Menopause Alternative

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to take Estrogen after having had a complete hysterectomy for endometrial cancer?
    I'm 44 and am at a higher risk for osteoporosis without any estrogen. However, endometrial cancer is estrogen dependent, so my thought is it wouldn't be wise to take it for risk of recurrence elsewhere. I can deal with the other menopausal symptoms, but am concerned about bone loss since I would typically have had several more years of estrogen before hitting menopause. Any alternatives or thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      I would say that it is probably not safe for someone who has had endometrial cancer to take estrogen replacement therapy but the only way to find out for sure is to double check with your dr to see what they think.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is a natural way to deal with menopause?
    I had cancer of the cervix, and the radiation treatment threw me into early menopause. What is a natural alternative to hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, and I have read all the latest info about natural alternatives to hormones, nothing really helps. The only remedy (partly a remedy) was to take some of the anti-anxiety medication like Prozac etc. Of course there are natural anti depressants (look at this site)
      http://www.menopause.realage.com/content.aspx/topic/17
      but I am not sure how well they alleviate the symptoms. I wish I kept these medical journals I get to give you the reference. If I find it I will let you have it.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are some alternative ways to treat menopause symptoms without using any hormone replacements?
    I really do not want to use any HRT therapy, even bio-identicals. Can you recommend a type of Dr. to see that can treat menopause symptoms without a prescription of some type?

    • ANSWER:
      I was told years ago by a dental hygenist that when hot flashes and mood swings begin to up the intake of calcium. This I have done for nearly 10 years. What a difference this has made! I breezed through menopause. It really works for me. So, I tell all women about it. With calcium, you want to be sure you are getting a 2:1 ratio of calcium to magnesium. Be sure if you are taking at least 1200 mg of calcium a day, that you get at LEAST 400 mg magnesium. The very best form of magnesium is magnesium glycinate with the Albion chealate process. Unfortunately, this is not found in every store and for sure it is not found combined in calcium supplements. I got mine on line. A good calcium supplement is better than none though. You also want to be sure you are getting enough Vit.D and Vit.D3 is the best form of that. Vit D helps the body absorb calcium as does magnesium. You can get the best VitD from the sun. 15-20 minutes a day is usually sufficient. Those who live in mid-northern states probably do not get enough sun in the winter, which means we have to supplement. Calcium is always in combination with magnesium, so one has to add a tablet of the gylcinate form of magnesium to reach the correct daily ratio. Women in this stage of life need 1500 mg of calcium, 400-700 mg of magnesium and 800-1000 units VitD3. Try this and see if you notice some changes within a week or so. If you notice some loose stools gradually add the magnesium. Many women I know also use wild yam extract cream which is a natural product women have been using for centuries without problems. Try the calcium trick first. If it doesn't work then add the cream. All one usually needs of this is 1/4 tsp once or twice a day rubbed on the thin areas of the skin. Directions where, are found on all containers of wild yam cream. Another thing I have found that works for me is a product found here: www.stemcellfacts.info I would try these first before looking for a naturopathic doctor or a holistic doctor. I do consult these doctors once in a while for other matters, but I have had no problem with menopause once I added the calcium program. When you get everything in balance, IF you should have a hot flash again, look to adding a bit more calcium for a day or two. Good luck! Let us now here how it is working for you.

  4. QUESTION:
    does any body know what to take for the menopause without resorting to pills from the doctor. Also?
    is excessive sweating whilst only doing the housework, hoovering etc part of the menopause?, i have heard people sweat at night but most days i really don't have to work hard in the home before i am dripping in sweat. please help if poss.

    • ANSWER:
      The trouble with herbal alternatives such as plant oestrogens is that no one knows what the long term implications of using them are, the studies are just not being done. It has taken more than 20 years of studies into the long term effects of conventional HRT, and doctors are even now not totally sure of how the risk benefits stack up.

      Homeopathic preparations are of course useless, since none of them have effects beyond placebo.

      Perhaps there is still an argument for conventional therapy as it can at least be said it is the devil we know.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are alternatives to horomone therapy after hystorectomy?
    I just underwent a complete hystorecomy. Due to illness, everything was taken, including my ovaries. I am looking for alternatives to hormone therapy because of the risks involved with this therapy, such as bloodclots and stroke. What are the alternatives available to me, besides hormone replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      You should see a Homeopathic Doctor......but I know FOR A FACT that the herbal supplement combo of Soy and Black Cohash works. I work at an OBGYN office and the doc prescribes that all the time. Its why you never see many Asian women with hairy faces or excessive wrinkles after menopause - soy is a heavy part of their diet.
      Plus the progestin in Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is know to cause blood clots in some women.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is it harmful for a person going through menopause to take a birth control pill?
    I am getting married soon and want to start the pill. I have prescription for it. However, I started missing my periods and have had tests that show that I am starting menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      No it is not harmful...but you might want to talk to your doctor about alternatives. Birth control pills are hormone based (as I'm sure you know) and menopause is a hormonally challenging time and there is one school of thought that says that it is not ideal to further mess around with hormones, and another which says it helps moderate menopause symptoms. You may want to use an IUD instead, and may want to look into the Mirena IUD which can be left in situ until you have come out the other side of menopause and it also stop your period, which you may or may not like.

      I would do some research, talk to your doctor, consider your options and then enjoy.

      ps congrats on your wedding, and if you do start bc pills make sure you do it so you are not having your period on your wedding day or honeymoon :)

  7. QUESTION:
    I am looking for a good healty concealer to cover my acne scars. What would be a good one?
    I have tried all of MACS concealers and liked them. However, they clogged my pores. I am looking for a healthy alternative concealer. I am switching to mineral makeup but need a good concealer because mineral makeup doesn't give you much coverage.

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is one of the most common skin disorders and affects mainly young people, but may even appear after the age of 30 years. This condition in many cases tends to disappear by itself after a certain period of time, however, if it is left untreated, it can cause deep scars in the skin. Acne can also cause psychological problems, especially among young people.

      These are the causes of this disorder:

      Excessive hormone production: Every square centimeter of skin contains about 100 sweat glands and 15 sebaceous glands that exist at the base of the hair and produce a substance called sebum. Sebum combined with sweat, form a liquid that acts as barrier against bacteria, parasites and fungus. However, under certain conditions the sebaceous glands produce more sebum than necessary. These conditions occur when there is a major hormonal change, such as an increase in androgens during puberty and an increase of progesterone during menopause. It seems that certain people have a strong sensitivity to these hormones and are therefore more likely to suffer from acne.
      Genetic factors: If your parents used to suffer from this disorder you are more likely to have it yourself. What is more, oily skin (which can be inherited) predisposes to acne due to the fact that it produces excessive sebum that blocks the skin's pores.

      Stress: Stress can increase the production of hormones, which cause acne outbreaks.

      Dietary factors: The excessive intake of fats, sweets, carbohydrates, alcohol and dairy products seem to make the situation worse. Sugar, in particular, is very harmful. In fact, certain pharmacological experiments have revealed that taking small doses of anti-diabetic medicines (which lower sugar in the blood) can improve acne.

      Constipation: surprisingly constipation can cause acne. Constipation leads to the failure to eliminate the toxins that accumulate in different parts of the body and particularly in the skin. Many times in fact, mild cases of acne have been cured due to the correction of this intestinal disorder.

      How to cure this problem:

      Drink plenty of water: it may sound too simple, but the most important thing to do is to drink at least eight glasses of water every day. Water is very beneficial for your skin's health.

      Drink green tea: another great natural treatment is green tea. It also has many other health benefits: it can reduce high cholesterol, infections, viruses, high blood sugar, headaches, and joint discomfort.

      Include fruits in your diet: There are many acids found in fruits that can help reduce sebum, which blocks the pores. Fruits can also eliminate excess toxins that build up in body and reduce the swelling and redness of spots. The best fruits to eat are apples, grapes and oranges. Also, including fresh fruits and green leafy vegetables in your diet can also help you get a better complexion.

      Although, these tips can be helpful but the only way to correct this problem permanently is to balance your hormones.

      .........

  8. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  9. QUESTION:
    What natural remedy can I take for hot flushes?
    I have reluctantly given in to the menopause and have started to get hot flushes (though I tell other women I don't get them). Can any of you ladies recommed a tried a tested natural remedy or do I have to go to my GP.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Sue, regular physical exercise is necessary to protect against bone loss. Exercise has many other benefits as well.

      A diet that is low in saturated fats and cholesterol and high in complex carbohydrates, such as grains, fruits and vegetables is important.2

      Vitamin E supplementation may reduce symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, palpitations, fatigue, and breathing difficulties.,,

      Calcium is important in maintaining bone mass.

      Magnesium intake is often low in women with osteoporosis. Low magnesium intake is associated with low bone mineral content (BMC).

      Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption.

      Boron reduces urinary calcium loss and increases serum levels of 17 estradiol (estrogen).

      Essential fatty acids can help prevent dryness of the hair, skin and vaginal tissues.

      Soy supplementation has been suggested as a possible alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Soy isoflavones act as estrogen-like compounds. Forty-five grams of dietary soy, per day for 12 weeks was shown to decrease post-menopausal hot flashes.

      Certain herbs such as black cohosh, chasteberry, licorice and dong quai have shown to have a beneficial effect in managing many of the menopause symptoms.
      Jason Homan

  10. QUESTION:
    Can anyone recommend any natural remedies for hot flashes?
    I am 53 and am finally I believe in menopause. I am not feeling to bad except for a few headaches and exhaustion but mostly the hot flashes. Living here in Texas with the 100 degree heat sure didnt help (looking forward to winter), anyway I do not want to go on any drugs and prefer to do it naturally. Can anyone recommend any vitamins, teas, foods anything that will help my hot flashes. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      my sister who had bad hot flashes and did not believe in alternative health at all as she is very medically oriented in that field tried this product I recommended to her and later told me her hot flashes completely left

      http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dnatural%2Bprogesterone%2Bcream%26b%3D21%26ni%3D20%26ei%3DUTF-8%26pstart%3D1%26fr%3Dytff1-%26fr2%3Dtab-web&w=300&h=320&imgurl=www.physicianformulas.com%2Fstore%2FProdImages%2Fprogesterone.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.physicianformulas.com%2Fstore%2FScripts%2Fprodview.asp%3Fidproduct%3D153%26name%3DProgesterone-Cream&size=21k&name=progesterone+jpg&p=natural+progesterone+cream&oid=c5afa88d2dc45b36&fr2=tab-web&no=22&tt=4031&b=21&ni=20&sigr=13121qnpt&sigi=11r2bmr1r&sigb=13sf8amgc

      purchase it here

      http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=ytff1-&p=source+natural+progesterone+cream&SpellState=n-1935705323_q-Ouw0bXd.mrMROAoIypuh1QAAAA%40%40&fr2=sp-qrw-corr-top

      also try the female plus formula found on the products page under female formulas on the left of page here

      https://web2.herbdoc.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=17&Itemid=38

      more help can be found here

      http://www.herballegacy.com/Menstruation.html

  11. QUESTION:
    How long should women take pill for?
    I have been on the pill for past 14 years. First on Norinyl and then now on Brevinor due to heavy bleeding each month. I stopped for close to a year and was then put on Brevinor. Since reading about DVT and all the other side effects that come with it, I am now wondering if I should stop and seek alternative natural therapies for my heavy periods. Has anyone been affect by deep vein thrombosis related to pill?

    • ANSWER:
      Depending on the overall medical history it can be ok for some to stay on the pill it's just about time for menopause. I had wondered the same thing with in regards to a different way to take the pill.

      I would recommend checking with your doctor as well to see what they say.

      I've never experienced DVT before.

  12. QUESTION:
    why can't women be given estrogen and progesteron to prevent menopause?
    is it possible to give women suffering from menopause estrogen and progesteron in order to stop bad effects of menopause on them?
    if so,then why there'r still women suffering from it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can take to prevent menopause. Hormones are given to women to ease the symptoms they are having while they go through menopause. Many women choose HRT or alternative treatments to stop all of the side effects. You don't have to suffer because there is lots of things that you can do to ease the side effects.

  13. QUESTION:
    FEMALES!!! Is there any good herbal remedies that can help terrible hot flushes during the menopause?? ?
    Im 49 and the hot flushes have kicked in big time.how long do these generally last for?someone told me about 10 years ago to try alternative medicine because it really worked for her.please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Soy is the number one ingredient to help prevent menopausal symptoms. Japanese woman rarely suffer from hot flushes due to the high amount of soy in their diet. My mother used a product called phytolife by blackmores (containing soy phytoestrogens) and after a few months of mild symptoms, there was no more symptoms for the next three years until she no longer needed to take it. The vast majority of women will experience menopause from 2 to 10 years. Strongly recommend avoiding HRT replacement therapy due to significant health risks such as breast cancer and blood clots.

      Phytolife >>>
      http://www.blackmores.com.au/products/phytolife

      Good news for menopausal women: You can avoid hot flashes by changing your diet>>>
      http://www.naturalnews.com/019412.html

  14. QUESTION:
    When is it justifiable to have hysterectomy?
    If a woman is 51 yrs old & experiencing heavy menstrual flow for a long period of time due to enlarged uterus,is hysterectomy the only options? I was told that uterus will shrink when woman menopause. Sometimes the cause of heavy bleeding is due to hormonal imbalance.

    • ANSWER:
      Its very difficult to advise through the internet. The best is to have several opinions from several gynecologists, who can examine the woman, see how enlarged the uterus is and how urgent is such a procedure. Its true that after menopause many fibroids shrink and there is no necessity to remove the uterus again. But, the question is, when will menopause start? And till it starts the woman loses a lot of blood is that too dangerous? Today the hysterectomy is done in several ways and is not such a serious operation (I know every surgery has its dangers) as it used to be 20 and more years ago.
      I found some sites that discuss alternatives to hysterectomy but I seriously think one must get several opinions.

      http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls=com.microsoft%3Aen-US&q=Hysterectomy+alternatives

  15. QUESTION:
    when does Premarin take effect in your system?
    I just started HRT and taking Premarin 1.25mg daily for menopause 3 days ago. Since then I haven't had any effects from it yet. When will the medicine kicks in my system? Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Please don't use premarin, it is made from the urine of pregnant horses, it is obtained in a very cruel way, there is an alternative, please ask your Doctor.

  16. QUESTION:
    What can I do if I hate pads AND tampons?
    Pads are ok but I feel filthy wearing them and I ALWAYS leak. Tampons aren't for me either, I just don't feel comfortable in them. Is there some sort of alternative, or a way to make my period stop comletely? I have to arrange everything around that time of month.
    Without taking a pill or visiting a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of different options, even different types of pads (commercial, organic, cloth, homemade, period panties, period belts) or different types of tampons (commercial, organic, soft, sponge, cloth) can feel and work totally differently.

      Otherwise the best options are menstrual cups, which are bell-shaped cups made from silicone, rubber or thermoplastic elastomer that you insert into your vagina to collect menstrual flow. Cups are folded, inserted and you twist to create a light seal, to remove simply squeeze the bottom and pull out. Women use them because they are far safer and more hygienic than tampons, because of this it means cups can be worn for up to 12 hours at a time safely and without any leaking, including from light to heavy flow, overnight, before menstruation and during sports like swimming. I use these as my period is too heavy for tampons or/and pads, plus I found when switching to cups that I never really liked tampons or pads anyway! Cups are definatly great, you can forget about having your period.

      There are also softcups called Instead which are a similar but are diaphragm-shapes so sit higher up in the vagina, softcups can also be worn during sex to avoid mess during menstruation. Softcups have many of the same advantages to menstrual cups, only they are a little more difficult to use and can leak. Diaphragms can also be used as menstrual cups, they are easier to use and less messy than softcups but have all the same advantages as menstrual cups.

      http://www.menstrualcups.org - Menstrual cup support
      http://www.scarleteen.com/article/advice/what_are_menstrual_cups - Cup article on Scarleteen
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menstrual_cup - Menstrual cups on Wikipedia

      There is free-flow or free bleeding, where you use no menstrual products, it's perfectly sanitary (more so than commercial tampons and pads in actual fact) and no one needs to know about it. Women will either bleed freely, or layer their clothing so that their clothing acts like a pad as protection to stop blood leaking through their clothing. There is also something known as instinctive free-flow, this is where women learn to recognise when they are going to bleed so that they can bleed into the toilet like they would if they were going to pee, rather than bleeding onto their clothing or menstrual products. Free-bleeding on All About My Vagina - http://myvag.net/blood/free

      You can stop your period completely by getting pregnant and staying pregnant or breastfeeding until menopause, otherwise the only other means is menstrual management - using hormonal birth control to suppress your periods. The normal issues exist such as side-effects from hormonal birth control, there is also an ongoing argument about whether or not it is safe long-term - plus it would mean visiting a doctor. More information here - http://www.noperiod.com (although this site is a little bias).

  17. QUESTION:
    Anyone out there tired of these awful menopause symptoms?
    Hate these (blankity-blank) Hot flashes. Feels like my head is on fire. Ugh!!!!

    I hate getting old, but I guess considering the alternative, I guess it's ok.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Roz. I'm answering from the male perspective (I've had night sweats), and from an empathetic perspective - I have 5 sisters in various stages of menopause and a partner (Sassy) who just came off hormone replacement therapy and into the pit called menopause after a cervical cancer scare. And before going any further - I'm not a doctor. I'm able to diagnose and fix machines. People? Not so much.
      Sassy found a silver bullet for her hot flashes - venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor) - although it did cause a dry mouth as a side effect. It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms; many doctors aren't even aware of that use for the drug. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may work for you too. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary - or it may not work at all.
      Regardless, Sassy and I put together a web page (below) with comments about diet, herbal remedies, and some other ways to get relief from night sweats, hot flashes, etc. Keep in mind that herbal treatments for night sweats and hot flashes can be broken down into two categories: phytoestrogen and non-estrogenic herbs, and each has their proponents. Hope this helps.

  18. QUESTION:
    So what can I expect during menopause?
    I just got my test results today to say I am in my menopause. I am 49. So far I've had no symptoms or discomfort. Is this a sign that I might skip all the uncomfortable side effects, or is it too soon to say? Also what kinds of supplements are best for calcium and what kinds of exercise can I motivate myself to do, as I really hate it?

    • ANSWER:
      During the perimenopausal transition, a woman's estrogen levels decrease, leading to the typical symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, problems with concentration or mood, vaginal dryness...the list goes on. Some options for relief include hormone replacement therapy (HRT), an alternative medical therapy, or herbal remedies

  19. QUESTION:
    alternative medication: What fruit, vegetables, and foods inhibit estrogen absorption?
    I have found a list of fruit, vegetables, and foods that inhibit estrogen absorption such as broccoli, corn, grapes, white rice, white floor, and so on.
    Does it have some implications to be used as an alternative medicine, for example can we call them foods that women should not eat or avoid consumption them in large amount during menopause or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Estrogen Inhibiting Foods

      If you are suffering from breast cancer, PMS, fibroids, ovarian cysts, and other situations that estrogen might exacerbate, the following estrogen inhibiting foods might be of interest to you.
      Berries
      Broccoli
      Buckwheat
      Cabbage
      Citrus Foods
      Corn
      Figs
      Fruits (except apples, cherries, dates, pomegranates)
      Grapes
      Green beans
      Melons
      Millet
      Onions
      Pears
      Pineapples
      Squashes
      Tapioca
      White rice
      White flour

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you get a rash from Menopause?
    I am getting this rash that really itches all over my neck and chest. Can it be related to Menopause? Or maybe and allergic reaction to something?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Stephanie

      Here are a few ideas to heal the issue.

      Cause
      Although most rashes are not symptoms of a serious health problem, they can be signs of allergies, liver and gallbladder problems, lupus, bleeding disorders, nutritional deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases.

      Rashes can also be due to the elimination of toxic wastes through the skin, or of an active immune reaction to an invading organism. Suppression of such a rash can lead to chronic disease states. Rather than try to suppress the rash, in such cases watchful waiting may be more advisable.

      Caution: If your rash becomes chronic, forms a "butterfly" shape over your cheeks, or is accompanied by high fever and joint pains, seek immediate medical attention to rule out more serious illnesses.

      ------------------------------...

      Natural Cures

      Diet: Screen for and eliminate any foods to which you are allergic or sensitive. Eat an organic, whole foods diet, with plenty of green leafy vegetables and yellow vegetables such as carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, and winter squash. Also drink plenty of pure, filtered water, and avoid all processed foods and chemical food additives.

      Flower Essences: Rescue Remedy Cream® applied topically to the affected areas.

      Herbs: The following herbal remedies can speed healing: A tincture of equal parts burdock root and gentian root, the fresh juice of coriander, and/or aloe vera juice or gel.

      Homeopathy: Useful homeopathic remedies include Belladonna, Sulfur, Graphites, and Calc carb.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment.
      *Purified water is essential for any hydrotherapy treatment. Remedies for Treating Chlorinated Bath Water offers clear instructions and recommendations.

      Juice Therapy: Drink fresh squeezed vegetable juices on a daily basis, especially carrot, beet, radish, and garlic juice.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following nutrients can be helpful to speed healing: vitamin A and vitamin E (both orally and applied topically over the affected areas), vitamin C, essential fatty acids (EFAs), flaxseed oil, and amma linolenic acid (GLA). In addition, add half a teaspoon of baking soda to water and drink every fifteen minutes. Do this three times, and then every two to three hours for two to three days or until the reaction subsides.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating rashes: Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Detoxification Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, Oxygen Therapy (Hydrogen Peroxide), and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

      Best of health to you

  21. QUESTION:
    Do any female animals experience menopause?
    If so, at what age do they experience it and what are the signs of menopause in say for example a rabbit.

    If not, how can you tell that an animal is to old to conceive a baby animal.

    I am mostly wondering about rabbits but I also want to know about any animal.

    • ANSWER:
      Humans (female) are a species that experience menopause. Info follows:

      Menopause
      Menopause is quite simply the final pause of menstruation. This phase of a woman's life is part of the natural aging process. It is not a disease or a disaster. Your ovaries slowly reduce the level of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) they produce and child bearing is no longer an option. For many women this is a big relief. Generally speaking, health professionals agree that 52 is the average age when full menopause takes affect. The full age range is between 42 to 56.

      Menopause is preceded by perimenopause and followed by post menopause. All three stages come with their own telltale signs with considerable overlap from one to the other. So, unlike the beginning of your period, which seems to happen in a single moment of time, menopause is very wishy washy. Full menopause is considered to be in effect when you have not had your period for a full year.

      Menopause is not experienced by all women in the same way. Much depends on the individual's diet, lifestyle, genetics and attitudes held by the woman, her family, culture and society about aging. If you come from a world that does not respect older people, and is narrowly focused on youth, your menopause transition period may be more difficult to navigate. However, you may also experience deep personal growth and a strong sense of liberation.

      Be aware that our commercialized society will try to medicalize your symptoms. Be wise. Look for natural alternatives before getting on the pill band wagon. Weigh the risks and benefits carefully. Become your own authority.

      There is a home-use test that you can take to determine if you are perimenopausal or fully menopausal. U.S Food and Drug Administration approved kits measure Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland. FSH levels increase temporarily each month to stimulate your ovaries to produce eggs. When you enter menopause and your ovaries stop working your FSH levels also increase. The test will provide a FSH level reading so that you can determine what stage of "the Pause" you are at.

      As for rabbits, this study may interest you:

      Lack of difference among progestins on the anti-atherogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol: a rabbit study
      Peter Alexandersen1,3, Jens Haarbo1, Pieter Zandberg2, Jørgen Jespersen1, Sven O. Skouby1 and Claus Christiansen1
      1 Center for Clinical & Basic Research, Ballerup Byvej 222, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark and 2 Department of Vascular Pharmacology, N.V.Organon, Molenstraat 110, 5340 BH Oss, The Netherlands

      3 To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: pa@ccbr.dk

      Abstract
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      BACKGROUND: Progestins in combination with estrogen are believed to have different effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different oral contraceptive formulations on the development of experimental atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity. METHODS: A total of 160 sexually mature rabbits were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to equally large groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) ethinyl estradiol (EE 70 µg/day, oral), (iii) desogestrel (DSG 525 µg/day, oral), (iv) gestodene (GSD 262.5 µg/day, oral), (v) levonorgestrel (LNG 525 µg/day, oral), (vi) EE + DSG, (vii) EE + LNG, or (viii) EE + GSD. After 31 weeks of treatment, aortic accumulation of cholesterol and vascular vasoreactivity (in vitro) were determined. RESULTS: Progestins alone did not reduce the accumulation of cholesterol. EE alone or in combination with a progestin reduced the accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (P < 0.0001). Isolated vessels from EE-treated animals relaxed significantly more to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine than did placebo (P < 0.001), whereas vessels treated with EE plus a progestin showed an intermediate response. CONCLUSION: The progestins investigated can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE.

      Key words: atherosclerosis/estrogen/progestins/rabbits/vascular reactivity

      Introduction
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The question of whether oral contraceptive (OC) formulations increase the risk of arterial events (such as myocardial infarction) in younger women remains unsolved. Several recent case–control studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction in women using OC compared with non-users (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Lewis, 1998; Dunn et al., 1999; 2001; Farley et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001; Rosendaal et al., 2002), although other recent data have not confirmed this observation (Sidney et al., 1998). Recent European studies have indicated that OC use is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, in contrast to US studies that found no increased risk among OC users (Lewis 1998; Sidney et al., 1998). Only a few studies have directly compared the effect on myocardial infarction of OC formulations containing a second-generation progestin (levonorgestrel) with those containing third-generation progestins (desogestrel or gestodene) (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Dunn et al., 2001; Tanis et al., 2001), but they were all designed as case–control studies; the reported relative risk in these studies varies (between 0.3 and 1.8), and the numbers are small.

      The relative preponderance in venous events (e.g. deep venous thrombosis) as compared with arterial events (e.g. myocardial infarction) in pre-menopausal women is gradually equalized as the menopause is reached, so that the relative frequency of these events is close to 1:1 in peri-menopausal women. Since OC are prescribed for millions of pre-menopausal (and peri-menopausal) women who use these formulations for many years, it would be of the utmost public health importance to establish even a small increase in the relative risk. Therefore, the issue of OC in relation to arterial disease is highly relevant. It should be borne in mind, however, that it is possible that for both OC and HRT users, there may be prothrombotic mechanisms in relation to arterial as well as venous complications that are not necessarily based on atherosclerosis, but that are reflected in the population-based studies. Primary (Rossouw et al., 2002) and secondary (Grady et al., 2002) prevention studies of HRT have failed to show cardioprotection in post-menopausal women.

      We report here the results from an experimental study in rabbits of atherosclerosis designed to investigate the effect of estrogen (ethinyl estradiol, EE) in combination with levonorgestrel (LNG), desogestrel (DSG), or gestodene (GSD) on vascular reactivity, lipoprotein metabolism, and the aortic accumulation of cholesterol.

      Materials and methods
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Study design
      A total of 160 sexually mature female rabbits of the Danish Country strain (SSC:CPH) were obtained from Statens Serum Institute, Denmark. They were individually housed at room temperature (20 ± 2°C), a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%, and with a 12 h light cycle. The study was conducted in the animal facilities at the Center for Clinical & Basic Research (CCBR), Ledoeje, Denmark. After a 2 week period of acclimatization, the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy to inhibit intrinsic production of sex hormones (Alexandersen et al., 1998). One week after surgery, the rabbits were then randomly assigned to one of the following eight treatment groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) EE (orally, 70 µg/day), (iii) DSG (orally, 525 µg/day), (iv) GSD (orally, 262.5 µg/day), (v) LNG (orally, 525 µg/day), (vi) EE continuously combined with DSG (doses as above) (EE + DSG), (vii) EE continuously combined with LNG (doses as above) (EE + LNG), or (viii) EE continuously combined with GSD (doses as above) (EE + GSD). We did not include a sham-operated group in this study as it was previously shown that sham operation per se in rabbits results in a mean accumulation of cholesterol that was not statistically significant from that of the non-treated control group (Haarbo et al., 1992). Hormone doses used in this study were chosen based on previous experience with these doses (the McPhail test in rabbits; EE, LNG and DSG) (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) or from in-house studies (GSD). The EE dose used was kept constant in all EE groups throughout the study period (31 weeks). We used the rabbit to evaluate the effect of sex steroids on atherogenesis because it is known to be a useful model of experimental atherosclerosis (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Sulistiyani et al., 1995).

      Key effect variables of the study comprised aortic atherosclerosis (i.e. fatty streaks and plaque formation), and vascular reactivity (primary key variables); and body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins, uterus wet weight, hepatic cholesterol content, uterine estrogen receptor content, liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count (secondary key variables).

      The study was approved and overviewed by the Experimental Animals Committee under the Danish Ministry of Justice. All procedures complied with the Danish guidelines for experimental animal studies.

