alcoholic drinks, white sugar (sugar can also cause palpitations), stress, hot weather, hot tubs and saunas, tobacco and marijuana and anger, especially when unexpressed,

      Herbs commonly used to alleviate hot flashes include ginseng, black cohosh, vitex agnus castii, blue cohosh, dong quai, wild yam root [natural progesterone, licorice root, false unicorn and sarsaparilla. Experiment with using one herb or several in combination.

      Evening primrose oil alleviates hot flashes and promotes restful sleep. These benefits may be due to the gamma linolenic acid in the oil which is said to influence prostaglandin production. (Evening primrose oil is used to relieve premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and tenderness of fibrocystic breasts). Depending on the amount of primrose oil in each capsule, effective dosages vary from 2 to 8 capsules a day.

      Chickweed tincture (25 to 40 drops) once or twice a day reduces the severity and frequency of hot flashes.

      A few homeopathic remedies suggested are:

      Lachesis: For mental irritation and hot flashes. Lachesis 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      Pulsatilla: For hot flashes followed by intense chills and emotional upset. Pulsatilla 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      Valeriana: For intense sweating and insomnia and Sepia for flashes that make you feel exhausted and depressed. Valeriana 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      There are no side effects or complications from homeopathic remedies if taken as directed. Do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances and do not try to mix any remedies.

      Avoid chocolates, mints, coffee, red meat, alcoholic and carbonated drinks, spicy rich food while taking any homeopathic remedies and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat, strong smells and perfumes and store in a cool dark place (no refrigerated).

  36. QUESTION:
    mum has menopause symptoms and it taking tablets, is numbness on one foot a symptom aswell?
    like what it says my mum had nearly all menopause symptoms like hot flashes, sweat, weight gained, anger, depression etc.....
    also she has numbness in her left foot just one side for over a week now, could that be the menopause symtoms or something else?
    my mum is 46 so that might help

    • ANSWER:
      No it shouldn't be. It sounds like she may have a pinched muscle in her back that is pressing on the nerves for her foot to cause that to happen. Has she had any other back type pains? They would be a symptom of that as well. Once she releases her back muscles the pain should be gone. Here's how to release the back muscles:
      Back:
      (do from a sitting position)
      Place your left hand on your left leg next to your body. Place your right hand over your left shoulder and find the muscles next to your spine and firmly press on them and hold. After 30 seconds slowly lower your body forward and to the outside of your left leg, keeping your left arm fairly straight as you do. When you reach your lap remain there for another 10 seconds, release the pressure but rest there for another 30 seconds. Then reverse your hand positions and do your right side.
      For best results relax the body first by taking a deep breath and exhaling then remain this relaxed.

  37. QUESTION:
    How do I stop mother from nagging?
    I am 15 and need mom help. She is absolutely freakishly mean to me sometimes and then all proud and happy with me the next. She has crazy mood swings. She is definitely sexist (against men) and that sucks because I am male. She treats me much worse than my 2 older sisters, but we all suffer. I know she is sexist because she admits to it and rants about men. If I say anything that she disagrees with she gets all pissed and makes me feel like shit. She nags like no other and doesn't trust me at all. She is worried that I might do drugs or get a girl pregnant. I obey her rules because I have no choice. If you get her mad she will get all emotional and mad. I know women are hard to understand (no offense), but my mom is a whole other matter. Please help me! What can I do to let her know that she can trust me? How can I stop the constant nagging and crazy mood swings?

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest that you get the book Toxic Parents. http://www.amazon.com/Toxic-Parents-Overcoming-Hurtful-Reclaiming/dp/0553381407/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358052656&sr=8-1&keywords=Toxic+Parents
      It's really great. You could get it at a local library and have a friend hide it for you, or put it in your locker at school. Your mom obviously has a lot of bitterness from her past. She's taking out her hatred for men on you. She's not doing this on purpose, but because she's had some bad men in her life who really hurt her. Unfortunately, she's taking her anger out on you (the only male she has access to). This is wrong. It has nothing to do with you, but her own inability to get psychological help for herself.

      She may have bipolar disorder, or she might be going through menopause (which can cause mood swings). If you really can't deal with this, you might write her a heartfelt letter or email asking if she can arrange some family counseling sessions for your family. Tell her that you love her and want your family to be better at getting along. Something like this....

      Dear Mom,
      I don't know how to ask this, and I don't want you to get angry at me about this, which is why I'm writing you this letter. I (and my sisters) want to get along with you better. I want to have a better relationship with you as my mom. I really think we could make a lot of progress if we went to a family counselor or psychologist as a family. Please know that I'm not saying this as a criticism of you as my mom......I just know we can be a better family, but I don't know how to make things better. I think we could use someone else (outside the family) who could help us interact in better ways. Please think about this a while before responding. I don't expect an answer write away. I hope you'll consider my request.

      If she doesn't respond well to this, you could enlist your sisters to help you plead the case, or you could seek the help of a psychologist on your own. Find someone who is local and has a Ph.D. in psychology. Call them and tell them you have a family problem that you need some advice about. Tell them you're only 15 and don't have any money to give them, but you need some help and some advice about a family problem. You might need to call a few places. There are places that do offer free counseling. Some psychologists charge discounted rates and some volunteer some time for free care. If your mom won't get help, you can at least go to a psychologist on your own and find out why she's behaving in this way, and learn new ways to interact with her (ways to diffuse her anger). Chances are, you're lashing back at her which makes things worse. A psychologist can help you deal with her in better ways. You can change her behavior by changing how you react to her, but you'll need an expert to help you with this.

      You could also go to a local hospital and ask someone where you can find a social worker. A social worker could also put you in touch with some free counseling services to help you. Even though your mom has psychological problems, you can get help so that her problems don't hurt YOU psychologically.

      Hang in there. There is help out there....you might have to ask around to find it. Don't give up. Keep asking. Someone will eventually help you. You could also ask your school guidance counselor about this. She could help you find a psychologist. Tell her you're asking for her help and don't want your mom to know about it.

  38. QUESTION:
    why am i surrendering to anger?
    a few things are troubling me but there's always going to be something to worry about. my question is why now am i constantly annoyed and easy to anger. i'm not usually like this. i'm too young for menopause and pms can't last for weeks. what is wrong with me?

    does anyone else ever have inexplicable anger?

    • ANSWER:
      Surrendering to anger is an artificial construct that we in todays' culture try to tell each other - you don't surrender to anger anymore than you surrender to needing to pee. If you have anger, then you have anger! We're not wise enough and certainly not powerful enough to pick and choose which emotions we "should" have - if we have them, we have them!

      All we can do is choose how to deal with them. In your case, apparently something keeps lighting your fuse. So, look around in your life for what might be irritating you all the time - might be something you'd rather it wasn't ... like a defective spouse ... sorry to say - or something else equally inconvenient.

      As to expressing the anger, nothing beats a good friend who will listen when you vent and really listen, not do the crossword while you talk to yourself.

      Sorry you're full of anger - it happens to most people for periods in our lives - it's the signal that something's fuct in our lives - like pain in our bodies - just try to figure out what's causing it.

      Trying to suppress it is doomed. The only possible outcomes to that are failure or success and mental illness. Bleh on either.

      Good luck. Keep heart.

  39. QUESTION:
    Why when a man reaches a certain age he is quick to anger & no patients?
    He just turned 48 he is 10 years older & he can be happy one sec then angry the next.I have heard male menopause is there a vitamin or something I can give to him or Im going to have to part.It has come to a point that Im scared to have a conversation or Ill get yelled @.

    • ANSWER:
      You mean patience right? Personally I would recommend omega 3 fatty acid supplements, they can help control mood swings and "upgrade" your brain cells to prevent them from dying off. By the way I think beer_man's gotta point here.

  40. QUESTION:
    is sudden hotting of face also related with any ill effects of brain tumor?
    Today was a very stressful day for me at work.While coming up the staircase of my apartment,my face suddenly became very hot.
    what does this signify?

    • ANSWER:
      the flushing of ones face can arise from a number of things such as the following:

      - embarrassment
      - anger
      - stress
      - frustration
      - sadness
      - happiness and laughter
      - menopause
      - hot and spicy foods
      - exercise

      basically any number of things but it is really common, and definitely not related to the effects of a brain tumor.

  41. QUESTION:
    It is complicated, wacky hormones, but...is Bad anxiety part of menopause?
    I am experiencing constant anxiety and occasional anger that incapacitates me at times. I am thinking of talk therapy if it is not just part of the process. Thanks for any help.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, that emotional roller coaster is definitely part of menopause. I am usually a mellow, person, but when I was going through that, I was snapping at people, staying awake nights weeping or worrying obsessively. Even if your out-of-control anger and anxiety are "part of the process," it still might be helpful to you to see a therapist for emotional support.

      I also agree with serenity, who advises you to have your thyroid levels checked. Thyroid problems can cause many of the same psychological symptoms. Thyroid problems are actually fairly common among middle-aged women but too often go undiagnosed because the symptoms are subtle or vague. Some male doctors will dismiss your complaints, treat you like a hypochondriac or even try to put you on antidepressants.

      Just remember, menopause is not forever. It may seem that way, but trust me, it will end!

  42. QUESTION:
    In the world of Woman's life change, what natural remedy's can be used for these blooming "Hot Flashes"?
    I know that I am going through the change.

    I am okay with that for it is apart of the circle.
    I choose to go through this naturally without the chemicals of man, approved by the FDA,with their warnings of serious side effects and possible death.

    What I am going through is natural and natural is how I select it to be.
    My question is how and what I may do for the "Hot Flashes" naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic remedies for hot flashes

      Women experience a variety of symptoms of menopause, but the hot flash is the one most discussed. During menopause the body produces less estrogen and progesterone. As a result, the thermostat in our brain, the hypothalamus, gets mixed signals: is it hot or cold? It is as if it cannot decide between these states. This oscillation causes our blood vessels to expand and contract on an irregular and unpredictable basis. With an increased blood flow in the body, a feeling of heat and a flush starts on the face, the neck, and continues to the chest. Some women perspire, others really sweat! Sometimes a chill follows a hot flash.

      Clothes made of natural fibers (cotton, wool, silk) can disperse heat away from the body. It is more practical to dress in layers so that clothing can be removed and added as needed.

      Hot flashes deplete our bodies of the B vitamins, vitamin C, and magnesium and potassium, so it is helpful to increase our consumption of these nutrients [don't forget Calcium].

      Triggers for hot flashes include spicy food, hot drinks, alcoholic drinks, white sugar (sugar can also cause palpitations), stress, hot weather, hot tubs and saunas, tobacco and marijuana and anger, especially when unexpressed,

      Herbs commonly used to alleviate hot flashes include ginseng, black cohosh, vitex agnus castii, blue cohosh, dong quai, wild yam root [natural progesterone, licorice root, false unicorn and sarsaparilla. Experiment with using one herb or several in combination.

      Evening primrose oil alleviates hot flashes and promotes restful sleep. These benefits may be due to the gamma linolenic acid in the oil which is said to influence prostaglandin production. (Evening primrose oil is used to relieve premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and tenderness of fibrocystic breasts). Depending on the amount of primrose oil in each capsule, effective dosages vary from 2 to 8 capsules a day.

      Chickweed tincture (25 to 40 drops) once or twice a day reduces the severity and frequency of hot flashes.

      A few homeopathic remedies suggested are:

      Lachesis: For mental irritation and hot flashes. Lachesis 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      Pulsatilla: For hot flashes followed by intense chills and emotional upset. Pulsatilla 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      Valeriana: For intense sweating and insomnia and Sepia for flashes that make you feel exhausted and depressed. Valeriana 30X or 200 4 hourly (3 Doses).

      There are no side effects or complications from homeopathic remedies if taken as directed. Do not exceed the given dosage under any circumstances and do not try to mix any remedies.

      Avoid chocolates, mints, coffee, red meat, alcoholic and carbonated drinks, spicy rich food while taking any homeopathic remedies and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat, strong smells and perfumes and store in a cool dark place (not refrigerated).

  43. QUESTION:
    What kind of spiritual, psychological, and physical changes does a person feel when he reaches 40 ?

    • ANSWER:
      I went thru my spiritual changes long before I hit 40. That sort of depends on if your a woman or a man. A woman will eventually start going into menopause and many changes occur both physical and mental. weight gain, hair growth on chin, lots more crying and lots more anger. Men tend to go thru the mid life crises by divorcing his wife of 20 years, chasing short skirts, buying a sports car and all to compensate for the loss of hair and the bed room equipment not working as well as it once did.

  44. QUESTION:
    What are some strategies for managing our emotions?

    • ANSWER:
      You can remove yourself from the situation in which you are becoming emotional. If this isn't possible, you can try and change the subject, breathe slowly in and out, try and imagine a happy place in your mind. Go there-to the happy place. Relax while you are thinking about that and breathing in and out.
      If a certain person or situation puts you in an emotional state, don't go around that person or near the situation. If you are living with that person (spouse), then you have to figure out why you are becoming so emotional and deal with it.
      There are anger management classes if it is an anger problem. You have to learn to watch out for what triggers the anger. If they are petty triggers, you need to manage those triggers and not let them control you.
      Some people are very emotional, even over commercials! sometimes it is menopause, depression, certain birth control pills, death, divorce, etc. If you are worried that your emotions are out of control, see a doctor.

  45. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me why my sister acts like this *kind of long*?
    How would you explain my sister’s personality? She constantly obsesses on aging and how life what and when a woman hits menopause. I’ve tried to tell her may be some things do change for the worse but there are people in the world to still go on and live happy lives. In fact, I told her I just came across something online that said 1/3 Italian women in their sixties have active sex lives. Her response was just to insults me and say so all you think is that a woman it should just focus on sex in their sixties really a woman should have other hobbies them that. I said to her why you twist what I say, I’m just showing you something positive. Then she does her typical over the top response, “oh my god! How easily offended you get! While I do know it took so little to anger you!” I asked her why she often responds like this when someone tries to talk to her? I also told her I am not angry I’m just tired of trying to talk to you but you always give this type of cynical response.

    My sister also poses with our parents. My sister sometimes loses things and shall go on indirectly blaming family members and often finds out she misplaced it. When she started to do this again during the holidays, my father just made a small comment “not this again” and my sister flew off the hook screaming at him how rude it was. This is after she accepted a lot of gift of money and going out to fancy restaurants everyday issue is visiting the family. I told my sister he draws just saying how he felt and you’re picking on him for the soul comments and yet what you’re doing is 100 times worse, despite all the nice things he’s done for us even if our childhood was a little chaotic. When we were little, our parents were a bit abusive. But now we’re grown up and we had access to different therapists. You can’t go on for ever blaming your parents even if they’re always be some scars. My sister refuses to get any more therapy saying she doesn’t want to show on her records when she goes to get a job. I know it’s not easy to find a good therapist anyways but it doesn’t give you an excuse to treat everyone like crap either.

    The thing is when she lost her wallet, show say things like I’m not accusing anyone but in the 100% sure I left it on the table. My father checked in the cars like 20 minutes and wasn’t there.. My father then said that my sister walked past him with a smirk on her face and went to the car and in 1 minute came back with its saying she found it there. The truth is my sister probably found were she misplaced it and she didn’t know my father had already searched the car and rather than just saying “sorry I misplaced it” she still sets it up for one of us to look like we took it. And of course we said to her “so is money missing?” and of course she says yes but she doesn’t know how much and it doesn’t matter. But the thing is she probably did have anything missing but she just makes up stuff like this. What is wrong with her personality? How can we help her when she isn’t willing to go to a therapist or listen to any of us? She gets very sad in life because a lot of friends and boyfriends won’t stay for long and I think people are afraid to tell her how they feel because she just acts cynical. But it’s hard for me to see her sometimes gets so sad and talk about life isn’t worth living.

    Why does my sister act like this? How can this be helped? Thank you.
    My sister is 37. Sorry for any typos, this was posted by using Vista voice Recognition sofware.

    • ANSWER:
      Well. I think in my opinion your sister is getting upset that she's aging, it can be a mid life quarter life crisis. Thats why shes so annoyed and upset with everything. Not that shes old! Dont get me wrong, but maybe wants to go back to her younger years?
      Seems to me she is still stuck in a teenage mentality... And kind of a (NOT TO OFFEND YOU) Bully, it seems like she is a bully i have a sister who is kind of mean also and can definitely relate. (dont want to go in depth) She is also older than me. Are you the older or younger sister? By the way, my sister is a Sagittarius... I know it sounds critical making excuses for how someone acts because of their sign. BUT alot of the time it is just who that person is, my sister also has her episodes when she gets depressed (not in an emo goth, cut herself way) But rather then shooting everything and everyone down... Blaming other people for the way her life is?

      Here girl check this link : http://www.iloveindia.com/astrology/

      Click on the sign and sex your sister is and read about her sign, you'd be surprised... maybe discover her personality a bit. BY THE WAY THIS SITE IS 100% accurate and it read my mom and whole family to perfection.

      My best guess is: She is not happy with the way her life is going, saw different plans for herself. Thought she would be better, greater, all of that can make a person really not (Angry) but frustrated with life. Each person has something theyre going through and a reason why they are the way they are.

      If she is a sag, you can try to uplift and get her to stop saying such crazy things but it will go in one ear and out the other. They have their mind set. Also if she is not sexually active (it can be sexual frustration as well. Because i know for sure when my sister used to be active and having more of a social life with boys she was MUCH happier and carefree, still is now but then again she was younger then. My sister is 21 btw, we are not too far apart! (My sister has been celibate for years, which is good )

      Hope i helped sweetie. Btw i am a girl. Haha and 18! (: Wise beyond my years huh? Good luck to you and your sister!

  46. QUESTION:
    What does it mean to see blood in your hands in a dream?
    I dreamed once, that I was in a place, a vast land, that looks like there was a held war in that area. The sky was red, and the soil is so dry and there were skeletons lying on the ground.
    When I tried to look at myself, my hands are covered in blood, and then i found myself crying.

    When i woke up, my heart was beating so fast, man!, I can't sleep afterwards... Perhaps dream interpretation will be a good idea, anyone out there knows...??

    • ANSWER:
      Since this dream is in the context of a post-war scenario with you being the only survivor (or so it seems) this could be connected to a fear of war or destruction. According to the book "The Element Encyclopedia of 20,000 Dreams:

      "Feeling dramatically out of control in your personal life can trigger apocalypse dreams. These may be caused by hormones in adolescence, menopause or andropause, the death of a loved one (especially a parent), or divorce and other significant relationship losses."

      Your dream also has connections to isolation.

      "In some cases, world-ending dreams feature the dreamer alone amongst generally unrecognized figures, reflecting the dreamers's sense of isolation in waking life. When interpreting this dream you should ask yourself, 'How is the world ending and who is to blame?' This dream may be calling for you to protect yourself against a risk that takes you well outside your comfort zone, to become more involved in a particular cause, or to think again about the rationale of your fears."