      Rabbit chow
      Each rabbit was fed 100 g of chow per day throughout the entire study. The cholesterol-rich chow was prepared by first dissolving the hormone or the combination of hormones (all provided by N.V. Organon, The Netherlands) in ethanol (96%; 0.50 ml per animal per day), then mixing with maize oil (Unikem, Denmark). Another mixture was prepared by dissolving cholesterol (SIGC-8503; Bie & Berntsen A/S, Denmark) in maize oil by slow heating. The hormone solution and the cholesterol solution containing maize oil (total daily intake of maize oil was 8 ml per animal) were then mixed manually together with the pellets (Altromin 2123, Brogaarden, Denmark), as previously described (Alexandersen et al., 1998). Food consumption was monitored weekly by weighing remaining chow. All animals had free access to water.

      Blood samples
      Blood samples were taken at baseline (week 0) and in weeks 6, 14 and 30. Blood samples were collected from a lateral ear vein on fasting animals (24 h) and analysed at the CCBR laboratory (Ballerup, Denmark) immediately after collection, except for the progestin concentrations that were assessed at Organon.

      Safety variables
      Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, leukocyte count (Sysmex K-1000; Toa Medical Electronics, Inc., USA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) (Cobas Mira Plus; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., F.Hoffmann–La Roche, Switzerland) were determined in weeks 0, 6, 14 and 30.

      Serum lipids and lipoproteins
      Total serum cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured enzymatically by kinetic colorimetric methods (Cobas Mira). Ultracentrifuged lipoproteins were determined regularly throughout the study as described in detail elsewhere (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Alexandersen et al., 1998).

      Serum progestin concentrations
      A kinetic study was performed after 16 weeks of treatment to determine the serum concentrations of the respective progestins. Blood samples were taken before dosing, and then again 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h after dosing, but taking only two samples per animal in each group (providing 40 samples per group), to give an impression of the pharmacokinetic profile of these compounds. These hormone concentrations were determined at Organon’s laboratories.

      Desogestrel
      DSG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng DSG per ml plasma DSG and its internal standard (IS), an analogue of DSG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 325.4 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 147.2 for DSG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.1 for its IS.

      Gestodene
      GSD study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of GSD per ml plasma. GSD and its IS, an analogue of GSD, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Hypersil BDS C18 column. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 311.0 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.1 for GSD and m/z 339.10 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.20 for its IS.

      Levonorgestrel
      LNG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of LNG per ml plasma. LNG and its IS, an analogue of LNG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 313.3 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.2 for LNG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.10 for its IS.

      Aortic accumulation of cholesterol
      Necropsy (week 32) was done with an i.v. injection of 1–2 ml of mebumal (pentobarbital) 20% solution. The thoracic aorta (just above the aortic valves to the level of the diaphragm) was dissected free, and the connective tissue adhering to the adventitia was then carefully removed under running saline. The aorta was cut longitudinally and the luminal surface was rinsed with saline. The vessel was fixed at the corners with pins onto a piece of paper on a corkboard. The tissue was separated in two parts (a proximal and a distal part) at the level of the first intercostal arteries. The proximal part was utilized to strip the luminal layer containing the intima and part of the media from the underlying media/adventitia. The proximal part was weighed and stored at –20°C until analysed. For analysis, the luminal layer of the aortic tissue was minced and the lipids were extracted chemically with chloroform and methanol (2:1, vol/vol) over 24 h. The lipids were separated from the proteins (Haarbo et al., 1991). The total aortic cholesterol content in the tissue specimens was measured enzymatically after the fraction containing cholesterol had been taken to dryness by heating and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of 2-propanol. The amount of protein in the aorta was measured as described by Lowry (1951). The weight of the heart was recorded.

      Morphometric analysis of aortic plaque area
      The aorta (comprising the ascendant part, the arch, and the descendant part, from the aortic valves and to the first intercostal artery) was opened longitudinally and rinsed in 50% ethanol and dyed in Sudan Red for 1 min. Each aortic tissue dyed was projected onto a horizontal surface with a projecting videocamera (JAI 2040 Protec, Japan) and videotaped under microscope (Zeiss Stemi 2000/C, Germany). The images obtained were then digitized (ImagePro Plus, USA) to determine the surface involvement of atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) and the total area occupied by the atheroma plaque (see below). Surface involvement by atherosclerosis in an animal was assessed by tracing the contours of the lumen expressed as percentage of the total aortic area. Summing the degree of surface involvement per animal and dividing by the number of animals in the group, the mean degree of surface involvement by atherosclerosis in a treatment group was calculated. Sudan Red was found not to significantly interfere with chemical determination of aortic accumulation of cholesterol (data not shown).

      Preparation of aortic rings and tension monitoring
      Isolated vascular segments (3–4 mm transverse sections) from the thoracic aorta were prepared from the newly killed rabbit (Furchgott and Zawadzki 1980). Five to ten rabbits randomly selected from each group were used. The rings were immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs’ solution and cleaned under careful protection of the endothelium. The Krebs’ solution consisted of (mmol/l): NaCl 118.0, KCl 4.7, CaCl2 2.6, MgSO4 1.2, KH2PO4 1.2, NaCHO3 24.9, and glucose 11.1. The isolated rings were mounted in the organ bath on two parallel and horizontal stainless steel wires (40 µm in diameter) inserted into the lumen of the vessel. The bath contained Krebs’ solution at 37°C, carbonized with 95%/5% of O2/CO2. One hook was fixed, and the other connected to a force transducer measuring the isometric tension of the ring (Myograph 400; JP Trading A/S, Denmark). Initially, the rings were stretched to a basal tension of 2.0 g and allowed to equilibrate for 45 min. From other experiments, it was found that a basal tension of 2.0 g developed the maximal active tension in the rings (data not shown), and the basal tension was therefore increased to 2.0 g before each experiment and allowed to equilibrate for ≥30 min. The rings were then contracted twice with a 126 mmol/l K+ Krebs’ solution, which is identical to Krebs solution, except that Na+ in the Krebs’ was exchanged with K+ on a molar basis. The experiment began with repeated contraction with phenylephrine to 40% of their maximal contraction with high dose potassium (126 mmol/l). Cumulative dose–response curves to acetylcholine were then obtained in the concentration range of 10–8 to 10–5 mol/l. The rings were washed and allowed to relax. The vessels were then stimulated with phenyleprine again to 50% of the maximal contractile response to 126 mmol/l of K+ , and dose–response curves were subsequently obtained for sodium nitroprusside (4x10–8 to 1.3x10–5 mol/l).

      Liver accumulation of cholesterol
      The amount of cholesterol accumulated during the study was determined after homogenization of a liver biopsy taken at the time of necropsy. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations were assessed after homogenization and adjusted for hepatic protein similarly as described for aortic cholesterol determinations (Haarbo et al., 1991).

      The uterus and endometrial tissue
      The bicornuate uterus was cut at the level of the vagina and beginning of the salpinges, removed and the wet weight determined. A sample of endometrial tissue was excised and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at –85°C until analysis. For analysis, the endometrial tissue was homogenized and centrifuged at 800 g. The supernatant was then further centrifuged at 105 000 g, and the obtained supernatant (cytosol) was used for determination of cytosolic estrogen-binding capacity by steroid-binding assay with dextran-coated charcoal separation (Thorpe, 1987). The estrogen-binding capacity was adjusted for the protein concentration in the cytosol (Bradford, 1976). The 800 g pellet was washed, the nuclear receptors extracted by 0.6 mol/l KCl (Thorpe et al., 1986) and the nuclear estrogen receptor content determined by an enzyme immunoassay (Abott Laboratories). The inter-assay variation of the estrogen-binding capacity and the estrogen receptor (immunoassay) and protein determination were 7, 6 and 5% respectively. All analyses were done without knowledge of the treatment group.

      Statistics
      The mean levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins during the treatment period were calculated as the area under the curve (AUC). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the primary and secondary key variables. If ANOVA indicated statistical significance, Student’s t-test was used to compare groups against the placebo group using Dunnett’s correction for multiple comparisons. The relationship between aortic accumulation of cholesterol and the averaged serum total cholesterol (and lipoprotein) level was determined by correlation analysis. Dose–response curves for acetylcholine were performed for each treatment group (n = 5–10), and ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences among groups at each concentration of acetylcholine. Linear correlation was performed between accumulation of cholesterol and vascular response to acetylcholine. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate the significance of serum lipids and lipoproteins and of other non-lipid-mediated effects of the hormone treatments (independent variables) on the accumulation of cholesterol (dependent variable), and to study the degree of endothelial dysfunction (dependent variable) after correction for aortic accumulation of cholesterol and treatment (independent variables). All statistical analyses were performed with 5% as the level of significance.

      Results
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      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Table I gives the baseline characteristics for the eight study groups in terms of body weight and serum lipids and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). There was no statistically significant difference among groups for any variable tested. During the study, all groups significantly increased the body weight by 20% (P < 0.05). Treatment with DSG, GSD, or LNG did not significantly affect the average TC concentration (Table II). However, treatment with EE or EE plus a progestin significantly lowered average TC concentrations. Changes in TC were paralleled by modifications in the atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-C, IDL-C, and VLDL-C) (ANOVA: P < 0.001 for all), and all hormone treatments (progestins alone or in combination with EE) significantly increased average HDL-C concentrations (ANOVA: P < 0.001).

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      Table I. Baseline characteristics

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      Table II. Mean (SEM) serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations calculated from the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC)

      Cholesterol feeding per se resulted in an extensive aortic accumulation of cholesterol (nmol/mg wet weight) and this was significantly attenuated by long-term treatment with EE (P < 0.0001) or EE plus a progestin (P 0.5}.

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      Figure 1. Individual values for the aortic accumulation of cholesterol (µmol/mg wet weight) (upper part of the figure) or the morphometric data based on the area of the aortic arch covered by plaque (lower part of the figure) in the eight groups. EE = ethinyl estradiol; DGS = desogestrel; GTD = gestodene; LNG = levonorgestrel. Rabbits treated with EE alone or in combination with a progestin (DSG, GSD or LNG) had significantly lower accumulation of cholesterol and atherosclerotic plaque than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the progestin groups and the placebo group. ***P < 0.0001 (analysis of variance).

      Morphometric analysis of the plaque covering the surface of the thoracic aorta revealed that there were significantly more atheromatous lesions in the placebo group than in the EE and the EE + progestin groups (P < 0.001 for all groups versus placebo) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). This still held true after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P < 0.0001).

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      Figure 2. Representative samples of the aortic arches used for morhometric determination of the area covered by atherosclerotic plaques. Upper panel shows examples from the placebo group (cholesterol feeding alone; placebo), and the ethinyl estradiol (EE) group; whereas the lower panel shows examples from each of the EE + progestin groups. There was significantly less plaque accumulated in the EE group and the EE + progestin groups compared with placebo (P < 0.0001). Numbers indicate animal identifications.

      Figure 3 shows the EC50 to acetylcholine for the various treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with EE and EE plus a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than controls. The response to two physiological doses of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) in precontracted vessels is shown (centre and bottom). Vessels treated with EE relaxed significantly more to acetylcholine than control vessels or vessels with a progestin alone (P < 0.05). Moreover, combining EE with a progestin relaxed the vessels significantly more than control vessels but to a lesser extent than with EE alone. Vasorelaxation to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) correlated significantly and inversely to aortic accumulation of cholesterol (r = –0.39 P = 0.002 and r = –0.37 P = 0.004 respectively). To study the influence of increasing accumulation of cholesterol on the endothelial dysfunction evaluated by vascular reactivity in vitro, ANCOVA was done. We found that treatment with EE significantly and independently of aortic accumulation of cholesterol restored vasorelaxation {for EE: estimate [mean (SEM)] was 49.3 (10.4)%, P = 0.0001}, whereas the other treatments with EE plus a progestin or a progestin alone [DSG, –7.7 (9.2)% (not significant); GSD, –8.5 (9.1)% (not significant); LNG, –3.2 (9.7)% (not significant); EE + DSG, 17.7 (9.4)% (P = 0.065); EE + GSD, 13.2 (10.2)% (not significant); and EE ± LNG, 17.0 (8.8)% (P = 0.058)], or accumulation of cholesterol per se [–0.1 (0.2)%] did not.

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      Figure 3. The EC50 values for acetylcholine of isolated vessels for the treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with ethinyl estradiol (EE) alone or combined with a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than the placebo group. Long-term treatment with EE alone or combined with a progestin relaxed precontracted vessels to two physiological doses of acetylcholine [1.0x10–7 mol/l (centre) and 3.2x10–7 mol/l (bottom) significantly more than control vessels (black bar; P < 0.0001)]. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      The uterine wet weight was significantly higher in EE-treated animals than in controls (P < 0.0001; Figure 4). Progestins had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with any of the progestins significantly increased the wet weight indicating that the progestins with the doses used were not able to completely abolish the stimulatory effect of EE on this target organ (Figure 4). The uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor (ER) concentrations were significantly lowered in the EE group (P < 0.0001) and also in each of the EE plus progestin groups (P < 0.001–0.0001) relative to the placebo group, but also the progestins alone resulted in reduced concentrations compared with controls (P < 0.001) (Table III). For the nuclear ER concentrations there was no significant differences for any of the treatment groups, but all were lower than the control group.

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      Figure 4. Uterine wet weight for the rabbits according to treatment. The wet weight was significantly higher in ethinyl estradiol (EE)-treated animals than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Progestins themselves had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with a progestin all significantly increased the wet weight (P < 0.0001). Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

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      Table III. Hepatic cholesterol content and uterine cytosolic and uterine nuclear estrogen receptor content (fmol/mg protein)

      Safety aspects in relation to the study
      Figure 5 shows that the rabbits receiving EE or EE plus a progestin had concentration peaks for the progestin between 1 and 8 h after administration, as based on the kinetic study. The differences in the area under the curve for LNG versus DSG, and EE + LNG versus EE + DSG respectively, indicate a difference in the serum concentrations of these two progestins and may, in part, reflect difference in protein binding. Nevertheless, the serum concentrations of LNG in rabbits are similar to those reported for women (Kook et al., 2002).

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      Figure 5. Mean concentrations in serum (ng/ml) of the various progestins alone or when combined with ethinyl estradiol. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      During the last 6–8 weeks, the animals and particularly those in the EE group ceased increasing in body weight probably as a result of general health deterioration, and in the EE group a significant number of rabbits (n = 8) did not complete the study. Autopsy of these animals suggested a toxic estrogenic effect of the liver (liver cirrhosis) and of the uterus (probably deciduocarcinoma) by macroscopic examination, as previously reported as a consequence of exogenous estrogens (Janne et al., 2001). Due to decay of the internal organs the precise cause of death could not be determined in most cases. Table IV summarizes the percentage change in ALAT, haemoglobin, and white cell count. In the EE group, eight rabbits died prematurely (mostly after week 20). The temporary increase in ALAT (week 6) in the LNG, EE + DSG, EE + GSD, and EE + LNG groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment, but never fully returned to pretreatment values (Table IV). The general health of the animals in the EE group as determined by the haemoglobin, red blood cell count and haematocrit (not shown), and clinical appearance deteriorated in the last period of the study, probably as a result of a toxic effect of the EE dose used.

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      Table IV. Mean (SEM) percentage changes from baseline in liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count

      Discussion
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      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The principal results of this experimental study was that EE either alone or in continuous combination with one of the progestins used, i.e. LNG, DSG or GSD, significantly inhibited the aortic accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (cholesterol-feeding alone), whereas treatment with progestin monotherapy had a neutral effect on atherogenesis, irrespective of the progestin used. After adjustment for lipids and lipoproteins, there still was an apparently inhibitory effect of EE on aortic accumulation of cholesterol suggesting a lipid concentration-independent mechanism of action for EE on atherogenesis. A previous study in non-human monkeys also found that animals treated with EE in combination with LNG (as a triphasic OC formulation) had significantly less iliac artery atherosclerosis than control animals (Kaplan et al., 1995). Extrapolating experimental data to the human situation should be done with caution, but only two population-based studies have been specifically designed to investigate the role of second versus third generation OC formulations on the risk of myocardial infarction (Dunn et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001). In the study by Dunn et al., the relative risk was found to be increased with third generation compared with second generation OC formulations [OR, 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7–4.8)], whereas in the study by Tanis et al. the relative risk was found to be decreased with third generation compared with second generation formulations [OR, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2–1.1]. In addition, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking and arterial hypertension) seems to be crucial for development of myocardial infarction in women taking OC (World Health Organization, 1997; Farley et al., 1998; Lewis, 1998; Petitti et al., 2000; Tanis et al., 2001). In fact, the WHO study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in non-smoking women with no other cardiovascular risk factors who also reported blood pressure check before starting use of combined OC. Controlled, randomized studies are therefore clearly needed, although these studies will be of a considerable size taking into account the expected low incidence of myocardial infarction in pre-menopausal women (Crook and Godsland, 1998), and consequently such trials are very expensive to perform. Therefore, until clinical data on vascular endpoints are available, experimental animal studies may provide important clues in terms of the effect of various OC formulations on atherogenesis.
      Data on the direct effect of OC formulations on the human arterial system are lacking (Kuhl, 1996). We found evidence that the OC formulations used in this study had a direct effect on the arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of precontracted aortic rings was increased in the EE plus progestin groups, although less than in the EE group alone as compared with placebo. EE’s significant effect on restoring vasorelaxation was found to be independent of the accumulation of cholesterol in the aortic wall. However, we also found that the addition of the progestins influenced the estrogen-induced vasorelaxation (Figure 3), although by an unknown mechanism of action. Recently, in a study of precontracted rabbit jugular veins, EE, LNG, DSG and GSD were reported to induce relaxations in vessels with intact endothelium (Herkert et al., 2000). However, this area warrants further investigation.

      It is well known that cholesterol-fed rabbits show alterations in their lipoprotein metabolism that differ from the human situation (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992). Combination of EE with a progestin in this study reflected the estrogenic effect. Furthermore, the three combined treatments lowered serum lipids and the atherogenic lipoprotein levels significantly and similarly to EE monotherapy. In contrast, treatment with a progestin alone did not affect these variables differently from the controls, in accordance with earlier findings (Haarbo et al., 1992). In women, OC frequently increases serum triglycerides (Gevers Leuven et al., 1990; Kuhl et al., 1990; Leuven et al., 1990; Lobo et al., 1996; Cheung et al., 1999).

      The dose of EE was selected to reflect serum concentrations of EE in peri-menopausal women taking OC. However, the duration of the present study was longer than in many previous studies (20 weeks). Among the animals receiving EE alone, 40% died after only ≥21 weeks of treatment, whereas animals given combined treatment did not die prematurely. This suggests that the accumulated estrogen dose may have been too high and/or the study too long, as also indicated by the safety variables of the EE-treated animals at week 30 (Table IV), but also that adding a progestin was able to negate this toxic effect. Progestins were used in equipotent doses (i.e. in combination with EE they inhibit endometrial stimulation equally in humans) relative to each other. The selected dose of the progestins (µg per kg body weight) was chosen based on previous experience (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) and in-house studies (in Organon), but may be considered as high doses. All three OC formulations significantly decreased the concentration of the cytosolic ER concentration relative to controls, suggesting that these formulations affect the endometrium through a down-regulation of the cytosolic ER. Addition of a progestin in this study also down-regulated the ER although less than found for EE, and when combining EE with a progestin, the estrogen component dominated the ER regulation. It should, however, be emphasized that the lack of modifying effect of the progestins relative to the EE dose on the endometrium should not be taken as a lack of progestogenic effect, since the primary intention was to investigate the effect of these hormone combinations on atherosclerosis and arterial responsiveness.

      A type II statistical error is not likely to have occurred in our study. However, the accumulation of cholesterol (and amount of fatty streaks) in the EE group was significantly lower than that of the placebo animals. For a type II error to occur, the null hypothesis (that there was no difference in aortic accumulation of cholesterol between the EE and the placebo group) would not be true, and despite this, we would obtain a non-significant result, i.e. a ‘false negative’ result.

      In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits, the progestins investigated (LNG, DSG, or GSD) can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE, partly by decreasing atherogenic lipoproteins, and partly by a direct effect on the endothelium, modulating the aortic vasomotor response in vitro.

      References
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Alexandersen, P., Haarbo, J., Sandholdt, I., Shalmi, M., Lawaetz, H. and Christiansen, C. (1998) Norethindrone acetate enhances the antiatherogenic effect of 17beta-estradiol: a secondary prevention study of aortic atherosclerosis in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol., 18, 902–907.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

      Bradford, M.M. (1976) A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Anal. Biochem., 72, 248–254.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

      Cheung, M.C., Walden, C.E. and Knopp, R.H. (1999) Comparison of the effects of triphasic oral contraceptives with desogestrel or levonorgestrel on apolipoprotein A-I-containing high density lipoprotein particles. Metabolism, 48, 648–664.

      Crook, D. and Godsland, I. (1998) Safety evaluation of modern oral contraceptives. Effects on lipoprotein and carbohydrate metabolism. Contraception, 57, 189–201.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

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      Dunn, N.R., Arscott, A. and Thorogood, M. (2001) The relationship between use of oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction in young women with fatal outcome, compared to those who survive: results from the MICA case–control study. Contraception, 63, 65–69.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

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      Herkert, O., Kuhl, H., Busse, R. and Schini-Kerth, V.B. (2000) The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP. Br. J. Pharmacol., 130, 1911–1918.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

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      Submitted on December 13, 2002; resubmitted on February 20, 2003; accepted on March 25, 2003.

      This article has been cited by other articles:

      T. Hayashi, T. Esaki, D. Sumi, T. Mukherjee, A. Iguchi, and G. Chaudhuri
      Modulating role of estradiol on arginase II expression in hyperlipidemic rabbits as an atheroprotective mechanism
      PNAS, July 5, 2006; 103(27): 10485 - 10490.
      [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

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  22. QUESTION:
    I need advice on MENOPAUSE & alternative to HRT?
    Complete hysterectomy, some hot flashes (mild at the moment) especially on my upper arms. Dr suggested a mild HRT. He thinks I am stupid for hesitating HRT. Are there any alternatives which do not thin your blood?

    • ANSWER:
      I just weathered my way through the menopause, as did my friend after her hysterectomy.

      My neighbour swore by black cohosh!

      Be guided by how you feel as far as accepting HRT or not.

  23. QUESTION:
    I having severe night sweats. Are there any natural things to help?
    I am going through menopause and having severe night sweats. Are there any natural things I can take to help with this? Also, what is a comfortable material to sleep in?

    • ANSWER:
      PLEASE! I cannot stress enough that you have a complete hormone panel test. Saliva is more accurate than blood, but unfortunately, most insurance companies do not recognize this fact (yet). You are experiencing a symptom of hormone inbalance so treating the night sweats is only treating the symptom. It is important to get to the cause of of this symptom.

      Here is an excerpt from womentowomen.com

      5 natural ways to reduce hot flashes and night sweats

      Most of the women we meet in our clinic and Personal Programs prefer to use the most natural, least invasive methods available for health care. For them, addressing their menopausal symptoms by filling a prescription doesn’t hold the appeal it might for others. Antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, sleeping pills, and synthetic hormones, the solutions conventional medicine continues to offer women for hot flash relief, are not the first line of therapy at Women to Women. For 25 years we’ve been offering women safe alternative solutions that effectively address the underlying causes of hot flashes and provide equivalent — if not superior — results.

      Here are some options we find helpful:

      1) Understand your triggers. The first step in pulling the plug on your hot flashes is to identify and understand your triggers. Are you more prone at certain times of the day or night? Do certain foods set you off on a heat wave? Track these observations and patterns in your journal or Women to Women’s Wellness Diary.

      2) Nourish your body’s neuroendocrine pathways. Eat whole, fresh foods, and balance your meals and snacks with plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and protein. Add a top-grade multivitamin-mineral complex, essential fatty acids, and soy to augment your core nutrition and ensure an adequate supply of the micronutrients your body needs for neurotransmitter and hormonal balance. With a solid nutritional foundation, you will find the passage through menopause to be a lot less bumpy. (To learn more, read our dietary pointers for quelling hot flashes.)

      3) Stay active. Recent research suggests exercise helps calm hot flashes by reducing anxiety. In a small study looking at the effect of exercise on overall menopause symptoms, women who exercised experienced reduced hot flashes, while those who did not experienced an increase. Whatever form of exercise you enjoy makes for better hormonal health, provided it does not make you feel more stressed-out or overheated. Forms of exercise that raise core body temperature can trigger hot flashes, so be sure to provide ample cool-down time, and avoid dashing off to undertake anything stressful after your work-outs.

      4) Cultivate emotional health. Make a commitment to follow a path that brings you emotional wellness. Take incremental steps to reduce stress, whatever form it takes in your life. Whether that means setting better boundaries at work, home, or within your community, learn to value your own well-being enough to keep commitments and expectations reasonable. Use your inner guidance to seek out and cultivate practices that calm rather than stimulate your inner thermometer. In our experience women find meditation, prayer, yoga, biofeedback, Emotional Freedom Technique, and the Hoffman Quadrinity Process to be extremely helpful.

      5) Add gentle hormonal support when needed. Given that phytohormones approximate the molecular configuration of the hormones produced in our own bodies, it stands to reason that we’re better equipped to utilize them safely and effectively than pharmaceutical drugs or synthetic forms of hormone therapy. If you’re considering herbal support, a product containing a range of plant constituents, like the one we offer in our Personal Program, can offer synergistic benefits that a single herb may not. For more information, read our article on phytotherapy. You may also want to explore acupuncture and Traditional Oriental Medicine (TOM), or talk to your practitioner about bioidentical hormones

  24. QUESTION:
    Are there any alternatives to spaying my female cat?
    She is an indoor cat and soooo sweet. I am worried about her personality changing and any health side effects from having a full hysterectomy without hormone supplement, which is essentially what spaying does.

    • ANSWER:
      You can simply just not spay her and tolerate her when she goes into heat. She will cry a lot, may spray, and be desperate for a mate for a couple of months every year. She will be miserable, and make you miserable as well.

      There are some hormonal shots and pills to prevent that, but the side effects are worse than simply spaying her. There is also evidence that ovaban (hormones) also increase chances of mammary cancer. Or you may forget a dose, and like clockwork your cat will go in heat and have all the dangers associated w it.

      An unspayed cat is at risk of pyometra (more info here: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?articleid=917 ) They also become great escape artists and may wander far in search for a mate and get lost

      A kitten recovers sooooo quickly and the risks are so minimal, even more minimal when you compare it w the risks of possible delivery if she gets pregnant, mammary cancer, spaying a pregnant cat or cat w pyometra. Hormones in dogs and cats is different than in women, they don't go into menopause like we do, and they are miserable when they go in heat. Their bodies are prepared to live without hormones since they only have all that hormonal rush once a year (twice in dogs), while our body is really not used to being without hormonal fluctuations since we deal w it all the time, every month... if we are not ovulating... we are having a period.... no break

      Im sure she will be much happier spayed than not and forced to be celibate w her raging hormones :-)

  25. QUESTION:
    Should they ban PMU Farms and cut off the production of Premarin?
    I am doing a paper on the menopause drug called Premarin and it is from a pregnant mares urine. The mare can't hardly move and she has to stand for a long time during the last six months of her pregnancy. She stays in the stall until she gives birth and the foal will be shipped off to auction and normally go to the slaughter house.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many alternatives to Premarin that are at least as good, possibly better. so it would be no loss if Premarin was banned--menopausal women will have plenty of alternatives that are equally as good. If there were NO alternatives, then that would be a different matter--human lives take precedence over animal lives. But there ARE alternatives, so animal cruelty is unnecessary. On the other hand, it would be hypocritical because other animals are treated equally as bad or worse that are raised for eating, so why single out horses for Premarin?

  26. QUESTION:
    Is a migraine behind eyes and hot flush feeling on left side normal heading into menopause?
    I'm just wondering because it feels like I only get hot on the left side but it radiates to the right...I can feel my left side of my face heat up, but I don't sweat and my face doesn't get red. Or does it sound like something neurological?

    • ANSWER:
      OOOh yes! migraine, stress, anxiety, and many others bad feelings..No hormone replacement please, but natural therapeuty..try this : http://menopauseandweight.com/ Don’t let menopause ruin your quality of life! and Change to alternative and proven methods, natural treatments.
      GOG bless

  27. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  28. QUESTION:
    whats a good thin comforter, that will keep me neither too hot or too cold?
    i keep waking up sweaty, im only 27 so i dont think its menopause. but i do have hormonal imbalance. i have the AC on and everyones freezing. whats a nice thin comforter that is warm, but not hot and heavy?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, There are a couple of light weight or year round down alternative duvet inserts here http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&keywords=down%20alternative%20duvet%20insert&tag=recommended0b-20&index=garden&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325 Hope this helps.

  29. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  30. QUESTION:
    Had total hysterectomy. Looking for advice re menopause. Can anyone give me some advice?
    I have just had a total hysterectomy and am beginning to have hot flushes. I am not sure about taking HRT and I would rather try alternative therapies. It has been 6 weeks since my surgery and I am still off work. Can anyone give me advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Were you not given advice at the time? Talk to your gynaecologist about this

  31. QUESTION:
    How does one deal with the night sweats due to menopause?
    I refuse to go on hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Alice, until now they found no real alternative to HRT.
      I read that Yoga decreases the frequency of hot flashes for many women and also that ispflavone (soy) is helping. But
      to entirely get rid of hot flashes I am afraid its just the HRT (I am suing it for many years, couldn't stand the hot flashes night and day).