      You mentioned the soil being very dry--a desert atmosphere of sorts. A desert can symbolize feelings of aloneness and isolation or the "hinting at things you have deserted or left behind."

      Your dream is also associated with fear and could be linked to your political views, a fear of warfare, concerns regarding environmental threats, or your religion beliefs.

      "If you are overcome with feelings of panic, fear, and horror in a nightmare dream scenario, try to identify what it was horrified you. Your dream may be reflecting a phobia you have in waking life; your unconscious is not trying to torture you but is encouraging you to confront that particular fear."

      "If you are religious in waking life, you may have a dream in which significiant icons of your faith inititiate, or withstand, the massive destruction. Another scenario is that adherents to your religious or belief system are identified in a particular way and thereby survive in destruction."

      In addition to powerlessness, isolation, fear, and feelings of impending doom, your dream could be a sign of insecurity, uncertainity, and/or a lack of self-confidence in your waking life since it appears that your life was threatened in the dream. Moreover, a fear of death or corpses in dreams may indicate a refusal to accept reality.

      As for the red sky and the blood, the color red is associated with fire, heat, blood, physical strength, life force, vitality, and energy. It is can also refer to overheated emotions like anger, rage, lust, passion, and the impulsive desire for revenge. Red can be indicative of the threat of danger, the giving into urges, violence, losing inner strength or energy, or death.

      As for the blood being on your hands, many would say that this is a reference to guilt (as seen in the play Macbeth). However, the rest of your dream doesn't suggest guilt to me unless the guilt would be more along the lines of survivor's guilt (others died while you lived) or regret--wishing you could go back and change events.

      "Finally, bear in mind that when feelings of guilt are experienced in your dream, they may be telling of repressed anger towards you or another person in real life. Dreams of anger may be equally be connected to experiences of guilt, so be alert and careful when you try to interprete them. Whatever you feel angry or guilty about in your dream, you may find that the only way to regain your peace of mind is to put things right or make amends or new resolutions in your waking life."

  47. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of/cope with SEVERE hot flashes.?
    My OBGYN has recommended HRT. I have been enduring severe hourly hot flashes for over 5 years. They were affecting my daily functioning. Now, they are invading my sleep (Night sweats) and I am finding it impossible to carry on my life. I have tried many things and spent a lot of money. Any suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      Well your doctor recommended HRT, so I would go with that. I too have been getting hot flashes for three years, they come and go, right now, I'm back to having them again. It was just found out I'm "not" going into early menopause so back to more tests to find the reason. I just want them gone because along with the hot flash comes severe anger. I feel like a walking time bomb sometimes. I will keep an eye on your question though to see what other recommendations come up.

  48. QUESTION:
    What are some successful ways to overcome depression?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many ways you can overcome depression that work very well. The most important thing to remember is that you can control your thoughts and feelings. You can learn to change habitual thoughts and feelings that bring on the moods of depression.

      One of the best ways to combat depression is to stay active. Find activities that you enjoy and seek out new interest. People are usually depressed when they have nothing to do. Get active in your community, join a bowling league, take a class at your local community college, volunteer your time to an organization, or take up a new hobby such as stamp collecting or crocheting. Busy yourself with things you enjoy doing.

      Be positive! When life lets you down, make a list of the good things in your life. Even the small ones count. The list can include such things as your family, your friends, your job, your back yard, your health, and even your ability to grill or cook. List items that you are good at doing. You may think grilling a steak to perfection is no big deal, but I have no idea how to grill a steak without it being leather. So, that is a feat to be proud of. On this list put every little thing. Now, when you feel depression coming on, take out this list and read it over and over again. This may help you with your self worth.

      Do not let others cause your depression! You can allow others to hurt your emotions, or anger you and this can also bring on depression. Remember the person that is negative is not you! Do not let their moods influence your emotions. So, what they don't like your shirt, they don't like the way you cooked breakfast, or they have some other complaint. You like your shirt, you enjoyed breakfast, and their complaints are just that, complaints without any merit. I am not saying to ignore others, but don't let them drag you down.

      Don't sit around by yourself! Being alone and idle can bring on major bouts of depression. Everyone enjoys having others around whether in a small group, one on one, or big social functions. Get out in the world. Find like minded friends and family to occupy those times.

      If you are still having problems with depression and just can't seem to rid your life of these feelings it would be advisable to visit your doctor. There could be a medical reason that is causing your depression such as prescribed medicines, menopause, or other illnesses.

  49. QUESTION:
    If a woman suffers 30 yrs of hormonal/menstrual hell, why would she agree to take HRT?
    I know the theory about weakened bones etc if a woman doesn't take it and some women never suffer PMS but having spent half a life held to ransom by hormones, surely it's better for some women when they finally disappear? Has going through the menopause improved your emotional life or do you still suffer from depression, anxiety, anger and all the psychological stuff each menstrual cycle caused?
    In the UK, going to an OB/GYN isn't exactly like going to the dentist!! Most women only have one when they are pregnant or have severe problems, so I can't ask someone I don't have. Also, what would be the point of asking someone something if they haven't gone through the menopause?? I'm asking about personal experiences, not professional ones!!

    • ANSWER:
      I am taking HRT currently.

      I was afraid of it. Not only because of the problems that my own natural levels of hormones caused (PMS, endometriosis, fibrocystic breasts...) But, the media also feeds into the fear of HRT...breast cancer, heart disease, stroke...

      Before my hysterectomy (both ovaries removed), I was hypertensive, had 'lumpy' breasts requiring yearly diagnostic mammograms, and my lipid profile sucked.

      Nothing has really changed in regards to my blood pressure and lipids except that physicians are more proactive in my care.

      My breast tissue is improving. I am counting on a screening mammo this year, no diagnostic mammo.

      PMS. That is a different issue. I never honestly addressed this with any physician. Hind sight allows me to realize that it was a much bigger issue than I was willing to give credit to. I didn't want to be labeled. I work in health-care. Complaints of depression, anger, etc negates everything, especially if you are a menstruating female.

      I still take medications since HRT. But, overall, things are more stablized. I allowed myself to experience a taste of menopause prior to starting HRT. I didn't like it.

      I'll wean myself off of the hormones in a decade or so. But, for now, I'll continue with my prescriptions. I am in my 30's. I have a family. I prefer the consistent levels of hormones I have now. I don't have the time and energy to address all the concerns and complaints of full-blown menopause at this point in my life.

      Good luck.

      Beccy (below) is right.

      I see an RE. A reproductive endocrinologist.

  50. QUESTION:
    What are some of the symptoms of male menopause?
    Besides moodiness and/or mental illness?

    • ANSWER:
      OK - Most of my mental problems are being moderated with drugs but I still get a little crazy and manic. This is what causes me to drive a fast little black 1275'S' Mini Cooper
      My voice is changing. It cracks like a teenage boy going through puberty.
      I should be mellowing with age but I still get hot flashes of rage and anger.
      My migraines are getting more frequent and severe.
      I'm going deaf in the range of a woman's voice and I'm still undecided whether or not this is a good thing.
      My eyes are dry and blood shot and I have chronic cotton mouth with the munchies.
      I'm having trouble with spotting although that could just be my hemorrhoids

      RScott

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I am 54 and am on menapause and I am finding it hard to keep alseep?
    I have tried everything, the doctor will not put me on sleeping tablets so he is giving me Amitriptyline to help me sleep. Can menopause cause sleeplessness, I do think I have hot flushes during the night, but I only get about 4 or 5 hours sleep a Night if I am lucky. Last night I only had 3 hourse sleep

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Ann, it is normal physiological change experienced in both sexes, however it is more disturbing in females, sleep disturbance give rise to many other problems, e.g irritability, BP spikes and so on..
      The level estrogen decreases in blood, so the body take times to adjust itself to new environment.
      So there are 2 schools of thoughts , one uses Hormones Replacement Therapy (HRT), the other with HRT along with some sedative or anti-anxiolytic therapy.
      Better take opinion of your gynaecologist or health care provider.
      Good Luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    what natural vitamins or OTC medicines can a woman take to reduce/relieve symptoms of menopause(cramps, flashe?
    my mother-in-law is going through menopause and she doesn't have very much money to spare, and she asked me to find out some stuff about it menopause and what she can take to help.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause with no side effects.

      Key ingredients are: Black Cohosh, Soy Isoflavones, Flaxseed, and a blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. Has no artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      A friend of mine has been taking it for some time and is very pleased with the results.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  3. QUESTION:
    what is a good otc menopause supplement?
    I have terrible night sweats. I wake up wet and freezing. My dr. suggested an otc menopause supplement. Anyone know of any good ones?
    Ok, I am not over weight and also I am not hot during these night sweats I am freezing. I only sleep in a t-shirt and I have a fan on.

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest giving Menopause Balance Complex a try. It uses compounds found in plants called photoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Contains extract of Black Cohosh, Soy Isoflavones, and flaxseed and a blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors or flavors or synthetic preservatives.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know if side effects of Arimidex subside after a period of time?
    My mother has been on it after stage IV breast cancer for almost 2 years now and the side effects keep getting worse. Any help for sleeplessness, hot flashes or depression?

    • ANSWER:
      Arimidex suppresses the production of estrogens. It is quite normal that it causes severe menopause symptoms. Even menopaused women normally retain half their production of estrogen; on that medication, it is almost all suppressed.

      There are other options for cancer hormonal treatment, which could be less debilitating for your mother. She could be treated using a SERM (Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator) such as Raloxifen. I suggest you talk about it to her doctor.

      Normally, breast cancer hormonal treatment should be discontinued after 5 years.

      Anyway, whatever you do, DO NOT encourage your mother to take phytoestrogen supplements, as those will stimulate tumor growth.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the most natural thing to take to regulate hormones during the first stages of menopause?
    I have some of the early symptoms, a few hot flashes and a couple of missed periods but nothing too bad so far. I just want to find out if there is anything natural that will help balance things so that all my hard workouts and correct eating will not be counteracted by the imbalance of hormones. Thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Also, Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion. It's a blend of natural ingredients that offers soothing relief and can help reduce the often dramatic sensation of skin temperature fluctuations common in women in their late 30's, 40's and beyond. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  6. QUESTION:
    What physical changes occur when a woman is in menopause?
    I would like to know about the external physical changes (skin, weight, hair, etc).

    • ANSWER:
      Majority of women enters into perimenopausal period around age of 35 , many of them even earlier. Peri-menopausal period is characterised with the following changes:
      •various hormonal imbalances of sexual hormones - which change from day to day (progesterone, estrogens, FSH, LH, testosterone) are changing their levels constantly
      •there is major tendency to FSH and LH levels raising up, but hormonal tests are very unreliable due to the constant change of hormonal levels. BTW, what is normal for one person, it does not to be normal for the other.
      •FSH and LH hormones, which are directly connected with producing the eggs, very often raise up, because body wants to burn the rest of the eggs as soon as possible, because there is not enough estrogens, progesterone and testosterone to keep the balance and support fertility. Excess of FSH and LH can create extreme desire for having the child, even if this desire is not realistic.
      •various hormonal imbalance of all other hormones as hormones of thyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal glands etc. Level of such hormones are also in constant change - they can change several times per day.
      •life energy drops down quickly - due to the constant hormonal change, because body is using all resources of minerals, vitamins, tissue salts etc. on extremely intensive way, while not being balanced with hormones.
      •mood changes are so typical in that period - ups and downs in feelings, blues and waltz are exchanging very often
      •problems with weight,
      •shape of the body might start to change
      •various problems with skin can become very obvious - skin very quickly shows first signs of aging and hormonal changes
      •sexual hormones support our immune system as well - so many women develop various chronic illnesses in that period
      •libido starts to change - extreme ups and downs might become significant
      •nervousness, anxiety, sleeplessness
      •fatigue and tiredness
      •lack of focus, lack of concentration
      •lack of wish to connect with other people
      •animosity towards opposite gender

  7. QUESTION:
    What are some natual or nutritional ways to combat menopause symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex.

      This complex uses compounds found in plants call phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors, or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions or the website.

  8. QUESTION:
    What age does Menopause on average start?
    Like my friend is 44 but hasnt had any symtoms...

    • ANSWER:
      Actually, it can start in your early 30s or in your 60s. It really isn't a magical thing. It is estrogen dominance. As our bodies age, progesterone production decreases more than estrogen production does. Couple that natural occurrence with the onslaught of phyto and xeno-estrogens in the life of the 21st century woman, and you can even see symptoms of estrogen dominance as young as 20!

      These extra estrogens in our lives are in anything soy, parabens, phenoxyethenol, and many other added chemicals. They are releases by microwaving in plastic, washing your hair, doing you laundry, and a host of other ways. We are being attacked by them. You friend must be living a fairly estrogen free lifestyle to still have no symptoms of estrogen dominance. But, then again, is she?

      I was 45 when I started realizing the my tiredness, weight gain, irregular periods, bloating, sleeplessness, liver pains and other symptoms were more than just aging. I started taking USP Progesterone (Progestelle brand) which is sold over the counter, and most of the symptoms went away within a month.

      I then started getting rid of the estrogens that were excess in my household, make my own laundry detergent, avoid all soy and even flax, no caffeine, and many other items on the lists, and feel much better.

      Every woman should educate herself on what menopause is - estrogen dominance, and live a lifestyle in preparation for the body changes which happen as we age. Dr. John Lee and Dr. William Eckhart, both MDs, are very well versed and you can find their literature and more by searching on the internet. It is well worth the education now! I wish I had known this about 10 years ago.

  9. QUESTION:
    what supplement should i take during menopause?
    i want a natural approach, what has worked best for you? plus what foods should i eat and what foods should avoid.

    • ANSWER:
      My friend had great results with all-natural Menopause Balance Complex. This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. Phytoestrogens are also being currently studied for heart, bone, and breast health.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors, or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions or the website.

  10. QUESTION:
    What MEDICATIONS can you take for insomnia? any advice from sufferers or doctors?
    I am looking for any medications which as less problematic in term of addiction and can be used for more than just 2 weeks or so. So preferably ones which have less addiction/dependence potential. They don't have to be spercifically for sleeping as long as they work for sleeping?

    • ANSWER:
      Do not take medicine for insomnia. Take medicine for cause of insomnia. i.e. do not take medicine to induce sleep. Findout the conditions that are causing sleeplessness and remove it.
      Sleeplessness can cause by Hyperactivity of mind, depressing events, sorrow or loss or death in family, friends or relatives, due to shocks of various kinds, worries and business matters, during menopause, pregnancy, pains and headaches, stomach pains, indigestion, anxiety due to exams, inteviews, over exertion, alcoholism, over excitement, exhaustion, stress, weakness, nervousness, fear of sleep, aching muscles, tension, hard labour, cramps and neuralgic pains, Insomnia on bad news, Insomnia on happy news, dentition and dental pain, mental illness, halucinations, asthma, night terrors and dreams, due to heat, due to coldness, restlessness, drugs withdrawal symptoms, medicine side effects, addictiveness to sleeping pills, insanity, sinile insomnia, dysmenorrhea, coughs, menopause, prolapse of uterus, urinary disturbances, fractures,sleeping in new bed,new place, diseases, ailments of various kinds, changes in timings of sleeping, sedentary habits like smoking, drinking, tea coffee consumption in excess, acidity and heartburn, gastric disturbances and many other reasons. Once the cause is determined, use appropriate medicines in homeopathy in appropriate potencies and remove the recurring cause, insomnia will disappear. Sit in meditation for fifteen minutes before sleep and soon you will be in deep sleep whatever be the cause. For meditation just sit comfortably anywhere with body straight and watch the deep breathing in and deep breathing out. Drop all the thoughts from the mind and just concentrate on the breathing. You will enter a realm of peace and calmness. Meditation is conscious sleeping, and sleeping is unconscious meditation.

  11. QUESTION:
    Is there Any good Hormonal Supplements that can be used othere then Premarin?
    My mom just got done having surgury and she needs a good Hormonal supplement othere then Premarin.

    • ANSWER:
      A friend of mine was using Premarin and after starting to experience some of the side effects she starting taking the natural supplement Menopause Balance Complex and has continued to take it to this day.

      It uses compounds found in plants - called phytoestrogens - to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes. Phytoestrogens are also currently being studied for heart, bone, and breast health. Also provides soy isoflavones and flaxseed lignans.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as the soy isoflavones and flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors or flavors and no synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and for more info feel free to contact me.

  12. QUESTION:
    Natural Products in dealing with Hot flushes?
    I've been having alot of Hot Flushes due to going through menopause. Does anyone out there know of any Natural Products to help me get through this. I don't want to have to take any hormonal products from the Doctor if I can help it. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex and Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion.

      Menopause Balance Complex uses compounds found in plants to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. Contains black cohosh, soy isoflavones and flaxseed lignans.

      Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion contains a blend of more than a dozen natural herbs including black cohosh, soy isoflavones, evening primrose extract, flaxseed, and jojoba seed oils. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  13. QUESTION:
    What causes insomnia when one is tired at night?
    I dont drink coffee or eat any caffeine in any form.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many causes, but they can include:

      1. Emotional Distress
      More particularly when it is from internalized anxiety or anger, emotional problems can easily trigger this sleep disorder.

      2. Substance Abuse
      Drinking too much coffee, colas or other "energy-upper drinks" is known to cause insomnia. Caffeine from these drinks is the main reason. Chain smokers can also be easy victims of insomnia because of the nicotine that cigarettes contain.

      Herbal remedies, alcohol and other medications can also make one prone to becoming an insomniac. Some may think that alcohol, when consumed, can make one feel drowsy. But little did they know that in the long run, when the alcohol gets metabolized, sudden wakefulness will follow.

      3. Biological Clock Disturbance.
      Also known as circadian rhythm, one's body clock, when altered, can damage the amount of sleep one can peacefully enjoy. This body clock disturbance can be caused by an irregular slumber schedule because of too much siesta or partying too late at night.

      It can also be jetlag or body clock disturbance due to traveling by plane to some place where there is a different time zone. Other causes may be the grave yard schedules of workers and cramming review season for students induced by exams.

      4. Environmental Factors
      Extreme temperatures can disrupt one's sleeping patterns. Noise and bright lights can have the same effect too. Homesickness or when one is forced to sleep in an unfamiliar place is also one reason behind getting into the habit of not having enough sleep.

      5. Health Problems
      Health disorders such as diabetes, heart failure, hyperthyroidism, ulcers, and Parkinson's disease can also induce insomnia. Asthma may also be one health problem that makes one prone to insomnia because of an asthmatic's shortness of breath.

      Frequent urination, heartburn, and chronic pain from leg cramps, tooth ache and arthritis can also cause insomnia.

      Psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression are also possible culprits for insomnia. Snoring with prolonged pauses in breathing while at sleep, also known as sleep apnea can also cause insomnia.

      Periodic arm and leg movements during sleep causing the muscles to twitch excessively is one underlying cause of this sleep disorder. Another cause is narcolepsy or one's lack of control on whether to stay awake or to fall asleep, is another cause of this sleep disorder.

      6. Pre-bedtime Activities
      Engaging to vigorous activities such as exercise just right before bedtime can deprive one of a good night's sleep. Consuming large meals when one is just about to sleep can also make one experience this sleeping disorder. This is because when metabolism is at its most active thus the body prompts one to stay awake.

      Risk Factors:
      Reports have it that 90% of people can acquire transient insomnia at some point in their lives. While an estimate of 30% suffers from its chronic form.

      a. Women are said to be more at risk in acquiring insomnia because of the following reasons:

      - Pre-menstrual syndrome with symptoms of irritability, depression and anxiety, and bloating due to menstruation disturbs a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Menopause can also change a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Pregnancy makes sleeplessness one common thing to happen.

      b. Elderly people are also prone to getting insomnia because ageing alters one's sleeping patterns.

      c. Depressed people have lighter slumbers compared to those who don't feel this psychological condition.

      d. Students or younger ones who are conscious with their grades (because of cramming) can easily become insomniacs too.

      With that vast information on what causes insomnia and who are at risk with this sleeping disorder, one can easily ward off this annoying condition.

      Prevention:

      Balance and perspective:
      At certain times, insomnia may result from stress.
      Massage techniques can ease tense necks, aching shoulders and upright torsos, and face massage can be an instant calmer.

      Some stress is an inevitable part of life, but when you need to achieve a state of inner calm, a range of meditation and visualization techniques can help you work through your insecurities, worries and anxieties.

      With practice, stress can be diminished so that it is no longer a cause of sleepless nights.

      A calm environment:
      Lack of sleep can also be exacerbated by external factors such as noise, a “busy” atmosphere in the bedroom, or simply the wrong type of mattress.

      By making the best of your physical environment, you can reduce or remove many of these detrimental factors.

      Following the principles of feng shui you can arrange your bedroom space to best effect and remove clutter that can clog free-flowing “chi” or energy.

      Choosing a calming room décor and lighting scheme can soothe the senses, while establishing a bed-time ritual can make sleep a pleasant and comforting experience to look forward to.

      Pampering treatments:
      In view of the many demands made by daily life, it is essential to find time to switch off from cares and worries in the evening, and indulge in some personal quality time.

      However busy you are, you should take time to wind down before trying to go to sleep, otherwise your mind will still be buzzing with the concerns of the day.

      Surrounding yourself with gentle candlelight and sinking into a hot bath laced with aromatherapy oils or herbal sachets can go a long way to soothe and prepare your body for sleep.

      Essential oils such as lavender and clary sage added to the water help to diminish tension headaches and muscular aches, while bath bags or bath salts made with chamomile help to ease stress.

      You can also use the natural energies from flowers and herbs as a base for warming foot baths, soporific sleep pillows and effective sleep tinctures.

      Bedtime snacks:
      You ate dinner at 6pm; it’s now 11.30pm and you’re ready to go to bed, but now you’re feeling hungry and thirsty again.

      What do you do? Instead of raiding the refrigerator for a substantial and perhaps indigestible meal, it is better to opt for a light snack, such as toast with a topping and perhaps a hot, comforting beverage.

      Try to avoid tea and coffee as they are stimulants and will tend to keep you awake if you drink them late in the day.

      Instead, herbal teas prepared for their sedative properties may be sipped in the evening, while warm, milky drinks are ideal for consumption before bed – milk contains peptides that calm the system.

      The occasional hot toddy can also provide a delicious way to wind down, and this is particularly good on a cold winter’s evening, especially if you are suffering from a cold.

      Calming the psyche:
      Sometimes it is difficult to sleep due to excessive emotions, such as fear, excitement or anxiety. Crystal therapy can help to calm heartache; choosing the right stones can also calm restlessness and anxiety, and help to regulate sleep patterns.

      Crystals can be helpful when bad dreams and nightmares are keeping you awake, as can techniques such as visualizing a guardian angel or spiritual protector. When you have perplexing or mystifying dreams, it can be very helpful to write down what happened before you forget, so that you can ponder and try to analyze them later on.

      Working towards an understanding of your dreams adds an enjoyable richness to what can be the fascinating pageant of sleep.

      Exercise to relax:
      Keeping the body moving is essential for good sleep – without exercise, you 3will not be physically tired enough to rest at night. Aerobic activities such as walking and cycling exercise the heart and tone the muscles, while some specific yoga techniques provide an excellent way to stretch and relax.

      This free ebook downlod explains Insomnia causes and how to fix it naturally with home remedies and behaviour modification

      http://www.thehealthsuccesssite.com/Sleep-disorders-free-health-book-download.html

  14. QUESTION:
    What happens in chemotherapy and why does it make people tired?

    • ANSWER:
      Chemotherapy is the use of chemicals to treat cancer. Usually more than one chemical is used and treatment is cyclical over a period of time to correspond with the cycle of cell division.
      The chemicals kill fast-growing cells including hair, bone marrow, digestive tract, and others and it is in these areas that side effects usually occur.

      Side effects of chemotherapy can range from mild to extreme.

      Almost everyone undergoing chemotherapy has some hair loss. Some may choose to wear wigs or other headcoverings during treatment, but if you’re comfortable without hair that’s OK, too!

      Many people experience nausea, fatigue, sleeplessness, periods of hyperactivity, irritability, and/or depression. If the symptoms interfere with your quality of life alert your medical team. They can help.

      Premenopausal women may experience premature menopause symptoms as a side effect. Talk with your oncologist and your OB/GYN.

      Your immune system is dependent on your bone marrow cells and they will be affected by chemotherapy. Your immune system will be depressed during and after chemotherapy and you should take prudent precautions.

      Women may find themselves particularly susceptible to vaginal and urinary tract infections during chemotherapy. Talk with your doctor about prophylactic medications. Read about sex and cancer.

      Chemotherapy is usually administered in a doctor’s office or clinic. The most common method is through an IV, however, long-term chemotherapy sometimes requires the insertion of a "port" or "heplock" which remains in your body for the duration of your treatments

  15. QUESTION:
    how I can solve hot flashes and depressions during the menopause?
    I had done total histerectomy on march and i just finnish chemoterapy for endometrium cancer 2 weeks ago

    • ANSWER:
      You might wish to try all-natural Menopause Balance Complex. This complex uses phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      These natural herbs - centuries old, but now clinically studied help relieve the common symptoms of menopause.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh (clinically proven herb that helps relieve hot flashes) as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is useful and feel free to contact with questions.

  16. QUESTION:
    When do women usually start menopause?
    I think my mom has hit it at 43..Is that normal?
    Shes 2 weeks late...don't ask me how I know lol.
    I saw that she took a pregnancy test...it was right there sitting face up in the trash. It said not pregnant...so.. menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible, or your mother may be experiencing something else altogether - a medical issue.

      About Menopause: (aka Estrogen Dominance) Actually, it can start in your early 30s or in your 60s. It really isn't a magical thing. It is estrogen dominance. As our bodies age, progesterone production decreases more than estrogen production does. Couple that natural occurrence with the onslaught of phyto and xeno-estrogens in the life of the 21st century woman, and you can even see symptoms of estrogen dominance as young as 20!

      These extra estrogens in our lives are in anything soy, parabens, phenoxyethenol, and many other added chemicals. They are releases by microwaving in plastic, washing your hair, doing you laundry, and a host of other ways. We are being attacked by them. You friend must be living a fairly estrogen free lifestyle to still have no symptoms of estrogen dominance. But, then again, is she?

      I was 45 when I started realizing the my tiredness, weight gain, irregular periods, bloating, sleeplessness, liver pains and other symptoms were more than just aging. I started taking USP Progesterone (Progestelle brand) which is sold over the counter, and most of the symptoms went away within a month.

      I then started getting rid of the estrogens that were excess in my household, make my own laundry detergent, avoid all soy and even flax, no caffeine, and many other items on the lists, and feel much better.

      Every woman should educate herself on what menopause is - estrogen dominance, and live a lifestyle in preparation for the body changes which happen as we age. Dr. John Lee and Dr. William Eckhart, both MDs, are very well versed and you can find their literature and more by searching on the internet. It is well worth the education now! I wish I had known this about 10 years ago.

      Maybe a good book for your mom for mother's day would be one of Dr. Lee's? It would be very helpful to her.

  17. QUESTION:
    does ignasia amara work for nervousness?
    i bought a little vile of it at the whole foods market/store. do you guys think these homeopathic medicines work that they sell there.
    i saw a whole slew of them..for nausea, sleeplessness, etc.
    do you guys think these really work..? i just dissolved the one for nervousness.. but i wanna know if anyone has had good results with them

    • ANSWER:
      You will definitely get good results provided the Ignatia Amara picture fits you!

      Ignatia (St. Ignatius' Bean)

      Named for the patron saint of spiritual retreats and exercises, this small tree supplies us with the emotionally and physically supportive St. Ignatius bean. In homeopathic form, this remedy treats a wide range of symptoms that can be caused by emotional turbulence. Loss of a loved one, trauma (even in the not so recent past), homesickness, broken hearts of all shapes and sizes, long, intense study periods, constant stress, in short any strong emotions that, if repressed can set off a wide array of symptoms in the body.

      Read http://www.1-800homeopathy.com/enews/ignatia.htm

      Ignatia, sometimes referred to as "homeopathic Prozac," treats acute stages of grief, most often resulting from a sudden loss, abuse, romantic disappointment, or emotional trauma, and the physical ailments that result. These commonly include digestive disorders, mood swings, anxiety, headaches, insomnia, muscle spasms, a lump in the throat, and hemorrhoids.

      Read http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_3_29/ai_54189565

      How to Use Ignatia Mara Homeopathic Remedy

      Homeopathy utilizes microextracts made from plants, flowers, herbs and animals in very diluted alcohol-based tinctures or pellets that are taken under the tongue. The extracts take time to work but can help alleviate health issues ranging from depression, anxiety, sadness or obsessive behaviors.Ignatia Mara is one remedy that every household could benefit from. It is often recommended by licensed homeopaths for use when a person is grieving over a death of family, friend or pet, or in times of a relationship breakup.

      Read http://www.ehow.com/how_4557815_use-ignatia-mara-homeopathic-remedy.html

      Homeopathic Remedy Ignatia

      The following is a list of health concerns for which Ignatia is listed as a homeopathic remedy. Refer to the individual concerns for more information.

      * Allergies and sensitivities
      * Anxiety
      * Backache
      * Depression
      * Hemorrhoids
      * Menopause symptoms
      * Postpartum depression
      * Restless legs syndrome
      * Sleeplessness

      Read http://www.vitacost.com/Healthnotes/Homeo-Homeoix/Ignatia.aspx

  18. QUESTION:
    Is it needed to take hormone therapy pills at the age of 64?
    I have been taking hormone replacement pills for 30 years to stop my nightly and daily sweats. Is it about time I stopped

    • ANSWER:
      If you mean hormones such as estrogen or progesterone, then read on. In any case, discuss your important question with your physician.

      Women are receiving estrogen replacement (ERT) alone, which is still commonly given to women who have had a hysterectomy with removal of both ovaries. The effects of ERT on women who no longer have a uterus are being studied.

      In the U.S., 38% of menopausal women take some form of HRT -- for several different reasons. Women find it especially useful to treat hot flashes, sleeplessness, moodiness, and other disruptive symptoms of menopause. It is also useful in preventing osteoporosis. And until now, HRT has been touted as a way to help prevent heart disease well after menopause.

      What Women Should Do Now - Researchers made the following specific recommendations on what to do now:

      "First, the therapy should not be continued or started to prevent heart disease. Women should consult their doctor about other methods of prevention, such as lifestyle changes, and cholesterol- and blood pressure-lowering drugs"

      "Second, for osteoporosis prevention, women should consult their doctor and weigh the benefits against their personal risks for heart attack, stroke, blood clots, and breast cancer."

      "Alternate treatments also are available to prevent osteoporosis and fractures."

      "Third, women should keep up with their regular schedule of mammograms and breast self-examinations."
      "Finally, while short-term use was not studied, women taking the therapy for relief of menopausal symptoms may reap more benefits than risks. Women should talk with their doctor about their personal risks and benefits."

  19. QUESTION:
    Why do women become increasingly belligerent after menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      it has to do with the hormones, here are facts regarding menopause.

      Majority of women enters into perimenopausal period around age of 35 , many of them even earlier. Peri-menopausal period is characterised with the following changes:
      •various hormonal imbalances of sexual hormones - which change from day to day (progesterone, estrogens, FSH, LH, testosterone) are changing their levels constantly
      •there is major tendency to FSH and LH levels raising up, but hormonal tests are very unreliable due to the constant change of hormonal levels. BTW, what is normal for one person, it does not to be normal for the other.
      •FSH and LH hormones, which are directly connected with producing the eggs, very often raise up, because body wants to burn the rest of the eggs as soon as possible, because there is not enough estrogens, progesterone and testosterone to keep the balance and support fertility. Excess of FSH and LH can create extreme desire for having the child, even if this desire is not realistic.
      •various hormonal imbalance of all other hormones as hormones of thyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal glands etc. Level of such hormones are also in constant change - they can change several times per day.
      •life energy drops down quickly - due to the constant hormonal change, because body is using all resources of minerals, vitamins, tissue salts etc. on extremely intensive way, while not being balanced with hormones.
      •mood changes are so typical in that period - ups and downs in feelings, blues and waltz are exchanging very often
      •problems with weight,
      •shape of the body might start to change
      •various problems with skin can become very obvious - skin very quickly shows first signs of aging and hormonal changes
      •sexual hormones support our immune system as well - so many women develop various chronic illnesses in that period
      •libido starts to change - extreme ups and downs might become significant
      •nervousness, anxiety, sleeplessness
      •fatigue and tiredness
      •lack of focus, lack of concentration
      •lack of wish to connect with other people
      •animosity towards opposite gender

  20. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a low dose estrogen that I can take?
    I am 41 years old and I had a hysteremtomy 2 years ago, and I have horrible hotflashes, I can't take estrodial at all, gives me shortness of breath, anyway, also, I don't want to have bone loss either. I need a low dose estrogen thats good. Does anyone know of a good estrogen that won't interfere with breathing or chest pain?

    • ANSWER:
      A friend of mine had really good success with all natural Menopause Balance Complex. She too had a hysterectomy at an early age and was given Premarin but started experiencing some of the side effects. She started taking Menopause Balance Complex and was very pleased. This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes.

      Also available is Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion which is a blend of natural ingredients that offers soothing relief and reduces skin temperature fluctuations. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  21. QUESTION:
    If you have insomnia, is it possible that your body can get back to normal on its own?
    Or is it one of those things that could take a lifetime to figure out?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on the cause. If you are temporarily worried or stressed, resolution of your problems could result in a return to a normal sleep pattern.
      If your insomnia is caused by hormonal imbalance, such as Peri-menopause, or menopause, it can also be temporary.
      Sleep apnea can also be a culprit.
      In all these cases a reduction in caffeine, smoking and exercise a few hours before bedtime can be helpful along with establishing a regular bedtime routine, like a warm bath, soft music and dim lighting. Using the bed only for sleeping and going at the same time each night, even on weekends and holidays also helps some people.
      The best course is not to fight it or struggle to sleep. Knowing that resting is also regenerating can help. When sleeplessness occurs move to a reclining chair and read. Drink warm milk (if you can stand it, uck!) and don't watch the clock.
      If symptoms persist, see a doctor.

  22. QUESTION:
    Is there a nonprescription estrogen replacement therapy that does not have appetite inducing properties?
    I have been on estradiol valerate (plant-based estrogen) injections for nearly a year. It increased my overall sense of well-being, but ... it has 'an appetite inducing property'. Since I am disabled and on a narcotic, I have a lot of problems w/ digestion/elimination, cannot exercise, and cannot endure the weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest Menopause Balance Complex. This is a natural supplement with no negative side effects.

      This complex uses compounds found in plants - called phytoestrogens - to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. Provides soy isoflavones and flaxseed lignans, phytoestrogens currently being studies for heart, bone, and breast health.

      In as few as 30 day or less, these natural herbs - centuries old, but now clinically studied - help relieve the common systems of menopause.

      A friend of mine will not be without the Menopause Balance Complex and it has not affected her appetite at all.

      Also, I would suggest all natural Optiflora (Two-Product System with Prebiotic & Probiotic) for your digestion/elimination problems. Taken regularly, it helps maintain a healthy colon and digestive system. This advanced two-product system uses new technology to protect beneficial microflora during the rigors of shipping, storage, and the acidic journey through your stomach. Other products claim live microflora at the time of manufacture. This product guarantees the delivery of live microflora to your colon. I regularly use this product.

      For more info or questions, please feel free to contact me.

      Best Wishes

  23. QUESTION:
    Question about Valerian root herbal supplement?
    How long does a 450 mg capsule of Valerian root stay in your system? It's the one from Walgreens that also has Passion Flower in it. Also does Valerian root interfere with birth control?

    • ANSWER:
      Valerian is a calmative and tranquilizer. Its properties have been known at least since the time of Hippocrates, and it was prescribed by the ancient Greek physician Galen for the treatment of headaches, insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, menstrual problems, nervous stomach, and hysteria. Clinical trials have confirmed the use of valerian for treating insomnia, especially the insomnia that accompanies menopause. The advantage of valerian over tranquilizers such as Valium and Xanax is that it reduces sleep latency, the time required to fall asleep, without a period of bedtime drowsiness and without creating a "hangover" or grogginess the next morning. Valerian has greatest effect in treating chronic insomnia, rather than short-term sleeplessness. It also soothes the digestive system and may prevent cramping caused by irritable bowel syndrome.

      Precautions
      If you use valerian for several months and suddenly stop using it, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as headache, insomnia, racing heart, and general grouchiness, although rare. Reduce dosage of a period of about a week if you wish to discontinue using the herb suddenly.

      Herbalists in Mexico, Central America, and Texas have used passionflower as a calmative and sleeping aid for over 200 years. Relieving muscle tension, the herb lowers blood pressure and calms anxiety.

      Passion Flower side effects, safety, risk
      No major side effects have been reported with passion flower in the medical journal. It may be wise to avoid the combination of passion flower and sedative drugs such as the benzodiazepines. One obvious side effect is sedation.

  24. QUESTION:
    menopause after total hysterectomy, still have my ovaries?
    I had my hysterectomy at 35, at 38 I believe I am starting into menopause, night sweats, sleeplessness, crankiness, some hot flashes during the day... has anyone else gone into menopause this soon while maintaining your ovaries?