  32. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever tried Black Cohosh for menopause?
    Sleepless nights, fatique, thinning hair, mood swings= Menopause for me. Any advice will be appreciated I thinking about using Black Cohosh, but I need to know if some had used it and what is their opinion. Other options will also be appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      If you are concerned about taking HRT then this article may be of some help to you.
      Use a step ladder approach to your health. Diet: First eat a health diet, limit coffee and alcohol as it can increase hot flashes. Exercise 1/2 hour a day with a walk at min. This helps your well being and increases certain hormones levels. Use vitamins and herbs such as estrogenic like from plants, doug quai, black cohosh, licorice, red clover or wild yam extracts. Any one of them can help, but do not use all at once or combine them. It is a waste of resouces. You can try one and see if it helps and switch to another one if it doesn't. You can add chaste tree berry or vitex, which is the only documented herb that shows in your blood life to increase progesterone. You can blend vitamins and herb's together, but be sure not to use more than one phyto-estrogen. When symptoms change or this is not effective enough, begin using a natural progesterone cream (aka wise women essentials a bio indentical cream) which will help the whole body and systems. If you are like me then you will be thinking 'I don't have the time, ability, resources to round up all these wonderfull natural ingredients. Well you could find the answer in Menozac.

      Menozac is Help from Mother Nature Menozac  is a botanical formulation containing a blend of natural herbal extracts. These are plants from Mother Nature that specifically ease your transition. They provide effective menopause relief, from the onset, and through the duration of typical menopause.
      Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals. These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body’s hormonal balance.
      Your grandmothers and great grandmothers learned how to make this life transition smoothly, by studying the plants. Their long history is being shared with you in the Menozac formula.
      For more information about Menozac then Click Here

  33. QUESTION:
    What is it like to have experienced menopause?
    I am trying to complete a survey for a women's health class in college and unfortunately, I do not have women I can ask. Please feel free to share any comments or details you might have.

    • ANSWER:
      It's a little different for each woman. My mom swears she had only 2 weeks of hot flashes and then was over it but anyone who had to be around her knew she went through at least 2 years (probably more) of terrorizing everyone, she seemed to get pleasure from embarrassing everyone, had mood swings so you never knew what kind of mad woman you were going to have to deal with at any given moment. She also got real forgetful--could never remember where she parked her car. My sister went through menopause when she was 45 because of the cancer therapy she had to go through and then had hot flashes for about 10 years. My supervisor at work would have severe hot flashes where she had to lock her office door because she had to periodically take off her blouse so it wouldn't get soaked; she also went through mood swings where she'd accuse you of trying to undermine her and that you were trying to steal her job from her. I've known women who would break into tears over basically nothing, they just couldn't control it. My friend's mom bleed so copiously that she had to go in for regular blood transfusions--and then even 2 years after her periods had stopped completely, she got pregnant. My menopause was a breeze and I knew it was coming because I know my body very well. My monthly periods had never been much of a problem, weren't normally painful or anything, my "PMS" was minor. During menopause, my back would get real hot during the night when I was sleeping but I got real good at pulling off the covers just over my back without hardly waking up, then when it was over, I'd toss the covers back over all of me again. I had a huge cramp just once--and since I'd never had menstrual cramps before, I thought I was dying until a friend said it was just a cramp (she knew, she had gotten them every month!). I went through a brief period where it felt like my head was in a fog, couldn't concentrate on anything, kept forgetting to take my keys when I stepped outside so had to devise alternatives (hiding keys doesn't work, and I have still left the house without my keys and it's been more than 10 years since I went through menopause). Otherwise, I really had a very lightweight menopause (and btw, I love not having a period except all the health coverage my hormones afforded me are not gone).

  34. QUESTION:
    What exactly does "standardized herbs" mean?
    I'm looking for an alternative method for menopause systems. A friend is pushing a website on me that sells herbal products but I do not see any mention of "standarized". How important is this?

    • ANSWER:
      Standardized herbs guarantee a certain amount of the "active ingredient" of an herb, or are the "active ingredient" isolated from herbs. The problem is that a single herb has hundreds of ingredients that help to make the herb medicine more effective and free of harmful side effects. Many of these chemical constituents are not even well understood by science, but still play a role in the plants healing attributes.

      You would do better to look for high quality herbs that are artfully combined by a knowledgeable herbalist, otherwise, you are just one step away from pharmaceuticals. You may have a qualified health care professional trained in herbs that can give you advice in your community.

  35. QUESTION:
    period after taking birth control for menopause?
    I am in my 50's, went through menopause early. A huge plus to this was no period for at least 8 yrs. Dr. put me on birth control for hormone replacement, forgot them when camping, developed severe cramping and now having a heavy flow period. I don't want them again, if I stay off the pills will my periods stop again? I would rather have all the bad that comes with the change than to have periods again.

    • ANSWER:
      If you stay off the pills, then yes, you will stop bleeding. The hormone replacement has caused a uterine lining to grow, and the abrupt cessation of hormones from forgetting your pills has caused the lining to shed. Once it's shed, it won't regrow again unless you start taking hormones again. BUT: your alternatives are not just "be on pills and get periods" and "be off pills and have no periods but have menopause symptoms". Nowadays, it's common for women to take what is called "continuous HRT". This means they take the same dose of hormones every day, never having a break. The dosage they use, and the continuous consumption without any break, means that your uterine lining never gets thick enough to have a period. So you can take pills and thereby get rid of menopause side effects, yet also not have a period, safely.

  36. QUESTION:
    Ladies I have a Q on menopause symptoms and how to dodge them?
    what have you experienced besides the (in)famous hot flashes and what did you do about it? (Apart from SHT hormone therapy which I can't do) Txs!

    • ANSWER:
      I went through menopause without really knowing too much that I was,as I was still on the pill. I still had the hot flushes tho. Many of my friends go to health food stores there are many alternative treatments there, most work really well Good Luck

  37. QUESTION:
    What difference does fermentation do to soya?
    I've heard that fermentation of soya can reduce the negative health effects associated with soya. Is there anywhere I can check this claim?

    Which products use fermented soya (vs unfermented?)

    • ANSWER:
      Tempeh is about the only product I know which is fermented soya. Rhizopus mould is introduced to cooked soya beans, a recipe which originated in Indonesia, if I remember correctly. It is a firm texture and has a nutty flavour. I buy it in frozen blocks from a health food shop (Goodness Direct) but I think it's available in some of the larger Chinese or Asian food shops. I slice it and fry it as a (passable) alternative to bacon for "non"BLT's & fry-ups. It can also be used in spreads, soups & stews as well as being used in salads and sandwiches. The fermentation process produces natural antibiotics and leaves all the goodness of the isoflavines found in soya. It is also a complete protein food that contains all the essential amino acids. Soy protein and isoflavones have many health benefits. Isoflavones strengthen bones, help to ease menopause symptoms, reduce risk of coronary hearth disease and possibly some cancers. The process of making Tempeh doesn't reduce any of the natural fibre of soya and the enzymes produced make it more easily digestable. It can be home made too, but you need to be able to get hold of the tempeh starter. In case you hadn't guessed I love the stuff LOL

  38. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that mouthwash is making my breath worse?
    I've noticed that everytime I remember to use mouthwash, I end up with bad breath a few hours later or the next day. Is this possible or am I imagining things? It is an anti-bacterial, alcohol-free mouthwash.

    My theory is that the good-bacteria in my mouth are being killed and the bad-breath-bacteria are being left, making it worse. Is that a possibility?

    • ANSWER:
      De-Mystifying the Mouthwash Myth

      As we mentioned earlier, all people have bad breath on occasion. When they do, most people immediately reach for the mouthwash. Not only is this ineffective but this action can also exacerbate the condition. Why is this so?

      Mouthwash contains flavoring and dyes but most importantly the primary component is alcohol! They claim to kill bacteria, which is true in most cases. However, the bacteria is quick to return with an exponential affect because the alcoholic content causes dry mouth which is the leading cause of bad breath. It creates a very ineffectual cycle of repetition.

      Commercial mouthwash products also contain other harsh chemicals. Studies have shown that excessive amounts of mouthwash irritate the gums, tongue, palate and mucous membranes in the mouth. If the user is a smoker AND consumes alcohol, heavy use of mouthwash can even cause certain cancers. It would be prudent to look at some of the other methods to deal with bad breath and stay away from the mouthwash.

      If you would like to freshen your breath try preparing your own breath freshening mouthwash. A rinse consisting of a few drops of peppermint oil in a glass of water will do the trick nicely just don’t count on it to kill bacteria. Also just use it as a rinse and do not swallow.

      There are other essential oils that work as well. Try tea tree, myrrh, spearmint, and ginger are also effective.

      Rinsing your mouth with salt water is a great home remedy for a sore throat. It is also good for eliminating bad breath. You might also try rinsing with lemon or lime water as well. Both are equally effective and may taste a bit more pleasant than salt water.

      Try drinking a small amount of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water at least once a day.

      What Causes Bad Breath?

      Dry mouth

      Sounds like such an innocuous little phrase, doesn’t it? Thought to be a leading cause of bad breath, dry mouth occurs when saliva production is reduced and carries its own nasty little package of problems.

      The medical term for dry mouth is “xerostomia” (pronounced ZEER-oh-STOH-mee-ah). Saliva performs vital work in your body. It aids in digestion by using the enzymes to help break up different foods and also makes it easier to talk.

      You may not realize that it can also help to prevent tooth decay by rinsing away food particles from between the teeth as well as the gums. Saliva also helps you taste the food you eat and makes it easier for you to swallow that food. It is also known for neutralizing any damaging acids.

      It is believed to be caused primarily by certain medications which we listed in the previous paragraph. The symptoms of dry mouth can include:

      * Dry, rough tongue
      * Poor sense of taste
      * Burning sensation in your mouth
      * Increased plaque
      * Reduced saliva production

      Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS and stroke are also attributed to causing dry mouth as well as pregnancy and/or hormonal changes due to menopause.

      Increasing fluid intake can help to re-hydrate the mouth. It’s important to keep it moist so you don’t lose all the benefits provided by saliva production.
      Gum disease/Gingivitus

      This is inflammation of soft tissue surrounding the teeth. This condition is much more serious than a single abscess. Gingivitis is the precursor to periodontitis which is the final step of gum disease that can ultimately lead to toot loss. This will be discussed in depth a bit further on.

      Hepatic encephalopathy

      This is a rare but possible cause as a result of liver disease.

      Impacted tooth

      An impacted tooth is one that rebelliously will not erupt into its proper position and most often results in infection, which we know is another cause of bad breath.

      Banish the Breath Mints and Chewing Gum

      Neither of these commercial products are particularly helpful as they only mask the problem and in fact could cause tooth decay. Try some of our alternative recommendations:

      Remember the trick the Greeks used? Anise seed is readily available and chewing on a few of them work just as effectively today as they did several thousand years ago. Fennel, cinnamon and cloves also work well. Try popping a few into your mouth after meals to fight bad breath.

      There are many other natural replacements for commercial mouthwash. Try adding a bit of baking soda to your toothpaste. After all, not only is it used in cooking and the laundry, we also use baking soda to absorb odor in the refrigerator. It will work well to help eliminate bad breath.

      Did you ever wonder why parsley and mint are often used as a garnish when dining out? Just like the Greeks, remember the Romans. Chewing on parsley helps fight bad breath.

      The reason is the high content of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll very quickly changes carbon dioxide into oxygen in the body. This prepares the digestive tract to prevent gases and toxins from backing up and by lubricating the tract and various valves.

      Boil a mixture of myrrh resin, sage leaves and lavender flowers in a small amount of water. Gargle three times a day as a bad breath remedy.

      Aloe vera will cleanse the colon and prevent toxins that could possibly back up in the digestive tract.

      Bad Breath and Your Diet

      We live in a world where food dominates. We are on sensory overload because everywhere we turn there is another delectable delight to tantalize the taste buds. Sadly, the majority of the foods that we are seduced by on a daily basis do serious damage to our teeth. In our discussion that also applies to bad breath.

      It is important to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet. Unfortunately all day snacks and binging have replaced the concept of “three square meals a day.”

      When indiscriminate snacking takes place oral hygiene goes out the window. If doubt that, begin a diary and document every single instance throughout the day when you place food or beverages in your mouth. Weight loss programs teach their users to do this and it can be an eye-opening experience. Some of our habits are so ingrained that we don’t even realize what we are doing.

      Someone brings a home made coffee cake to the office and it’s very easy to unconsciously grab “just a little sliver” back to your desk along with your. . .what?. . third or fourth cup of java of course.

      You may be sitting in the grandstands at a little league ballgame when your partner waves the bag of popcorn under your nose. Well, it’s just a few kernels of popcorn, right?

      Now, do you immediately run to the ladies room at the office and brush your teeth? Do you leap off the bleachers and sprint to the “facilities” and floss? Of course not, that would be ridiculous, right? If we all did that, there wouldn’t be a problem with dental disease or bad breath.

      All the snacking that we do throughout the day not only contributes to bad breath but snack food is usually very high in carbohydrates and produces excessive amounts of sugar that cause tooth decay and promote bad breath. Harmful acids contained in soda pop attack the enamel on the teeth, yet we sip on sodas all day long.

      And, if you thought that just sodas are the culprit, think again. A recent study claims that all those popular sports drinks we buy may not be such a good idea after all. They may re-hydrate the body, but they can cause irreversible damage to the dental enamel.

      The study reports that fitness water, sports drinks, energy drinks and other non-cola beverages increase the risk of damage by anywhere from 3 to 11 times!

      It should be mentioned that the findings are indicative of long term use. However, it appears that these drinks may not necessarily beneficial as a substitute for plain old-fashioned fresh water!

      Foods like garlic, onions, peppers and more all have a role in creating bad breath. When the food you eat is released into the bloodstream, the lungs will expel the odor.

      While garlic and onions seem to top the list of bad breath offenders, there are other foods that are just as likely to produce bad breath. A few of these are:

      * Meats that are spicy like pepperoni, salami and pastrami
      * Cheese, especially soft cheeses
      * Fish
      * Dairy foods
      * Seafood
      * Eggs

      Practically every food that is high in protein is also a harbinger of bad breath. In fact practically one third of our diet is comprised of high protein foods.

      This can be especially distressing if you are on a “high protein” diet. The obvious result is that when on a diet such as this bad breath will become significantly more annoying.

      Short of totally eliminating protein from our diet (not recommended) what else can we do? At the risk of sounding redundant let’s review some of our earlier discussion.

      Drink plenty of water. Dehydration certainly won’t help to improve the situation.

      As difficult as it may be, clean your teeth and tongue thoroughly each time you eat anything that is high in protein.

      Try and adjust your diet to contain less high protein foods and more high fiber foods. Foods high in fiber naturally produce some of those important enzymes we previously discussed.

      Fiber will help fight constipation. Homeopathic healers report that regular bowel movements help to rid the body of toxins that contribute to bad breath.

      Not only will changing to a higher fiber diet help your bad breath, it will also improve the overall health of your digestive system.

      Instead of snacking on junk food, try chewing on fresh fruits and vegetables, especially the crunchy foods. Apples, pears, celery and carrots are good suggestions. They will aid in enzyme production and the natural chewing of the crunchy foods will stimulate the gums.

      Consider adding that yogurt we mentioned as a permanent part of your daily food intake. Again, it will promote the production of the live bacteria you need.

      Stimulate the flow of saliva to keep the mouth moist. Remember to avoid ineffectual commercial mouthwashes. Chewing on a clove or adding a drop of cinnamon or peppermint oil on your tongue will be much more productive.

      If you are having post-nasal drip, use an over the counter medication to reduce the flow of the noxious drainage of the draining mucous.

      There are numerous over the counter treatments for bad breath, the majority of which we have already reported to be ineffectual.

      One type of product does appear to bear some scrutiny, however. Advertised as a “new innovation” in mouthwashes they are called Chlorine Dioxide Mouthwashes.

      They claim to totally eliminate bad breath by attacking the sulfur compounds that cause bad breath rather than masking them as conventional mouthwashes do.

      They make a provocative case however, when you understand that chlorine dioxide has been used in municipal water supplies for decades. Use your own judgment, but it might not hurt to give one a try.

      Further research shows another fairly recent medical treatment for periodontal disease that may present some hope for remedying bad breath by treating the periodontal condition.

  39. QUESTION:
    Can anyone give me advice on how to stop eating too much when I am stressed.?
    I eat too much when srtressed or bored. I want to stick to a diet and loose weight. Help! I am age 50 and going through the menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      The best way is not to have tempting things (like biscuits and cakes and cheese) in the house. If you need to make a special trip to the shops you will find that you usually can't be bothered.

      Stock up on alternative snacks that won't be so bad for you, so that if you don't win the battle with the urge to eat then at least you're not eating things that are going to knock you too far off.

      Also - try finding a way of working through your stress. A walk, a bath, get on an exercise bike, get a punch bag...... anything that will help you get through the stress without resorting to eating.

      Good luck!

  40. QUESTION:
    How do I make peppermint essence?
    I have this peppermint plant at home, I want to do something with it.

    • ANSWER:
      One new aspect of Alternative Medicine is to use the essential oils of plants to treat all sorts of human conditions from fevers to dandruff. I have used many of these treatments myself and my family and pets, and found that some work very well indeed. However, the plant essences used are VERY expensive. They are also so very concentrated they can not be used on the skin undiluted. Just to give you an idea of how strong they are the usual dilution is three drops to a tablespoon of oil or water before use.

      Soooooooooo, rather than buy many expensive distilled essences, and then extensively dilute them, you can make "user friendly" body oils right from the start. What you need are your fresh or dried herb of choice, a jar with a lid, and some cooking oil. With these simple household items you can make your own oils!

      BASIC DIRECTIONS:

      Materials:
      Pint Jar with Lid (recycle!!)
      Fresh Herbs to tightly fill the jar
      Salad Oil
      Sterilized knife blade

      Process:
      Wash and sterilize the jar and lid. Boiling them both, and letting them air dry will work fine.

      Chop fresh herbs to fill the jar. The chopped edge will release more essence to the oil. Pack into the jar. Heat the oil to 160 degrees F. Carefully pour into jar over the herbs. Swish the sterilized knife blade around to release any air bubbles. Cap the jar. Store away from light for a month or more. The essence will infuse the oil to exactly the right dilution for therapeutic use or to just jazz up a salad!

      Suggested Oils for Beginners:

      Peppermint Infused Oil:
      Pick peppermint and process according to directions. If you pick herbs in the wild please never
      take more than a quarter of the patch. You may wipe out next year’s bounty if you take more. Peppermint oil is good for sore muscles and for congestion due to colds and flu. Another use is to rub on one’s abdomen to cure a stomach ache or cramps.

      Sage Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh sage and process according to the above instructions. Sage is an antiseptic and also useful for menopause symptoms.

      Rosemary Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh rosemary sprigs or use one of the containers of dry rosemary you can purchase at the grocery. Infuse according to directions. If you use the dry herbs you need much less only a quarter the amount of fresh. Rosemary is great for scalp problems like dandruff, and also is wonderful mixed half and half with Peppermint Infused oil for a muscle rub.

      Rose Petal Infused Oil:
      Pick fresh rose petals after the dew has dried. Process as above. Great for skin care, and a super mood improver in the winter months!

      To gain more knowledge of Aromatherapy check out the book:
      COMPLETE BOOK OF ESSENTIAL OILS and AROMATHERAPY
      by Valarie Ann Wormwood (great name for a herbalist!!!)

      This text is so helpful and comprehensive I think every house should have one! It focuses on uses of commercial distilled essences, but your infused oils will work fine adapted to her recipes.

      Peppermint Creams are made nearly entirely of icing sugar and are easy to make. Their melt-in-the-mouth quality makes them a treat for anytime.

      Ingredients
      450g icing sugar (plus 50g extra just in case)
      1 tablespoon milk
      1/2-1 teaspoon peppermint essence
      food colouring (optional)

      Steps
      Sift the 450g of icing sugar into a bowl.
      Add in the milk and peppermint essence.
      Mix with your hands as you would for dough.
      If it has too much icing sugar, add some milk. If it is too runny, add icing sugar.
      When it reaches a thick enough texture, take it out of the bowl, and knead it on the on top of a table sprinkled in icing sugar.
      Dust the surface with icing sugar.
      Roll out the mixture till it is about half a centimetre thick.
      Cut out small shapes (circles are easiest), and put the on a tray which has also been dusted with icing sugar.
      Leave for about 10-15 mins then turn over.
      In 15 mins time -enjoy!

      Tips
      If you want solid colour-add the colouring after the peppermint essence. However, for a marbled effect-add in just before you knead the mixture.
      Add in decorations as you put them on the tray-before they start to harden.
      For people who dont quite like peppermint, you could use other flavourings.
      Blue and green work best.

  41. QUESTION:
    How did you feel after your hysterectomy?
    I had really bad post partum depression after my kids were born. It started about 3 days after their birth. I think it probably had to do with hormonal changes after the birth.I am worried if they remove my ovaries and uterus, it will cause me to be depressed from hormone loss. Did you have anything like this and should I be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      You will be having your ovaries, uterus, and fallopian tubes removed in what is called a Total hysterectomy with salipingo-oophorectomy. Following removal of the ovaries, in particular, you will experience menopausal symptoms. Some women will opt for hormone therapy, whereas others will turn to alternative medicine. Deciding whether or not to follow hormone therapy may not be an easy choice. Some researchers recommend this therapy to relieve menopausal symptoms as well as prevent osteoporosis, whereas others issue warnings about the increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease related to its use. What are the short-term risks and complications of a hysterectomy?
      All surgery is not without its risks. Therefore, a list of the main risks and complications that could occur following hysterectomy includes:

      serious infections that may require a woman to return to the hospital and be treated with antibiotics;
      urinary problems, from a kidney or bladder infection to urinary incontinence (this risk is greater for radical hysterectomies);
      hemorrhaging that may require blood transfusions;
      severe reactions to the anaesthesia; and
      intestinal problems if the intestines were damaged during surgery–some women may have to undergo another operation to remove any adherence* obstructing (blocking) their intestines.
      *Adherence: Scar tissue that attaches organs together or can end up in an organ, blocking it and disturbing its function.

      Regardless of the type of surgery you will undergo, make sure that you are aware of all the possible risks and complications. You have the right to clear answers to your questions.

      What are the long-term risks and complications of a hysterectomy?
      The main risks and complications that may occur after hysterectomy are:

      Prolapse, which means the descent of an organ downwards. When the uterus is removed, other organs, such as the intestines and bladder can descend towards the bottom and lead to problems of constipation and/or urinary incontinence (problems or inability to control one's bladder). These types of prolapse can also lead to pain during penetration with a penis, finger or object into the vagina.
      Menopause. When the ovaries are removed during hysterectomy, the quantity of hormones circulating in the blood drops sharply. Following this type of surgery, women who are not menopausal will become so. It is what is known as “surgical” or “sudden” menopause. Menopausal symptoms are then felt. The main symptoms of menopause are:
      heat flashes;
      vaginal dryness (lubrication problems);
      fatigue;
      night sweats;
      irritability;
      insomnia;
      migraines, and
      increased risk of osteoporosis and heart disease.
      Even if the ovaries are not removed, some women may be menopausal following the operation. In these cases, menopause is caused by a decrease in the amount of blood being fed to the ovaries. This prevents the ovaries from producing enough hormones. Sadness/mourning. To some women, losing their uterus is a sad and upsetting event. Their self-image as women may be affected following the operation. Some women may become depressed and experience a period of mourning, especially if they had wanted to become pregnant one day. The emotions experienced after a hysterectomy can also have a physiological cause. Removing the ovaries causes a drop in the hormone levels, which can provoke behavioural changes: irritability, crying fits, insomnia, etc. If this is your case, support from friends, family, a health professional or a support group can help you go through this period of change and adaptation. It is important to mention that, for some women hysterectomy will be a positive experience since the benefits far outweigh the complications from the operation.

  42. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to use a BIRTH CONTROL PATCH prior to losing virginity?
    Hi, I am a 22 year old virgin who's planning to lose it to my boyfriend soon. Do you think it's a smart move to start on the patch already before actually doing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  43. QUESTION:
    Which natural product is working for hot flashes?
    I lost my left ovary to cancer couple of years ago. I wake up so often during the night and it's hard to go back to sleep again. I am against prescription drug which doctor would give me.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      There is two ways to go in the treatment of hot flushes. Allopathic or Naturopathic.

      As hot flashes are the main symptom of menopause, the favorite treatment by your treating doctor will be the Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). On the other hand, the use of herbs for hot flashes is more of alternative way. The basic are herbs such as the Licorice root, Panax ginseng, Black Cohosh and Wild yams. In lite cases, one can experiment with the combination of those.

      If the case of your problem is more deeply seated, then the use of special mixes is the right way to go.

      Out of those, the best ones (in my opinion) are: Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma Longifolia), Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pothoina) and Akar Serapat (Paramignya Polyne) mix.

      Or...
      Shu Di Huang, the steamed and dried form of Sheng Di Huang which does tonify the blood with hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, pale complexion, palpitations, nocturnal emissions, insomnia, irregular menses, uterine bleeding and post partum bleeding. It also does foster Yin – kidney Yin deficiency with constant thirst, steaming bone disorder, tinnitus, premature graying.

      Or...
      Sheng Di Huang as one of herbs for hot flashes, Sheng Di Huang is mainly used to clear the heat, cool the blood and foster Yin for production of body fluid.
      Sheng Di Huang is used for high fever, constant thirst, red tongue, bleeding due to excessive heat in the blood and promote body fluids. Sheng Di Huang is used for Yin deficiency with damage of body fluids by excessive heat, symptoms such as mouth dryness, low fever, constipation, throat pain.
      Also is used for sores in mouth and tongue, irritability, insomnia and malar flush.

      One supporting factor is also the Wu Wei Zi which is mainly used as an astringent preparation to decrease perspiration, benefit kidney to calm heart and benefit Qi to produce fluid.

      Now you have the information but the footwork must be done by you.
      As each of us is an individual, we do respond differently to even the best medication in the world.

      The only way now is the trial and error. To be under the supervision of experienced Naturopath wouldn't hurt you either.

  44. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if i wake up in the middle of the night feeling dizzy and feeling like i have to trow up?
    What does it mean if i wake up in the middle of the night feeling dizzy and feeling like i have to trow up?
    i woke up in the middle of the night last night feeling very dizzy like the room was spinning and like i had to throw up. i also ate alot of sugar that night also...could that be the problem?? i am still a bit dizzy this morning.
    thanks so much!
    i am not pregnant also

    • ANSWER:
      There are many things that can be the cause. The physiology is obviously out of balance in some area.

      Some possibilities I can think of that can make you dizzy with upset stomach:

      Hormone imbalance (menopause or birth control method can throw off hormones)
      Insect bites and related illnesses to the bite
      Low potassium
      Alcohol overload
      Colon malfunction and disease in that area
      Blood flow supply impaired somewhere
      Food poisoning

      I thought I would address sugar since you brought up an idea of your upset being related to excess sugar. Sugar can be quite devastating to the blood vessels. Sugar, especially white*, is an irritant to them and the body will send out little band aids to cover the irritation resulting in excessive arterial plaque (that's the band aid). Health professionals don't always tell you that what you are putting into your body can kill you.

      If you are a sugar junkie like I used to be, I would look to switch to other alternative sweeteners -

      like honey (but don't cook with it because it can't be digested once it is super heated),

      agave nectar (extracted from cactus and is also low glycemic which means it does not store in your fat cells like most sugars do) It has a very delicate flavor and is even good in tea and coffee.

      sucanat - sugar cane natural. It does not shock your system and tastes like brown sugar or caramel and is brown. You can bake with it and it too is good in tea and coffee.

      Fruit syrups are nice to use but be sure there is no added sugar or corn syrup. You can find these in natural food stores. The only ingredient should be fruit juice. Period.

      Steer way clear of corn syrup and artificial sweeteners, including splenda.

      White sugar is bleached sugar cane nectar, bleached in a process that makes it jettison into your blood stream very fast when you eat it. You've heard of sugar rushes I'm sure.

      Be smart about what you put into your body if you want to live a healthy life without ailments caused by what you do put into your mouth and swallow. You will feel better, trust that.

      I hope you get to the root of your problem. If it continues or worsens get yourself in to a doctor. You might try to find a naturopathic doctor in your area or a good acupuncturist. They can be a wealth of information and use non chemical methods to heal your body. They will treat the cause and not the symptom without unwanted side effects drugs can produce.

  45. QUESTION:
    How come sometimes a man can have an erection and sometimes he can't?
    I don't understand some of the male testerone and the functions, why is it sometimes he can get an erection and other times he cant?

    • ANSWER:
      It would help, Laura, if you had given the age of the person in reference as that too is central to understanding...

      When males reach puberty it's as if someone popped a balloon and the explosion opened the door to sexual discovery...!

      The normal male produces 17 times the hormonal fluids as does a female and does so mostly as the male sleeps. Plenty of activities of exercize during the day will burn away those hormones, but rarely all..

      From puberty on, that abundance of hormone becomes the sexual urge of males even to the extent of having un-controlled, un-anticipated and even un-wanted erections even if physically active when not sleeping...

      Sensual or explicit thoughts and images, whether visual or mentally developed, are the most common triggers for male erection while just driving over a bumpy washboard dirt road can do it also...

      That covers the youth factor...

      When males reach age forty or so, their body begins the reversal process much like female menopause. Most males don't recognize their changes for an average of ten years later...about age fifty...

      Male menopause is degeneration or reversal of the male productive system and it is uusually noticed moreso about the age fifty. His sperm count has begun to dwindle and it is noticed with less ejaculation fluid. Un-expected erections are less often, ejaculation takes longer, recovery time for an additional ejaculation is longer as well...

      Then the beast makes its appearance...his mind...!

      The male notices change and usually shrugs it off and feels it isn't serious. However, the change has been instilled in his mind and will not go away...sub-conciously he worries and the more he worries the more unsuccessful ejaculations will follow... Thusly, developing SED...sexual erectile dysfunction...!

      Meanwhile, his sex drive does not reverse at menopause but continues on for the rest of his life regardlless of his ability to perform...the male curse...!

      Is there a cure...for most males, yes, and that would require extensive mental therepy to drive away the constant realization of failure from the sub-concious mind...a rather difficult undetaking, I assure you...

      Naturally, the use of supplements as viagra and cialis are a quick solution but may also have residual side affects with continued usage...

      My suggestion would be to change your sexual lifestyle. Return your acts to those beginning years when exploration and experimenting was aghast to heavens door. Introduce extended times of foreplay and experimentation into your private times...try different things and do different things...to and for each other... Do not feel an erection and penetration is the ultimate for pleasure and satisfaction as it isn't, it really isn't...

      When an erection fails don't make a big deal of it...do your other thing and do so with all the intimate desire of a young bride in a slow and savouring manner and I am sure the results you are wanting will be there more often than not...

      In the elder years, SED seems not to overlook any males and other major physical changes are taking their toll as well. Yet, that beastly desire still lurks and won't go away. Erection frequency becomes so few that frustration overcomes the male. His mind wants as a young groom does but his body absolutely refuses to respond. He goes thru the motions and may even have minimal penetration but he knows his life will never be the same...it won't, I assure you. If his health can handle alternatives in the event foreplay does not work then supplements are the last resort...

      I do hope I have covered all the bases, Laura, and this answers your need...

  46. QUESTION:
    any alternatives to getting rid of or managing migraines other than doctor prescribed drugs?
    I am on Topamax. Doesn't seem to be working and I have been at theraputic level for more than 2 months now. Help. Something has to be better than all the drugs.
    Okay Maybe I need to add that I know what a headache is....I have Multiple Sclerosis and part of MS is migraines...but the Topamax doesn't help and I don't want to take more meds..and I can't take more meds (once you start something you pretty much have to stay on it forever).
    I already see a chiropractor.
    I am ready to try almost anything.
    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Migraine due to different reasons and with different set of symptoms :-

      From mental work; cold, uncovering head, pressure, sitting upright or sun-stroke Glonoinum 30, 3 hourly

      For nervous, gastric, bilious individuals. Migraine due to mental over exertion in teachers and students. Right sided, specially Sunday migraine, blurred vision, hemiopia; blindness; often burning pain in entire gastro-intestinal tract with violent acid vomiting at the height of attack; worse hot weather; spring and fall; better after vomiting or sufficient night sleep Iris V.200 or above, 10 min (3 Doses)

      For irritable hypochondriacs of bad temper; cholerics, neuropathics; from abuse of alcohol, coffee, spices, tobacco, vexation and worry, mental over exertion, business worries, sexual excesses, sedentary habits, cold dry air and winds Nux vomica 30 or 200, 4 hourly

      For pronounced vasomotor individuals (irritable and full of fear) during pre-climacteric and menopausal stage.Tired expression, head congestion, circumscribed red cheeks; pain above right eye, throbbing, stitching, rhythmic pain, often in every 8 days, early morning, beginning in nape, extending upwards, locating in the region of eye, rising and falling with the sun; sensation of heavy congestion Sanguinaria Can 200, 10 min (3 Doses)

      For weak, fat and irritable patient; often apathetic, changing moods, strange changes of character(egocenteric), memory weak, due to disturbance during climacteric period, results of tobacco abuse.Person with shallow complexion, yellow saddle across the nose; pain located on left temple; throbbing, stitching pains Sepia 200, 10 min (3 Doses)

      For neuropathic persons, full of fear caused by noises, change of weather or worms; with face pale, located above left eye; specially left pupil (ciliary neuralgia); sharp, shooting, tearing, stitching, periodical pain from occiput to left eye; slowly rising in intensity with sun. Bile vomiting at the height of attack, slowly improving with setting sun.feeling as if head were open along sagittal suture Spigelia 200 or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Left sided; worse during and after sleep; before menstruation; heat;during menopause Lachesis 200 or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Intercurrent remedy Bacillinum 200 or 1M, fortnightly (3 Doses)
      ______________________________________________
      If you have different set of symptoms then the ones given here please post your details and symptoms exactly the way you feel them.
      Take Care and God Bless you !

  47. QUESTION:
    What health benefits can we get from drinking soya coffee instead of the usual coffee?
    Soya coffee are the ones made from roasted soybeans.
    I have been drinking it for a week because I like its taste. But I still don't know if it is better to drink this kind of coffee than the original coffee.

    • ANSWER:
      Soy is wonderful and great for women. The more soy a person has early in their life, the less symptoms of menopause you will have. Also, soy is a "heart healthy" product - it lowers cholesteral and other bad things for you. It is caffine free and has great nutrients in it as well. A wonderful alternative to regular coffee because of these benifits. It is generally cheaper as well. Promotes a healthy heart, supports weightloss, pms prevention and others. Check out my source on this if you want more info.

      promote younger looking skin
      reduce hot flashes
      improve sleeping
      lower cholesterol
      promote healthy prostate function
      promote healthy and strong bones and joints
      increase lean muscle mass
      reduce risks of heart disease

  48. QUESTION:
    What are some health benefits to soy milk and almond milk?
    Does soy milk help prevent cancer? What are benefits of almond milk?

    • ANSWER:
      No. Processed soy products of ANY kind actually can increase the risk of cancer due to the phytoestrogens in them--which one study found to increase birth defects by 500% (because of the hormone disruption it causes in the body). The flip side is that if you ALREADY HAVE cancer, there are applications of soy that might be beneficial in treating the disease; but that is not through soy milk. Soy also has high levels of phytic acid, which blocks the uptake of essential nutrients (this is the same problem as eating brown rice that has not been soaked before cooking it). Fermented soy products (natto, tempeh or miso) can increase estrogen levels in the body and may be mildly beneficial for women going through menopause, but by and large, soy is a tremendous problem.

      Almond milk is a good alternative for people who can't tolerate cow's milk and need some kind of milk replacement for recipes (or if they're just accustomed to drinking milk--which is not a required component of the human diet and Harvard medical has actually chastised the American gov't for putting it in their eating plan recommendations/MyPlate). Nut milks have more fats in them than rice or soy milks--making them an especially good option for children, whose brains need fat and cholesterol for development.

      You won't get this information from your doctors. They are not trained in nutrition and can barely keep up with the research on the problems they DO encounter daily. :/

  49. QUESTION:
    What can you tell me about herbal sage?
    I need to find all the information I can I Sage for a project. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      it is organic

      The use of herbal remedies, including the herb sage (also known as common sage), classified as Salvia officinalis, are popular as an alternative to standard Western allopathic medicine for a variety of problems, including memory enhancement, reducing hot flushes in menopause and boosting natural estrogen production, as well as reducing breast milk when weaning a baby.

      Some naturopaths and herbalist prefer to use purple sage (Salvia Purpurascens), as some people consider it more potent.

      Salvia officinalis is an effective remedy for various ailments, and this natural holistic approach to health is becoming more and more popular, but should NOT replace conventional medicine or prescription drugs.

      Herbal remedies using Sage (Salvia officinalis)
      Also known as salie and common sage
      The use of herbal remedies, including the herb sage (also known as common sage), classified as Salvia officinalis, are popular as an alternative to standard Western allopathic medicine for a variety of problems, including memory enhancement, reducing hot flushes in menopause and boosting natural estrogen production, as well as reducing breast milk when weaning a baby.

      Some naturopaths and herbalist prefer to use purple sage (Salvia Purpurascens), as some people consider it more potent.

      Salvia officinalis is an effective remedy for various ailments, and this natural holistic approach to health is becoming more and more popular, but should NOT replace conventional medicine or prescription drugs.

      On this page
      Sage is used for

      Which part of sage is used

      Making herbal tea

      Warnings

      Other infusions and herbal index

      Salvia officinalis
      Sage is also known as Salvia officinalis, and has certain therapeutic properties. The reported benefits of using it internally, in the form of a herbal tea

      (infusion),

      Salvia officinalis benefits:

      enhances memory
      astringent
      hormone stimulant
      natural antibiotic
      reduce hot flushes in menopause and boost natural estrogen production
      improves liver function and digestion
      reduces breast milk when weaning babies
      relieves muscles spasm
      reduces excessive perspiration and salivation
      female sterility
      Which part to use for sage herbal tea
      The leaves are used for making the brew.

      Making herbal tea
      The standard way to make an infusion, unless otherwise specified, is to pour a cup of boiling water over the material to be infused, let it stand for 5 minutes, strain it, and drink it.

      Fresh plant material
      When the recipe refers to fresh plant material to be used, a 1/4 cup fresh material is used, following the method above.
      Dried material
      When the recipe refers to using dried material, use 2 teaspoons of material when making it.
      Bark or seeds
      Should the recipe call for bark or seeds to be used, use 2 teaspoons of seeds or 1 tablespoon of bark.
      Sweetening your infusion
      You could sweeten your health drink with honey, should you so require, and a dash of fresh lemon juice may also enhance the taste.
      General warning when using herbal infusions
      Only use the herbal material if you are 100% sure that it really the herb in question.
      If you are ill or have any health concerns, consult your health practitioner.
      Do not continuously drink the same infusion. At maximum use for 10 days and then skip 5 days.
      Only have one cup of herbal infusion per day, except during acute periods - such as when you have a cold or flu, you can then have it three times a day, but for a maximum of 4 days.
      When you use herbal remedies, be aware that they can be extremely powerful, and should you have any side effects when taking these infusions, immediately stop using the herb and consult your health practitioner right away.

  50. QUESTION:
    Can a child be breast-fed by someone other than the mother?
    I read somewhere that in the middle-east the Arabs used to have separate nurses to breast-feed the children. Is this true? How is it possible if the nurse is not lactating herself?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Lactation continues as long as the milk is being removed from the breasts. So a woman can continue to lactate long after her own children are weaned if she goes on to nurse another child.

      It used to be common world-wide (not just in the middle-east) for some women to be employed as wet-nurses. These would be women who had had children of their own previously, or who had been pregnant but lost the baby to miscarriage/stillbirth, and then began nursing someone else's child before they dried up. As long as she kept breastfeeding continuously with no break, she would continue producing milk. A few cases have been recorded of women lactating for decades, even well past menopause.

      Before formula became readily available, either mom breastfed, or you found a wet-nurse for the baby. The only alternative would be giving the baby plain cow's milk or goat's milk, or home-made formulas, which typically led to MUCH high mortality rates. So if a mother died in childbirth or was otherwise unable to breastfeed, the dad (or whoever) would look for a friend or relative who was lactating and would be willing to feed the child. Rich women would hire a wet-nurse just so they didn't have to do it themselves.

      This is still common today in some more primitive cultures around the world. Even in Western societies women occasionally nurse someone else's child, although it's much rarer since formula is so readily available.


menopause alternative

Hormones Therapy

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can hormone therapy be an alternative to breast augmentation?
    Can hormone therapy be an alternative to breast augmentation? I've heard that transgender men use the therapy to change their bodys-including breast growth.Would that work for women too?

    • ANSWER:
      no or they would be doing it

  2. QUESTION:
    How much is male to female hormone therapy?
    How much does it usually cost lets say for a full year of hormone therapy? Where can this process be done? What else is required, or is there a page with all this info?

    • ANSWER:
      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minmize the risks of HRT.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.Susans.org/forums click "transsexual talk"

      That should get you started.

  3. QUESTION:
    Do you have to get hormone therapy if you have gynecomastia?
    So if you have gynecomastia during puberty and your testosterone level is fine, do you still have to get hormone therapy? What if the production of estrogen once was too high, but isn´t no more? Should you still get hormone therapy? Or is it just something that had happened once and all that is needed is a surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      If your estrogen is normal you don't need hormone therapy but if you are in puberty you should just wait because it will probably go away on it's own.

  4. QUESTION:
    Hormone therapy for a stallion who is not completely dropped?
    Has anyone had any experience with hormone therapy for a stallion who has not dropped completey. Has one down, no show on the other. Cannot show like this. Does this work and is it worth the expense, since it would be easier to geld with both down, or should we just go ahead and have the surgery done and forgo the hormone treatment. Vet said we could do either, choice is up to us. Just uncertian, since I have never had a stallion who was not fully decended before he was cut.
    Do not and have never planned on breeding this horse. My question was not breeding related (since he is not stud material), but if the hormone therapy would work, since it would be easier on the horse to geld with both dropped, instead of having to lay him down and do major surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      On the racetrack we call them ridgelings. It always requires surgery to remove retained teste. Aside from the breeding issues and behavior issues (for pets) I'm convinced that it can become uncomfortable for some horses. I rubbed an older horse (8yo) who was a ridgeling, he had no major leg issues and overall was at one point a really classy horse. The trainer sent him out for the surgery, he was back training a few days later (just shedrowing) in a couple of weeks was back galloping in the am and then raced in a couple of weeks. He made a huge jump in class and was even back in allowance races. I swear he had been uncomfortable. Also, if your friend is not wanting to deal with a "colt" attitude, she wants no part of hormones. Many horses on the track are on them in part to get them "racy", trust me- big difference in attitude!

  5. QUESTION:
    How much will hormone therapy cost if I went into private health care?
    In the uk we have the NHS. It's where tax money pays for all medical bills. I'm transexual and I want to start hormone therapy. The waiting list in my area is about 3-5 years for the hormone therapy/ surgery. How much would it cost to go private so I wouldn't be on a waiting list for the rest of my life?

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of money, as the individual consultations and the cost of the actual medication will be extensive over a period of time. Once you enter the private sector the drugs bill also becomes a private expense as mix and match is not always an option.

      Private is not a short cut to the NHS and will not get you a NHS bed for this type of treatment and gender re assignment surgery will cost thousands.

      Remember that some of the waiting time within the NHS is also part of the future treatment programme and there is a lot of counselling and other support processes in place while you go on to hormone treatment and then surgery. This type of extensive and permanent surgery should not be rushed as it is life changing the time involved is to some extent a safety net as well.

  6. QUESTION:
    About 870 men took part in a study to study the effectiveness of a hormone therapy. Half of the men were sele?
    About 870 men took part in a study to study the effectiveness of a hormone therapy. Half of the men were selected randomly to come in and receive the hormone therapy while the other half were told to stay home and thus did not receive the therapy. After about a year, blood tests were conducted on each subject by a lab technician who was aware of which group (treatment or those given nothing) the blood samples originated from. In presenting the results of the experiment, the authors reported that the men in the treatment group had experienced a statistically significant increase in HDL (the so-called "good" cholesterol) and a statistically significant reduction in LDL (the so-called "bad" cholesterol) when compared with the control group.

    a. This is an example of a block design.
    b. The treatments are the hormone therapy or the absence of it.
    c. This study would be classified as un-blinded.
    d. This study would be classified as double-blind.
    e. The subjects are the blood tests.
    f. The treatments are the HDL and the LDL.
    g. This is an example of a completely randomized design.
    h. This is an example of a matched pairs design.
    i. The subjects are the 870 men in the study.
    j. This study would be classified as single-blind.

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    About 870 men took part in a study to study the effectiveness of a hormone therapy. Half of the men were sele?
    About 870 men took part in a study to study the effectiveness of a hormone therapy. Half of the men were selected randomly to come in and receive the hormone therapy while the other half were told to stay home and thus did not receive the therapy. After about a year, blood tests were conducted on each subject by a lab technician who was aware of which group (treatment or those given nothing) the blood samples originated from. In presenting the results of the experiment, the authors reported that the men in the treatment group had experienced a statistically significant increase in HDL (the so-called "good" cholesterol) and a statistically significant reduction in LDL (the so-called "bad" cholesterol) when compared with the control group.

    select all that apply

    This is an example of a block design.
    The treatments are the hormone therapy or the absence of it.
    This study would be classified as un-blinded.
    This study would be classified as double-blind.
    The subjects are the blood tests.
    The treatments are the HDL and the LDL.
    This is an example of a completely randomized design.
    This is an example of a matched pairs design.
    The subjects are the 870 men in the study.
    This study would be classified as single-blind.

    • ANSWER:
      ye

  8. QUESTION:
    Which doctor specializes in hormone therapy to increase breast size and other growth/reproductive disorders?
    One of my friend's underwent a hormone therapy to increase her breast and butt sizes. Now, my little cousin is under hormone therapy for growth disorder and I am noticing a quick pre-teen development, I am wondering whether this is ok and which type of doctor specializes in this?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends how old are you. every person develops differently in different period of time. If you are above 9 the puberty changes are normal. Yet I don't have enough info, how old are you, and what exactly do you mean by quick development?
      Anyway, if you are worried, right doctor to consult is specialist in endocrinology.

  9. QUESTION:
    Is too much hormone therapy can be a bad thing for prostate cancer patients?
    I hear that a heart attack is one of the risk factors of hormone therapy. And (if my dad who is 81 with prostate cancer stage 3 and has spread into the lymph nodes already) has a heart attack. His survival chances at his age are slim to none.

    He already experiences other symptons of hormone therapy and this is only his 4-5 months into it and he is on it up to next year. He's only on hormone therapy nothing else.

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      It is also a bad thing to have untreated prostate cancer.

  10. QUESTION:
    Are there any known adverse effects on offspring conceived by parents using hormone therapy for infertility?
    Wondering if any studies have explored if there is an increased incidence of adverse conditions (mental disorders, hormone imbalance, etc) in individuals who were conceived using hormone therapy opposed to those conceived without.

    • ANSWER:
      NO,of course not.

  11. QUESTION:
    Anyone fighting breast cancer been thru treatment and prepparing for hormone therapy?
    I have read articles on hormone threrapy and find myself being very nieve about this treatment. My doctors have left me with so many open questions I am not sure what to do. So my real question is " what do you feel about hormone therapy or is there a natural remedy to equal the hormone drug therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I'm sorry that you are going through this as I know personally how difficult it can be. I am approaching my 4th year of Tamoxifen therapy and am very grateful to have this option for treatment (I am 4 years in remission so it appears that the Tamoxifen is working for me!) The side effects are pretty tolerable and it's in a daily pill form which is easy to manage. Depending on your age, you may be considering Arimidex which I have also heard positive things about. I know how hard it is to make these kind of decisions and my heart goes out to you. I personally make my choices based on what I can live with long term. For example, will hormone therapy give you peace of mind long term or will the potential side effects be a bigger issue for you? Your Dr. likely explained to you the positive results of hormone therapy in reducing a recurrence. That is a very important factor to consider when making your decision. There are many women who do not have hormone sensitive cancer and so the opportunity to use this therapy should not be taken lightly. I know a lot of women who have had breast cancer in all different stages and my best advice to you is to do everything you can to protect your health and your life. It is a precious gift. Good luck and god bless!!

  12. QUESTION:
    would be possible to avoid transgender through hormone therapy?
    Would be possible through hormone therapy to keep a male with female feeling a male or a female with male feelings a female? Usually a male preparing to become a female receives female hormones and a female preparing to become a male receives male hormones? My question is if using male hormones a male can remain a man or if using female hormones a female can remain a female? What will be the negative side of this kind of treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Listen to Clones what she has told you is correct

  13. QUESTION:
    Why my blood color got much darker after hormone therapy?
    I had some hormone therapy involves letrozole, progesterone, etc about a month ago ( not for health reason but as part of family expansion plan). And I had fever during my treatment. Doctor couldn't find what is wrong with me at that time. Now I noticed that my blood color changed from brite red to really dark color. Is this a concern?

    • ANSWER:
      Your blood normally varies in color depending on whether it is in a vein or an artery. Oxygen-rich blood is in the arteries (going away from your heart and lungs) and is bright red. Oxygen depleted blood in your veins that is on its way back to the heart and lungs for replenishing is a deep reddish-purple.

  14. QUESTION:
    Does hormone therapy for prostate cancer cause impotence?
    Someone I know got prostate cancer in their 50's. They have been taking hormone therapy for 1 year. No surgery. No radiation. Will this drug cause impotency? What is the percentage of it happening. Also, they want to stop the treatment because they are afraid of other side effects. Has anyone had any experience with hormone therapy for prostate cancer? Did they have side effects and did you use an alternative treatments successfully?
    Is it permanent impotency or only when the drugs are taken and for a short time after they are discontinued?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes hormone therapy can cause impotency and loss of libido.
      The best treatment for prostate cancer is surgery.
      Once alternative treatments are proven to be successful they are no longer alternative.

  15. QUESTION:
    How effective can hormone therapy work for someone with prostate cancer?
    How long can it prolong a man life? I know someone who has had chemo twice radiation once and several hormone replacement therapy over a 6 year period. Now his testosterone test shows slightly high but has to get it checked in another 6 months just to see where it is. from everything how much longer would his survival be.
    They are using female hormones by giving a shot into the groin area.

    • ANSWER:
      Denise is flat out right, and she knows this disease.
      Give her the best answer.
      I am - or was until I retired - a chemotherapy specialist
      and I did not think any of my many chemotherapy drugs
      did anything to help prostate cancer patients.
      Hormone therapy was handled by the urologists in all the hospitals where I worked.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to get on Hormone Replacement Therapy?
    I'm a 19 year old transgender woman who wants to get started on her hormones. As a college student, I'm not financially well off nor do I want to tell my parents about this until a later time. So I was wondering how I can start hormone therapy without having to pay for doctor visits.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey! Welcome to my world of a decade ago! ;) I started at 19, too, in college, and likewise too afraid to tell my parents yet.

      My solution at the time? DIY. First, you need information. And these people know bloody everything about doing DIY (including all the latest research; I've had three doctors since I did DIY, and not a one of them knew half what the average person on that list did about how to treat transsexuals).

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TsDoItYourselfHormones

      Want a general guide to get started?

      http://www.tsroadmap.com/early/transsexual-hormones.html

      My recommendations? Get on 200mg/d spironolactone (one pill in the morning, one in the evening), a non-oral estrogen (I currently use climara -- you'd use two patches), and a progestin (such as progesterone) to help with breast duct development. Avoid oral estrogens, as they increase the risk of pulmonary embolism and other clotting disorders (although it's mainly a problem for older TSs). With spiro, the main side effect to be aware of is that you retain potassium and lose sodium, so avoid salt substitutes and potassium supplements (you don't want to OD on potassium... although even on spiro, if you're young and have no kidney disease, that's hard to do)

      The spiro will cost you about 70 cents a day. The cost of the estrogen and progestin depends on what form you choose. If you have to cut one thing out, cut out the progestin. If you have to cut out two things, IMHO, also cut the estrogen. The spiro is the most important thing to stay on, as it blocks all further testosterone damage, buying you time until you can afford the estrogen.

      Email me if you have any Qs; I'd be glad to help you with whatever I can. :) I've been there. You're about to start an amazing journey, so fasten your seatbelt.

  17. QUESTION:
    Quicker way of starting hormone therapy in london?
    Just wanted to know if anyone in the UK knows a quicker way of starting hormone therapy for FTM's.
    Doesn't have to be in London, im willing to travel any where to get this treatment started, really cant wait on the NHS is a loooong process (could be over a yr before i even see someone to talk about my condition at a clinic)
    I already had my mentall exam though and got the go ahead for a referrel.

    • ANSWER:
      If you're concerned about the wait for treatment on the NHS, you could try seeing a private specialist; it will, of course, cost you money. Typical charges are around £150 for an initial appointment, and £50-70 for subsequent appointments.

      There's a list of gender specialists here (although it's a little out of date; Richard Green has - thankfully- retired now) http://www.drbecky.com/therapists01.html

      But for trans men, the name that's most often recommended is Dr Richard Curtis; his clinic has a website here; http://www.transhealth.co.uk/

  18. QUESTION:
    Can you answer some questions about transexual hormone therapy?
    When does the average transexual start therapy? Does the effectiveness oh the hormones decrease as age increases? If so, what is the best age to start hormone therapy by? How much does hormone therapy usually cost without insurance? How much does hormone therapy usually cost with insurance? PLEASE ANSWER THIS QUESTION IN NUMBERED PARAGRAPHES...

    • ANSWER:
      Calm yourself!

      You should see a gender therapist.

      When does it start? When you're ready.
      Does the effectiveness decrease? No and if it does they would change the doses.
      Best age to start? Whenever you're ready. I'm started at 15 (next month, but still)
      Cost? It depends. Mine cost 139$/m.

      Transition is NOT a competition there is no set ideal age to start, and just because you're not the hottest little thang in the world doesn't mean you fail.

  19. QUESTION:
    If any one suggest where is best Hormone Therapy in Fremont in us?
    if any one give their valuable suggestions for best hormone therapy in fremont...i loss my energy levels and overall vitality by loosing hormones.

    • ANSWER:
      You are much better off trying to cure the underlying problem of lost vitality. Possible causes: overweight, constipation, disease and the list goes on. I would suggest starting with a basic colon cleanse to prepare yourself for a fast (if you are overweight). The colon cleanses that I have tried that you consume don't work good. Some contain clay (bentonite) which is utterly stupid. The best cleanse is the coffee enema preceded by a clean water enema. Do this daily for 3 weeks before attempting a fast. I just fasted for 3 days and then resumed small meals for a couple of days before repeating the fast. I felt more energy than I have had in years and lost 10 pounds. Other health issues can be addressed by taking 2 T. Braggs apple cider vinegar and honey in water, once or twice a day. Also take food grade hydrogen peroxide diluted with apple juice. Start with 6 drops a day (3 morning, 3 night) and increase from there as you see fit. Don't exceed 15 or 20. If you take care of your health, drastic steps like hormone replacement would not be necessary.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is the best form of hormone replacement therapy with the lowest risk for weight gain?
    Due to severe menopausal symptoms, my doctor has placed me on hormone replacement therapy. We decided on a pill that is plant based, Cenestin. However, I have taken Cenestin for 4-months and now noticed a slow weight gain. Can anyone suggest another hormone replacement therapy medication that is not known to cause weight gain?

    • ANSWER:
      I had to take Progyluton for irregular periods, and the info packet said it was for hormone replacement therapy too. And I didn't gain weight while on it.

  21. QUESTION:
    What are alternatives to horomone therapy after hystorectomy?
    I just underwent a complete hystorecomy. Due to illness, everything was taken, including my ovaries. I am looking for alternatives to hormone therapy because of the risks involved with this therapy, such as bloodclots and stroke. What are the alternatives available to me, besides hormone replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      You should see a Homeopathic Doctor......but I know FOR A FACT that the herbal supplement combo of Soy and Black Cohash works. I work at an OBGYN office and the doc prescribes that all the time. Its why you never see many Asian women with hairy faces or excessive wrinkles after menopause - soy is a heavy part of their diet.
      Plus the progestin in Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is know to cause blood clots in some women.

  22. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used hormone therapy for depression?
    Have tried many different types of anti-depressants and pill cocktails however none of them work, they just keep me on a roller coaster ride and am tired of all the side effects. Wondering if anyone has tried hormone replacement and if yes how did it go or how is it going? Talking it over with my doctor but wanted some input from someone who has gone this route.
    I'm male, male or female input regarding hormone therapy appreciated.
    I can Google sites, especially ones that are only trying to sell something.
    Looking for personal experience if anyone has any.

    • ANSWER:
      I have heard of great results with this, yes. Here are some resources for you canaryclub.org
      feelingfff.com thehallcenter.com Most regular doctors dont do this, so i dont know about yours. You can find doctors that do this by calling a compounding pharmacy and asking them for a list of doctors that do that.

  23. QUESTION:
    What type of doctor handles treatment of hormone imbalance?
    I need to know what type of doctor specializes in hormone therapy.
    I thought it was an Endocrinologist but I'm being told that they deal with metabolic issues such as diabetes.

    Specifically, what type of doctor would test/treat someone for testosterone deficiency or start HGH supplementation?

    • ANSWER:
      endocrinologist.

  24. QUESTION:
    If a man has a muscular physique, will hormones reduce the size of the muscles?
    I am a male who wants to be a female, and i want to know if a while im a man if i work out and get bigger muscles and make my apperance much more masculine, is there any hope of obtaining a female figure by means of hormone therapy? I dont mean like Spartan, ripped out of your mind muscles, just like in shape zach effron muscles. Like in shape and lookin good but not Rambo or anything.