    • ANSWER:
      My friend found that all-natural Menopause Balance Complex helped her with these symptoms. She was taking Premarin but started experiencing some of the side effects and decided to try the Menopause Balance Complex and still uses it. She also had a hysterectomy at an early age.

      This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. Black cohosh is a clinically proven herb that helps relieve hot flashes.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and for questions or the website, feel free to contact me.

  25. QUESTION:
    I had a hysterectomy in 1996 was on hormone pills for years and then quit,lately I have been having?
    AWFUL hot flashes at night,a burning headace,mainly on the right side,dryness,I do haveanxiety and take xanax for that,but the anxiety has got worse,and I have dizzy spells constanyly. I think Im having a nervous breakdown,would going back on a low dose of Premarin help?

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest trying all-natural Menopause Balance Complex. This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness and hot flashes. Black cohosh is a clinically proven herb that helps relieve hot flashes.

      A friend of mine was taking Premarin for several years as well due to having a hysterectomy but after starting to experience some of the side effects decided to try Menopause Balance Complex and has been using it ever since then.

      I would also consider B-Complex which is often called the "happy food". The B vitamins feed the nerves and have a profound effect on mental and emotional stability. Stress, medications, sugars and alcohol all rob the body of B vitamins.

      Hope this is useful and for the brand I'm speaking of, the website, or questions, feel free to contact me.

  26. QUESTION:
    For mature women only. How long do hot flashes normally last?
    It's going on a year and 7 months and I see no signs that they are dissipating! It's practically unbearable and is a whole lot worse in the summer time. I would like to hear from women who have experienced what I am talking about as I might have a medical problem which keeps them going on.

    • ANSWER:
      Hot Flashes

      Hot flashes, or flushes, are the most common symptom of menopause, affecting more than 60 percent of menopausal women in the U.S. A hot flash is a sudden sensation of intense heat in the upper part or all of the body. The face and neck may become flushed, with red blotches appearing on the chest, back, and arms. This is often followed by profuse sweating and then cold shivering as body temperature readjusts. A hot flash can last a few moments or 30 minutes or longer.
      Hot flashes occur sporadically and often start several years before other signs of menopause. They gradually decline in frequency and intensity as you age. Eighty percent of all women with hot flashes have them for 2 years or less, while a small percentage have them for more than 5 years.

      Hot flashes can happen at any time. They can be as mild as a light blush, or severe enough to wake you from a deep sleep. Some women even develop insomnia. Others have experienced that caffeine, alcohol, hot drinks, spicy foods, and stressful or frightening events can sometimes trigger a hot flash. However, avoiding these triggers will not necessarily prevent all episodes.

      Hot flashes appear to be a direct result of decreasing estrogen levels. In response to falling estrogen levels, your glands release higher amounts of other hormones that affect the brain's thermostat, causing body temperatures to fluctuate. Hormone therapy relieves the discomfort of hot flashes in most cases. Some women claim that vitamin E offers minor relief, although there has never been a study to confirm it. Aside from hormone therapy, which is not for everyone, here are some suggestions for coping with hot flashes:

      Dress in layers so you can remove them at the first sign of a flash.

      Drink a glass of cold water or juice at the onset of a flash.

      At night keep a thermos of ice water or an ice pack by your bed.

      Use cotton sheets, lingerie and clothing to let your skin "breathe."

      Symptoms of Menopause:

      Hot flashes and night sweats. Women often experience hot flashes as an intense build-up in body heat, followed by sweating and chills. Some women report accompanying anxiety as the sensation builds. In most cases hot flashes resolve within two years of menopause, although in some women they may persist for years.

      Heart pounding or racing can occur, with or independent from hot flashes.

      Difficulty sleeping. Insomnia is also common during menopause; it may be caused by the hot flashes or it may be an independent symptom of hormonal changes.

      Mood changes. Mood changes are most likely to be a combination of sleeplessness, hormonal swings, and psychologic factors as a woman undergoes this intense passage in her life. Once a woman has reached a menopausal state, however, depression is no more common than before, and women with a history of premenstrual depression often experience significant mood improvement.

      Sexuality. Sexual responsiveness tends to decline in most women after menopause, although other aspects of sexual function, including interest, frequency, and vaginal dryness vary. It is useful to remember that the symptoms of menopause eventually go away.

      Forgetfulness. This appears to be one of the few symptoms that are common across most cultural and ethnic groups.

      Urine leakage.

      Vaginal dryness.

      Joint stiffness.

  27. QUESTION:
    I am suffering from sleeplessness for a week.?
    I could not sleep even for an hour in a 24-hour day.I have a blood pressure ranging 170/90 and the blood sugar presence in my body is 200/90.What to do? I also sweat sometime.Last night my jaws clenched for a minute,first time in my life.I am 56 yr old and live in India.What to do?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure if you're a man or a woman so...

      If you are female, it could be related to menopause.

      Otherwise, whether you're male or female - anxiety, thyroid problems and hormones (insulin is a hormone) can really affect your sleep patterns. Has this ever happened to you before or is it new?

      Have you recently started taking a new/different type of medicine?

      I'm not an expert on diabetes, although my mother had it and 200 is high - could you eat more protein, less refined carbohydrates for the next few days and see if that helps to bring it in line? A High Protein/ Low GI Carbs is really good for diabetics to follow - I have those tendancies and when my diet is better (more meat, eggs, cheese and less foods that break down easily - like sugars & refined grains - even when found in natural foods), I feel much better in general.

      I hope the info below can help with the insulin levels. Once they are under control, I'm sure that sleep will come!

      Good Luck!

  28. QUESTION:
    What works for hot flashes rather than prempro or HRT medication?

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest all-natural Menopause Balance Complex and Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion.

      Menopause Balance Complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes. Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorce. No artificial colors or flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      Cooling Lotion - is a blend of natural ingredients. Contains a proprietary, synergistic blend of more than a dozen natural herbs including black cohosh, soy isoflavones, evening primrose extract, flaxseed, and jojoba seed oils.

      It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is useful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  29. QUESTION:
    I had my period about 3 weeks ago, but a week after my breast became really sore, stayed that way for 2 wks?
    Ive been regular all my life, and have never had any harmone problems, and today the soreness stopped out of nowhere. What could it be? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You should have given more details like your age, childbriths had etc to enable to answer correctly.

      Sore breasts and sore nipples - post-ovulation, pregnant, perimenopause or menopause.

      Causes of sore nipples and painful breasts - perimenopause and menopause
      Soreness or the breasts and nipples can occur as part of what is known as the climacteric syndrome. Symptoms of the climacteric syndrome include:

      - hot flashes,
      - sleeplessness,
      - weight gain and bloating,
      - mood changes,
      - irregular menstruation,
      - painful breasts
      - headaches.
      - The climacteric syndrome is caused by wildly fluctuating hormone levels and irregular functioning of the ovaries. It is not caused by an absence of estrogen. That is why hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives are sometimes prescribed to try and even out the hormone levels.

      If you start experiencing sore breasts a few days after ovulation, you can’t assume that you’re pregnant. A good sign (if you’re trying to conceive that is!) is if the breast discomfort does not subside and the breasts continue to increase in size and your period is 7-10 days late. You still need to be a bit careful because, although pregnancy is the commonest cause of a missed period, there are other causes including extreme stress and perimenopausal changes.

      However I suggest you to see a doctor to acess the situation though there no much reason to get frightend-

  30. QUESTION:
    How can I get help with Hot flashes at night (menopause)?

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all-natural Menopause Balance Complex and Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion.

      Menopause Balance Complex uses compounds found in plants call phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes.

      Contains black cohosh as well as soy isoflavones and flaxseed. Also a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      Cooling Lotion contains a blend of more than a dozen natural herbs including black cohosh, soy isoflavones, evening primrose extract, flaxseed, and jojoba seed oils. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the definition depression?
    I think im depressed but what is the deffinition?

    • ANSWER:
      Depression is a state of feeling sad, pessimistic, hopeless and dispirited. The old name for severe depression was melancholia. Most of us experience mild depression as a normal reaction to adverse circumstances. Pathological depression is characterised by over-whelming feelings of black despair, usually accompanied by physical ill health, that persist and deepen, making work and social activities impossible. Symptoms may develop slowly, and it can take some time to recognise that a person is depressed. Mildly depressed people feel miserable, are mentally and physically lethargic, and are often tearful. Symptoms that develop as depression deepens include anxiety; fear of the future; poor concentration; loss of interest on and enjoyment of normal activities (including family affairs, sex work and recreation); loss of appetite and weight; constipation; and sleep disturbances. Despair often worsens during the night, especially if sleeplessness is a problem, with the mood lifting somewhat around mid-morning and improving as the day wears on. Severely depressed people usually also feel worthless, hopeless, guilty, and physically and mentally inactive. Some may withdraw totally and huddle in bed all day. In extreme cases, sufferers may have delusions of persecution. Suicidal thoughts and attempts are common. Depression is believed to be the result of a disturbance of some chemical process within the brain. This may be triggered by viral or other infections, serious injury or persistent illness; hormonal disorders such as Hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone deficiency), hormonal changes at puberty, menopause, or after pregnancy; and life crises such as bereavement or other profound loss. In some cases (endogenous depression) there is no apparent trigger. A personality prone to depression may possibly be inherited, as it tends to run in families. Consultaton with a psychiatrist is advised if depression persists or deepens, or occurs for no apparent reason. Loving care, and reassurance by family and friends, can also be a great help.

  32. QUESTION:
    I need to get some sleep. Hot flashes preventing it. Any suggestions?
    I recently had a total hysterectomy. I am 33 years old and I am having the worst time with hot flashes. Mainly at night causing me not to have a peaceful sleep. I really could use some help.

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes. Black cohosh is a clinically proven herb that helps relieve hot flashes.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors, flavors, or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  33. QUESTION:
    why can't I go to sleep even though I am tired?
    I go to bed around 10pm and cant fall asleep till like 2am even though i am exhausted, so i only get around 5 hours of sleep a day, and if i take evan an hour nap during the day i cant fall asleep and my legs feel like ive been running for a while.

    • ANSWER:
      Sleeplessness, Insomnia is caused by so many factors that you can have one reason or six, each one potent enough to keep a person awake. When you can't sleep, consider the following possible causes:

      Common cause of insomnia and sleep deprivation disorder:

      1. Caffeine. Some people get jittery after a single cup of coffee and others can drink gallons with no discernable effect. In some situations, drinking moderate amounts of caffeine (which includes tea and cola, by the way) seems to have no effect until you've been at it for several days in a row. If I can't sleep and don't have a pressing reason for anxiety, I think back over the past several days and unusually realize I've been hitting the iced tea by the gallon. Leaving it alone for a few days usually puts things right again.

      2. Stress. If you're worried or tense, insomnia comes along as part of the package. You can try a couple of techniques to relieve your tension enough to get to sleep.

      a. Promise yourself you'll deal with whatever it is the very first thing in the morning. If you're like me, putting off paying a bill or making an unpleasant phone call can worry at me until I can't sleep. Promising to solve the problem helps you to temporarily shelve it (but you'd better keep that promise, or you'll never trust yourself again!)
      b. Setting aside a daily time for worry can help you contain it. Take ten minutes out of each day and worry like crazy. Make lists of the things you're agonizing over, then rate each item from 1-10 on a "likelihood of happening" scale. When you find yourself worrying at other times of the day or night, remind yourself that you'll worry tomorrow, at 3PM and set it aside.

      c. Imagine yourself taking a bundle of worries and locking them inside a cabinet. Take your time and be thorough. They may try to wiggle away or sneak out, but gather them all together. You may decide to put rubber bands around them or have them sedated. You might want to tie them together and roll them up like a fire hose. Be as creative as you can when picturing your worries and the way you're going to handle them. Will you stow them in an iron-bound trunk? A cedar chest? A garage or barn? Visualize the type of lock you'll use and see yourself locking the door or cabinet. Sometimes, just elaborating on this exercise is enough to put yourself to sleep.

      d. If nothing you try seems to work, consider visiting a therapist to help you learn more about reducing your anxiety. Medications have proven very effective.

      4. Hormones. Insomnia can result from hormonal fluctuations. Keeping an insomnia diary can help you figure out if sleeplessness is linked to your menstrual cycle. Sleeplessness is also one of the symptoms of menopause. If you're generally content with the way your hormones are performing, you may choose to induce sleep by having an extra glass of wine at night, or a hot bath. If hormones are causing you real problems, try herbal remedies or go have a chat with your ob-gyn about the latest in the medical community's understanding about women's sexual health.
      5. Sugar. Eating late snacks or desserts can cause insomnia as your blood sugar races around trying to find something to do. Replace sweets with sugar-free snacks and see if it helps. Eating a meal late at night can also cause insomnia, either because of the rise in blood sugar or because trying to sleep before your meal is fully assimilated can give you indigestion.

      6. Exercise. Studies have shown that when people exercise later in the evening, they also tend to have a harder time getting to sleep.

      7. Too much alcohol. If you drink a lot, sleeplessness occurs when the body rebounds from the depressant effect of alcohol on the central nervous system. This happens to chronic alcoholics, but also to people who don't usually drink much but make an exception at a bachelor party and have more than a couple. Typically, alcohol makes us sleepy, but as the alcohol is metabolized by the body, the change wakes us up. Too much sugar can work the same way in reverse, first making us high and lively, then sending the blood sugar into a crashing low. Sugar is often a major cause of sleeplessness in children. They get hopped up on popsicles and won't go down for a nap. When a grown-up tries to get them to nap anyway, the blood sugar crash comes along, and the result is a screeching, wailing, but exhausted child. Fun stuff, huh!

      We've all seen the commercials for pain relievers and cold medicines with "sleep aids", which often consist of either decongestants or alcohol. There are also herbal remedies, usually containing chamomile, which is a sleep aid know world-wide since medieval times. Valerian root ( to see an example of a .) smells stinky, even ground and in capsule form, but it's also effective and gentle. Of course, there are always pharmaceutical remedies for sleeplessness, but they should be last resorts, because they tend to be habit-forming and have other side effects.

  34. QUESTION:
    what are the best natural remedies for night sweats and heat flashes? (I'm recovering from a hysterectomy)
    I had a hysterectomy a month ago, and the only inconvience i am having is heat flashes and night sweats, I prefer natural replacements or alternative medicines to synthetic. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest all natural Menopause Balance Complex.

      Uses compounds found in plants call phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover and licorice. No artifical colors or flavors. No synthetic preservatives.

      My friend had been taking HRT but started having some of the bad side effects. She tried the Menopause Balance Complex and has been using ever since. It has worked very well for her.

      Hope this helps and best wishes. For more info, feel free to contact me.

  35. QUESTION:
    Help Menopausal hot flashes are killing me and I can't sleep!?
    Need over the counter medications I can take. I don't like swallowing lots of pills, so just one or two supplements.
    I've been taking black cohosh 300mg 2 or 3 times a day for a month! They (hot flashes) are not as intense, but still disrupt sleep and having 10-20 per day!

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest trying all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes. Only two soft gels needed per day.

      Ingredients: Black Cohosh Extract - 80 mg
      Soy Isoflavones - 30 mg
      Flaxseed Extract - 333 mg
      PhytoFem Proprietary Blend (Dong Quai Extract, Red Clover Extract and Licorice Extract) - 100 mg

      Works really well with no side effects.

  36. QUESTION:
    I am 41 years old and suffering from terrible hot flashes and night sweats, Do you have any remedies?
    I was told to take red clover, I have never heard of this, however, I have been taking Black Cohash it has done nothing for me.

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest Shaklee's Menopause Balance Complex.

      This complex uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      These natural herbs - centuries old, but now clinically studied - help relieve the common symptoms of menopause.

      Ingredients:

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover, and licorice. No artificial colors or flavors. No synthetic preservatives.

      A friend of mine has had great success with this product.

      Hope this is helpful and best wishes.

      For more info or questions, feel free to contact me.

  37. QUESTION:
    im a night owl and I cant sleep?
    Im a night owl and im energetic and talkative and alert but during the day I am like dragging and have no energy, and im moody. I've been this way for awhile .......any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Sleeplessness, Insomnia is caused by so many factors that you can have one reason or six, each one potent enough to keep a person awake. When you can't sleep, consider the following possible causes:

      Common cause of insomnia and sleep deprivation disorder:

      1. Caffeine. Some people get jittery after a single cup of coffee and others can drink gallons with no discernable effect. In some situations, drinking moderate amounts of caffeine (which includes tea and cola, by the way) seems to have no effect until you've been at it for several days in a row. If I can't sleep and don't have a pressing reason for anxiety, I think back over the past several days and unusually realize I've been hitting the iced tea by the gallon. Leaving it alone for a few days usually puts things right again.

      2. Stress. If you're worried or tense, insomnia comes along as part of the package. You can try a couple of techniques to relieve your tension enough to get to sleep.

      a. Promise yourself you'll deal with whatever it is the very first thing in the morning. If you're like me, putting off paying a bill or making an unpleasant phone call can worry at me until I can't sleep. Promising to solve the problem helps you to temporarily shelve it (but you'd better keep that promise, or you'll never trust yourself again!)
      b. Setting aside a daily time for worry can help you contain it. Take ten minutes out of each day and worry like crazy. Make lists of the things you're agonizing over, then rate each item from 1-10 on a "likelihood of happening" scale. When you find yourself worrying at other times of the day or night, remind yourself that you'll worry tomorrow, at 3PM and set it aside.

      c. Imagine yourself taking a bundle of worries and locking them inside a cabinet. Take your time and be thorough. They may try to wiggle away or sneak out, but gather them all together. You may decide to put rubber bands around them or have them sedated. You might want to tie them together and roll them up like a fire hose. Be as creative as you can when picturing your worries and the way you're going to handle them. Will you stow them in an iron-bound trunk? A cedar chest? A garage or barn? Visualize the type of lock you'll use and see yourself locking the door or cabinet. Sometimes, just elaborating on this exercise is enough to put yourself to sleep.

      d. If nothing you try seems to work, consider visiting a therapist to help you learn more about reducing your anxiety. Medications have proven very effective.

      4. Hormones. Insomnia can result from hormonal fluctuations. Keeping an insomnia diary can help you figure out if sleeplessness is linked to your menstrual cycle. Sleeplessness is also one of the symptoms of menopause. If you're generally content with the way your hormones are performing, you may choose to induce sleep by having an extra glass of wine at night, or a hot bath. If hormones are causing you real problems, try herbal remedies or go have a chat with your ob-gyn about the latest in the medical community's understanding about women's sexual health.
      5. Sugar. Eating late snacks or desserts can cause insomnia as your blood sugar races around trying to find something to do. Replace sweets with sugar-free snacks and see if it helps. Eating a meal late at night can also cause insomnia, either because of the rise in blood sugar or because trying to sleep before your meal is fully assimilated can give you indigestion.