    • ANSWER:
      You can't pick and choose the results you get from hormones. Also results are highly variable. Some lose lots of muscle and some don't lose any. Hormones are not magic, although testosterone does do an excellent job on FtM's! That's because it's easier to masculinize than to feminize. "Female figure"? Again it varies. I was lucky physically before transition and as a result I blend pretty well (5'6" 150lbs). Hormones can't do anything about excessive height. And if you're heavy best to lose that weight now BEFORE starting estrogen. Oh and I would suggest you don't do any upper body exercise at all. The best way to be rid of upper body muscles is not to develop them in the first place.

      Are you seeing a therapist?

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Are you a member of an on-line support group?

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      Good Luck!

  25. QUESTION:
    I was looking into hormone breast enhancers or herbal enhancers, does anyone know of one that works?
    I want to know from a doctor's perspective, because I want a less invasive approach to breast augmentation. I just really wanted to know if herbal remedies or if hormone therapy worked and if so which ones are recommended?

    • ANSWER:
      Just Naturally herbal breast pills are the best! I took an 8 month supply and I wear a 34D now. My bra size used to be 36B. My breasts are round and firm and I spent less than 0.00! Actually after 6 months, they were a D cup, but I kept taking them just to see what would happen. But, of course, we all have a natural limit. I've told all my female friends and family members about Just Naturally pills. My friend and sister are both taking them now...so far with positive results. Good luck with your search!

  26. QUESTION:
    Should parents consider growth hormone therapy when their child is really short?
    A girl has been diagnose with idiopathic short stature (ISS), which is a familial short stature. Her parents are concerned about the challenges she may face as a short child and are considering growth hormone therapy to make their child grow taller. Is this ethically right? what are the ethical issues involved in this case? (also giving the fact that the treatment is extremely costly)

    • ANSWER:

  27. QUESTION:
    What is the medical name for a doctor who does hormone replacement therapy, and how do I find one?
    My boyfriend is only 31 and has the testosterone of a 70 year old man. He needs to find someone to do hormone replacemnt therapy close to home, and we are having problems finding one on the web. I think this may be a result of searching broad topics and I can't narrow it down or even really find what I am looking for.

    • ANSWER:
      a regular doctor can do this..if not..see a urologist....

  28. QUESTION:
    I'm a female and my testosterone levels are way to high, how can I naturally get my hormones balanced?
    I have been told that the imbalance is so bad that I will not be able to loose weight, and will continue to have major increase on unwanted hair if I do not get the hormones balanced, but the risk of breast cancer in my opinion and my husbands, is to high for me to go on medications for hormone therapy, what are your opinions on what i should do?

    • ANSWER:
      You should get hormone replacement if you do not have enough estrogen . But testo does not lead to breast cancer . Estrogen causes breast cancer and doctors give testosterone to balance too much estrogen in patients with breast cancer .
      I can not say more without seeing your hormone test results if you can scan them send at tahazybk@yahoo.com I will check it for you .
      You can show your results to another doctor to get another opinion sometimes doctors do not know their job and put at risk their customers.

  29. QUESTION:
    Female-to-Male (FTM) hormone therapy - does taking testosterone if you're eighteen affect your height?
    If you are eighteen and you begin hormone therapy (testosterone), can it increase your height? Do you have personal experience of it changing your height?

    • ANSWER:
      Ignore the prudes, but expect to get it a lot, unfortunately.

      At the age of eighteen, testosterone therapy isn't likely to change your height all that much, but it will fill out your figure and counter the estrogen your body is naturally producing, cause beard growth and so forth.

  30. QUESTION:
    What happens when your hormones are balanced again?
    Because I'm a girl & my testerone levels are too high so I'm thinking about doing hormone therapy (the pill' & spironolactone) & I want to know what happens to my excess hair growth. Does it fall out/& or lighten on it's own or do you still have to remove it & then see the change in regrowth?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm also taking spironolactone for hair loss due to high testosterone. I trying to not do the birth control and see if it works that way. I hate birth control once you get off of it all your problems will be 20,000 times worst than what they were in the begining, and they can cause breast cancer if your prone to it.

      I just started taking spirolactone almost 2 wks ago. I see no change in my hair loss its still falling out... I read it takes up to 6 months to see results.

      About your question you can keep nairing/waxing/shaving whatever you do to the facial hair for now. Its supposed to eventually stop growing as much because it lowers your testosterone so once its lowered you wont grow hair where men do.

  31. QUESTION:
    How expensive are MTF hormones for HRT therapy?
    Ive been to that TSroadmap site, but their budget approximation includes things like hair removal and implants. a ton of surgery is included in the cost lets just say.

    so how much would it cost for just the hormone therapy? I hear its "relatively inexpensive" but I ave no clue what that means.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends. If your insurance covers it, it's very cheap. If not, it's anywhere from 60-100$ a month.

      That's if your endo knows what she's doing. My first endocrinologist didn't know what she was doing, and put me on premarin. 50$ for a 3 days supply. Absolutely ridiculous. Make your your endo has a lot of experience with trans patients.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can a man get penile inversion without taking hormones or doing psychology tests?
    Is it possible for a man that simply wants to change his sex organ get a penile inversion surgery? Because it seems that most surgeons require someone to have passed from a specific hormone therapy and transsexual psychology tests in order to get that surgery done
    are there any doctors who perform that surgery without such prior tests and therapies?

    • ANSWER:
      Why would a man do this?

      Almost all surgeons follow the Benjamin Standards of Care:

      http://www.wpath.org/Documents2/socv6.pdf

      So unless you are diagnosed as being transsexual, been on HRT and lived full-time in the female gender for a year... it ain't gonna happen. You could probably find some back alley surgeon to do it, but do you really want to go there?
      .

  33. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to use nicotine replacement therapy while taking oral estradiol (estrogen) for hormone replacement?
    I am 32 years old and have undergone a total hysterectomy. I was what I consider to be a light smoker for about 10 years (about 6 cigarettes a day.) Since you are not supposed to smoke while taking the hormone therapy because of the increased risk of blood clots, I was wondering if it was safe to use other nicotine replacement items in lieu of actual cigarettes (ie: electronic cigarette, gum, etc..)
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Nicotine is still a blood coagulant, if you're smoking e-cigs or chewing gum with it in there it may as well be smoking as far as blood clots are concerned... Try e-cigs that don't contain nicotine, or have really low amounts of it, you need to stop taking so much nicotine otherwise you're going to develop a serious complication with the hormone therapy.

      Anyways since I can't force you to stop smoking/chewing to get your nicotine, I'll drop a link below that'll help you prevent your chances of developing a serious blood clot.

      http://healthmad.com/conditions-and-diseases/onions/

      There's no maximum uptake limitation for it, but I'd suggest around half an onion daily should be enough to significantly reduce chances of clotting.. Cooked or uncooked, it doesn't matter... Read the article for more information, and best of wishes.

  34. QUESTION:
    What happens when a girl does not get her period because she has hormonal problems?
    Do they put her on the pill or do they give her hormone therapy? What is hormone therapy?
    What treatment does she receive and for what length of time, in general?

    • ANSWER:
      This was going to happen to me, until I got my period a few days ago. Hormonal problems with menstruation usually are caused by the thyroid, some kind of hormone producing organ in your neck. When too much of one kind is released, it can cause hormone imbalance, which leads to lack of periods. So, the girl would get a blood test first to see if she has this. Then, she would either take pills to balance the hormones, or she may even have to get her thyroid removed, which would result in more pills. In order to have a regular period, it would have to be caused by pills. So the girl would basically never have a "natural" period. I'm not sure what hormone therapy is; this is what my doctor told me literally 4 days ago, until I got my period 2 days ago.

  35. QUESTION:
    What enviromental hazards could be present in my house that would cause my testosterone to be fouled up?
    In the last year myself (19) and my mother (55) have gone to seperate doctors and both been prescribed hormone therapy. Is this a coincidence or is there something chemical, enviromentally wrong with our house that could cause this? I tested the house for radon it was low but not exceptionally low.
    Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      If your mother also needs hormone therapy, could be hereditary.

      If this is something new for your mom: Women around her age begin to stop their menstrual cycles....this means the ovaries begin to shut down. This can cause very uncomfortable symptoms for her. This could be the reason she is on treatment. It is very common in women.

  36. QUESTION:
    Will Using Wellbutrin deter my ability to use hormones?
    I just thought of this. I take wellbutrin and I worry that it might be effected by hormones. I know that people aren't doctors here, but those with experience, is the drug wellbutrin known to have negative effects with hormone therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      Wellbutrin is a terrible drug in my opinion. Sorry.. I know many people who took wellbutrin and went nuts! I've seen people have panic attacks and turn to zombies on this drug. Wellbutrin is not good with any other kinds of drugs/medications. It counter reacts with almost everything. Obviously you know this but drinking/smoking/doing drugs on wellbutrin will make you psychotic. I would honestly get off this drug I'm sorry as a caring person I just think its poison. My opinion.

      Good luck though

  37. QUESTION:
    Does mtf hormone therapy make you infertile ?
    I want to go on male-to-female hormone replacement therapy (just to soften my face and have more of a feminine shape) - however I didnt go through with it as I heard it makes you infertile - I've come across some transgender woman who, however stop hormones for a short period and then conceive a child normally (without sperm banking) is this true ?

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Shane with one further caution: Some people don't get any facial change from hormones at all.

      So you want to "soften your face" at the risk of:

      Possibly permanent sterility

      Loss of normal male sexual function

      Shrinkage of your penis and testicles

      Difficulty getting an erection or maybe even loss of the ability to do so.

      Loss of upper body strength

      Increased risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (which can kill you)

      You must be very desperate to think this is wise.

  38. QUESTION:
    How do I lower my testosterone level to slow the growth of prostate cancer?
    I presently have prostate cancer and have been treated with 120 radio active iodine seeds imbedded in my prostate gland. I do not want to follw up with hormone therapy but want to lower my testosterone level via vitamins or herb therpy. My PSA after the seed procedure was at 1.29 but a year and a half later has risen to 1.78.

    • ANSWER:
      If you really want to avoid the therapy - then I would see a naturopath - don't screw around with remedies you read on the web. This is your life you're talking about. I am all for homeopathic, herbal and naturopathic remedies, but most of them I talk to (who are any good) believe that combination therapy is a good thing. You might be able to follow up with hormone therapy - but take something homeopathic or naturopathic to help with the side effects or to help cleanse your body (just make sure it doesn't interact with your therapy) Some herbs and remedies can actually counteract certain treatments - so see a professional. I know - seeing a classical homeopath can work wonders. My sister shrank her cancerous tumour in her breast (before surgery) to a third of its size - through one dose of a remedy. I used a homeopathic vet for my cat too - and her tumour went down to next to nothing as well. But remember - they all help each other. Good luck.

  39. QUESTION:
    Can I be in the National Guard and take M to F hormone replacements?
    I am a male who would like to start transitioning to a female. I have looked around and found that a Gender Reassignment Surgery is completely prohibited. I would like to start hormone therapy as soon as possible. It would not change my sex, just alter my body in a more feminine way, that way once I am finished with my contract I can start making more progress. Is there anyone with a definite answer for this question?

    • ANSWER:
      You would be prohibited from joining the services. Under the provisions of AR 40-501 (the joint military regulation for medical exams), transsexualism is a permanent bar to enlistment. See paragraph 3-35.

  40. QUESTION:
    what are the steps in starting hormone replacement therapy?
    i am a transsexual, and i am wondering, i am going to do a hormone replacement therapy, but how exsactly is that done? what do i have to do to get it?

    • ANSWER:
      The journey of a thousand miles begins with but a step.

      Good answers above.

      You do need to start with a therapist. They will verify your condition so you can start HRT.

      It really is important to find a gender therapist. Try to get a referral if you can. Those with more experience with trans-folk can save you time and money by analyzing your condition quicker. They are also more knowledgeable and helpful in getting you started on the actual transitioning; explain the process, resources, what others have found during the journey, etc.

      The doctor will also examine you. Do blood tests, start you on a low dose, and explain what to expect next.

      Find a local group, we have several here in Michigan and they are lots of help and have many resources.

      Like Diane said lots of information on the web.

      Have a safe journey

  41. QUESTION:
    Is there a hormone supplement for men that doesn't make you grow breasts?
    I want to stop becoming manlier and lower my testosterone levels, but want to stay on the androgynous side because I'm not transgendered nor want to be. Is there some sort of supplement that gives you the same effects hormone therapy does, besides growing breasts and a non working penis?

    • ANSWER:
      You can start a new diet - there are plenty of foods that have high amounts of estrogen in them. Here for instance: http://dogtorj.tripod.com/id46.html

      You should also look up a list of foods that are high in testosterone and avoid them.

  42. QUESTION:
    What happens if someone takes vitamins for a woman and is a man?
    ( i had no clue what to put this in what category)
    will it kill them or cause them damage.. Also what does hormone pills really do like when you are going through hormone therapy for transgendered and transsexuals, does it make it to where u can use ur parts or what... just curious...

    • ANSWER:
      A man taking vitamins for a woman wouldn't even notice the difference.
      Vitamins are vitamins. The only difference between vitamin formulations for women, and those for men, are the combination of vitamins, and (sometimes) the dosage.

      Hormone therapy does for transsexual people the same thing that hormones do for non-trans people at puberty; it causes the development of secondary sexual characteristics appropriate to that person's gender. In other words, it causes facial and body hair to grow or diminish depending on gender, causes some changes to the body shape, and causes the genitalia to stop functioning. It also creates a profound sense of well-being in the transsexual person (who will have been 'at war' with his or her hormones up until beginning therapy).

  43. QUESTION:
    What does chemotherapy do for prostate cancer?
    My father is 82 years old with prostate cancer stage 4 (presently in the lymph nodes only, not yet bones).

    He thinks his doctors is going to sign him up for chemotherapy later this year because his PSA seems to be rising and his hormone therapy its not working.

    Which is worst, hormone or chemotherapy? And after chemotherapy, do you think he can go back to hormone?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      1. The progress that has been made in the treatment of prostate cancer has resulted from development of better treatments in patients with more advanced stages of cancer and participation in clinical studies. While some progress has been made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, the majority of patients still succumb to cancer and better treatment strategies are clearly needed. Future progress in the treatment of prostate cancer will result from continued participation in appropriate clinical studies. Currently, there are several areas of active exploration aimed at improving the treatment of prostate cancer.
      Chemotherapy: Because hormone therapy is not curative and only controls metastatic prostate cancer for a certain amount of time, efforts are underway to discover more effective systemic therapy. Recently, several chemotherapeutic drugs have demonstrated the ability to kill prostate cancer cells in patients with recurrent cancer. Developing and exploring single or multi-agent chemotherapy agents as a treatment approach for patients with metastatic prostate cancer is an area of active investigation. In particular, the chemotherapy drugs Novantrone®, Taxotere®, paclitaxel and estramustine are being evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer.
      Select patients with recurrent prostate cancer have been shown to live longer when treated with Taxotere compared to standard chemotherapy.
      In a direct comparison of treatment with Taxotere®/prednisone to the historical standard treatment–mitoxantrone/prednisone–patients treated with Taxotere survived more than a year and a half (19 months), on average, compared to 16.5 months for patients treated with mitoxantrone.[4] There also appears to be a similar improvement in survival when Taxotere is combined with the chemotherapy drug estramustine.[5]
      Combination Therapy: The growth of prostate cancers can be slowed but not eliminated by using drugs that block the effect of hormones on prostate cancer cells. Combining hormonal therapy with chemotherapy treatment appears promising.
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  44. QUESTION:
    Will Transexual MTF Hormones alter your body weight significantly?
    For example, if a woman and a man are the same height (6 feet) and the man is 180 pounds and the woman is 150. If a man who is 6 feet wants to be a woman and he starts taking hormones, will he be somewhere around 150 pounds?

    Basically what I'm asking is if hormone therapy will change the bodies weight significantly.

    • ANSWER:
      As Beyond stated, you'll never know specifically what hormones will do until you're on them. In my experience, they don't make you "lose" weight, but you will lose muscle, and gain fat. The net result may be that you'll end up the same, slightly lighter (fat is lighter than muscle) or slightly heavier.

      What WILL affect your weight during cross-hormone therapy is diet and exercise.

      Personally, I was blessed with a naturally high metabolism. Before Transition, I could eat pretty much anything I wanted in any quantity, and I'd never gain weight. At 6'1", the most I ever weighed in my life was about 180 lbs, but it was ALL muscle. I was in extremely good physical condition (think swimmers body.) About 7 years before I Transitioned, I became a vegetarian, but I still consumed dairy. I lost about 5 lbs, but it was hardly noticeable. About a year and a half before I started hormones, I stopped eating. I mean, I really stopped. I was probably eating less than 1000 calories a day. Within a year, I had lost almost 35 lbs of muscle. I looked pretty gaunt & unhealthy at 140 lbs, but I did this intentionally, because I wanted whatever weight the hormones put back on to be mostly fat. Everyone told me I'd gain weight easier once I was on estrogen. Not me. I hovered between 140 and 145 for about 6 months, and after 10 months on HRT, I'm staying around 150 lbs, but I can't seem to get much higher. I look thin, but not unhealthy because hormones sort of add fat to you face. I'd like to be 155-160. I've been eating a LOT (though not as much as before Transition because my stomach has shrunk a lot) and it makes no difference.

      So as you can see, there's really no way to predict what hormones are going to do. I read posts by people who claim they can't keep from gaining weight now that they're on HRT. They have to watch every single thing they eat.

      (I should point out that the entire time I was dieting up through today I've been under a doctors care, and I've always been physiologically healthy.)

  45. QUESTION:
    Is there any other reason to have hot flashes other than menopause?
    Having them for over 10 years. 4 years on Hormone Therapy (they do work but the side effects are terrible). Natural remedies don't work or at least the ones I have tried.

    • ANSWER:
      It's hormonal, but maybe you have too low a dose of HRT, or your other systems are out of whack, like your thyroid hormones, etc.

  46. QUESTION:
    What do you think of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy?
    I am over 50 and considering bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      It looks like the latesst expensive gimmick...
      Compounded "bioidentical hormones" are plant-derived hormones that pharmacists prepare and label as drugs. The products are claimed to be biochemically similar or identical to those produced by the ovaries or body. However, the relevant chemicals (steroids) in plants are not identical to those in humans. To make products that work in humans, raw materials from the plants must be converted to human hormones synthetically. Thus, to the extent that they are potent, the "bioidentical" products would pose the same risks as those of standard hormones—plus whatever problems might be introduced during compounding.
      The FDA regards "bio-identical" as a marketing term that implies a benefit for which there is no medical or scientific basis. Some were also making unsupportable claims that their drugs are better than FDA-approved menopausal hormone therapy drugs

  47. QUESTION:
    Electrolysis for men, will hair grow back with hormones?
    I am 21. In the future I would like to get electrolysis to permanently remove my facial and chest hair. I would like to under go hormone therapy, but that's another topic. I prefer an androgynous look. I wish to have a more feminine boyish appeal. I was wondering if my hair would grow back with my T hormones once I underwent electrolysis. I hope there is a solution for my unwanted hair, I feel very uncomfortable with it.

    • ANSWER:
      Nope
      Any hair that is removed by electrolysis is gone forever. However, you may naturally get new hair growing as you age if you go back on testosterone. It won't be much though, so you may need the periodic re-touching

  48. QUESTION:
    Turner Syndrome, What happens when they reach the age of 25?
    I have a 17 year old sister that have turner syndrome. She went through hormone therapy for about 4 years. When she reached her teenage years , she started having problems with her kidneys and she is now prone to diabetes. What happens to girls to have TS when they reach the age of 25? Is it true that they will also experience pre-mature aging?

    • ANSWER:
      No, I'm not aware of any correlation between premature aging as such and Turner's. There are medical issues she needs to be aware of, though, like cardiac issues and the propensity to diabetes you mentioned. When you say she "went through hormone therapy," do you mean estrogen or growth hormone? If she's 17, she's probably old enough that she's stopped growth hormone, but she still needs to be on estrogen/progesterone replacement therapy. Adequate HRT throughout adulthood is *very important* in women with TS, and the current thinking is that women with TS should remain on HRT until 50 or so, the age at which menopause would naturally be beginning. It will do a lot to combat osteoporosis and other issues. I don't know why you picked 25, but there's nothing in particular that "happens" to women with TS at that age or any age, they just need to be aware throughout their adulthood of the medical issues that can arise with TS and be sure they are getting good medical care from a doctor who is knowledgeable about the condition. The Turner's Syndrome Society of the United States is a great resource for keeping up with the latest medical research on TS - http://www.turnersyndrome.org.

  49. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to still have children with a partial hysterectomy?
    I had a partial Hysterectomy 18 years ago. They left one ovary. Is it possible that that ovary is still producing eggs or is it dormant? I am not on any kind of hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends upon what was done. A hysterectomy is the removal of your uterus, which must be in place to carry a child. A partial hysterectomy usually involves removing the uterus but leaving the cervix. An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both ovaries. If you had a partial oophorectomy and your uterus, fallopian tubes and one ovary are still intact it is possible-- not all ovaries go dormant after this kind of procedure. If you had a partial hysterectomy it would be unlikely and inadvisable, although still possible if enough of the uterus was left intact.

      Hormone therapy is usually just prescribed for women experiencing symptoms of menopause. Not all women have the 'normal' night sweats, hot flashes and other associated symptoms of menopause (surgical or otherwise) and they would not be placed on hormone therapy if it was not needed.

      I would talk to your Dr. he or she would be able to give you a realistic picture. You can always seek a second opinion as well. Best of luck.

  50. QUESTION:
    What are other options other then chemotherapy for stage 2 breast cancer?
    My 75 year old mother made a life decision today ...............she is not going to go through with chemotherapy treatments. She has decided to pursue just radiation and hormone therapy. Is there any other treatment options she can take. She is afraid that chemo is not worth the risks at her age and would rather just live her life to the fullest without it.

    • ANSWER:
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      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ Vol. I & II--- by Dr.Devendra Vora, D.Sc.,M.D.,F.R.C.P.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India. Available all over the globe in all Indian languages. Dr.Vora, cured and caused to cure more than 2.00 lac cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

      Latest recorded documentation on cure for ‘breast cancer’-live case.
      •1. A diabetic patient aged 62 years from Hyderabad. Mastectomy of left breast in 2005 and recurrence of tumors in the left chest in 2011. Metastases/Secondaries spread to sternum and complained of breathing problems, constipation, insomnia, severe pain edema in the left chest. Chemotherapy is fraught with severe reactions & doctors refused to treat her due to advancing age & extremely weak constitution. On 01102011 Doctors @ Image Hospitals, Hyderabad predicted, in the light of prognosis, metastases, etc., that she would live for a month. Patient shifted to Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies on 17102011. Feed back Dated 01012012-sleeping well, edema and pain subsided substantially and no problem of breathing on passing very stinking stools on 15122011. Again the patient approached us for further treatment and the domiciliary treatment is commenced on 25042012 and she is getting on well. Her son made a phone on 12052012 and told that her appetite improved, constipation issues solved, sleeping well. Excepting that she has severe sciatica pain, for which we suggested them to contact an Acupuncturist @ Hyderabad.
      •On 10062012, her son rang up and sought further medication for stomachache, bronchial asthma. Sciatica pain under check.
      •Impression of CT Scanning- Dated: 22092011 [before commencement of target therapy—Known case of carcinoma of left breast, post modified radical mastectomy, multiple lung secondaries, chest wall metastases.
      CT Scanning Dated 21062012 [after 2 sets/bouts of target therapy] Bilateral pulmonary sternal metastases, Bilateral plural effusion. Target therapy for another 45 days continues.


hormones therapy

Bio Identical Hormones

Supplementation with bioidentical hormones may be the key to unlocking your metabolism. Weight loss is a challenge for anyone, however, it becomes even more difficult as people age. The ability of our aging internal organs to produce fat burning hormones declines, resulting in a slower metabolism and an increased risk for health problems. Taking bioidentical hormones not only promotes weight loss, it also helps keep unwanted pounds off. While traditional hormone replacement therapy has been linked to certain health conditions, naturally occurring bioidentical hormones are considered safe, generally. Since bioidentical hormones are commonly plant-based and derived from urinary sources, they tend to have similar molecular structures as hormones produced by the human body. Because of their similarity to natural occurring hormones, bioidentical hormones have been shown to have almost identical physiological reactions in the body. Furthermore, because of their safe track record and naturally occuring origination, many types of these hormones are available over-the-counter. Hormonal supplementation may help burn calories by increasing metabolism.

A higher metabolism helps the body's percentage of fat be converted to fuel. In addition to stoking your metabolism, bioidentical hormones might also relieve insomnia, decrease anxiety, improve memory and relieve hot flashes in the menopausal woman. A common type of bioidentical hormone is human growth hormone. This substance helps the body convert fat into lean muscle mass. Another widely used bioidentical is pregnenolone, which helps block cortisol in the human body. Cortisol is a hormone that is commonly released in correlation with stress. It also ensures that the metabolism remains elevated to burn calories more efficiently. Estrone is another substance that if found lacking, might increase cravings for sugar and carbohydrates. Although bioidentical hormones are derived from natural sources, they still remain synthetically manufactured. In addition to plant-based sources, these hormones are commonly extracted from horse's urine and the urine from pregnant women. In addition, since every woman's needs are different, the physician typically calls upon the expertise of the compounding pharmacy in order to individualize treatment.

Methods of hormonal delivery include intramuscular injection, transmucosal and transdermal. The transmucosal method of delivery is achieved through the injesting troches, and the transdermal method is achieved through the application of patches, topical lotions or gels. Bioidentical hormone replacement therapy or BHRT not only helps unlock your metabolism, it is also helpful in the treatment of "male menopause" or andropause. Even through BHRT is considered very safe, those considering it should first speak with their health care providers to make sure that they have no pre-existing medical conditions that would be contraindicated. Typically, prior to prescribing this therapy, the physician will recommend a series of blood tests to determine which circulating hormonal levels are deficient in the patient.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Any success with bio-identical natural hormones for the prevention of menstrual migraines?
    I have suffered from menstrual migraines monthly and have tried many pain relievers which only medicate the pain not balance my hormones at that time to prevent the imbalance that triggers it.
    I tried synthetic hormones which were unsuccessful plus had many side effects from it. I have heard and read about bio-identical hormones and would really appreciate it if any one here personally has had any success with it.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I know of another site that you can check out that may help you get the info you need. Check out: http://www.WebMD.com

      They have a Women's health board over there too that may be able to help you.

  2. QUESTION:
    What do you think of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy?
    I am over 50 and considering bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      It looks like the latesst expensive gimmick...
      Compounded "bioidentical hormones" are plant-derived hormones that pharmacists prepare and label as drugs. The products are claimed to be biochemically similar or identical to those produced by the ovaries or body. However, the relevant chemicals (steroids) in plants are not identical to those in humans. To make products that work in humans, raw materials from the plants must be converted to human hormones synthetically. Thus, to the extent that they are potent, the "bioidentical" products would pose the same risks as those of standard hormones—plus whatever problems might be introduced during compounding.
      The FDA regards "bio-identical" as a marketing term that implies a benefit for which there is no medical or scientific basis. Some were also making unsupportable claims that their drugs are better than FDA-approved menopausal hormone therapy drugs

  3. QUESTION:
    Why all the controversy surrounding Bio-Identical hormones?
    I would like to become more informed about Bio-Identical hormones, but I keep finding conflicting information. Does anyone have any good insight here?

    • ANSWER:
      The reason for all the controversy about bioidentical hormones is related to how some of the products are made. Some of them are made by a kind of pharmacy called a compounding pharmacy. These kind of pharmacies are not FDA approved.

      And problems can occur if the amount of hormone in the product is too high for a woman which then adds to the controversy.

      (learned about some of this on Oprah and also talking to other women who have tried to use them).

      There was also an article on the subject of bioidentical hormones about a month ago thru WebMD that was pretty interesting as well and it explained it real easily.

  4. QUESTION:
    Are bioidentical hormones available in the Netherlands?
    Can anyone tell me if Bio-Identical hormones for the treatment of menopause available in the Netherlands?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a new one for me, and difficult to find out more to be honest.

      Given the lack of info (in Dutch as well) then I would say that it is not common (if at all) in the Netherlands, but I guess the only person that can really confirm it is your GP

      In the meantime there is a thread about it on Expatica which makes for interesting reading http://forum.expatica.com/Bio-Identical-hormones-t110145.html&pid=807433&mode=threaded#entry807433

      Sorry I couldn't help more, but I know very little about it, and hopefully someone else can offer some more info

  5. QUESTION:
    What kinds of vitamin supplements should I be taking after my total abdominal hysterectomy?
    i had a total abdominal hyst. on Sep. 30th 2008. I know my body has to be missing valuable vitamins now. i am taking estradiol bio-identicals for the hormone therapy and herbs for hot flashes but what about iron? or other valuable needed vitamins...can anyone point me in the correct direction?

    • ANSWER:
      Post menopausal women actually require less iron than they did before, so you should be fine. If you like to take a multivitimin/mineral supplement for now, you certainly can and it won't hurt a thing. You shouldn't have lost that much blood in the surgery, and should have recouperated just fine- iron wise, anyway, by now. A regular supermarket brand, generic label, should do well for you. Get a chewable if you can, and if you like you can even take the children's chewables as they provide the majority of what you will need. Since you are taking an estradiol bioidentical, you shouldn't really be having much trouble with the hot flashes. The only other thing you will need to be concerned with taking as a supplement would be calcium, because you will now be depleting those calcium stores at a slightly higher rate than before. You probably should discuss the options for calcium with your doctor. There are those tablets and chews at the grocery store, but those are not always as easily absorbed by the body. There are also prescription medications that can help you avoid osteoporesis. But first you should discuss it with your doctor, and then decide which is best for you.

  6. QUESTION:
    How do I find a local Endrocronologist that specializes in bio identical Hormones in the St. Louis MO area?
    I am 42 and have had a partial in hysterectomy in 2003. My mother had breast cancer and I won't take pharmeceutical grade hormones. I am having issues with hot flashes, mood swings, hair loss and and just recently weight gain. I have tried to search the internet with no success. I would appreciate any help that I can get at this point.

    • ANSWER:
      ask your family doctor for a referral and he can get you in with a good doctor in that field.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are some alternative ways to treat menopause symptoms without using any hormone replacements?
    I really do not want to use any HRT therapy, even bio-identicals. Can you recommend a type of Dr. to see that can treat menopause symptoms without a prescription of some type?

    • ANSWER:
      I was told years ago by a dental hygenist that when hot flashes and mood swings begin to up the intake of calcium. This I have done for nearly 10 years. What a difference this has made! I breezed through menopause. It really works for me. So, I tell all women about it. With calcium, you want to be sure you are getting a 2:1 ratio of calcium to magnesium. Be sure if you are taking at least 1200 mg of calcium a day, that you get at LEAST 400 mg magnesium. The very best form of magnesium is magnesium glycinate with the Albion chealate process. Unfortunately, this is not found in every store and for sure it is not found combined in calcium supplements. I got mine on line. A good calcium supplement is better than none though. You also want to be sure you are getting enough Vit.D and Vit.D3 is the best form of that. Vit D helps the body absorb calcium as does magnesium. You can get the best VitD from the sun. 15-20 minutes a day is usually sufficient. Those who live in mid-northern states probably do not get enough sun in the winter, which means we have to supplement. Calcium is always in combination with magnesium, so one has to add a tablet of the gylcinate form of magnesium to reach the correct daily ratio. Women in this stage of life need 1500 mg of calcium, 400-700 mg of magnesium and 800-1000 units VitD3. Try this and see if you notice some changes within a week or so. If you notice some loose stools gradually add the magnesium. Many women I know also use wild yam extract cream which is a natural product women have been using for centuries without problems. Try the calcium trick first. If it doesn't work then add the cream. All one usually needs of this is 1/4 tsp once or twice a day rubbed on the thin areas of the skin. Directions where, are found on all containers of wild yam cream. Another thing I have found that works for me is a product found here: www.stemcellfacts.info I would try these first before looking for a naturopathic doctor or a holistic doctor. I do consult these doctors once in a while for other matters, but I have had no problem with menopause once I added the calcium program. When you get everything in balance, IF you should have a hot flash again, look to adding a bit more calcium for a day or two. Good luck! Let us now here how it is working for you.

  8. QUESTION:
    Acupuncture to correct damage done from hormones?
    Hello,
    20 months ago, I fell for a common scam called "bio-identical progesterone". I became quite ill from the progesterone and I am still healing. I suffer from food and chemical sensitivities and insomnia.
    Have you ever heard of acupuncture correcting the damage done from hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      Acupuncture can help, but what you need to do is look at your cholesterol readings. If they are too low, you are not going to make good hormones. If you have ANY infections going on in your body, you will be deficient in minerals and not be able to make good hormones. Progesterone is made from pregnenalone and pregnenalone is made from cholesterol and fats.

      Your total cholesterol should be above 240 to be normal. I know you won't hear that from doctors, but that is because they have no idea what they are doing with hormones. Look what happened when you tried the Bio-identical progesterone. You may need to look at your digestion because that is where a lot of this kind of thing has it's root cause. If your liver is toxic, you will not be making good bile and your fat digestion will be not good.

      The liver makes the bile and sends it to the gallbladder for storage to digest fats. If the bile is viscous or you are eating low fat this and non fat that, you will be creating a big problem for yourself and your hormone production is going to be affected greatly.

      Generally speaking, most doctors and practitioners are giving hormones based on symptom presentations and are not performing any baseline testing, or monitoring progress. This can lead to many problems.

      I strongly suggest you see a Certified Nutritional Therapist that can help you with this problem. An understanding of how your body works nutritionally can greatly help you and set you on a course of good health.

      good luck to you

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the litany of test necessary for Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy?
    My wife is a Dr. (but does not know much about this) so I can have it done for free and then get what I need from there.
    I will get the test done and then bring it to a Doctor trained in this particular field of medicine.

    • ANSWER:
      "A 2010 article published in The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics concluded "There is no acceptable evidence that 'bioidentical' hormones are safe or effective. Patients should be discouraged from taking them."[20]
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioidentical_hormone_replacement_therapy#cite_note-Medlett-19

  10. QUESTION:
    Can someone give me some educated info regarding bio identical hormone therapy?
    Any success stories out there?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm049311.htm

  11. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used bio-identical hormones to treat menopause?
    I found some affordable ones online at www.AgelessApple.com and supposedly they're safer than regular hormone regimines. Does anybody know anything about them?

    • ANSWER:
      I was reading through some articles about the menopause and I noticed that some people have a very positive attitude towards this difficult time of life for women.  I read that the menopause should not be regarded as an illness or a disease. It is simply an occurrence wherein the woman is entering her second phase of feminine life.
      Of course, these women are experiencing a gradual discomfort because of the transition...this is only natural. If there are telltale signs of menopause symptoms, you can opt to procure some treatment in order to minimize the feeling of discomfort. But it is important to remember that any kind of treatment will not prevent you from undergoing menopause process, especially when your age is already falling from and between 48 - 55 years old.
      It will only help you to deal a lot easier with menopause symptoms or relieve the  majority of their major discomfort effects. Your lifestyle might also need some changing especially your smoking, eating, drinking, and sleeping habits in order to minimize the severity of menopause symptoms.
      What can herbs do to treat menopause symptoms?
      There are many types of reliable herbs available that can treat menopause symptoms. They can maintain women's healthy life even when menstruation process causes a lot of discomfort and decline in their health aspect. With herbs carefully and religiously applied you may not only alleviate those various forms of discomfort but you will also maintain your healthy life. Two basic types of herbs for menopause Phytoestrogenic herbs These are the herbs or plants that contain natural phytoestrogen, a type of chemical compound, which is similar to the women body estrogen. These herbs work by replacing the lost natural body estrogen with the plant hormones, phytoestrogen. Aside from this, there are other elements of phytoestrogenic herbs that are considered beneficial to menopausal women such as amino acids, vitamins and minerals.
      Generally, these herbs are an alternative to disorders relating to low hormonal/estrogen levels. Most popular phytoestrogenic herbs: Ginseng. Used to improve your overall vitality and energy, this is a dried root from one of the Araliaceae herb species. Ginkgo. Used to enhance memory, prevent memory-related diseases such as Dementia, Alzheimer's and others. This herb is one of the oldest herbal medicines used in China. Dong Quai. Most effective in treating gynecological complaints caused by the change in hormonal production. Red Clover. Diseases treated are skin disorders and bronchitis, asthma and spasmodic coughing. Black Cohosh. Symptoms treated include depression, night sweats and hot flashes. Non-estrogenic herbs In contrast with the phytoestrogenic plants, non-estrogenic herbs, as the name suggests, are those plants that do not produce estrogen chemical structures.
      These plants are widely recognized by the doctors and medical experts because of their effectiveness to relieve women's menopause symptoms. Furthermore, they are considered completely safe and do not provide side effects. The right non-estrogenic herbs contain nutrients that can nourish endocrine system, eventually balancing your hormonal levels. With the proper application, occurrences of the loss of hormones will be reduced as they can promote your body to naturally produce the needed healthy level of estrogen hormones, without the distracting side effects. Specifically, non-estrogenic herbs will provide relief to the following disorders relating to menopause symptoms: - majority of the menopause symptoms - hormonal imbalance - osteoporosis or bone mass loss - infertility - sexual intercourse problems - cardiovascular disease It is important to note, however, that even these herbs are a natural treatment you need to research on the kind of plant that you are going to take as not all of these will relieve and alleviate you from those menopause symptoms.
      There are herbal plants that can cause many other side effects, may it be minor or major. It has been written that Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals.   These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body's hormonal balance and a natural alternative to HRT.

  12. QUESTION:
    Have you heard anything about bio-identical hormone replacement?
    What are the pros and cons?

    • ANSWER:
      in my experience it seems to maintain normal levels for a longer time, and gives one a more gradual build up compared to synthetics...and maybe?? more healthy. Need to be able to trust the compounding pharmacist but I think? there may be less health risk over the long run using them. One older lady friend of mine uses them and swears by them. I still would be but the cost was prohibitive

  13. QUESTION:
    What kind of results have you had taking bioidentical hormones?
    I am in my second year of menopause and am still suffering terrible effects: Night sweats, hot flashes, mood swings, depression, and heaven help me, putting on weight without trying! I would like to know if anyone has had good results with bioidentical hormones (those gotten from a compounding pharmacy). I have taken the saliva tests and thyroid tests and am awaiting the results. What can I expect in the way of results? By the way, this is a FEMALE ONLY QUESTION AND A I WOULD APPRECIATE ONLY SERIOUS ANSWERS FROM THOSE WITH EXPERIENCE WITH THIS. THANKS.

    • ANSWER:
      Suzanne summers has two books that has helped me a lot
      I had been having a menopause from----!
      i feel your pain. get the sexy years ! good reading lots of information.
      take what you need and leave the rest.
      the book is the bomb urlfriend
      The only thing diff rent from me and a doberman pincher is a tube of lipstick!

      God bless my poor family! i am currently reading her book,"

      Age less the naked truth about bio identical hormones

      So far great reading! My heart goes out to you ! I feel your pain also sister! I am struggling with this also.

      These books make sense and are helping me.
      read and judge for yourself God bless

  14. QUESTION:
    Does the bio identical hormone DHEA really work?
    Why is Suzanne somers looking so young at 65 years old? I want to hear from people with direct experience.

    • ANSWER:
      It works in some instances and for certain conditions, but perhaps not in the way you describe that you would like:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22430044
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22388931
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22335129

      You can look at all of the results at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=dhea%20supplementation
      and you'll find more input.

  15. QUESTION:
    What do you guys think about taking hormone replacement therapy?
    I am asking this for my mother. Her doctor wants her to stay on hormone pills for the rest of her life, but she is worried about breast cancer, and only wants to take the lowest dose for a short amount of time (couple years). Should she stand up to her doctor? PS She is NOT in a high breast cancer risk group

    • ANSWER:
      If your mother feels uncomfortable with "traditional" hormone replacement therapy, she should ask her doctor about bio identical hormones. They are developed with products from plants. If her doctor is unfamiliar with them, she can call a compounding pharmacy and ask the pharmacist to recommend a doctor in your area. A compounding pharmacy will "tailor" your mother's hormones to suit her needs.

      A couple of words or warning about bio identical hormones. They may not be fully covered by your mother's health insurance and can be expensive. And, since they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, there is no way to know if they are actually "safer" than traditional hormone replacement therapy.

      Hormone replacement therapy is essential for women. As long as your mother has periodic examinations, and since she is not at high-risk for breast cancer, I would suggest she consider hormone replacement therapy.

  16. QUESTION:
    What do you think about natural hormone replacement treatments?
    Have you ever heard of or visited the clinic which offers bioidentical hormone replacement treatments?
    Any experience with human growth hormone treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had very good results using natural bio-identical hormones at a specialty clinic. I did not use HGH though, so I don't know about that.

  17. QUESTION:
    How are the meds used in HRT for transgender people manufactured?
    I mean, imagine that. Artificial puberty. It's pretty incredible, but one needs to question the origin of these "hormones".
    Because last I checked, "hormones" are naturally occurring. How do they produce these meds?

    • ANSWER:
      They are synthesized in a lab, just like hundreds of other bio-identical organic chemical compounds. Estrogen is just a molecule, specifically C18-H24-O2, meaning it has 18 carbon atoms, 24 hydrogen atoms and 2 oxygen atoms. How the atoms are arranged is what makes the molecule what it is.

      "Naturally occurring" simply means that nature created the molecules through chemical reactions in the human body. The body takes in raw materials in the form of food, air, and water. The raw materials are broken down into various molecules and elements, and then rearranged or converted to form the various building blocks of life. The body is just a biological machine. In the lab, we can take the same elements, put them through the same reactions artificially, and create the same molecules found in the body. This is what "bio-identical" means. The FDA ensures that the drugs manufactured in labs are safe for human consumption.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are some long-term effects of birth control?
    I'm going to my OB/GYN sometime next week to talk about going on birth control (I don't have sex, this is purely for hormonal issues)

    I'm afraid if I go on birth control for a while to regulate my hormones, that I won't be able to have children when the time comes.

    Opinions?

    • ANSWER:
      Funny you should ask.... :)

      And I respect that others are telling you that thousands of women get off the pill and get pregnant all the time. I am also here to tell you the other side. Because I have and AM living it! There are also thousands of women, thanks to the pill, who cannot have children now or other debilitating female issues. I know about 6 right off the top of my head and that's in MY community and social circle alone!

      I was put on the pill for hormonal problems and I chose to stop it when I got married so we could have babies. The first thing you need to understand is - you said you have a hormone issue...all taking the pill is going to do is 'mask the symptoms' AND NOT FIX THEM. My body no longer makes hormones of it's own...imagine being SEVERELY PMSish ALL DAY EVERY DAY...and when you talk to doctors they look at you like you have a third head and suggest antidepressants.

      When you choose to come off the pill in the future, your hormone problem WILL resurface. It's a synthetic (aka FAKE) chemical you are putting in your body. There are many ways to treat it naturally...you just either have to research and find your own way (www.curezone.com) and ask loads of questions....or find a naturopathic doctor to guide the process. After 7 years of dealing with what 'the pill' did to me...I found doctor #14 about 2 months ago and so far, he's been the ONLY one who has helped me. I have been put on 5 natural, bio-identical hormones to help my body function...since I don't make any on my own. I am improving!!

      We will never be able to have children, thanks to synthetic hormones in the pill.

      I would never have gone on it if I knew then, what I know now.

      It's your life. It's your choice. It's a gamble. And you're the one who will have to live with whatever the outcome is...

      But I do want to say thanks...for questioning your possible med choice before you maybe go on it. FEW DO! You're a smart cookie!

      Good luck! :)

  19. QUESTION:
    why does doctors encourage women to take HRT when it is not suitable for the human body?
    Why is it the many doctors encourage many women to take HRT or contraceptive pills when they know it is not suitable for the women's body?

    I think there is more dangers to the body because it is not the same type of hormone suitbale for the body. Any one have bad experience?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes! I have taken what is known as "Bio-Identical progesterone" and it nearly killed me.
      This is a very dangerous scam. They tell women that it is the same and it is NOT. It is NOT natural!!!
      Never ever ever take hormones.

  20. QUESTION:
    does it matter whether i take hormone pills or not after Total Laporscopic Hysterectomy.?
    I am 30 years old and had to have a TLH due to severe endometriosis and i wanted to know if I have to take the hormone pills, I've heard horror stories about taking them. I've now been taking them for a year. Also, how long will i experience these severe hot flashes and stuff.

    • ANSWER:
      With you having had endometriosis, your gynecologist may recommend you not take any hormones that contain estrogen. Since you are so young, you do need some form of hormone replacement therapy. Talk with your gynecologist and discuss your options. You may be able to tolerate "bio-identical" hormones--plant based hormones.

  21. QUESTION:
    Are hormones still produced after premature ovarian failure?
    Like testosterone and estrogen and stuff? Could these hormones ever be elevated or above normal after POF/premature menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      This is unlikely but the process of menopause is lengthy and still not clearly understood. I recommend that you start on bio identical hormone therapy tailored to your needs.

  22. QUESTION:
    Do women with endocrine problems benefit from oral sex from male hormones?
    From PMS to menopause is my source . The book also said some women who are low on testosterone prefer getting it from males than horse hormone shots. Will you take the shot when the time comes per shot or will you? Men produce 3cc of hormone a day. FYI

    • ANSWER:
      lol, they produce bio-identical hormones in labs no without horses or men....and it doesn't cost bucks a pop either. You need to update your knowledge base.

  23. QUESTION:
    What are some healthy ways or things you have done to deal with menopause?
    I'm doing a project on women's issues and I'd like to get a wide variety of ideas and answers from all over. I figured this would be a good place to ask. Please no rude answers or cheeky stuff. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I use bio identical hormones estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and DHEA. I have a high protein low carb diet as instructed by my specialist. I avoid alcohol, cigarettes,sugar, starch, opiate based analgesics and I get a decent nights sleep. I try and avoid stress and drink plenty of plain water and no coffee.I also use a pro biotic, vitamin D3 supplement and tomato juice for vascular health,

  24. QUESTION:
    what is a natural way to cure night sweats?
    I had a complete hysterectomy in 1998, and I'm done dealing with HRT, due to all the bad effects it causes, and it never did help with my night sweats anyway!! Is there anything out there I can take for them that is natural?

    • ANSWER:
      I entered peri-menopause and I simply refuse to take HRT. You are a smart girl to discontinue them but you do need some sort of help with your symptoms.

      What I use is a Bio-Identical Hormone Cream which comes from wild yam. I order mine online at www.askdrhelen.com. If you go to her website (Dr. Helen Pensanti) there is a simple questionaire that you can fill out and it will tell you which hormone cream is the best suited for you. It is very inexpensive and I have never had a problem with ordering from them.

      My periods were coming once every 3 months and since I started using the cream, approx. 6 months ago, I now have regulated back to a once a month menses. You rub a small amount of the cream, approx. 1/4 tsp., on your inner thighs or inner arms. I believe it states that if you have problems sleeping or have night sweats you can rub it on your face and the back of your neck. I personally don't get the hot flashes.

      Also, if you have questions you can click on to the section where it says "contact Dr. Pensanti" and you can write questions to her and she will respond back to you. I have gotten very prompt responses when I have written to her.

      A jar of her Phyto-Progesterone cream runs about .00 - .00 and one jar lasts me about 4-5 months because you use such a small amount. I have had NO side effects from this product and I am very pleased with it.

      Do a little check on her website and read through her material. I hope this helps you to feel better soon! Good Luck!

  25. QUESTION:
    What is your experience with Bioidentical Hormone Replacement treatment? Did it work?
    That is if you have tried it? I've been on it for a month and I don't have night sweats any more and have more energy and was wondering if it worked for anyone else? Mine is the cream that comes in a syringe!!! I saw it on Oprah and bought her magazine in October and was sold!!

    • ANSWER:
      I have used bio identical hormone replacement for many years and I have found it to be wonderful for controlling the pesky "power surges" and mood swings,retaining bone density, eliminating brain fog and preventing arthritis without any of the side effects of synthetic hormone replacement.
      Synthetic hormone replacement is made from pregnant horse mare urine...which is fine if you are a horse. Last time I checked, I was a human.
      Yes, it does typically come in a syringe.
      Most importantly is that I have my hormone levels regularly checked by a competent anti-aging doctor who does routine blood and saliva testing.
      After all...as humans...our bodies are constantly changing as we age and the dosage must periodically be adjusted.
      Correct dosage is extremely important.

  26. QUESTION:
    Are there any other ways to lighten a period than birth control?
    I am staying home sick from work today because I can hardly get out of bed. I have really really heavy periods. They weren't so bad when I was on birth control, but my husband and I want to start a family, so that's not an option. What else can be done to help me?

    • ANSWER:
      My salvation was bio-identical hormones. My hormones were low and out of balance. My doctor had me do a saliva test and then using those results, he compounded a natural hormone cream for me to use.

      Now my period is like that of a normal person. I don't need any painkillers (down to 0 from 16 a day), my pms is nearly gone so I can control it now, I don't flood anymore, and I just feel better.

      Find a doctor in your yellow pages who deals with bio-identical hormones.

  27. QUESTION:
    What are the best questions to ask your doctor concerning male TRT?
    Hormone Therapy, libido, wellness.

    • ANSWER:
      First ask to see the entire male hormone panel of blood work. Ask what the normal ranges are. Check a second opinion. If you need TRT your options are bio- identical hormone pellets, creams, or shot. The later two wear off quickly.

      www.awisealternative.com

  28. QUESTION:
    has anyone tried bio identical hormones for perimenopause symptoms?
    Did u have any luck?

    • ANSWER:
      I have never used bioidentical hormones but I have met women who have tried them for perimenopausal side effects and had fairly good results with it.

  29. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between natural and synthetic progesterone?
    I am pregnant and the doctor prescribed me 50 mg of progesterone. The doctor said the pharmacy has to make it, and not every pharmacy carries it. Does this mean it is Natural Progesterone??

    • ANSWER:
      Basically, the difference between synthetic progesterone and natural progesterone is that natural progesterone is "bio-identical". Natural Progesterone is the name of the hormone that chemically is exactly like the hormone progesterone produced in the human body.

      Bio-identical means that it is the same as what the body makes. This makes them more effective with no side effects when used correctly in dosages similar to the body's normal production.

      Since natural progesterone exists in humans and nature, it cannot be patented by pharmaceutical companies.

      That means what you are taking is synthetic since the pharmacy is making it.

  30. QUESTION:
    I have a thyroid issue. Any suggestions as to how I can effectively lose weight?
    Ive been vigilant about counting calories and exercising. Also just had a baby 4 months ago. Never had a thyroid issue before then.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have a low level of thyroid hormone you are going to have a very difficult time losing weight. You will also be tired and may experience other significant health problems as a result.

      So you need to correct the thyroid problem. Unfortunately, the tests for thyroid hormone arent very good and many physicians aren't adept at replacing this hormone. So I suggest consulting a physician who is trained in bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. These physicians are commonly known as "anti-aging" physicians.

      If you visit the "menopause" section of my website I have a link to a directory of these physicians (at the bottom of any of the pages).

      Hope this helps...

      B Schibly MD
      www.physicians-weight-loss-tips.com

  31. QUESTION:
    What can cause levels of testosterone to decrease?
    Especially in an 18 year old Male. (Don't Judge ME!), could masturbation be one of the causes?

    • ANSWER:
      Masturbation does not 'use up' testosterone and in fact, if anything, it increases it.

      Ejaculation tells your body that you are sexually active and that sends a signal to your system that it needs more testosterone to continue to assist the process of manufacturing motile sperm - of which testosterone is a vital ingredient.

      There are a number of possible reasons why you t-levels may decrease:

      There are a number of things you can do to help increase it naturally - so if these are things you are NOT doing then they could be contributing factors in low-t.

      1/ Eat a good balanced diet high in zinc. Zinc is critical to the manufacture of testosterone in your body, it stops testosterone from being converted into estradiol [a female hormone] and help convert any estradiol you may have in your body into testosterone.

      Here are a couple of sites that let you know which foods are high in zinc and give some other info as well:

      http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydiet/nu...

      http://www.goodness.co.uk/cgi-bin/page/z...

      Steroids will work far faster as you might expect but there are other issues with them as well such as - cost, availability, do you need the high doses that come from the use of steroids, etc.

      2/ If you smoke stop and if you drink alcohol stop. Both of these interfere with testosterone production - especially alcohol and

      3/ Undertake a gentle exercise regime. Do NOT exercise to excess as that will also destroy your t-levels.

      If all that fails then try a source of natural bio-identical testosterone cream such as AndroMen Forte 5% T-cream which can be imported from Australia and is very cost effective or if you need a quick boost go and see your doctor who may prescribe a t-injection to get you over the hump.

      Also there are a number of genetic problems, health problems and injuries that can impact on t-levels.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is the best testosterone booster on the market?
    I'm looking for size increase. What testosterone booster would be the best for me to take?

    • ANSWER:
      Most testosterone boosters are vitamin and mineral supplements as they are the first step towards a good balanced diet and these 'boosters' ensure you get all the minerals and vitamins you need.

      So most of them will not help you build muscle (I'm assuming that's what you mean when you say 'size increase' - if you mean increase the size of your penis you're out of luck as nothing will help that grow larger than nature intended).

      The way to increase, the the max, what you body can naturally product is:

      1/ Balanced diet high in zinc (zinc is vital in the manufacture of testosterone, it stop it from being converted into estradiol (female hormone) and acts to convert any estradiol in your body into testosterone);

      2/ stop smoking and drinking (alcohol is a real t-killer) and

      3/ Start a regime of gentle exercise and slowly built this up to a tougher and tougher regime. Do NOT take on excessive exercise as this will also kill your t-levels.

      If this fails then you need (after you see your doctor for a blood test to check t-levels) bio-identical testosterone supplementation. Bio-identical as it does not have any side-effects and is exactly what your body is trying to manufacture and so works better than any artificially manufactured alternatives.

  33. QUESTION:
    could i be in menopause while on birth control pills and not know it?
    I am 48 years old and have been on BC pills for over 20 years. I have stopped the pill as my husband has completed his vasectomy and microscopic exam revealed he was clean. I did not have sex with him until after the exam. After my last BCP induced period, I am now 38 days and counting while I wait for a period. Could I be in the midst of menopause? And could it have been disguised by the pill? My hormone check almost a year ago was normal.

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills can cause you to feel as though you are in menopause or premenopause. It can take several months after you get off of them to get back to normal.

      I recommend you try bio-identical hormones or USP Progesterone to help get you back on track.

      You should also pick up a copy of my favorite book, "What your doctor may not tell you about premenopause" by John Lee, MD.

  34. QUESTION:
    How to stop picking on my scalp?
    I've been doing this for the past 6-7 months. It causes hair fall too. I want to stop. I've vowed to stop it so many times but I end up doing it anyway. I'm embarrassed. And I'm concerned about my hair.
    HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      1. Protein Grows Hair
      Because the hair is made of protein, a protein deficiency can cause hair loss. Add protein to the diet by including animal products, such as meat and dairy, or protein shakes made from whey.

      2. Vitamin C is Needed for Healthy Hair
      Vitamin C is also a component of healthy hair. Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons, are especially high in vitamin C, as are green peppers. Suggested dosage is 1,000 to 3,000 mg a day.

      3. B Vitamins Increase Hair Growth
      Biotin and the complex B vitamins are needed to grow hair. B3 helps increase circulation to the scalp, thereby encouraging hair growth. It is best to take a supplement that includes all of the B vitamins, called a B complex supplement, as the nutrients work synergistically.

      4. Iron Reduces Hair Loss
      The mineral iron helps increase circulation in the scalp as well, which then fuels hair growth. Foods that are high in iron include liver, apricots and raisins.

      5. Drink Water to Grow Hair
      The hair shaft is comprised of one quarter water. Drink at least 4 to 8 cups of water a day to stay hydrated and grow healthy hair.

      6. Reduce Alcoholic Beverages to Reduce Hair Loss
      Drinking alcohol reduces hair growth. Reduce or eliminate alcohol from the diet and you will see an increase in hair growth.

      7. Hormones Influence Hair Growth
      Hormones influence the production of hair. Hormones decrease with age and slow hair growth. Increasing hormones can increase hair growth. Adding bio-identical hormones for women is a possibility, but accurate blood tests are needed to identify and balance the various hormonal components in the body. Natural foods contain some hormones as well, for instance, wild yam is a natural source of estrogen.

      8. Vitamin E Grows Hair
      Vitamin E is another nutrient needed to grow hair. It stimulates the circulation in the scalp and can be taken internally or applied to the scalp.

      9. Smoking Causes Hair Loss
      Smoking cigarettes reduces the blood flow to the scalp and this causes a reduction in hair growth. Stop smoking to help hair grow.

      10. Vitamin A Feeds Healthy Hair
      Vitamin A helps create vibrant shiny hair because it works with the fat synthesis in the hair follicles and spurs hair growth. Foods that contain vitamin A include eggs, kale, squash, and carrots.

      Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/028251_hair_loss_balding.html#ixzz1ut77gmoN
      God bless you and Good luck.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to stop picking on my scalp?
    I've been doing this for the past 6-7 months. It causes hair fall too. I want to stop. I've vowed to stop it so many times but I end up doing it anyway. I'm embarrassed. And I'm concerned about my hair.
    HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      1. Protein Grows Hair
      Because the hair is made of protein, a protein deficiency can cause hair loss. Add protein to the diet by including animal products, such as meat and dairy, or protein shakes made from whey.

      2. Vitamin C is Needed for Healthy Hair
      Vitamin C is also a component of healthy hair. Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons, are especially high in vitamin C, as are green peppers. Suggested dosage is 1,000 to 3,000 mg a day.

      3. B Vitamins Increase Hair Growth
      Biotin and the complex B vitamins are needed to grow hair. B3 helps increase circulation to the scalp, thereby encouraging hair growth. It is best to take a supplement that includes all of the B vitamins, called a B complex supplement, as the nutrients work synergistically.