      6. Exercise. Studies have shown that when people exercise later in the evening, they also tend to have a harder time getting to sleep.

      7. Too much alcohol. If you drink a lot, sleeplessness occurs when the body rebounds from the depressant effect of alcohol on the central nervous system. This happens to chronic alcoholics, but also to people who don't usually drink much but make an exception at a bachelor party and have more than a couple. Typically, alcohol makes us sleepy, but as the alcohol is metabolized by the body, the change wakes us up. Too much sugar can work the same way in reverse, first making us high and lively, then sending the blood sugar into a crashing low. Sugar is often a major cause of sleeplessness in children. They get hopped up on popsicles and won't go down for a nap. When a grown-up tries to get them to nap anyway, the blood sugar crash comes along, and the result is a screeching, wailing, but exhausted child. Fun stuff, huh!

      We've all seen the commercials for pain relievers and cold medicines with "sleep aids", which often consist of either decongestants or alcohol. There are also herbal remedies, usually containing chamomile, which is a sleep aid know world-wide since medieval times. Valerian root ( to see an example of a .) smells stinky, even ground and in capsule form, but it's also effective and gentle. Of course, there are always pharmaceutical remedies for sleeplessness, but they should be last resorts, because they tend to be habit-forming and have other side effects.

      If you don't have to go to work the next morning, insomnia can be pretty manageable. You might find that with punchiness comes creativity, so it wouldn't rule out getting out of bed to sketch, bake or plan next year's garden. Also, not having the stress of counting the hours until you have to get to work can often calm you down to the point of relaxation. If you're expected at work the next day, you could call in sick the night before. Then, if you can't get to sleep, you can stay home and rest the next day, and if you can get to sleep, you can show up the next day.

  38. QUESTION:
    i am going through early menopause i haven' had a period since February?
    i had a bleed 2 weeks ago and now im bleeding again is this normal or is there a problem ?
    i went to my doctor and had tests done and he confirmed it was early menopause but with bleeding every 2 weeks is bothering me dont know if its normal or not.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello dear,
      There are various symptoms of early menopause like
      • Irregular or missed periods
      • Periods that are heavier or lighter than usual
      • Hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth that spreads over the upper body)
      • Vaginal dryness (the vagina may also become thinner and less flexible)
      • Bladder irritability and worsening of loss of bladder control (incontinence)
      • Emotional changes (irritability, mood swings, mild depression)
      • Dry skin, eyes, or mouth
      • Sleeplessness
      • Decreased sex drive

      Don't be stress. Take a proper diet and do regular exercise. This all will help you to feel relief in menopause

  39. QUESTION:
    i am going through menopause and hormones are off what can i take natural and i have a lot of belly fat?

    • ANSWER:
      Hot Flashes
      Hot flashes and night sweats are the most common complaint of women during the menopause transition. While estrogen is very effective in alleviating vasomotor symptoms, there are alternative therapies that work quite well for some women.

      •Black Cohosh
      Black cohosh is a nutritional supplement derived from a plant in the buttercup family. It has been used for centuries as a remedy for menstrual disorders and menopause symptoms.

      •Flaxseed Oil
      Flaxseed and flaxseed oil contain plant estrogens and oils that are used as a treatment for breast pain and hot flashes.

      •Soy
      The research on whether or not soybeans and soybean products are helpful with menopause symptoms has been mixed. Part of the mystery may have been solved by a study that showed a reduction in symptoms for women who produced an estrogen called “equol” when they ate soy.

      •Red Clover
      Red clover is another plant estrogen that some women find effective for reducing hot flashes. Studies show a very modest effect of red clover on hot flash symptoms.

      •Breathing and Relaxation Techniques
      Slow, deliberate, deep breathing and progressive relaxation techniques have been shown to decrease hot flashes by up to 60%. Breathe in slowly through your nose, counting to five. Then breathe slowly out through your mouth, counting from five back to one.

      •Acupuncture
      Acupuncture does seem to help hot flash symptoms. It’s not clear whether this is because of the acupuncture itself or because you relax during the treatment. One study suggested that true acupuncture and “pretend” acupuncture had the same effect on hot flash symptoms.

      Mood Problems
      Mood changes are another major complaint for women during menopause. Women describe themselves as “wanting to bite someone’s head off” or “sad for no reason at all.” The more sensitive you are to hormone changes, the more likely you will notice some mood swings with menopause.

      •St. John’s Wort
      St. John’s Wort has been shown in studies to help mild to moderate depression in the general population and menopausal mood problems for some women.

      •Vitamin D
      Vitamin D plays a role in moderating many body processes. It has been linked to prevention of cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis and many other chronic diseases. It has also been proven to moderate mood in people who are deficient. The current recommended daily dose of vitamin D (400 IU) is seen by many health practitioners as too low to maintain optimal levels of this vitamin in your system. It is generally agreed that doses of 1,000 IU per day are not harmful and can help correct a vitamin D deficiency.

      •Kava No More
      For many years, kava or “kava kava” was recommended for mood disorders. Recent research shows increasing evidence that it is toxic to the liver, so it is not recommended as a natural remedy for menopause symptoms.

      Insomnia
      Natural remedies insomnia may work for you if your sleeplessness is ongoing. If you have tried sleep hygiene and are still finding yourself wrestling with wakefulness, there are natural approaches that may help.

      •Melatonin
      Melatonin is a hormone that helps regulate the sleep/wake cycle. It is relatively safe when used in small doses and may help you get back to a pattern of solid sleep. It is not recommended to be used for more than two weeks, so if you haven’t resumed a normal sleep pattern after using it for a couple of weeks, check with your doctor about other choices.

      •Acupuncture
      Acupuncture is based on ancient Chinese medicine, and research shows that it can be more effective than prescription medications for insomnia in women.

      •Relaxation
      If you are having trouble getting to sleep or can’t get back to sleep once you wake in the night, learning relaxation techniques can save the day (or night).

  40. QUESTION:
    menopause and women breaking up?
    when women go thru menopause,...or are going thru........why do alot of women cant take a relationship and break up with there partner???....this is something ive notice happening alot and need advice....thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      You've got to be kidding! It's the men who can't handle the relationships associated with the mood swings, night sweats, sleeplessness, hot flashes, etc. Every guy that I know of who has left his menopausal partner, has gone to a much younger one. Men can't handle it.

      Now, if you will excuse me, I need to turn on the fan.

  41. QUESTION:
    My doc said I was in Menopause, if so why am I still having a period?

    • ANSWER:
      Majority of women enters into perimenopausal period around age of 35 , many of them even earlier. Peri-menopausal period is characterised with the following changes:
      •various hormonal imbalances of sexual hormones - which change from day to day (progesterone, estrogens, FSH, LH, testosterone) are changing their levels constantly
      •there is major tendency to FSH and LH levels raising up, but hormonal tests are very unreliable due to the constant change of hormonal levels. BTW, what is normal for one person, it does not to be normal for the other.
      •FSH and LH hormones, which are directly connected with producing the eggs, very often raise up, because body wants to burn the rest of the eggs as soon as possible, because there is not enough estrogens, progesterone and testosterone to keep the balance and support fertility. Excess of FSH and LH can create extreme desire for having the child, even if this desire is not realistic.
      •various hormonal imbalance of all other hormones as hormones of thyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal glands etc. Level of such hormones are also in constant change - they can change several times per day.
      •life energy drops down quickly - due to the constant hormonal change, because body is using all resources of minerals, vitamins, tissue salts etc. on extremely intensive way, while not being balanced with hormones.
      •mood changes are so typical in that period - ups and downs in feelings, blues and waltz are exchanging very often
      •problems with weight,
      •shape of the body might start to change
      •various problems with skin can become very obvious - skin very quickly shows first signs of aging and hormonal changes
      •sexual hormones support our immune system as well - so many women develop various chronic illnesses in that period
      •libido starts to change - extreme ups and downs might become significant
      •nervousness, anxiety, sleeplessness
      •fatigue and tiredness
      •lack of focus, lack of concentration
      •lack of wish to connect with other people
      •animosity towards opposite gender

  42. QUESTION:
    I think I'm about to go into menopause; I'm 52 and having unpredictable periods.?
    I wake up every night at 2 am, and feel like adrenaline is racing thru me. Also, I can cry at the drop of a hat. What has anyone done with these kinds of problems? I don't think I can take estrogen yet because I am still having periods. Is that true? Would that be a good idea if my doc said it was okay? What the hell else can I do? This sleeplessness is a real bitch, and I can't stand being so damn moody. Thanks so very much for any input!

    • ANSWER:
      Sure sounds like you're in perimenopause! I have to agree with the answers that say talk with your doctor. Hormone replacement therapy is controversial right now and there are other genetic conditions that can worsen if you take herbal remedies.

      Talk with your doctor. Read WebMD, a good article on there is http://www.webmd.com/content/article/51/40623.htm

      Take care of yourself, stay away from caffene for now and rest when you need to do so.

      Good luck!

  43. QUESTION:
    prescribe for me the medicine 4 hotflushes pre menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      I'll suggest you 4 treatments.
      1. Beet root juice is very effective in resolving the symptoms of menopause.
      2. Black Cohosh was a major ingredient in Lydia Pinkham’s famous women’s tonic, sold for more than 50 years in the 19th century.
      Clinical studies support its safety and efficacy for treating the physical and emotional symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, irritability and occasional sleeplessness associated with menopause.
      3. Carrot seeds is very beneficial in regulating the severity of these symptoms.Carrot seeds resolves the hot flushes,vaginal dryness and irritability in menopause.
      4. Liquorice is very beneficial in regulating the severity of these symptoms like genital dryness, irritability, and hot flushes.

  44. QUESTION:
    Childless and Menapause?
    I've read that women who have never given birth can start menopause as early as their late 30s. I'm 43 and childless by choice. For the past 5 years my periods have come every 3 weeks and have been extremely painful with heavy bleeding and many, many clots. I wake with wet hair and the front of my t-shirt drenched almost every night. Are these symptoms of menapause? I'd love to hear from other childless women who have started menapause or already gone through it. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Actually, it can start in your early 30s or in your 60s for any woman, not just childless. It has more to do with exposure to estrogen in your life and lifestyle, but is obviously a body hormonal issue.

      It really isn't a magical thing. It is estrogen dominance. As our bodies age, progesterone production decreases more than estrogen production does. Couple that natural occurrence with the onslaught of phyto and xeno-estrogens in the life of the 21st century woman, and you can even see symptoms of estrogen dominance as young as 20!

      These extra estrogens in our lives are in anything soy, parabens, phenoxyethenol, and many other added chemicals. They are releases by microwaving in plastic, washing your hair, doing you laundry, and a host of other ways. We are being attacked by them. You friend must be living a fairly estrogen free lifestyle to still have no symptoms of estrogen dominance. But, then again, is she?

      I was 45 when I started realizing the my tiredness, weight gain, irregular periods, bloating, sleeplessness, liver pains and other symptoms were more than just aging. I started taking USP Progesterone (Progestelle brand) which is sold over the counter, and most of the symptoms went away within a month.

      I then started getting rid of the estrogens that were excess in my household, make my own laundry detergent, avoid all soy and even flax, no caffeine, and many other items on the lists, and feel much better.

      Every woman should educate herself on what menopause is - estrogen dominance, and live a lifestyle in preparation for the body changes which happen as we age. Dr. John Lee and Dr. William Eckhart, both MDs, are very well versed and you can find their literature and more by searching on the internet. It is well worth the education now! I wish I had known this about 10 years ago.

  45. QUESTION:
    Do I have underactive thyroid?
    I am 34.My symptoms are:Fatigue,sleeplessness,hot flushes and muscle aches...

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Anxiety,the other is it could be Menopause.Don't laugh,it can happen at your age, and a simple blood test can confirm or deny it.

  46. QUESTION:
    Should I go for HRT?
    I'm 42 and starting to experience "pre-menopause" type symptoms. I've heard both good and bad things about Hormone Replacement Therapy. Obviously, I'll talk to my Doc, first, but I wondered if other people had good or bad experiences with it.

    • ANSWER:
      Fortunately I went through menopause with no problems but my friend was taking HRT in her early forties and started experiencing some bad side effects. She started using all natural Menopause Balance Complex and had very good results and continues to use it today.

      It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      It contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover and licorice. No artificial colors or flavors. No synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is useful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is there a certain age or signs that you know when you are going into menopause?
    I am a 37 yr old female. I believe it is still a little early to be thinking about going into menopause. I have just within the year gotten my tube tied and I have heard that it could put you into early menopause. I mean I don't plan on having any more kids so what is the point of having a period any longer. Honestly if I could have had a hysterectomy I would have just to be done with it all. I know all women have the same problems and probably feel the same but it is just bothering me a lot right now. I know going into early menopause isn't good not sure why though. So Im just wondering if there is a certain age or certain signs I should watch out for. I don't know if it has anything to do with it but I did start my period at an early age of 9. Thanks for any help or Information.

    • ANSWER:
      I had my tubes tied when I was 23 after several miscarriages,I always had heavy periods (you can get similar symptoms to the menopause after tubal tie but it's not),But they became even heavier & more frequent & my uterus prolapsed so I had a hysterectomy at 27.I still had the menopause without the period at 46 until I was 55.you can start in your late 40s ( the average is about 52.) til late 50s.The best person to ask is your gynecologist Going into early menopause the down side.Vagina thinner less flexible dryness through lack of eostrogen,(I had to use lub since I was 27 know matter how aroused I was) thrush through lackof same,lack of bladder control,dry eyes & mouth sleeplessness,mood swings depression,hot flushes, night sweats & a risk of osteoporosis. to name the 1s I can think ofHope it helps.Good Luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    Herbal alternatives TO TREAT HOT FLUSHES cuased from menopause?
    Hi i was wondering are there any good herbs that are used to treat hot flushes cuased from the menopause. I am asking this question on behalf of my Mother. She was on HRT but is no longer taking it, and wont be taking it any more. She is taking medicine perscribed to her from the GP for hot flushes but made her to tierd; especially with her stessfull job.
    So if anyone knows safe herbal alternatives i wuold very much appreicaite your help Many thanks from C

    • ANSWER:
      She may be very successful in using all natural Menopause Balance Complex and has no side effects. It uses compounds found in plants to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause. My friend swares by it. She too used to take HRT.

      Key ingredients are: Black Cohosh, Soy Isoflavones and a blend of dong quai, red clover and licorice. Contains no artificial colors, flavors or synthetic preservatives.

      Hope this is useful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  49. QUESTION:
    Am I going through the beginnings of menopause?
    I am 37. For the past three months, my period has diminished from 3 days and moderate to 1 day and very light. Also in that time frame, I have had frequent hot flashes that start in my stomach and go up to my head, as well as intermittent dizziness and extreme irritability. I also have to take a melatonin pill in order to sleep. I talked to my general doctor who said it does sound like my body is trying to start to go through the change. He recommended I see a gyno for a full work-up, including FSH tests and hormone levels.

    Does this sound like the beginnings of menopause to you all, too? (I have not been under any added stress, so it's not that.)
    I've never had any children. I asked the doctor if women who don't bear children go through menopause earlier, and the doctor said that it's fairly common.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, It sounds like your doctor might be right, but a little research is always best, you should never take one doctors opinion as the holy grail.
      I found you some extra info in Web MD.com
      Premature Menopause

      In the U.S., the average age of onset for "natural" menopause is 51. However, because of genetics, illness, or medical procedures, some women go through menopause before the age of 40. Menopause that occurs before this age, whether natural or induced, is known as "premature" menopause.

      In addition to dealing with hot flashes, mood swings and other symptoms that accompany menopause, many women undergoing premature menopause have to cope with additional physical and emotional concerns. For example, since menopause signals the end of a woman's fertile years, a woman who wishes to get pregnant is likely to have trouble.
      What Are the Symptoms of Premature Menopause?

      Symptoms of premature menopause are often the same as those experienced by women undergoing natural menopause and may include:

      * Irregular or missed periods.
      * Periods that are heavier or lighter than usual.
      * Hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth that spreads over the upper body).

      These symptoms are a sign that the ovaries are producing less estrogen.

      Along with the above symptoms, some women may experience:

      * Vaginal dryness (the vagina may also become thinner and less flexible)
      * Bladder irritability and worsening of loss of bladder control (incontinence)
      * Emotional changes (irritability, mood swings, mild depression)
      * Dry skin, eyes, or mouth
      * Sleeplessness
      * Decreased sex drive

      In addition to the symptoms listed above, if you are under the age of 40 and experience any of the following conditions, you should see your doctor to determine whether you are undergoing premature menopause:

      * You have undergone chemotherapy or radiation.
      * You or a family member has an autoimmune disorder such as hypothyroidism, Graves' disease or lupus.
      * You have unsuccessfully tried to become pregnant for more than a year.
      * Your mother or sister experienced premature menopause.

  50. QUESTION:
    Menopause question: Anybody have any tips on dealing with night sweats.?

    • ANSWER:
      There's a couple all-natural products that you might want to consider.

      Menopause Balance Complex - Uses compounds found in plants call phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Contains a standardized extract of Black Cohosh as well as Soy Isoflavones and Flaxseed. Also contains a proprietary phytoestrogen blend of dong quai, red clover and licorice.

      Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion - It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects. Pleasantly scented.

      Contains a proprietary, synergistic blend of more than a dozen natural herbs including black cohosh, soy isoflavones, evening primrose extract, flaxseed, and jojoba seed oils.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions or the website.


menopause sleeplessness

Menopause Treatment

[STARTPOSTCONTENT][POSTCONTENT][ENDPOSTCONTENT]

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the best treatments and products for endometriosis?
    Does anybody know of anyone who was cured by a specific treatment, product, or diet that had endometriosis? Or does anybody have any advice that would be helpful? Anything that can at least minimize or stop the pain? Please let me know, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      When I was diagnosed with Endometriosis many years ago, it was already so bad that my ovaries were on the verge of rupturing so I had to have emergency surgery. The doctor removed one ovary and left the other teeny partial ovary so I wouldn't go into menopause at such an early age. He also removed massive endometrial tissue from my uterus and almost every other internal organ. Before the surgery Naproxen (Alleve) really helped but it was prescription strength back then.

      I remember hearing back then that a pregnancy would "cure" it but I don't know anyone (including myself) that would choose that option and I am sure it involves much more along with the pregnancy.

      My daughter was diagnosed too and had a laproscopy done to see how far along the disease was and it so bad that she had to have a total hysterectomy at age 27.

      It is a scary thing to go through but just like many other health issues, an early diagnosis helps a lot! Talk with your doctor about your questions and concerns because there may be other treatments out there now that weren't available when it happened to me or to my daughter. Good luck to you and please find out all that you can before the major worry sets in!

  2. QUESTION:
    How do you know when menopause is over?
    After years of hot flashes, night sweats, hormone replacement treatment, bad nerves, ........ After starting hormones they symptoms slow down almost don't know they are there. How do you know when it is over and you can stop taking the hormones? Or is this a life style for the rest of my life?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the deal, from a guy with 5 sisters (all at various stages of menopause), and a partner who's had to wrestle with hot flashes / night sweats after coming off HRT at 61 -- I'm not sure the symptoms are ever done. All it takes is for your hormone levels to get out of whack, and you're off the the races. OK, maybe you shouldn't call it menopause, but anything from head trauma to bad diet to an overly warm shower can take you past the tipping point and light up a hot flash. So maybe menopause doesn't last forever, but some of the symptoms seem to. So watch your diet, exercise, do all the things you should be doing - but keep a small fan handy, use wicking pajamas, etc. My partner and I actually put together a web page with a number of issues attendant to the symptoms of menopause at the link below.

      Oh - and finally - in addition to the remedies we listed on the web site, her OB/GYN suggested that she try venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor) - and it stopped her hot flashes and night sweats almost immediately - although it did cause a dry mouth as a side effect. It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms, and there are a lot of doctors who don't know of this benefit. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may stop the hot and cold flashes and night sweats. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary, however - or it may not work at all. If you'd prefer to avoid drugs, visit the web page below for other ways to attack the beast. Hope your symptoms stay at bay!

  3. QUESTION:
    how can you tell the difference from bipolar and menopause?
    my mother has always been a bit pissed off. I need to find out if it's menopause or bipolar disease. if bipolar, how would you get your mother to get checked out by a psychiatrist?

    • ANSWER:
      Bipolar Illness
      Bipolar Disorder: Mania and Mixed Episodes
      Bipolar disorder is an illness bipolar illness of severe mood swings. It is also called manic depression. If you have this bipolar illness illness, you may have periods of severe high or low moods. These periods may impact your day-to-day functioning.

      The high moods are called acute mania. They can make you feel restless, grouchy, or very happy. The low moods are called depression. They can make you feel very sad.

      Some people can have a mixed state. That’s when you have acute mania and depression at the same time.

      Both women and men get bipolar disorder in equal numbers. The disease is usually first seen in adults 18 and older.

      Technically, menopause is the stopping of periods or menses. The average age is 52; however, a woman’s menopause can occur at any point between her 30’s and her 60’s. This time in a woman’s life can be dramatic or quite simple — it is different for each woman — but every woman does stop having periods. Some people call it adolescence in reverse — a rocky time of fluctuating hormones and emotions. Perimenopause is usually the two to five years beforehand, but sometimes women have symptoms for 10–15 years before stopping their periods. When symptoms arise at a young age it is commonly called early menopause.

      Menopause symptoms can range from mild hot spells at night to constant dripping sweats all day and night. Some women spot for a few months, others bleed heavily for years. These symptoms are caused by hormonal imbalances and changes — not necessarily estrogen loss. They are also related to diet, lifestyle and genetic factors. Many menopausal women seek forms of menopause treatment that do not work and create even greater hormone imbalance.

      i hope this helps

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you know when will you be menopause?
    I had my first period when i was 12. Can we calculate the estimated time of our menopause? Somebody told me to add 30 to the age I had my first period and that'll be my age to be menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      34 Menopause Symptoms

      Menopausal symptoms affect about 70% of women approaching menopause. Typical menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes or night sweats, are caused by changing hormonal levels in the female reproductive system. Almost all women notice early symptoms while still having periods. This stage of gradually falling and fluctuating hormone levels is called perimenopause, which often begins in the early 40s.

      The symptoms of menopause usually last for the whole menopause transition (until the mid 50s), but some women may experience them for the rest of their lives. The most common symptoms are: Hot Flashes, Night Sweats, Irregular Periods, Loss of Libido, and Vaginal Dryness.
      However, there are a variety of treatments that can be considered to deal with these symptoms.

  5. QUESTION:
    What was the first question you asked your mother the day she found out you were going through menopause?
    Because my mother will start going through menopause soon and I want to prep some questions for her to ask Grandma.

    • ANSWER:
      A person came to Allah's Messenger (may peace be upon him) and said: Who among the people is most deserving my companionship (of a kind treatment from me?) He said: Your mother. He, again, said: Then who (is the next one)? He said: It is your mother (who deserves the best treatment from you). He said: Then who (is the next one)? He (the Holy Prophet) said: It is your mother. He (again) said: Then who? Thereupon he (The Prophet (peace be upon him)) said: It is your father.

      http://youtu.be/PInPedCLGFo

  6. QUESTION:
    My wife will be going through menopause soon what should I expect?
    Because of Cancer treatment and a hysterectomy after that my wife will be going through menopause, pretty soon. The cancer treatment gave me a preview but the hysterectomy will be the full on thing. What should I expect? How can I be supportive?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause typically occurs in women between the ages of 45 and 55 year old. Symptoms include irregular periods, heavy bleeding, hot flashes, disrupted sleep, headaches, dry eyes, vaginal changes (dryness), hair loss, weight gain and a loss of interest in sex. Someone women may also experience extreme emotional distress. Some women also have short term memory loss, lack of focus and irritability. Some women describe feelings of “fuzzy thinking” and the inability to multi-task. Some also experience increased feelings of anxiety, fatigue and depression. Also, women should be cautious of extreme or drastic mood swings.

  7. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  8. QUESTION:
    What happens when a person doesn't take their menopause supplements?
    What happens when a female/male does/doesnt take it?
    What are some of the major signs of withdrawal?
    What do menopause supplements help with?

    • ANSWER:
      hormones are the only effective treatments to deal with menopause. Withdrawl will cause the return of menopausal symptoms.
      Hormone treatments effectively prescribed in the right dose will eliminate the great majority of unpleasant symptoms. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are the main ones but these can be supplemented with low dose DHEA and melatonin for insomnia.

  9. QUESTION:
    what happens if my cervical cancer has not gone after treatment?
    I am 27 years old and I have recently undergone chemo and radiation therapy for cervical cancer and i am still waiting for my results. i was just wondering if anyone knows of my options if the treatment has not worked this time round. What if it is still there but has shrunk? would i have to undergo another round of chemo or would they just do a hysterectomy as i have already had two rounds of chemo and radiation? Can anyone please help me?
    if i have the surgery to remove the cervix would that mean that i would not be able to have children?

    • ANSWER:
      Please feel free to email me, and I can send you my regularly used email address (not the yahoo one) if you need to talk.

      I just turned 28 and I just found out last month that my stage 2B cervical cancer was gone. It had spread into lymph nodes and tissues in my pelvis. I was diagnosed in July, I was 27 also. I feel like your doctors should be informing you better because I don't know of any radiation and chemo treatments for cervical cancer which are fertility sparing. I did not have a hysterectomy, I still have my uterus AND cervix, as well as all of my other "parts" BUT my eggs were all destroyed throwing me into menopause at 27. This ALWAYS happens unless you have ovarian transposition and your radiation avoids the higher area above your pelvis (mine did not because it was in lymph nodes higher up) and on top of it, cervical cancer chemo is often Cisplatin which almost always causes infertility. If one doesn't get you, sadly the other probably will. And thats just the egg issue. I was lucky to have a few weeks to have them frozen before starting treatments. But even after all of this, I've done extensive research on the possibility of carrying my own child in the future, and I have found that this had never been successfully done, ever. There are cases of women with smaller doses of radiation, smaller than those used for cervical cancer, who occasionally are able to sustain pregnancy. Usually they are childhood cancer survivors for lymphoma or other cancers through the body and even then, it's not very common for them to be able to carry a pregnancy successfully. Removal of the cervix is called a trachelectomy and it's used for women who don't get chemo and radiation, but just have the cervix removed so that they can carry a pregnancy. If the surgeon doesn't get clear margins during the surgery (they test the edges of the removed cervix for signs of cancer) then they will proceed to do a hysterectomy because that means that the cancer has gone too high into the endocervical canal for a trachelectomy. BUT after chemo and radiation theres no way to have children naturally anyways.

      To answer your question correctly otherwise, I need more information. Why did you get chemo and radiation? Usually this is done because it's advanced stage, stage 2B or later like mine was. Any earlier, and theres a good chance you are getting a radical hysterectomy with complete lymph node dissection and removal in the area affected. Those lymph nodes are tested for cancer and then if any test positive, you will likely then get chemo and radiation or sometimes just radiation alone but chemo reduces recurrance A LOT.

      What stage is your cervical cancer?

      If the cancer is contained to the cervix after treatment (or was it contained to the cervix before treatment, and they for some reason did chemo and radiation anyways?) then you can have a hysterectomy to remove the residual cancer.

      Now here's the scary part...which had me on pins and needles for months. IF the cancer is spread outside of the cervix, into nearby tissues or nodes, theres a radical surgery they do, which usually involves removal of abdominal organs including possibly (and usually) complete hysterectomy, oophrectomy (ovaries removed), part of your bowels or intestines, tissues and muscles affected, and even sometimes the bladder, other affected organs which cancer would likely be in such as a kidney, etc. This is considered salvage surgery and it's used in the most desperate of situations as a last hope to save a patient who hasn't responded well to radiation and chemo.

      Most of the time, I found out that we will receive the max dose of radiation for cervical cancer, I know I did. That means that you cannot receive radiation to the same area ever again, as long as you live. This also scares the hell out of me. They can do pin point radiation elsewhere in the body should it ever happen, but not full radiation because theres a max that the body can handle without becoming toxic :/ Also theres a max dose chemo, although typically they use chemosensitization for cervical cancer which is not a high dose. Mine was a double dose because they thought I could handle it physically but it was still considered a fairly low dose.

      Also what do you mean by 2 round of chemo and radiation? For my treatment, I received a total of 8 weeks of chemo, radiation internal and external.

      Mondays were chemo days, every monday for 8 weeks.

      Then I did 8 weeks of external beam radiation, and the last week or 2 (can't remember) I received a total of about 5 internal brachytherapy radiation treatments.

      I wish I could give you more solid answers but I need more information. Please email me if you want to talk about this more. I have a few young cervical cancer friends I've met thru forums such as this and we support eachother, there are not many young cervical cancer survivors out there willing to talk, or so I've found when going thru my treat

  10. QUESTION:
    What do you do if your mom is going through menopause?
    Okay im a teenager with a mom who i think is going through menopause. seriously its hell. she picks on me all the time and doesnt give a break. she has weird moments which i never saw b4. how do you deal with this?

    • ANSWER:
      What you can do is to communicate openly with her about her physical and emotional condition. You may suggest her to talk about her symptoms and how they affect her mood with other women who experience menopause before. Try to establish some mutual rules for resolving family issues and avoiding unnecessary conflicts.

      You also can suggest her to take some herbal menopause treatment like the one mention in our website which will help her to relief menopause symptom.

  11. QUESTION:
    Can hair loss treatment such as Rogaine be used to help facial hair growth?
    I am a 22 year old man and my facial hair is still fine and patchy. I only have to shave about once or twice a week. Could rubbing a hair loss treatment for baldness onto the face every day cause my facial grow to grow out thicker and faster? If so, how long until the effect is noticeable? Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Like menopause, the story of unwanted facial hair is often all about estrogen, or to be more precise, the relationship between levels of estrogen and testosterone. Since rogaine will take over on the hormonal imbalance that it happening on your body it will likely cause some unwanted hair to grow. But typically, any rubbing treatment that was originally made for scalp care won't be effective if it will be use on some facial purposes.

  12. QUESTION:
    When to seek infertility treatment with different circumstances?
    My circumstances are a little different than most. One circumstance being in my late 20's I donated eggs two times (which i have read takes away years of fertility), and two, my mother went through menopause at an extremely early age (before 40). I am now 32 and trying to conceive with no luck. When should I seek help?

    • ANSWER:
      first try to follow recommendations concerning How to get Pregnant Fast (during minimum 6 months) - discover below

  13. QUESTION:
    Have you had any relief from menopause symptoms WITHOUT any HRT?
    I am interested in learning about treatments without any type of hormones. I do not even want the bioidenticals. Please let me know if you have tried anything else for hot flashes, dry skin, dry mouth, irregular sleep patterns, stiffness, etc. Thank You very much.

    • ANSWER:
      Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  14. QUESTION:
    What are the first signs of menopause?
    I am 47 years old and my periods have become very heavy. They have always been very light. Is this a sign that I am starting to go through menopause? What can I expect next?

    • ANSWER:
      it could be...everyone is different when it comes to the first stages of menopause - usually you have changes in your cycle (some get heavier and more frequent, some are the opposite) accompanied by symptoms of hormonal changes (moodiness, achiness, fatique, hot flashes, sweating). Talk to your doctor - if you're interested in hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), this can relieve some of the symptoms you're experiencing (as well as help to prevent bone loss that can occur during menopause). Some women will continue to have abnormal, irregular periods for years before they actually hit 'menopause'. Others will progress quite quickly...again, talk to your doc, they can give you an idea of where you are by testing the functioning of your ovaries (which excrete estrogen), as well as give you some treatment options.

      here's some general menopause info:
      http://www.fbhc.org/Patients/Modules/menopause.cfm

  15. QUESTION:
    What Is The Negative and Positive Feedback In Menopause?
    Can someone please tell me the positive and negative feedback for hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, ovarian follicles, gnrh, fsh, lh and oestradiol in menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause Scoop’s Free Menopause Social Network is a place where people interested in the topics of menopause, menopause causes, menopause signs, menopause symptoms, menopause treatments, early menopause, male menopause, and menopause effects can meet each other, invite friends, and join groups, while gathering and sharing first-hand information and experiences. Users can set up their own groups, participate in forums, engage in online chat, see the latest research, and enjoy menopause humor.
      Like Facebook, The Free Menopause Social Network is an online community of internet users. The only difference is that the community’s interest is geared around interacting with each other on subjects relating to menopause. Also like Facebook, it is a place where you can update your friends on your feelings and experiences and they can do the same for you. Not only is it a place to research facts, but it is also a source of entertainment, whether it is from the human interaction between friends or from the collection of humorous videos and links provided by the network.
      Once you have subscribed to The Menopause Social Network you can immediately begin to socialize, ask questions, get answers, read research, join groups, invite friends, share stories, and feel better about your own situation. The friends that you can make are just one of the many benefits to The Menopause Social Network. Another one of those benefits includes diversity because the network gives individuals from all around the world access to each other. This means that although you may be in the United States, you could develop an online friendship with someone in Denmark or India. Not only will you make new friends, but you just might learn a thing or two about how menopausal symptoms, menopausal treatments, and menopausal effects are dealt with in other cultures and learning is always a good thing.
      As mentioned, The Menopause Social Network often involves individual forming their own groups or sub groups around a particular topic of interest, geographical proximity, or some other attribute. As long as they have an interest in menopause, anyone can become a member, no matter what their hobbies, beliefs, or views are. However, once you are inside the network, you can begin to create your own circle of friends and eliminate members that do not share your interests or goals.

      http://menopausescoop.com/

  16. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a good support group for young women going through surgical menopause?
    I am 29 and underwent a complete hysterectomy last december i have no ovaries or anything left. I am truly suffering with extreme severe hot flashes constantly and sweating alot as well. I would like to talk to others like myself who are young and experiencing severe menopause symptoms caused by surgical menopause.
    I live in a very small town. We have no groups like that here. I was wanting to meet other women online to discuss this problem. People who are going through this as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I can relate to your situation. I had a complete hysterectomy also when I was 27 and also live in a small town.There is just no support groups out there for young women like us! I can give you some advice on certain things.First of all you need some Hormone Replacement Treatment for those Hot Flashes and Mood Swings,Second you need to give yourself time to heel,it takes usually around a year for your body to get back to normal,so don't rush things.One more thing (Always Remember...Your Still Are and Always will be A Complete Woman) Please feel free to contact me anytime!! I do know what you are going through.

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any suggestions about treatments for menopause other than hormone replacement therapy?
    My mom is 50yrs old and she has been going through menopause since last Jan. She uses progestercare cream from the health food store but she doesnt want to do hormone replacement therapy or premprose because they increase the risk of breast cancer. Her doctor is telling her that she will develop osteoporosis if she doesnt get on some sort of HRT though. Can anyone give her any advice on what to do? Are there any natural ways that anyone has tried that worked? And does anyone know if not going on HRT can really cause osteoporosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is on the right track using natural progesterone. It's the ONLY substance that has been shown to REBUILD bone, from the inside out.

      (Natural progesterone does NOT cause cancer like synthetic HRT does. In fact, it helps protect against cancer.)

      Estrogen (in the synthetic HRT) only delays bone breakdown, and it only works for four to five years. The problem is that it actually stops the bone from performing its natural cycle - breaking down old bone and rebuilding new to replace it. If old bone is not being broken down, there is no new bone being rebuilt! After five years on HRT, bone will be brittle.

      Have her read Dr. John Lee's book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause". He explains it very well!
      He also gives guidelines for finding a quality progesterone cream. She may want to compare the one she's using to his recommendations.

      Your mom's doctor is not fully informed. Dr. Lee says, "You can educate your doctor, or find a new one."

  18. QUESTION:
    Having a period two times a month,is this related to menopause?
    How can I stay healthy even though symptoms of menopause seem to effect me with arthritis in my knees?

    • ANSWER:
      Try an all natural health product like Hot Flash Freedom instead of using chemical based treatments for your symptoms in order to stay healthy while treating such discomfort.

  19. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  20. QUESTION:
    How difficult would it be to get pregnant as a thirtysomething?
    My ob-gyn told me today that my age (mid 30's) was nothing to worry about in regards to being fertile and that the average age of menopause was 51. She didn't endorse me getting the ovarian reserve test (to test how many eggs I have left). How difficult would it be to get pregnant as a thirtysomething year old woman? I want to know if I should relax or start planning. Thanks for your advice!

    • ANSWER:
      I've known lots of people pregnant in their 30s. And some have to keep trying, and trying. Some resort to spending all of their money on medical treatments, when they could just adopt. If it's something you want, give it a whirl, but keep your wits about you..

  21. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  22. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  23. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  24. QUESTION:
    What is a natural way to deal with menopause?
    I had cancer of the cervix, and the radiation treatment threw me into early menopause. What is a natural alternative to hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, and I have read all the latest info about natural alternatives to hormones, nothing really helps. The only remedy (partly a remedy) was to take some of the anti-anxiety medication like Prozac etc. Of course there are natural anti depressants (look at this site)
      http://www.menopause.realage.com/content.aspx/topic/17
      but I am not sure how well they alleviate the symptoms. I wish I kept these medical journals I get to give you the reference. If I find it I will let you have it.