      4. Iron Reduces Hair Loss
      The mineral iron helps increase circulation in the scalp as well, which then fuels hair growth. Foods that are high in iron include liver, apricots and raisins.

      5. Drink Water to Grow Hair
      The hair shaft is comprised of one quarter water. Drink at least 4 to 8 cups of water a day to stay hydrated and grow healthy hair.

      6. Reduce Alcoholic Beverages to Reduce Hair Loss
      Drinking alcohol reduces hair growth. Reduce or eliminate alcohol from the diet and you will see an increase in hair growth.

      7. Hormones Influence Hair Growth
      Hormones influence the production of hair. Hormones decrease with age and slow hair growth. Increasing hormones can increase hair growth. Adding bio-identical hormones for women is a possibility, but accurate blood tests are needed to identify and balance the various hormonal components in the body. Natural foods contain some hormones as well, for instance, wild yam is a natural source of estrogen.

      8. Vitamin E Grows Hair
      Vitamin E is another nutrient needed to grow hair. It stimulates the circulation in the scalp and can be taken internally or applied to the scalp.

      9. Smoking Causes Hair Loss
      Smoking cigarettes reduces the blood flow to the scalp and this causes a reduction in hair growth. Stop smoking to help hair grow.

      10. Vitamin A Feeds Healthy Hair
      Vitamin A helps create vibrant shiny hair because it works with the fat synthesis in the hair follicles and spurs hair growth. Foods that contain vitamin A include eggs, kale, squash, and carrots.

      Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/028251_hair_l…
      God bless you and Good luck.

  36. QUESTION:
    Can my wife be on mystery diagnosis or can someone here help?
    My wife has been sick for nearly a year suffering with numbness in extremities, discolored toes, bruises easily, shortness of breath, fatigue, joint pain, migraines, has nodules on her thyroid but blood tests do not indicate hypo or hyperthyroidism, she tests on borderline for lupus, but not definitively enough for doctors to make a diagnosis. They try to tell her its just stress, but we can't see that she would have constant stress for an entire year to cause all of this. Has anyone experienced anything similar?

    • ANSWER:
      Your wife is very fortunate to have a husband that cares about her as much as you do - you are wonderful to be helping her search for a cure/treatment for her problems.

      I STRONGLY recommend that she see a physician that specializes in hormone treatments (doesn't necessarily need to be an endocrinologist). This seems like a classic hormone imbalance situation and it can get even worse than it is now. It's very possible to have a thyroid or other hormone imbalance and not have it show up in blood tests. A physician experienced with this will be able to explain to you why that's the case.

      A good route to finding a physician that knows a lot about this is to find one that specializes in bio-identical hormones. Here are links to two sites that might be helpful:

      http://www.drerika.com/ - one with a lot of information that treats patients through phone consults nationally

      www.hotzehwc.com/ - a clinic in my area that has had a lot of success with these cases - it's probably not close to you - but, the site has some good information.

      I wish you and your wife the best of luck!

  37. QUESTION:
    Now that andro is no loger available.Is there a clinically proven way to increase testosterone naturally?
    Certainly not interested in replies regarding SDI lbs etc.I said clinically proven.Please point out the source of your information.Only interested in legal stuff.
    Don't botther with tribulus terrestris either.The only clinical proof in the US is a decrease in performance.Only one study has ever shown benefits.This was in bulgaria.The same country that found Ecdysterone 4 times more powerful than Dianabol.I did say cinically proven.That means no ZMA,tribulus and plant sterols.

    • ANSWER:
      yeah legal dude:)

      its called bio-identical hormone replacement,

      also progenelone , dhea, increase testorone because are
      precursor,

      exercise

      and fasting also increases all hormones

  38. QUESTION:
    Is Estrogen something I should be taking for my menopause? What does Estrogen do?
    I am going through menopause and I get all the hot flashes and mood swings, but I also feel like my body is missing something, I don't feel right on my insides. I'm also diabetic and I have hypothyroidism and asthma.

    • ANSWER:
      You should be taking estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Menopause symptoms are made worse with a thyroid problem. Estrogen strengthens the bones, improves moods, helps prevent incontinence stops hot flashes, improves your skin and hair. It also wards off arthritis raised cholesterol and depression not to mention osteoporosis. Bio identical hormones are your best option

  39. QUESTION:
    Do bio identical hormones work?
    I want to hear from people who have direct experience. Also please give an example of how it helped you or the person you know.

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely helped me. As we age, and our hormone production fluctuates dramatically or start to shut down, the body reflects the wear and tear that is naturally occurring due to these conditions. For me, the bio-identical hormones, although quite pricey and often out of network, are well worth the advantage of slowing down muscular/bone deterioration, keeping weight/energy/sexual levels stable, improving skin and sleep conditions etc. I stay away from the cheaper, synthetic hormones that are prescribed by the majority of doctors (and are covered much cheaper under most drug plans) and go to specialists that deal w/bio-identical hormones and reputable compounding pharmacies. It takes some diligence to seek these out. I have blood/saliva tests 2-3 times a to monitor how they affect my system. Often people take other potent drugs for other conditions that become exacerbated with age such as high blood pressure, cholesterol or sugar. To me, this is no different. If I want to age gracefully and in good health, maintaining my hormone levels is a significant part of it. I am 50, in perio-menopause, and have been taking bio-identical progesterone, estrogen and testosterone for several years and have had incredibly positive experiences with them all. Wouldn't give them up for anything. As far as cost is concerned, I feel its a matter of priority. I am worth the investment and I rather pay to stay healthy than pay later on to manage a sickness. My specialist costs me 250 for a one hour visit. The hormones cost me 1000-2000 a year. The best way to find out if this is the course for you is to start reading the literature available online and in books w/regards to how they work, the difference w/synthetic hormones and what the advantages/controversies are surrounding it and then make an educated decision on whether to incorporate them in your life. Be careful of studies that show a cancer link because all the ones I have seen so far were w/regard to "synthetic", not bio-identical hormones, and the distinction is significant . Asking this question is a good start. I included a web site that a very reputable NY doctor, Dr. Gordon, created that has great short videos w/more information on testosterone deficiency in men and women.

  40. QUESTION:
    What are some things i can do to balance my hormones? I have symptoms of hormone imbalance.........?
    acne, overweight and ovarian pain. i might have some sort of hormone problem right? so what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      The best thing you can use to balance your hormones is a good natural progesterone cream. It is applied topically because hormones are not meant to go through the digestive system. I like to recommend the ones that are a combinations of bio-identical progesterone and diosgenin, an extract from the wild yam root. I use one called Pro-G-Yam 500. The results are dramatic.

      Good Luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    My partner has just undergone an hysterectomy and now suffers from hot flushes?
    She is on HRT and yet the hot flushes continue, is there anything else my partner can take to help reduce or control them, how long can she expect to the hot flushes to continue. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There are some over the counter product that help some people. She needs to talk with her physician, she may need to increase the dosage.
      She can have blood work done to check her levels and to see if they are in range. But she needs to know that unless she had levels drawn when she was feeling fine they have no base line to refer to. So she could show as being in the normal range but her levels could not be "normal" for her.
      She should also check to see if someone in the area does bio-identical. These are hormones from plants, the are not processed through the liver and do not have the negative side affects of synthetic hormones and appear to be safer over a longer period of time.

  42. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with a severe loss of sex drive after hysterectomy?

    Ok,,,need to clarify. Unable to take hrt.

    • ANSWER:
      I'd suggest getting a full blood scan done to determine what hormones you're missing-- most likely you're down on all of them, but with sex drive, it cam point to a testosterone deficiency (yes, women have testosterone, too). I'm not sure why you can't take HRT- most bio-identical hormones come in a cream form, with the exception of DHEA, which is a supplement similar to a vitamin E capsule. Your thyroid could be flatlining, and that's easily reversed with 1 small tablet a day (Levoxyl)

  43. QUESTION:
    what should i do to prevent my hairloss?
    I am 21 years old and my hairline is rescinding . its a patterned hairloss as i can see . from both side or my forehead . i believe this is hereditary because whole of my paternal family are kinda bald . but i am too young for that . please help me with a solution as this is is consuming me and shattering my confidence in me. also is search on net regarding medications like propecia but it has serious side effects . please if you can help me out with natural remedies or medication with lesser side effects .
    thanx :)

    • ANSWER:
      1. Protein Grows Hair
      Because the hair is made of protein, a protein deficiency can cause hair loss. Add protein to the diet by including animal products, such as meat and dairy, or protein shakes made from whey.

      2. Vitamin C is Needed for Healthy Hair
      Vitamin C is also a component of healthy hair. Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons, are especially high in vitamin C, as are green peppers. Suggested dosage is 1,000 to 3,000 mg a day.

      3. B Vitamins Increase Hair Growth
      Biotin and the complex B vitamins are needed to grow hair. B3 helps increase circulation to the scalp, thereby encouraging hair growth. It is best to take a supplement that includes all of the B vitamins, called a B complex supplement, as the nutrients work synergistically.

      4. Iron Reduces Hair Loss
      The mineral iron helps increase circulation in the scalp as well, which then fuels hair growth. Foods that are high in iron include liver, apricots and raisins.

      5. Drink Water to Grow Hair
      The hair shaft is comprised of one quarter water. Drink at least 4 to 8 cups of water a day to stay hydrated and grow healthy hair.

      6. Reduce Alcoholic Beverages to Reduce Hair Loss
      Drinking alcohol reduces hair growth. Reduce or eliminate alcohol from the diet and you will see an increase in hair growth.

      7. Hormones Influence Hair Growth
      Hormones influence the production of hair. Hormones decrease with age and slow hair growth. Increasing hormones can increase hair growth. Adding bio-identical hormones for women is a possibility, but accurate blood tests are needed to identify and balance the various hormonal components in the body. Natural foods contain some hormones as well, for instance, wild yam is a natural source of estrogen.

      8. Vitamin E Grows Hair
      Vitamin E is another nutrient needed to grow hair. It stimulates the circulation in the scalp and can be taken internally or applied to the scalp.

      9. Smoking Causes Hair Loss
      Smoking cigarettes reduces the blood flow to the scalp and this causes a reduction in hair growth. Stop smoking to help hair grow.

      10. Vitamin A Feeds Healthy Hair
      Vitamin A helps create vibrant shiny hair because it works with the fat synthesis in the hair follicles and spurs hair growth. Foods that contain vitamin A include eggs, kale, squash, and carrots.

      Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/028251_hair_loss_balding.html#ixzz1ut77gmoN
      God bless you and Good luck.

  44. QUESTION:
    Can I ever get pregnant without chemicals?
    I am 21 and have never had a period without taking birht control. I have hyperandrogenism, too much hormone androgen, and have never gotten my period naturally. Is it possible for me to ever get pregnant without taking chemical fertility pills? Thanks, Kristin

    • ANSWER:
      There are Bio-Identical Hormones that you can take to help with this. Bio-Identical hormones are hormones that are similar to your body's own natural hormones. I use Bio-Identical Hormones in my practice for a variety issues.

      www.womensvirtualhealth.com (Virtual Office)

  45. QUESTION:
    Are bio-identical hormones better than synthetic hormones? What do you know about them?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Caycie,

      I personally have experienced great relief using natural thyroid (Armour) instead of synthetic based products such as Syn Thyroid...

      I also use a compounded bio-identical progesterone cream that is much better than what the doctor prescribed for me. I used the doctors prescribed progesterone for some excessive bleeding issues and it did nothing. But my nurse practioner who subscribes to hormone balancing adjusted my Armour a bit and added bio-identical progesterone gelto my schedule and I feel great.

      I do not and will not use estrogen or DHEA supplements because I believe we have too much in our diet already and there is a lot of problems with their use. (Read Anti-Estrogenic Diet for more info).

      I do know since using the hormones I feel better, my cycle is much more regular and my PMS symptoms have been greatly reduced. I know my family says I am nicer ;)

  46. QUESTION:
    How can I fight weight gain because of hormonal imbalance?
    My right ovary was removed 5 years ago and since then I'm gaining weight. My friends told me it's because I already have hormonal imbalance. Even I go dieting...it's no use! Still I'm gaining more pounds every year. Now my weight has doubled compared to my original weight.What is the best regimen for me? Now I'm suffering from frequent asthma attacks and I do have palpitations because of too much weight gain. Will somebody help me on this. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      In general, hormone replacement therapy is somewhat controversial due to the known carcinogenic and coagulative properties of estrogen; however, many physicians and patients feel the benefits outweigh the risks in women who may face serious health and quality of life issues as a consequence of early surgical menopause. The ovarian hormones of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone are involved in the regulation of hundreds of bodily functions; it is believed by some doctors that hormone therapy programs mitigate surgical menopause side effects such as increased risk of cardiovascular disease , and female sexual dysfunction. There are many options for hormone replacement currently available and a considerable controversy exists in regards to synthetic versus natural or bio-identical regimens

  47. QUESTION:
    Women who have used bio-identical hormones.?
    I'd like to know if you have used bio-identical hormones to help treat (get rid of) your uterine fibroid tumors instead of receiving major surgery like hysterectomy. I know uterine fibroids are a results of hormonal imbalance so I am wanting info!
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I have friends who have used bio-identical hormones but not for treating fibroids. They have used it for other problems and had pretty good results.

  48. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to strength train before breakfast?
    Is it possible to strength train before breakfast? And if it is, would I be using alot less energy than I would have eaten breakfast beforehand?

    • ANSWER:
      The energy expenditure is identical but there are many bio chemical reasons to strength train in the morning rather then others.In the morning before you eat your body is in a fasted state and introducing these stresses on it will cause it to release more growth factors and androgenic hormones as well as mitigating insulin response.I compete in power lifting and have been working out before work and breakfast for years now.
      It would be beneficial to have a low carb protein supplement to stave off catabolism.

  49. QUESTION:
    What are some natural treatements (diet, vitamins) I can take increase my progesterone?
    I'm relatively healthy, married and 26. For the past 3 years, I've begun spotting about 1 day before my period. From what I've read, it can be caused by low progesterone, endometriosis or fibroids. I think that I'm having a difficult time getting pregnant because of low progesterone which can affect implantation into my uterus. What are some natural solutions I can do? I don't want to take prescriptions or use the progesterone cream.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have had your hormonal level checked and have low progesterone here is a few options. One you can buy a cream from the health food stores, made of plants. You can also do what is called Bio-Identical hormonal replacement. You would have a saliva test done. Pharmacies who sell bio identicals will give you the test. You have to spit a LOT in the morning. It will test all your female hormone levels. This test is more sensative and acurate than even blood. The Bio-Identical's are all natural, and the pharmasist will mix them together right there to the exact level your body needs. You can get the test done for about 0.00. Then you get the results back, and your Dr. would have to prescribe the exact dosage of what you need. Many Dr's who practice natural medicine are encouraging Bio-Identicals. They have seemed to help many women with a lot less side effects than the standard pills and creams. If you have not had the low progesterone verified by any testing and are just guessing. I would tell you to do the Lab, and get check at least. Have a Dr verify this is the problem. I tried natural low dose health food store progesterone once to help my cycle. OMG, that was not my problem I have never EVER had a headache so desperatly bad in my life. It was the MOMMA Migrain of them all. I'm including a link for more info on the Bio Identicals. It is a link for Women to Women, this site is awesome. The clinic was established by Dr. Christina Northrup. Her book womens bodies womens wisdom, helped me get rid of fibroids without medication, and without surgery. One was the size of a tennis ball. I would highly recomend the book to any women as a guide to your woman hood. She goes over all kinds of female problems and the most natural way to the most invasive way to treat them. I have had great luck with her natural methods. Good luck hon, email me if you want, we can talk more.

      Christal

  50. QUESTION:
    What are the effects of menopause?
    i heard like women get sweat easily,they might have joint pains etc.. what actually are the effetcs and how are they need to be treated. my mom is presently in that phase. most of them suggested me to give calcium supplements.but why? is it safe to provide without doctor prescription/suggestion?

    • ANSWER:
      vaginal atrophy, libido reduction, osteoporosis, arthritis, raised cholesterol, higher blood pressure,oincreased risk of auto immune disease, night sweats, flushes, depression, anxiety, digestive issues, thinning hair, wrinkled skin, collagen depletion, lethargy and insomnia.
      Bio identical hormones are the best option


bio identical hormones

Cancer Hormone Therapy

Thyroid is a gland in the neck. It comprises of two kinds of cells, which make thyroid hormones. Thyroid is butterfly shaped and placed in front part of the neck. Thyroid cancer may be due to benign or malignant tumor produced in thyroid gland.

The causes of this disease are unknown. The common risk factor is exposure to radiations. For instance radiation treatment was used in the past for treatment of infected areas like lymph nodes, thymus and tonsils. The symptoms include formation of lump or a nodule on the neck. Sometimes pain in the neck is also considered to be an alarming sign.

There are three types of thyroid cancer; papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, medullary thyroid cancer, Ana plastic thyroid cancer. When it spreads outside the gland, it infects the other parts of the body. The main causes for this type of cancer are; Radiation, genetic, age, insufficient amount of iodine in the diet.

Common symptoms used to detect the this type of cancer are; a small elevated tumor found on the front of the neck near Adam's apple, difficulty while speaking a normal tone, extreme difficulty in swallowing and breathing, immense pain on neck. The thyroid cancer is diagnosed by following methods, ultrasonography, radio nuclide scanning and biopsy.

This type of cancer may be treated with surgery, radioactive iodine, hormone treatment, external radiation and chemotherapy. Surgery is proved to be the best thyroid cancer treatment in India. By removing the entire tumor from the gland, the disease can be completely cured. The surgeon removes the thyroid from the neck by a small incision on the neck.

In the radioactive iodine method, the radioactive iodine is passed through the cancer cells to completely destroy them. After the thyroid is removed entirely, there still some infections cells may be present in the affected area. To remove them the method called hormone treatment is employed.

External radiation therapy is passing high energy x-rays through the affected area to destroy the infected cells. Chemotherapy is a systematic method of injecting drugs through the entire body to remove all infected cells.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can hormone therapy causes a heart attack?
    My dad is 80 years old with stage 3 prostate cancer. And the hormone therapy is the only treatment that works for him. He will be on this treatment for 1 and a half year or more. Other treatments did not work for him well like Chemo and Radiation.

    I read somewhere that this treatment can cause a heart attack as its one of its side effects? he currently experiences other normal side effects but wondering if heart attack be part of that list?

    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Almost any intense therapy has the possibility of triggering a heart attack....

      I am NOT saying that this therapy WILL trigger a heat attack in your grand father....

  2. QUESTION:
    Is too much hormone therapy can be a bad thing for prostate cancer patients?
    I hear that a heart attack is one of the risk factors of hormone therapy. And (if my dad who is 81 with prostate cancer stage 3 and has spread into the lymph nodes already) has a heart attack. His survival chances at his age are slim to none.

    He already experiences other symptons of hormone therapy and this is only his 4-5 months into it and he is on it up to next year. He's only on hormone therapy nothing else.

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      It is also a bad thing to have untreated prostate cancer.

  3. QUESTION:
    How effective can hormone therapy work for someone with prostate cancer?
    How long can it prolong a man life? I know someone who has had chemo twice radiation once and several hormone replacement therapy over a 6 year period. Now his testosterone test shows slightly high but has to get it checked in another 6 months just to see where it is. from everything how much longer would his survival be.
    They are using female hormones by giving a shot into the groin area.

    • ANSWER:
      Denise is flat out right, and she knows this disease.
      Give her the best answer.
      I am - or was until I retired - a chemotherapy specialist
      and I did not think any of my many chemotherapy drugs
      did anything to help prostate cancer patients.
      Hormone therapy was handled by the urologists in all the hospitals where I worked.

  4. QUESTION:
    What does chemotherapy do for prostate cancer?
    My father is 82 years old with prostate cancer stage 4 (presently in the lymph nodes only, not yet bones).

    He thinks his doctors is going to sign him up for chemotherapy later this year because his PSA seems to be rising and his hormone therapy its not working.

    Which is worst, hormone or chemotherapy? And after chemotherapy, do you think he can go back to hormone?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      1. The progress that has been made in the treatment of prostate cancer has resulted from development of better treatments in patients with more advanced stages of cancer and participation in clinical studies. While some progress has been made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, the majority of patients still succumb to cancer and better treatment strategies are clearly needed. Future progress in the treatment of prostate cancer will result from continued participation in appropriate clinical studies. Currently, there are several areas of active exploration aimed at improving the treatment of prostate cancer.
      Chemotherapy: Because hormone therapy is not curative and only controls metastatic prostate cancer for a certain amount of time, efforts are underway to discover more effective systemic therapy. Recently, several chemotherapeutic drugs have demonstrated the ability to kill prostate cancer cells in patients with recurrent cancer. Developing and exploring single or multi-agent chemotherapy agents as a treatment approach for patients with metastatic prostate cancer is an area of active investigation. In particular, the chemotherapy drugs Novantrone®, Taxotere®, paclitaxel and estramustine are being evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer.
      Select patients with recurrent prostate cancer have been shown to live longer when treated with Taxotere compared to standard chemotherapy.
      In a direct comparison of treatment with Taxotere®/prednisone to the historical standard treatment–mitoxantrone/prednisone–patients treated with Taxotere survived more than a year and a half (19 months), on average, compared to 16.5 months for patients treated with mitoxantrone.[4] There also appears to be a similar improvement in survival when Taxotere is combined with the chemotherapy drug estramustine.[5]
      Combination Therapy: The growth of prostate cancers can be slowed but not eliminated by using drugs that block the effect of hormones on prostate cancer cells. Combining hormonal therapy with chemotherapy treatment appears promising.
      Targeted Therapy:-is worth trying. Why? Because----

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.

      Target Therapy with the aid of Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, comprising Ayurveda-[ Using Patented Ayurveda Food & Nutrition Supplements manufactured India and USA, approved by USFDA, in KOSHER, HALAL, GMP, ISO ETC., and made available at Stores in your vicinity in 40 countries all over the globe. No Side Effects.], Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc., U can have sizable & perceivable cure/relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.
      U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, ADD/ADHD, HIV/AIDS, Prostate caner, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc.,

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do I lower my testosterone level to slow the growth of prostate cancer?
    I presently have prostate cancer and have been treated with 120 radio active iodine seeds imbedded in my prostate gland. I do not want to follw up with hormone therapy but want to lower my testosterone level via vitamins or herb therpy. My PSA after the seed procedure was at 1.29 but a year and a half later has risen to 1.78.

    • ANSWER:
      If you really want to avoid the therapy - then I would see a naturopath - don't screw around with remedies you read on the web. This is your life you're talking about. I am all for homeopathic, herbal and naturopathic remedies, but most of them I talk to (who are any good) believe that combination therapy is a good thing. You might be able to follow up with hormone therapy - but take something homeopathic or naturopathic to help with the side effects or to help cleanse your body (just make sure it doesn't interact with your therapy) Some herbs and remedies can actually counteract certain treatments - so see a professional. I know - seeing a classical homeopath can work wonders. My sister shrank her cancerous tumour in her breast (before surgery) to a third of its size - through one dose of a remedy. I used a homeopathic vet for my cat too - and her tumour went down to next to nothing as well. But remember - they all help each other. Good luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    Does hormone therapy for males suffering prostate cancer cause mental confusion?
    My father has organic brain damage and moderate cognitive deficits after suffering a stroke in 2001. He has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer. We are concerned that hormone therapy might increase his level of mental confusion. Is this a common side effect of hormone therapy to assist in treatment of prostate cancer? He is looking at radiation therapy and hormone therapy now.

    • ANSWER:
      No, it could actually help your cognitive abilities. Men are hardwired a weird way, and we actually need testosterone at certain points in our lives, not having the testosterone making organs, you need to substitute. I feel this would be his best bet to actually keep his sanity.

      Consult with his doctor. They will tell u the truth seeing as how they see it every day.

      I hope this helped!

  7. QUESTION:
    Does hormone therapy for prostate cancer cause impotence?
    Someone I know got prostate cancer in their 50's. They have been taking hormone therapy for 1 year. No surgery. No radiation. Will this drug cause impotency? What is the percentage of it happening. Also, they want to stop the treatment because they are afraid of other side effects. Has anyone had any experience with hormone therapy for prostate cancer? Did they have side effects and did you use an alternative treatments successfully?
    Is it permanent impotency or only when the drugs are taken and for a short time after they are discontinued?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes hormone therapy can cause impotency and loss of libido.
      The best treatment for prostate cancer is surgery.
      Once alternative treatments are proven to be successful they are no longer alternative.

  8. QUESTION:
    Anyone fighting breast cancer been thru treatment and prepparing for hormone therapy?
    I have read articles on hormone threrapy and find myself being very nieve about this treatment. My doctors have left me with so many open questions I am not sure what to do. So my real question is " what do you feel about hormone therapy or is there a natural remedy to equal the hormone drug therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I'm sorry that you are going through this as I know personally how difficult it can be. I am approaching my 4th year of Tamoxifen therapy and am very grateful to have this option for treatment (I am 4 years in remission so it appears that the Tamoxifen is working for me!) The side effects are pretty tolerable and it's in a daily pill form which is easy to manage. Depending on your age, you may be considering Arimidex which I have also heard positive things about. I know how hard it is to make these kind of decisions and my heart goes out to you. I personally make my choices based on what I can live with long term. For example, will hormone therapy give you peace of mind long term or will the potential side effects be a bigger issue for you? Your Dr. likely explained to you the positive results of hormone therapy in reducing a recurrence. That is a very important factor to consider when making your decision. There are many women who do not have hormone sensitive cancer and so the opportunity to use this therapy should not be taken lightly. I know a lot of women who have had breast cancer in all different stages and my best advice to you is to do everything you can to protect your health and your life. It is a precious gift. Good luck and god bless!!

  9. QUESTION:
    when breast cancer has spread to brian liver lungs and bone how much time do you have?
    21/2 years ago my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer from taking hormone replacement therapy for menopause they removed part of the breast in may 2009 they found they cancer returned they did brain surgery to remove the cancer from the brain how ever they told her it has spread to lungs liver and bones. On 9/11/09 they told her she is terminal and to start preparing for hospice. When the doctor tells you to prepare for hospice how long does she have left?

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to hear this.
      From experience in working in Palliative Care wards, (and having father who died from Lung Cancer), once it spreads to the brain, then the patient is already stage 4 - thankfully your mother has survived that ordeal, but now she has to battle it in the liver, lungs and bones, unfortunately this is last stage. This is hard.
      Once it is in the liver, there is little time because the liver is responsible for so many things in the body, along with the lungs.
      I cannot give you a time frame, i am not God. But keep her comfortable, alot of pain medication will help her pass without being in pain.
      In training we were taught some signs of approaching death.
      1) Shallow and irregular breathing
      2) Low urine output
      3) Little or no appetite
      and some more that i forgot.

      My dad was diagosed with lung cancer - 4 months later he was dead. It spread to the liver and bones, and brain but my mother didn't even tell me (i was 13).

      May she have a peaceful passing. God bless you and your family

  10. QUESTION:
    How will I know if prostate cancer treatment has helped?
    I have had 41 external beam radiation treatments, 25 full pelvic treatments and 16 "Boost" treatments aimed at the prostate only. I am receiving hormone therapy also that requires one shot every three months. So far I have had two treatments.

    When I was first diagnosed, my Urologist said three hormone treatments was all I could have as more would cause brittle bones. Now, this same doctor says I may have to take these shots for the rest of my life. When I asked how I would know if treatments have helped, he replied six months after I'm off the hormones a PSA test would tell. Now that's really a Catch 22.

    Has anyone experianced these same treatments and what are your results?
    My Gleason score from my biopsy was 9, so removal was out of the question. My bone scan did not show any cancer there. I am told the full pelvic treatments were for cancer cells that may have been in the lymph nodes.
    My Gleason score from my biopsy was 9, so removal was out of the question. My bone scan did not show any cancer there. I am told the full pelvic treatments were for cancer cells that may have been in the lymph nodes.
    Several good answers, to the answerers who wanted me to go to link, I've tried and didn't get anywhere.

    To the researcher, read the post, PSA levels are no good as long as you're on hormone therapy and I was told, I might be on hormone for the rest of my life.

    No removal is what I was told as soon as I met with the Urologist who did the biopsy. I could overhear him talking with his assistant about what the tumor looked like with the sonogram while doing the biopsy. I can only speculate that the cancer had left the prostate. A bone scan showed that it had not got into the bones.

    It could also be that the insurance company would only pay for one procedure and radiation was chosen.
    There are some good answers here, there are a couple that refer me to a link that doesn't work and one that sounds good except it doesn't answer the question. I have provided all the details.

    I guess I'll just let this go to vote.

    • ANSWER:
      Let me see if I can help you a bit. After your third hormone treatment, you will go off for 6 months, retest the PSA, & then if your PSA is low enough, you can stay off the hormone therapy & just get the PSA rechecked in 3-6 month intervals for life. When the PSA levels rise again, then the Dr. will discuss the possibility of going back on the hormone shots. An eventual tolerance to the hormone therapy will develop down the road, that is why you are on for a certain amount of months & then off.