  25. QUESTION:
    Possible for early menopause in early 20s?
    I have the symptoms, no reason to really have started menopause (no cancer treatments, etc.) Is it possible, and for what reasons? Any other symptoms I should look for other than the obvious ones?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a condition called Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) or Premature Ovarian Insufficiency (POI). It's when the ovaries stop working for some reason. It could be an obvious reason, like cancer, or it could be for no reason that can be determined. Most cases are for reasons that are undetermined. The way to diagnose it is to get your FSH tested. Pretty much the only thing that causes a menopausal-level FSH in a young woman is POF. If she has other problems, other hormone irregularities, then her FSH will likely be normal, even though other values, like estrogen and progesterone and testosterone may be off for some reason. So there are many reasons why one might not be having a period, and to find that out you need to see a gynecologist or endocrinologist. Be sure they do the FSH test--a lot don't do it because they just dont' think of POF since it's pretty unusual. But it's just a simple blood test and so easy to do! I hope that this is not your situation, but you can read all about POF at this website support group: http://www.pofsupport.org/
      They'll have a list of symptoms for you. If you do have it, then you should go on hormone replacement. But let's not get ahead of ourselves. Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    How can women have periods yet unable to conceive?
    My great aunt had her period (before menopause of course), and she tried to conceive, but she was unable to have kids but her husband had 3 kids before her though, so we don't think it was him? How is this so?

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps her fallopian tubes were scarred and the ova couldn't make it through. Perhaps she simply didn't produce ova that were capable of fertilization. There are folks who are infertile for reasons that are never really discovered. In fact, the majority of couples in fertility treatment are infertile for unknown reasons. It is also always in the realm of possibility that the three children did not belong to the uncle. After all, prior to DNA testing, fatherhood was a matter of faith and not science. The only person you could be sure of was the mother. And in these days of donated ova, and test tube babies, even that isn't a promise anymore. It might also have been the uncle in question had troubles that weren't made public. One never really knows, unless you happen to be told. And in those days, you didn't ordinarily discuss it except with the doctor.

  27. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know of any treatment for arthritis following chickungunya- homeo or ayaurveda or whatever?
    My mother who is 57 got chickungunya a year back and is still suffering from severe joint pain and swelling, arthritis due to chickengunya. Anybody who has gone through the same , please advise on what treatment would help? Does taking long periods of rest help?

    • ANSWER:
      HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT FOR RHEUMATISM / ARTHRITIS without any side effects or complications of any sort, (Arthritis including Gout, Arthritis Deformans/Osteoarthritis and Rheumatism) :-

      Pain knee joints, worse by movements; better initial movements, continuous pain in joints, worse while rising from seat; pain in heels, worse by movements. Cassia Sophera 30X, 4 hourly

      Acute attack of gout of joints of the feet.Pain with bright red swelling Aconite Nap 200, 2 hourly

      Pain with inflammation, worse by movements. Bryonia Alba 200 or 1M, 6 hourly

      Complaints worse after rest and exposure to cold Rhus tox 200 or 1M, 4 hourly

      Complaints worse during menstruation; beginning at the time of menopause; more in hands and feet Caulophyllum 30X, 4 hourly

      When the origin of complaints is gonorrhoeal; worse during day time. Medorrhinum 1M. fortnightly (3 Doses)

      When the origin of complaints is tubercular Tuberculinum k, 1M fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of small joints with red or pale swelling; tenderness and shifting pains; worse by motion. Main remedy for gout during cold weather Colchicum 30X, 4 hourly

      When Rhus Tox cease to work; pain is worse in cold damp weather and better by movements Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, 6 hourly (6 Doses)

      Nodosities in the joints with gastric complaints. At last nodules become painless (Rheumatoid Arthritis). Tongue whitish thickly coated Antim Crud 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Complaints of feets and ankles; stiffness Drosera 200 fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of long bones; contraction of ligaments Causticum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain worse at night; in wet weather; Rheumatism of large muscles Cimicifuga 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism; worse in damp cold weather. Gout.Pain in limbs and hip joints Natrum Sulph 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain travels downwards affecting the large part of a limb and passes through quickly along course of nerve Kalmia Lat 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Pains worse during rest, night and warmth, better by cold, open air and movements Pulsatilla 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain :- violent; bruised or as if sprained ; cannot bear touch, feels somebody coming near him may touch him and hit the affected part Arnica Montana 200, 4 hourly

      Gout of great toe and joints with swelling; soreness and drawing pain on stepping; worse in warmth, pressure and motion. Pain travels upwards; better cold compresses Ledum Pal 200, 4 hourly

      Gouty nodosities of joints; tearing pain and extremities and contraction of the muscles Guaiacum 30 4 hourly

      Chronic nodosities of joints; hands twisted, out of shape due to deposits of water of soda Ammonium Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      Gouty complaints with offensive urine Acid Benzoic 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      When there is red sand in urine in gouty patients Lycopodium 30, 4 hourly

      Severe pain with enlargement of the joints; worse during rest and when storm approaches Rhododendron 200 or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Almost a specific for gout (to drain out uric acid and urates) Urtica Urens Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 -10 drops in hot water

      Arthritic deformans (chronic rheumatoid, particularly of fingers) Picric Acid 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pains or arthritis after checked diarrhoea Abrotanum 30 or 200 4 hourly (6 Doses)

      Specific for pain with numbness; Pain so severe patient says that he would prefer death than the pain Chamomilla 200 or 1M, 1/2 hourly (3 Doses)

      Pain appear diagonally as right arm and left leg with sensation of cold, numbness and tingling Agaricus Mus 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      In weak persons; burning pain with chilliness, feels better by heat, while eating, and worse in cold open air Capsicum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Unbearable pain; rigidity and stiffness. Superiority / inferiority complex Platina 1M, weekly (3 Doses)

      Pain flies like electric shock; due to exposurse of damp cold weather. Better by warmth and rest Phytolacca 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pain, worse after washing clothes, doing laundry work Sepia 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain in long bones; may be due to injury or rheumatism Ruta Grav 200, 6 hourly

      Pain worse on slightest touch specially after loss of vital fluids like excessive bleeding, diarrhoea, vomiting China Off 6X or 30, 3 hourly

      Pain in the small joints of extremities with swelling. Backache, worse in the morning before rising Staphysagria 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain heels; better by putting most of the weight on them Berberis Vulgaris Q (Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 - 10 drops

      Stiffing pain in all parts of the body; worse by movement Stellaria Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8-10 drops in warm water

      Rheumatic pain without swelling; pain joints; worse at night Iodium 30X, 4 hourly

      Osteo-arthritis of large joints with degeneration. Pain, swelling, stiffness and tenderness of joints; worse by motion (cracking joints) and cold ; better by warmth O.A.Nosode 1M, weekly (6 Doses)

      Chronic muscular rheumatism of back and neck. Intense pain along with sciatic nerve. Numbness alternates with pain Gnaphalium 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Muscular atrophy; rigidity and stiffness Strychninum 3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism accompained with skin ailments and itiching; cannot walk erect Sulphur 200, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Rheumatism of knee joint; with round worms Natrum Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      For defective bony growth; better by warmth and worse by cold Calcarea Flour 12X or 30, 4 hourly

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms.
      No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.

      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      For more information on Homeopathic Treatment of ARTHRITIS/RHEUMATISM/GOUT etc please check these articles :-
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/arthritis...
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/rheumatis...

      Best of health to you my friend get well real soon.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  28. QUESTION:
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in th?
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in the subordinate group? Or did physicians simply see women as an easy target for success? Also, what may have been some of the unintended consequences that came out of this widespread medicalization? And by "medicalization" I mean, the process by which human conditions and problems come to be defined and treated as medical conditions, and thus become the subject of medical study, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. Thanks for any thoughts or ideas!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Female bodies are overmedicalized. Menarche is not a medical issue, yet menopause is.

      Pregnancy can become life-threatening. But in general, we approach this natural passage as if some crisis were imminent.

      Men's bodies could use a bit more medical attention. Rather than look at erectile dysfunction as a symbol of waning masculinity and prescribing a pill, they should consider it as a symptom of perhaps a larger systemic problem.

      Not a doctor but still ... I do see what you are saying.

      No I do not think that there is some conspiracy to keep women down. I think it is the opposite. I think that too many women died in the past of childbirth, and they are over cautious.

      Yes, there is also a massive industry surrounding women's bodies and women's health products. Absolutely there is. From Insurance policies, to publishers, to baby accessories, to bras, tampax ... you bet!

  29. QUESTION:
    Could you recommend a really good womens clinique in UK?
    I need to consult about early menopause (infertility) problems and I am 25 now. So this is not a usual case and not every GP can consult me well. I would appreciate it if you could recommend me a quality professional doctor, any place in UK is good, London, York or Leeds prefered. Many thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There's no need for a private clinic. Ask your GP to refer you to the relevant consultant at a hospital (you should get a list online to choose from). GPs don't normally carry out infertility treatments or deal with early menopause problems directly. If you're Up North, then LGI may be on your local list.

      If you are a member of BUPA, then ask them for a referral to a suitable hospital on their list.

  30. QUESTION:
    Can a multivitamin help with female hair thinning, or do I need a specific vitamin for this?
    I have noticed I can see my scalp on the very front of my head, I always had thin hair but not this bad. I am not in menopause or anywhere close to this so that is not the cause, is there a vitamin supplement that can help?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamins won't help. Check with your family doctor first as some conditions like low thyroid can cause hair thinning. Do you use curling irons, flattening irons, hot blow dryers? They can cause hair damage and thinning. The most common cause is inherited female pattern balding, for which their is no treatment.

  31. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with women going thru menopause?
    I'm pretty sure my mom is going through menopause right now because she is really irritable and moody and she's giving my dad the silent treatment because he got mad at her. Today was her birthday but she didn't even want to eat the cake we got her. I'm really pis$ed off about this and I want my family back. Anything I can do or do I just have to wait it out?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is the period marked by the natural and permanent cessation of menstruation. A woman begins to see changes in her menstrual cycles usually between the ages of 45 and 55. It's the time in a woman's life that the function of her ovaries begins to cease. Most people recognize this as the "turning point".

      Some women may have few or no first signs of menopause, while others experience multiple psychological and physical symptoms. The symptoms and severity of them varies significantly from woman to woman.

      Every woman's experience will be different but some of the common first signs of menopause are:

      -Irregular Periods -Hot Flashes -Problems with the Vagina and Bladder -Loss of Sex Drive -Fatigue -Mood Changes -Headaches -Sleep Problems -Water Retention

      Can you imagine having to deal with all that and nobody understands what you’re going through?

      Spend some time and talk to her about your concerns (Your Mom’s Health and Well Being). Show empathy for her. The more you can learn on your own about this change, the more your mom will open up to you about it.

      This could help tremendously.

  32. QUESTION:
    Why would my feet hurt and feel stiff without having an injury and continue to feel worse over the last month?
    My feet started feeling stiff going down stairs in the mornings some months ago. My right foot now feels like it's been injured - it hasn't and is painful to bend and hurts in the arch area. My toes are stiff to bend and my feet ache even when they are resting and not weight bearing. I am a relatively fit woman of 50, going through menopause and am about 10 kilos overweight. I like walking and am continuing to do so as I can't bear not to!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Helen,

      Arch pain is the term used to describe symptoms that occur under the arch of the foot. When a patient has arch pain they usually have inflammation of the tissues within the midfoot. The arch of the foot is formed by a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes.
      This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics and transfer of weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful.

      Plantar Fasciitis
      The most common cause of arch pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is the name that describes inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain early in the morning and pain with long walks or prolonged standing.
      Arch pain early in the morning is due to the plantar fascia becoming contracted and tight as you sleep through the night. When awakening and walking in the morning, the fascia is still tight and prone to irritation when stretched. When walking or standing for long periods, the plantar fascia becomes inflamed and painful.

      Treatment of plantar fasciitis is best accomplished with some simple stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications, and inserts for your shoes.
      ___________________________________________________________________________________
      Ankle pain is an extremely common complaint with many causes. It is important to accurately diagnose the cause of your symptoms so you can get appropriate treatment. If you have ankle pain, some common causes include:

      •Arthritis
      Arthritis causing ankle pain is much less common than degenerative changes in other joints. However, ankle cartilage can wear away and is often quite painful. Ankle arthritis is most common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or in patients with a previous injury to the ankle joint.

      •Sprains
      Ankle sprains cause an injury to the ligaments around the ankle. Sprains can cause significant ankle pain, as well as swelling and a feeling as though the joint may 'give-out.'
      •High Ankle Sprain A high ankle sprain is a specific type of ligament injury to the ankle. In a high ankle sprain, the ligaments on top of the joint are injured. The treatment and rehabilitation from a high ankle sprain is different from a usual sprain.

      •Tendonitis
      Tendonitis can occur in any of the tendons around the joint and cause ankle pain. Tendonitis occurs when the tendons, the attachments of muscles to the bone, become irritated and inflamed.
      •Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
      Posterior tibial tendonitis cause ankle pain on the inside part of the joint. If left untreated, posterior tibial tendonitis can lead to significant walking problems.

      •Achilles Tendonitis
      Achilles tendonitis causes ankle pain in the back of the joint. Achilles tendonitis is the most common type of tendonitis around the ankle joint.

      •Fractures
      Ankle fractures are a common type of broken bone. However, there any many different types of ankle fractures and each of these must be treated individually. Some ankle fractures can be treated like sprains, and others require surgery.

      •Cartilage Damage
      The cartilage of the ankle joint is susceptible to injury if you sustain an ankle sprain, fracture, or other traumatic injury. Cartilage injuries can run the spectrum from a limited area of damage to more widespread ankle arthritis.

      •Gout
      Gout is an uncommon cause of ankle pain. However, in patients who have a diagnosis of gout, it must be considered as a cause for new ankle pain.

      YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO CHECK INTO THE POSSIBILITY OF THIS BEING SIGNS OF DIABETES.

      Take care! Mama Bear

  33. QUESTION:
    What is the condition called where a female cannot engage in sexual intercourse?
    I am trying to figure out what the condition is called when a female is told by her doctor that intercourse is not possible. I think it has to do with inflammation around the vaginal region. There is no cure for it and treatments sometimes do not work. There is surgery that can be performed with a 93% success rate. Although I know all of this information, I cannot remember the name of the condition. Any help?

    • ANSWER:
      pray about it because unless you are a eunuch, i dont know what else to say.....is it that you have never engaged sexually or that you are getting older and sex is now impossible? The older women get, esp during menopause, the vagina tends to become inflamed and sex is less enjoyable to women...i dont know the details of your problem so maybe if you were more specific

  34. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these hairs on my chin?
    I have hair on my chin! I have tryed plucking them and facial remover but within a few days they are back. My gyno told me I had started early menopause, could this be the cause? Any ideas on how to get rid of them or at least slow the growth?

    • ANSWER:
      you could try bleaching them and trimming them really short or just keep plucking them. i wouldn't recommend shaving because that will make them thick and stubbly :(

      if you have the money, you could get them removed with a laser treatment

  35. QUESTION:
    When does fertility start to decrease?
    I'm 28 now and have one beautiful daughter. But, we're not planning to have another child anytime soon for a number of reasons. But, there is a part of me that still wants to have another (biological) child. So, at what age do the chances of getting pregnant start to fall or drop dramatically? What are the chances of getting pregnant past 35 w/o the use of any fertility treatments? Does anyone know where I can find reliable information or statistics??? Thanks in advance for taking the time to answer my question!

    • ANSWER:
      More women today find they want to put off pregnancy until their careers are well established, or until they've gotten more life experience. However, research shows that pregnancies in women over the age of 35 suffer from more problems than those in younger women. How great are the risks compared with the benefits, and what do you really need to be concerned about?
      How Old is Too Old to Have a Baby?
      According to the Mayo Clinic, a woman's fertility peaks between the ages of 20 and 24. However, fertility rates remain relatively constant through the early 30s, after which they begin to decline:

      At age 30 to 35, fertility is 15 to 20 percent below maximum. From age 35 to 39, the decrease is 25 to 50 percent. From 40 to 45, the decrease is 50 to 95 percent.

      Technically, any woman who has not gone through menopause, and who does not have other reproductive problems, can become pregnant. Successful pregnancies have been reported in women as old as 59.

      Pregnancy Risks After 35
      The risk of miscarriage increases after age 35; by the early 40s, more than 50 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage. Many of these occur at an early stage and may not even be detected, or may be mistaken for a late period. The majority of these miscarriages are due to the chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

      Other age-related factors affecting fertility include less frequent and/or irregular ovulation, and endometriosis, in which tissue that attaches to the ovaries or fallopian tubes interferes with conception.

      When they do get pregnant, women older than 35 may have a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and placenta previa. There is also a potentially higher risk of having a baby with low birth weight, and of chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome.

      Aiming for a Positive Pregnancy
      Although older women may find it somewhat harder to achieve pregnancy, the overall outcomes are excellent. In fact, birth rates for mothers in their 30s and 40s have increased dramatically over the past 25 years. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the birth rate for women age 35 to 39 nearly doubled between 1978 and 1998. Between 1981 and 1997, the birth rate for women in their 40s increased 92 percent.

      If you're over 35 and thinking of getting pregnant, a few simple tips will help minimize the risks:

      Start taking prenatal vitamins
      See your doctor for prepregnancy checkups
      Eat well
      Exercise regularly
      Cut out nicotine, alcohol, and drugs

      Finally, if you don't succeed in getting pregnant within six months, see a reproductive endocrinologist (fertility specialist) to discuss next steps.

      Sources: The Mayo Clinic Complete Book of Pregnancy and Baby's First Year (Morrow, 1994); March of Dimes: 888-MODIMES, www.modimes.org, www.nacersano.org

      The information on this Web site is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child's condition.

      Content courtesy of American Baby.

  36. QUESTION:
    How aware are you of your fertility?
    Women could be told how many eggs they have left in their ovaries by a simple blood test that could be sold over the counter. Australian researchers say the ‘egg timer’ blood test will cost about £38 and could revolutionise family planning and fertility treatment.
    But how aware are you of your fertility? Would you like to know how many eggs you have left?

    • ANSWER:
      My concern isn't with my eggs, it's with my fallopian tubes. I only have one left.
      I do think I'd like to know more about my fertility, but not now. I've already been blessed with two healthy children, while we would like another, I'm not sure I could handle being told that it may not be possible. I need to have hope :-)

      One of my friends was told last year that her fertility was done, she was already well into earlly menopause, aged only 37. She's due to have a little boy in May :-D

  37. QUESTION:
    How can I make my hair look better before my wedding?
    I have quite thin hair that is brittle and always has split ends. I really, really want to improve its condition before my wedding in August 2011. Does anyone have any advice? It seems to fall out a lot, which I don't help because it feels so coarse that I continually run my hands through it in an attempt to smooth it out, and I end up pulling more hair out.

    Can anyone recommend a product/home treatment that will make my hair softer/shinier/thicker?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you say you have thin hair and it's brittle, has split ends? Treat your hair like that of a baby's hair, LOTS OF TLCs. I know you're an adult now with adult hair, but there are symptoms for bleaching, hair straightening, relaxing, crimping hair even to normal hair types. Imagine that happening to your hair, I mean as you've experienced already no product can improve your style. That's another reason why the hair industry is a billion dollar business, but they do not give money back guarantee for damaged hair or hair loss due to 'abuse', and hair loss happen more to people with thin or coarse hair.

      You have several problems with your hair here, let's go each one:

      1. Split Ends: Even healthy hair like mine get split ends, due to normal hair brushing & styling. Hair protectant doesn't protect hair 100%. Like sunscreen, you still get sunburned. Same with hair, as you've already experienced. Spend 5-10 mins. trimming your hair strand per strand, section by section when the sun is shinning so you'll understand how the hair is split in several places, and not always at the end, even somewhere in the middle. Do it yourself trim, is the best. Use a 2" folding shears for trimming. Allowing healthier hair to take over. Then 2x a year, get a good trim.
      It may grow very slowly or none at all if you've straightened your hair in the past.

      2. Thin hair comes from your good genes, You can set your hair in plastic curlers, after you towel dry, then curlers, briefly dry, take the curlers out & style as usual, or finger comb. Shampoos that says it makes your hair more volume, it's all marketing gimmicks to get your attention, it is a billion dollar business. Plastic curlers have been used for over 5 decades in the fashion & hair business. They're still being used today

      3. You hair fall out a lot: touching your hair has nothing to do WHY your hair falls out. Reasons why hair falls out easily: Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs), steroids, hereditary, hair dyes, perming/relaxers, straightening (have read many on YA HAIR, and have responded to them since 2009), diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/
      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      4. To get healthier, softer, shinier hair: Eliminate the chemicals and heating tools to style your hair. You get all your vitamins & minerals & proteins FREE from the good foods you eat from Mother Nature, not made by man, and no shampoo can help grow hair, not even those made for horses. Horses don't abuse their hair, using heating tools, and they eat better than people, but it won't add more hair & make their hair longer faster.Shampoo intended for animals may contain insecticides or other medications for treatment of skin conditions or parasite infestations such as fleas or mange. These must never be used on humans.

      Prenatal vitamins don't make your hair grow. Pregnant women have to start taking care of their bodies when they're pregnant, meaning stop smoking, drinking, dyeing or perming their hair SO OF COURSE their hair start growing again. But it has nothing to do with their hair, it has something to do to help the development of their unborn child.
      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php

      Any OTC Shampoo and conditioner formulated for your hair texture. None is better than the other, and salon is not better than OTC. Shampoos are meant to clean and conditioners are meant to condition curly/wavy, chemically treated & damaged hair.

  38. QUESTION:
    What kind of product should one uses to stop her hair from falling off because of aging?
    This is for older women whose hair start to fall off. Any recommendation on good brand of Shampoos and Hair Treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many reason for hair loss.. in old age also the reason are related to hormones . Ladies might exp hair loss after menopause..

      there are some very successful product out there which have proven there effectiveness even in old age.. check out the links below

  39. QUESTION:
    What options are available to fix Hair Loss for Older Women?
    I am a 50yr old women and I am losing hair in a few spots in my head and I wanted to know what are some great products or treatments available to help me with new growth in those affected areas. I am trying to avoid wigs.

    • ANSWER:
      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took months even years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons for hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.About 23-25 if I shampooed/brush my hair, which is every 4th day.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing from girls under 15. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  40. QUESTION:
    what is a good sight to find info about early menopause?
    I have 12 of 15 signs of early menopause but I have not had any kind of surgery or other procedure to send me into early menopause. please help me.
    I need a good source so i'm not driving myself crazy. i am only 29.

    • ANSWER:
      The best "sight" would be in the face of a great gynecologist--one who is very experienced with 10+ years, preferably a female gyn. A great one may confirm that is it rare, but not impossible at age 29, or that you just have something else. The suddenly on/off, heavy/light, short/long, etc., spotting might be perfectly normal, but if there's another reason, it is paramount that you follow the advice of that great gyn. Don't be afraid to ask how long any have been a gyn; it's to be expected, and if any gets upset, you don't want them to work with your body anyway. Additionally, try to breathe easily while you research on the internet and READ ALL THE SITES for all the information out there because they're not designed just for YOU, but for everyone to get those parts that are applicable to her and ignore those that aren't. Your body won't necessarily follow the IDENTICAL path in this area that others do. Each can be very different, like yours seem to be. It would be interesting to know how you determined those "12-15 signs," but try not to believe those relatives and friends until you see that great gyn. If necessary, see up to 5, like I did with my uterine tumors; the 5th one was the only one with the CORRECT diagnosis and treatment! Try not to "go crazy," because if it's actually menopause, you need to save that for all those likely "hot flashes." If it is really menopause, do whatever you need to do to stay comfortable--YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

  41. QUESTION:
    why can't women be given estrogen and progesteron to prevent menopause?
    is it possible to give women suffering from menopause estrogen and progesteron in order to stop bad effects of menopause on them?
    if so,then why there'r still women suffering from it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can take to prevent menopause. Hormones are given to women to ease the symptoms they are having while they go through menopause. Many women choose HRT or alternative treatments to stop all of the side effects. You don't have to suffer because there is lots of things that you can do to ease the side effects.

  42. QUESTION:
    How does menopause work?
    Hello, I am 44 years old and I think I might be menopausal. I have been getting my periods between 45-53 days instead of the normal 28 days. Does anyone know how menopause works? Some details on this would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Natural menopause is the permanent ending of menstruation that is not brought on by any type of medical treatment. For women undergoing natural menopause, the process is gradual and is described in three stages:

      Perimenopause . Perimenopause begins several years before menopause, when the ovaries gradually produce less estrogen. Perimenopause lasts up until menopause, the point when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. In the last one to two years of perimenopause, the decrease in estrogen accelerates. At this stage, many women experience menopause symptoms (see below).
      Menopause. Menopause is the point when a woman has her last menstrual period. At this stage, the ovaries have stopped releasing eggs and producing most of their estrogen. Menopause is diagnosed when a woman has gone without a period for 12 consecutive months.
      Postmenopause. These are the years after menopause. During this stage, menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, ease for most women. However, health risks related to the loss of estrogen increase as the woman ages.

  43. QUESTION:
    My period have stopped from one year is this a serious condition?
    Due to some mental tablets treatments, my periods have completely stopped from one year. I am 40 years. Is this a serious condition and could it turn to cancer or something else serious?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be menopause
      Pl consult a gynaecologist

  44. QUESTION:
    How many hairs lost in a day would mean you have 'hair loss'?
    Im approaching the menopause and Im sure my hair is thinning a bit. It seems finer also and there are about 6-8 hairs that come loose after hair washing or styling. Do I have hair loss???? If so what can I do about it.

    • ANSWER:
      6 - 8 hairs a day is not significant. However if this is a change from what is normal to you there are things you can do. I am a 44 year old woman and am peri-menopausal. I began losing a significant amount of hair each morning when I showered. I don't know how many but I know it was a change from what was normal for me. I began taking Macafem (maca root), biotin, and MSM supllements, and I switched to Organix coconut milk shampoo and conditioner. Once a week I do a pure coconut oil treatment on my hair (leave oil on for one hour & wash out) I started these changes about a month ago and have noticed a decrease in hair loss and also have new hair growth. Hope this helps

  45. QUESTION:
    My wife's frequency of menstrual period has increased and are irregular. Whats the cause and remedy?
    My wife's frequency of menstrual period has increased and are irregular. Whats the cause and remedy/treatment?
    What are the do and donts?

    • ANSWER:
      what is her age? just go and check with doctor whether there is any cyst or some growth in the uterus.it may happen at the time of pre menopause too.

  46. QUESTION:
    How can I find a recipe for Keishi Bukyro tea?
    This is supposed to be a Japanese treatment for menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      The particular kampo formula mentioned contains the Poria fungus (Poria cocos) and cinnamon, among other ingredients.

      Bai Shao / Peony (White) / 20%
      Rou Gui / Cinnamon Bark / 20%
      Tao Ren / Persica / 20%
      Fu Ling / Poria / 20%
      Mu Dan Pi (Su) / Moutan / 20%

  47. QUESTION:
    Can partial seizures occur once a month regularly and last for the whole day recurring about every hour?
    My friend has been having them since her menopause started. Her EEG and MRI were normal and her doctor says it is depression.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the Ontario Epilepsy website
      http://www.epilepsyontario.org/client/EO/EOWeb.nsf/web/
      which describes as many seizure types as there are(a lot!). I looked up both partial seizures simple and complex. Then I looked at this types. The key here is that these are rooted in emotional issues, there is no EEG abnormality and that medication for epilepsy is ineffective. Since she only gets the seizures once a month, it could well be tied into some kind of menstrual issue surrounding menopause. I hope this helps you out.

      Psychogenic Seizures

      (Pseudo-seizures)

      Psychogenic seizures are not classified as a form of epilepsy. They affect between 5 and 20 percent of people thought to have epilepsy. Psychogenic seizures can occur at any age, but are more common in people under the age of 55. They occur 3 times more frequently in women than men. They may arise from various psychological factors, may be prompted by stress, and may occur in response to suggestion. It has also been found that such disorders may be self-induced. They may be used to get attention, to be excused from work, to collect financial compensation, or merely to escape an intolerable social situation. They seldom occur in the absence of others. Trauma related to physical illness has been found to trigger these seizures in elderly individuals. People with early-onset psychogenic seizures often have a history of sexual abuse.

      Psychogenic seizures can be characterized by features common with epilepsy like writhing and thrashing movements, quivering, screaming or talking sounds, and falling to the floor. Psychogenic attacks differ from epileptic seizures in that out-of-phase movements of the upper and lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, and side-to-side head movements are evident. However, psychogenic seizures vary from one occurrence to another and are not readily stereotyped. Indicators like pupillary dilation, depressed corneal reflexes, the presence of Babinski responses, autonomic cardiorespiratory changes, tongue biting and urinary/fecal incontinence are more probable with epilepsy and are not usually manifested in psychogenic seizures.

      Psychogenic seizures may last a couple of minutes or hours, ending as abruptly as they began. Anxiety may be experienced prior to an attack, followed by relief and relaxation afterwards, leading some to postulate that psychogenic seizures may occur as a direct response to stress in order to relieve tension. Afterwards, patients usually have a vague recollection of the seizure, without the usual postictal symptoms of drowsiness and depression.

      It is difficult to differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures. However, one highly reliable indicator of a psychogenic seizure is eye closure during the seizure; when people with epilepsy have seizures the eyes tend to remain open. Still, statistics indicate that, in 20-30% of cases, epileptologists are incorrect in attempting to distinguish one from the other. Although psychogenic seizures are not caused by electrical discharges in the brain and thus do not register any EEG abnormalities, they are often mistaken for epileptic disorders. It is also possible to have both psychogenic seizures and epilepsy. Most patients with psychogenic seizures are misdiagnosed and consequently treated with epilepsy drugs or other epilepsy therapies, sometimes with severe and fatal side effects.

      Medications are ineffective in the treatment of psychogenic disorders. Patients who are diagnosed with psychogenic seizures are usually referred to a therapist, to learn to control stress and become familiar with coping techniques. Since the vast majority of psychogenic seizures operate on a psychological level, behavioral manipulation methods may be used.

  48. QUESTION:
    How can one treat high blood pressure?
    This is for a 48-year-old woman who seems to be going through menopause, and seems to be a worrier.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of High Blood Pressure
      It is important to take steps to keep your blood pressure under control. The treatment goal is blood pressure below 140/90 and lower for people with other conditions, such as diabetes and kidney disease. Adopting healthy lifestyle habits is an effective first step in both preventing and controlling high blood pressure. If lifestyle changes alone are not effective in keeping your pressure controlled, it may be necessary to add blood pressure medications. In this section you will learn about blood pressure-lowering lifestyle habits and blood pressure medications.

      Lifestyle

      Following a Healthy Eating Pattern
      Reducing Salt and Sodium in Your Diet
      Maintaining a Healthy Weight
      Being Physically Active
      Limiting Alcohol Intake
      Quitting Smoking
      Other Factors Affecting Blood Pressure

  49. QUESTION:
    Can I go through menopause at 32 years old?
    I am 32 years old.. About 5 years ago I had an IUD put in and my periods stopped. I had the IUD removed in December of 2005 and got pregnant in Feb of 2006. After I had my baby I got another IUD and then a little while later had my tubes tied. So I haven't really had a period in 5 years. I am having symptoms of menopause. Could I be going through menopause this early?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you could be going through early onset menopause. There are even gals in their 20's that are going through menopause. You need to go to your doctor and ask for a FSH blood test. This test will tell your hormone levels and what stage of menopause you are in. If you have symptoms then discuss the treatments with your doctor.

  50. QUESTION:
    Is the prescription Ogen used as a form of birth control?
    I researched it a little and it seems to be for menopause, but i don't see anything about it being a birth control pill.

    • ANSWER:
      I've spent some time researching your question. I do not feel that this medication is meant to be used as a hormonal birth control. You see, hormonal birth controls utilize a two hormones, progesterone and estrogen. Ogen is a full Estrogen medication therefore, would be best used in the treatment of low estrogen or other estrogen related disorders; not contraception.

      I hope this helps you in some way. Best Wishes

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menopause treatment

Menopausal Pregnancy

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can you synchronize menstrual cycles with a menopausal woman?
    My period is about 3 weeks late now. I had sex about 4 weeks ago, but we used protection and he didn't ejaculate, so I don't think I'm pregnant. However, my menopausal mother is the woman I've had the most consistent contact with this summer. Is it possible that my period is delayed because my body is trying to synchronize with her? I've never been super regular with my periods, and I have skipped months before, but usually it comes around the same time, with a week being the usual margin of error. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      The menstrual cycle synchronization is NOT a universal thing that always happens. Take a pregnancy test. Even if it is negative, if your period doesn't show up in another month, go see a doctor

  2. QUESTION:
    How would the legality of a home made pregnancy contract work?
    I'm curious about how this would work out legally. Let's say a man and woman are going to have sex for fun, and the man really doesn't want a child but the woman says she's menopausal so no condom is needed. If they made and signed a home made contract agreeing before sex that if she got pregnant and decides to keep the baby that the man is not obligated to any child support would that contract hold up legally if she wanted to go back on it afterwards?

    • ANSWER:
      It wouldn't work at all. A contract such as the one you describe would be detrimental to the rights of the child, thus legally unenforceable. All signed contractual agreements are not enforceable by the courts. This would not be enforceable because it is against public policy.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have positive pregnancy test 5 days after sexual encounter?
    Hi I was wondering if it's normal to have a positive pregnancy test 5 days after sexual encounter?

    • ANSWER:
      I was worried about having a false positive and getting my hopes up, but my OB/Gyn told me on the phone positive results are very reliable. I then got online to research, and from everything I read, you can only get a false positive if you are pre-menopausal/menopausal or if you take a medication that contains estrogen. I'm now almost 12 weeks along! Also, another test never hurts to make sure!

  4. QUESTION:
    What does it mean reference range apply to pregnancy on blood test?
    Hi,

    On blood test its says i am negative but on the blood test amounts where the fsh, progesterone, testorone etc it says on results that reference range apply to pregnancy.

    what does it mean?

    • ANSWER:
      I work at a laboratory and certain lab values change for pregnant women. So they will list normals for males, for menstrating females, menopausal women etc.. depending on the test. At the lab I work at for an hcg(pregnancy) any result <6 can be considered negative(unless a miscarriage is in the works or if it is extremely early) anything usually 25 or over is considered positive and then the Hcg level should double every few days.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are the risks during early pregnancy if a woman has fibroids 7-9 weeks large?
    If she had 1 miscarrige 2 years ago, what are the chances of bringing forth a healthy baby ? Right now she's possibly only 3 weeks pregnant. I said possibly because she is pre-menopausal and not sure if she's pregnant or just irregular. (will be 40 years in July). She now feels tingling all over.Act took place 1x on March 19th but she did not see her period for over 60 days. What can be done to save the baby and go to full term at this point? She never gave birth.

    • ANSWER:
      check with the gynecologist.

      i think the baby will be all right. the miscarage was 2 years ago the baby should be fine.

      but check

      thats not my medical field.

  6. QUESTION:
    How early were you able to detect pregnancy on a HPT?
    I know they claim to tell you days before a missed period but in YOUR experience does it work and how accurate. I am going to use EPT brand or a similar well known brand. Did any one find out they were pregnant and it be really early in the pregnancy? How many weeks were you when you found out? Can you find out before symptoms????? I have a 4.5 year old but it seems like it was forever ago and this time TTC. Last time was a suprise.

    • ANSWER:
      I found this on an HPT website (listed below) I hope it helps you out.

      The Science Behind the Accuracy of Pregnancy Tests and Knowing Sooner

      At-home pregnancy tests that claim to be sensitive enough to detect pregnancy before the first day of your missed period must be able to identify more than one form of the pregnancy hormone hCG. These tests must be able to detect not only hCG but also a variant of the pregnancy hormone, hyperglycosylated hCG or hCG-H.

      The cell that originates when a fertilized egg is implanted in the uterine wall initially secretes the pregnancy hormone variant hCG-H. As such, this hormone is actually produced in the earliest stages of pregnancy before the primary pregnancy hormone, hCG, which is produced immediately following implantation by a different set of cells.

      The FIRST RESPONSE® Early Result Pregnancy Test uses advanced patented technology that enables it to deliver highly sensitive results. The test is able to detect total hCG, which is hCG and hCG-H combined, at lower levels than some other at-home pregnancy tests, which allows you to know sooner.

      The FIRST RESPONSE® Early Result Pregnancy Test detects the pregnancy hormone five days before your missed period — with our most accurate results.1

      In clinical research, FIRST RESPONSE® Early Result Pregnancy Test detected the hormone level in 69% of women four days before their expected period (which is five days sooner than the day of their missed period), in 83% of women three days before their expected period, in 93% of women two days before their expected period, in 93% of women one day before their expected period.

      Factors Affecting the Accuracy of At-Home Pregnancy Tests:
      Today's tests are highly accurate and unlikely to yield false results. False positive results can occur due to the following:

      There are remaining levels of hCG in your body due to a recent birth or miscarriage.
      You are receiving injections of hCG to induce ovulation.
      An ectopic pregnancy (a fertilized egg that implants outside of the uterus) has occurred. This may produce either a positive or negative result on a home pregnancy test and is a life-threatening condition. If you experience any abdominal pain or abnormal bleeding during the time when you think you might be pregnant, contact your health care provi