      This hormone therapy does cause Osteoporosis. I would highly suggest adding a good Calcium supplement along with Vitamin D to combat this inevitable side effect. My father was on this therapy on & off for 8 years & suffered from this along with hot flashes & uncontrollable sweating, weight gain, bone pain,& a host of other things. He chose to eventually go off because of the side effects. The decision comes down to an individual choice of what you wish your quality of life to be & how controllable your case may be.

      If I were you, I would suggest getting a 2nd opinion on your treatment plan. Looking back on my Father's care, that is something we didn't do, that I wish we had done!. We followed his Urologist's hormone therapy plan & didn't try any alternative therapies. I am unsure with your Gleason numbers why they didn't decide on surgery after your radiation. If you have a Cancer Institue in your state, I would start there to get an appointment with a specialist in Prostate Cancer. If you don't have one, ask your Radiologist who he would recommend. I would also suggest seeing if you qualify for any investigational drug studies being conducted with Prostate Cancer specialists in your area.

      The hormone therapy companies got in trouble a few years back for bribing Dr's with kickbacks to keep patients on these shots & they settled it for a record 875 million $$$$$!!! So, I am always suspect of motives.

      Anyway, as far as helpful sites, I suggest www.mdanderson.org & then just type in prostate cancer. I think that is a great resource & they have an 800 number you can call for advice.

      My prayers are with you & I hope that I have been of some help! Be strong in your fight ! God Bless!

      ADDITIONAL QUESTION: My husband just brought up this morning, if surgery isn't an option what about Radioactive Implant(seeding).?

      In our past research we found that a diet with limited dairy is best.. If you have milk make sure it is hormone free. Also, if you can buy hormone free meat & eggs that is key. The more you limit your outside hormone influences the morre control you will have in your cancer. I know I mentioned Vit. D & calcium earlier, but no matter what increase your intake of those. If you can get at least an hour a day of sunshine along with taking Vitamin D3 (3 Capsules a day, for a total intake of 15,000 IU) that is as important in treating the cancer as much as helping in the bone loss. I would get the D3 from a health food store in your area. Thorne makes a good brand called D-5000. In addition, take 3000 mg of Calcium Citrate daily.( capsules are easiest to take) If you have any bone pain, take MSM capsules 3000 mg twice daily. You can get this anywhere & any brand is fine (inexpensive) New studies have found Lycopene 10 mg. twice a day is extremely beneficial in fighting the cancer cells. EGCG (Green tea extract....decaffinated) 200 mg. twice a day. Try & not drink soda pop as it will pull calcium from your system. Also the aspartame in diet drinks can create toxicity enhancing cancer cell growth. If you have any more questions please email me, my husband is a Dr. & I spent the last 12 years researching everything I could to help my Dad during his fight.

      NOTE: DO NOT TAKE MUTIPLE VITAMINS containing SELENIUM or CADMIUM because a new study in Britain shows these may ne linked to Prostate Cancer.

      INSURANCE: Your insurance will pay for whatever treatment your Dr. deems necessary to eradicate the cancer. If you have problems or questions with insurance coverage contact your treatment hospital & ask for the Patient Advocate for assistance & advice.

  11. QUESTION:
    Ok, Why is it that we think we can self diagnose ourselves using the internet ?
    I am 1 year survivor of breast cancer. I am currently on hormone therapy and will be for 4 more years. I am also starting Lymphedema treatment in a few days. My question is .... I am having pain in my bones. It just started a few days ago and I see my oncologist this month. I am imagining the worst and would love some feed back and advice before I see my doctor so as to ask the right questions.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know that the objective of many people really is to self diagnose. The physicians office is a slightly frightening place for most people. Many people have received frightening news there in the past, and this makes people understandably reticent. Rather than trying to diagnose themselves, I think they are simply trying to gather information and try to anticipate what might be asked at the physician's office, as a way of decreasing their own anxiety concerning the unknown. It's natural, and as long as the physician is competent and secure enough to manage the patient's questions, an educated patient can actually be a great and compliant patient to have.
      Speak to the physician who prescribed the hormonal treatments concerning the bone discomfort. It could be something as simple as a side effect from that treatment, or even the beginnings of hypothyroidism. Simply report the location and intensity of the pain, and your level of concern about this. Let them conclude and adjust accordingly.
      Congratulations on your one year survival. May the next four years be enjoyable and happy as you progress to the five year mark. Best wishes.

  12. QUESTION:
    What does it mean to a patient where you are stuck w only 1 treatment option?
    My father is on prostate cancer, and despite other treatments he is only from now on hormone therapy?

    He has tried other treatments but no good. Is that usually a bad sign that the end might be near for him than we expected?
    My dad has tried Chemo and Radiation therapy and told me he has tried some Lupron drugs before. I live in another state so I cannot see his situation.

    • ANSWER:
      What other treatments are you suggesting?
      Have you talked to his doctor?
      This has nothing to do with how much time someone may have.

      So are you saying he should go back to those?
      There is something wrong if he has had chemo as it has nothing to offer prostate cancer patients.
      You were saying the other day it is in his node so radiation is not going to help.

  13. QUESTION:
    How to convince my parents to get another dog?
    On the 13th of May last year (which happened to be Mother's Day) we had to unexpectedly put down our dog of nearly 11 years due to water on the lungs. I had had her since I was 5 and I was torn up over it for weeks and it is still unpleasant to the point of tears to think about today. We have recently moved house and in two weeks our lawn will be put in. I want to ask my parents if we could get another dog, as I really miss the company they give (I'm an only child who doesn't like spending more time with people than I really need to). After my last dog died we did discuss briefly the idea of getting another dog once we were in our new house.

    Unfortunately life isn't going particularly well at the moment. About two months after Mali (my dog) died, my mother was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer that had spread to some lymph nodes. She underwent 4 rounds of chemotherapy and is now in her second last week of six weeks of radiation. She will be on hormone therapy for the next five years as the tumor was hormone receptive. This means that she will most probably have all the symptoms of menopause all over again for that period of time. So basically Mum is now staring to lean towards no dog. Dad is more open to the idea.

    I'm not planning on asking for a new dog, I would much prefer to rescue on from the pound or similar welfare organisations in my area, reducing the cost somewhat. We still have my old dog's bed and several kilograms of dog food (yes, it is still good) and I've obviously had previous experience in looking after a dog, and in light of recent event's I feel a lot more mature than I was raising Mali from a puppy. I have two other pets, a python (most low maintenance pet ever!) and a horse about 5 minutes drive away whom I ride regularly and see twice a day every day, before and after school. Unfortunately, horses and snakes are not the most cuddly animals and I've been longing for a dog for a long time. A lot of my friends have dogs, and at the farm where I work every weekend there's an old kelpie and a husky and when they come say hello and ask for cuddles, it makes my day.

    Any advice on how t approach this matter would be highly appreciated.
    @Dominator You sir, are an insensitive piece of humanity. And at 16, I have as much of a right to controlling my own life as anyone else. Go grow a heart.
    @Dominator I'm not a nagging child. And who's to say that "children" are incapable of thought and emotion. I've certainly met children with greater emotional and rational capacity than you seem to have.

    • ANSWER:
      Tell them as you've told us. I agree, having a wonderful friend to tell every thing to makes life easier.
      As long as you are willing to care for it I'd say yes.
      Getting a rescue is a wonderful idea and you can give a lonely dog a forever home.

  14. QUESTION:
    What are other options other then chemotherapy for stage 2 breast cancer?
    My 75 year old mother made a life decision today ...............she is not going to go through with chemotherapy treatments. She has decided to pursue just radiation and hormone therapy. Is there any other treatment options she can take. She is afraid that chemo is not worth the risks at her age and would rather just live her life to the fullest without it.

    • ANSWER:
      *Prevention & Cure of Breast Cancer--If U press the surrounding area on both sides of palms, soles, wrists and ankles regularly three times a day and then breast cancer shall not grow further. Side benefit is that Ur menses cycles are regulated.Acupressure & Indian Natural Remedies can cure breast cancer safely & totally in 45-90 days. T & C apply.

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2306802071169.2103895.1282822997&type=1&l=38eadce9df

      In Ur case, target therapy is helpful to have total cure. “Target therapy” is worth trying.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ Vol. I & II--- by Dr.Devendra Vora, D.Sc.,M.D.,F.R.C.P.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India. Available all over the globe in all Indian languages. Dr.Vora, cured and caused to cure more than 2.00 lac cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

      Latest recorded documentation on cure for ‘breast cancer’-live case.
      •1. A diabetic patient aged 62 years from Hyderabad. Mastectomy of left breast in 2005 and recurrence of tumors in the left chest in 2011. Metastases/Secondaries spread to sternum and complained of breathing problems, constipation, insomnia, severe pain edema in the left chest. Chemotherapy is fraught with severe reactions & doctors refused to treat her due to advancing age & extremely weak constitution. On 01102011 Doctors @ Image Hospitals, Hyderabad predicted, in the light of prognosis, metastases, etc., that she would live for a month. Patient shifted to Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies on 17102011. Feed back Dated 01012012-sleeping well, edema and pain subsided substantially and no problem of breathing on passing very stinking stools on 15122011. Again the patient approached us for further treatment and the domiciliary treatment is commenced on 25042012 and she is getting on well. Her son made a phone on 12052012 and told that her appetite improved, constipation issues solved, sleeping well. Excepting that she has severe sciatica pain, for which we suggested them to contact an Acupuncturist @ Hyderabad.
      •On 10062012, her son rang up and sought further medication for stomachache, bronchial asthma. Sciatica pain under check.
      •Impression of CT Scanning- Dated: 22092011 [before commencement of target therapy—Known case of carcinoma of left breast, post modified radical mastectomy, multiple lung secondaries, chest wall metastases.
      CT Scanning Dated 21062012 [after 2 sets/bouts of target therapy] Bilateral pulmonary sternal metastases, Bilateral plural effusion. Target therapy for another 45 days continues.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between prostate cancer stage 3 & 4?
    I'm kinda confused on this one. My dad has the cancer and tells me its present in the lymph nodes area only. He tells me he is stage 3 and NOT stage 4.

    Other people have advised me he is stage 4 not stage 3. Who should I believe? lol
    He is on hormone therapy only.

    • ANSWER:
      Prostate cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes is stage 4. Hormones will not cure the disease but will slow the growth for awhile. Hormones work differently for different people. They can stop working in as little as 12 months or continue to work for years. I've had metastatic prostate cancer over 4 years and the hormones have kept the cancer from growing. As the cancer spreads the Doctors will treat the symptoms with pain medication. This is what the Doctors are telling me.

  16. QUESTION:
    Is it ever possible to get a flat stomach again after a bikini line hysterectomy?
    I had a traditional bikini line hysterectomy 3 years ago after a cancer scare. I always had a fairly flat stomach, not ripped and firm, but flat-ish. 3 years later, it seems the more I try to get my stomach down with diet and exercise, the more intent it seems to be on staying put. I am not on any type of hormone therapy, nor am I on any type of meds for anything at all. Is there a reason why my weight loss is stalled and my stomach is stayin put?

    • ANSWER:
      not in my world. it's been 15 yrs and i still have my "pooch".

  17. QUESTION:
    Medical trials on the results of orchidectomy and LHRH agonist drugs on prostate cancer?
    I have biology coursework in on Monday. I'm writing an issue report on prostate cancer and I'm using those forms of hormone therapy as my 'solution' to the problem (prostate cancer). I'm finding it hard to find/understand medical trials on orchedectomy and LHRH agonist drugs.
    Any information of medical trials on prostate cancer would be very useful. Thanks for the help :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Trials are quite a complicated business. Below is a link to the US government database of registered trials. For your information, here is a basic rundown of the basic "phases" of each trial.

      * Phase 1- A small study on just a few people to make sure that the new treatment is safe and doesn't have any obvious side effects.

      * Phase 2- A medium-sized study to see if the new treatment is effective against the disease it is supposed to treat, and if so, is it better than existing treatments. Sometimes, phases 1 and 2 are combined.

      * Phase 3- A much larger trial involving hundreds of patients to confirm the results of the phase 2 study. This is the final stage necessary before review by regulatory agencies.

      * Phase 4- This is done after the drug enters the market, and basically involves seeing if it continues to produce results outside the trial setting, and keeping an eye out to see if any unwanted effects got past the trials.

      Needless to say, you must pass all of 1-3 to get approval.

  18. QUESTION:
    How bad is it when a PSA (prostate cancer) goes from below 0 range to 1.7?
    My dad is 82 years old with prostate cancer stage 3 (presently in the lymph nodes). For the past year almost two, it has been below 1 regarding the psa, but today is now 1.7. People tells me its really bad. Hes not gonna live long.

    It's obviously getting to my head, are they right? He is on hormone therapy. He used to be on chemo but went into hormone. Then he stop getting the injections ever since last Sept. From what I've heard by other people close to my dad, my dad wants to get his private part working. He still wants to basically have sex. I said, ewww at age 82? lol. But hey, it's his life. But I get the feeling his part doesn't work anymore. So his sex life is completely over.

    So, what do you think are the chances? I asked other people close to my dad for advice, they say, either he gets an operation or just dies with it. And my dad being stubborn and being to cheap to get the proper treatments, he will just mostly die with it.

    Any advice please? Thanks!

    Only gleason score that he ever took was at 7. He has this cancer for 2 years now.

    • ANSWER:
      If it is in his lymph nodes it is a stage 4 and it does not get worse than that.
      Obviously if he has stopped treatment his PSA will go up.
      What are his chances of what?
      Side effects of hormone therapy include impotence. People have sex until they die in case you didn’t know.
      Leave him alone and let him do what he wants.

  19. QUESTION:
    What happens when your hormones are balanced again?
    Because I'm a girl & my testerone levels are too high so I'm thinking about doing hormone therapy (the pill' & spironolactone) & I want to know what happens to my excess hair growth. Does it fall out/& or lighten on it's own or do you still have to remove it & then see the change in regrowth?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm also taking spironolactone for hair loss due to high testosterone. I trying to not do the birth control and see if it works that way. I hate birth control once you get off of it all your problems will be 20,000 times worst than what they were in the begining, and they can cause breast cancer if your prone to it.

      I just started taking spirolactone almost 2 wks ago. I see no change in my hair loss its still falling out... I read it takes up to 6 months to see results.

      About your question you can keep nairing/waxing/shaving whatever you do to the facial hair for now. Its supposed to eventually stop growing as much because it lowers your testosterone so once its lowered you wont grow hair where men do.

  20. QUESTION:
    What are my mothers chances of reoccurence without chemo?
    I was also wondering my mother has a stage 2 breast cancer but its a grade 3. If my mother declined chemo what are her chances of reoccurence with only radiation and hormone therapy. Also are the chemo drugs used today less toxix then say the ones that were used 15 years ago -

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 2, grade 3 is usually treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation (depending upon whether or not a lumpectomy was performed. Most mastectomies don't require radiation following surgery and chemotherapy.). Hormone therapy is used for hormone positive cancers.

      Chemotherapy is just as toxic as it was in the past, but support drugs are much better now. It used to be a given that patients would be incredibly ill under chemo, but with modern support medications, the gastro-intestinal side effects are reduced. They aren't gone completely and most people still feel quite ill, but it's not as bad as in the past.

      Grade 3 cancer is a fast growing cancer and the chemotherapy could be instrumental in attacking cells that may be floating around your mother's bloodstream.

      "Clinical trials have shown that adjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of stage II breast cancer improves a patient’s chance of survival and decreases the risk of cancer recurrence compared to local therapy alone." http://www.texasoncology.com/types-of-cancer/breast-cancer/stage-ii-breast-cancer/#_edn6

      You might want to take a look at the Texas Oncology site I quote from above as it goes into more details over the type of chemotherapy typically used for Stage II breast cancers. Of course, the best recourse for your mom is to talk in-depth with her oncologist.

      Best wishes to all of you.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I take precautions for Breast Cancer?
    My mother has been recently diagnosed with breast cancer. It is not hereditary & she is healthy. She has in her DNA some predisposition to getting it based on certain environmental factors. I am assuming this is related to hormone replacement therapy drugs she took when she was going through menopause.

    Understandably so, there is a risk factor associated with breast cancer and these drugs that were studied and this conclusions still remains to be proven.

    My question is my choice to get on birth control, as it is one form of hormone replacement. Will this heighten my own risk to get breast cancer down the line? I am early 30s and healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      The link between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer has been established. However, birth control does not increase the risk. The amount of hormones used in the pill was decreased in the 1970s and has remained quite low. The only real precaution you can take is to have annual mammograms when it is time. Most of the risk factors are out of our control. 75% of all breast cancers occur in postmenopausal women.

  22. QUESTION:
    On menopause, Why you think the concept of hormone replacement therapy is greatly debated?
    Do you believe that women with menopause could actually benefit from hormone replacement therapy? Why or why not?

    • ANSWER:
      Alot of women do seem to benefit from it, however I think that because there are some women who have adverse reactions to hormones or there are studies that link hormones to cancer or other issues many women are skeptical to try them.
      I think it's very similar to women who use birth control in order to aid with issues during their cycle. It works for some and causes more problems for other women. I personally will not use oral contraceptives for this reason, but I do not fault others for using them. I think it really boils down to what is most effective for your body.

  23. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any suggestions about treatments for menopause other than hormone replacement therapy?
    My mom is 50yrs old and she has been going through menopause since last Jan. She uses progestercare cream from the health food store but she doesnt want to do hormone replacement therapy or premprose because they increase the risk of breast cancer. Her doctor is telling her that she will develop osteoporosis if she doesnt get on some sort of HRT though. Can anyone give her any advice on what to do? Are there any natural ways that anyone has tried that worked? And does anyone know if not going on HRT can really cause osteoporosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is on the right track using natural progesterone. It's the ONLY substance that has been shown to REBUILD bone, from the inside out.

      (Natural progesterone does NOT cause cancer like synthetic HRT does. In fact, it helps protect against cancer.)

      Estrogen (in the synthetic HRT) only delays bone breakdown, and it only works for four to five years. The problem is that it actually stops the bone from performing its natural cycle - breaking down old bone and rebuilding new to replace it. If old bone is not being broken down, there is no new bone being rebuilt! After five years on HRT, bone will be brittle.

      Have her read Dr. John Lee's book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause". He explains it very well!
      He also gives guidelines for finding a quality progesterone cream. She may want to compare the one she's using to his recommendations.

      Your mom's doctor is not fully informed. Dr. Lee says, "You can educate your doctor, or find a new one."

  24. QUESTION:
    What is the prognosis for a recurrence of prostate cancer being treated with hormone therapy?
    My husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer 5 years ago and had radiotherapy after which he was ok until early this year when his PSA started to rise. It is now 16 and he has been advised to go on permanent hormone treatment. The doctor didn't tell us how likely this was to work and how long for. He is 63. Does anyone here know anything about it.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not sure what you mean by “work”. I assume you know this will not cure him of the disease. Prostate cancer is typically slow growing and far more often than not managed very well. How aggressive it is, is determined by the Gleason score. This would have been determined at biopsy. Hormone therapy is standard care and works quite well at slowing the disease for long periods of time. It is not unusual to see men with prostate cancer for 15-20 and more. Whenever you realize you have an unanswered question call the doctor and ask over the phone they are used to it – it’s part of the job.

      You may also be interested in knowing there is a prostate cancer vaccine due on the market by February. I can’t remember the name but I believe it is coming from a company in New Jersey. From what I was told it works very well, but it is also very expensive ,000-,000. The patient’s tumor cells are used to make the vaccine so it is specific to the patient and their cancer. Over time, which fortunately you husband has, I suspect the price will come down. I also believe this type of vaccine will become available for different types of cancer. I work with a doctor who has had one for brain tumors in clinical trials for a few years now and it has been doing very well. Best wishes.

  25. QUESTION:
    What should I expect to see for men with prostate cancer?
    My dad was diagnosed 2 years ago and even though the hormone therapy and other treatments are working, what should I expect that might happen to him? his now 80 will be 81 in sept. I'm afraid as he grows older, I always get worried of what will happen to him in the next year or so.

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women?
    8)Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to be one way to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, however recent clinical trials have indicated there are dangerous increased risks of heart disease, stroke and various cancers associated with HRT. What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women and when do women need to start being concerned about this?

    • ANSWER:
      I think the best method to help prevent osteoporosis is exercise. Exercise strengthens the bones in men and women.

      Also there are good medications on the market to help prevent this condition:

      If the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is the only issue under consideration, then bisphosphonates such as alendronate, ibandronate, or risedronate are more effective than menopausal hormone therapy in preventing osteoporotic fractures, and less likely to be associated with substantial adverse effects. So far, bisphosphonates are the most effective category or prescription medications for treating postmenopausal osteoporosis.

      hope this helps..

  27. QUESTION:
    What exactly will happen when i go in for a hysterectomy inc taking the ovaries away due to endometriosis.?
    need to know what the best hormone therapy will be best? Endometriosis is affecting my quality of life so hysterectomy is only option for me now i've exhausted all other treatments. How will it make me feel once the op is done.

    • ANSWER:
      The trouble is that endometriosis may be deposited in many different areas of the pelvis, thus the last resort plan of hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy ( removal of tubes and ovaries) must be all that is left for you.

      Your gynaecologist must decide on your hormone replacement. He will probably choose oestrogen only, since you have no uterus there is no increase in uterine cancer risk. I quite like premarin, it is a natural oestrogen, the one from pregnant mares urine, but it is sometimes better tolerated than the synthetics.

      It tends to elevate mood and helps prevent osteoporosis. I suspect once things have settles down you will feel better than pre-op.

      Breast cancer risks on hormone replacement don't seem to rise until after 50 years, so you will probably be kept on oestrogen until then.

  28. QUESTION:
    Question regarding my mothers stage 2 node positive breast cancer?
    My Mother has opted to not have chemotherapy for breast cancer. She will have radiation therapy and hormone therapy. Does anybody have a general idea what her chances of reoccurence are?

    • ANSWER:
      When I went through this, there was a website that provided the percentage chance of recurrence or death based on age, stage, treatments taken, etc. I don't know if it is still available, but I didn't put a lot of stock in it. I had a 67% chance of being alive after 5 years. I'm doing fine so far (4 yrs), but that's not really high chances. I believe it's just personal luck. Bad luck that I got it in the first place, and if it came back, that would just be more bad luck. It's unpredictable, but I keep a sense of humor and a positive (denial) attitude and that gets me through.

  29. QUESTION:
    Is it permisable or wise to donate blood while your are being treated for prostate cancer?
    I have prostate cancer and my treatment is: Hormone Therapy and External Beam Radiation. Is my blood OK to use for what ever purposes blood banks use it?

    I can't help any other way at the moment and wish to continue helping others. Prior to my cancer I would do volunteer work. Now I am too tired to do the physical work I used to do. Even driving my car has been too much.
    Thank you everyone, it was so silly of me to think I could donate.

    • ANSWER:
      Blood banks must follow Food & Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. Contact your area blood bank with this question.

      Regarding the use of donated blood: By FDA regulations, if you are paid to donate plasma (this process is called plasmapheresis), this plasma is not transfused into human beings. The companies you donate to will sell the plasma to research companies and drug manufacturers.

      You do not mention how long you have been receiving your radiation therapy. Your oncologist should be able to instruct you regarding fatigue--what causes it, how long it will last, what can be done to address it so you may become active again. You are a very unselfish, empathetic person to be still thinking of others in your own times of hardship--bless you.

      Please talk to your oncologist. I hope your cancer is treated successfully!

  30. QUESTION:
    Natural Herbal Remedy for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?
    My teenage daughter has just been diagnosed with it. I don't want to put her on hormone replacement therapy to bring on her periods (which occur about twice per year). We have extensive breast cancer in the family, and hormone therapy is frightening. Does anyone know of any natural remedies that are safe? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Medicines & Treatment for Ovarian Cysts, Ovary Pain Neuralgia, Ovaritis

      #Apis mellifica. [Apis]
      Few remedies cause as many ovarian symptoms as Apis. It has an active congestion of the right ovary going on to ovaritis, with soreness in the inguinal region, burning, stinging and tumefaction. Ovarian cysts in their incipiency have been arrested by this remedy; here one of the indicating features is numbness down the thigh. It has also proved useful in affections of the left ovary. Tightness of the chest may also be present, with the occurrence of a reflex cough and urging to urinate. Mercurius corrosivus. Hughes prefers this remedy in ovarian neuralgia. Peritoneal complications also indicate it. Bovista has also cured ovarian tumors.

      #Belladonna. [Bell]
      As this remedy is one particularly adapted to glandular growths it is especially useful in acute ovaritis, and more so if the peritoneum be involved. The pains are clutching and throbbing, worse on the right side, the slightest jar is painful, and the patient is extremely sensitive. The symptoms appear suddenly; flushed face and other Belladonna symptoms are present. Platinum. Ovaries sensitive, burning pains in them, bearing down, chronic ovarian irritation with sexual excitement. Much ovarian induration is present. Palladium. Swelling and induration of right ovary. It lacks the mental symptoms of Platinum, such as mental egotism and excitement. Aurum. Ovarian induration. Lilium. Ovarian neuralgias. Burning pains from ovary up into abdomen and down into thighs, shooting pains from left ovary across the pubes, or up to the mammary gland. Staphisagria. Very useful in ovarian irritation in nervous, irritable women. Hypochondriacal moods.

      #Lachesis. [Lach]
      Pain in left ovary relieved by a discharge from the uterus; can bear nothing heavy on region. Hughes and Guernsey seem to think that Lachesis acts even more prominently on the right ovary; others believe the opposite, the tendency of affections being, however, to move from the left toward the right side. Suppuration and chronic enlargements of ovary may call for Lachesis. Zincum. Boring in the left ovary relieved by the flow, somewhat better from pressure; fidgety feet. Graphites. Swelling and induration of the left ovary; also pains in the right ovarian region with delayed scanty menses. Argentum metallicum. Bruised pain in left ovary and sensation as if ovary were growing large. Naja. Violent crampy pain in left ovary. Dr. Hughes valued it in obscure ovarian pains not inflammatory in nature.

      #Arsenicum. [Ars]
      Burning tensive pains in the ovaries, especially in the right. Ovaritis relieved by hot applications. Patient thirsty, irritable and restless. Colocynth. Ovarian colic; griping pains, relieved by bending double; stitching pains deep in right ovarian region. It is also a useful remedy,according to Southwick, in ovaritis of left ovary with colicky pains. A dropsical condition may be present. Hamamelis. Ovaritis and ovarian neuralgia. Ludlam praises this remedy in the sub-acute form of gonorrhoeal ovaritis; it allays the pain and averts the menstrual derangement. Ovaritis after a blow. There is agonizing soreness all over the abdomen. An external application of hot extract of Hamamelis acts marvelously in subduing the distress and pain consequent to ovaritis. Iodine. Congestion or dropsy of the right ovary. Dwindling of the mammae; dull, pressing, wedge-like pain, extending from right ovary to uterus like a plug, worse during menstruation. Thuja. Left-sided ovaritis, with suspicion of veneral taint, calls for Thuja. Grumbling pains in the ovaries all the time, with mental irritability, call for Thuja. Podophyllum has a pain in the right ovary, running down the thigh of that side. Numbness may be an attending symptom.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/ovary-sym...
      _____________________________________

      Homeopathy treats the patient not the disease, complete symptoms of the patient(Mental and Physical) are taken into consideration to find the appropriate remedy which is the most similar to the patients symptoms. When prescribed according to the patients symptoms Homeopathic medicine are known to work very fast and without any side effects or complications of any kind and once cured there are no relapse or comebacks 100% cure. For more either post your complete symptoms or better to consult a reputable Homeopathic Practitioner for the successful treat ment of your ailment. Giving just the name of the disease or disorder is showing someone the tip of the iceberg what lays underneath is what you have to treat and cure. And that is the key to the success of Homeopathic Medicine.

      I hope the provided information proves to be of help. Wishing you the best of health.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  31. QUESTION:
    Approach to deal with Cancer Tumors. It is said that “No metal can penetrate iron only with iron”, and we kno?
    Approach to deal with Cancer Tumors.

    It is said that “No metal can penetrate iron only with iron”, and we know a fact that curing someone bitten with a snake’s poison can only be treated with the same poison but of course after it is being processed.

    I am now approaching the same case with cancer disease. But in slightly different approach, yet on the same principle.

    I thought of my wife’s case who is now in stage four cancer, she had been diagnosed with Cancer in the left breast last year, she was on the first line of chemotherapy (FEC), then she ended up with a radical mastectomy after three sessions of chemotherapy.

    After six months, she was diagnosed with metastasis in the right lung. She was then given three sessions of taxane through infusion after being diagnosed with four tumors in the right lung. Now the tumors are also found in the bone, liver, brain as well as the chest after a painstaking endurance of the side effects of the chemo.

    I have come with a theory that could make sense in the field of experiments on cancer cells. We know that defining a cancer in a way can mean a cell goes on rebellion and does not obey the general rules which is followed by the specific function of each cell, therefore, it changes its function as well as the other surrounded cells and consequently making a tumor; this cell is now called an active cancer cell. As we know that our body have already cancer cells but they cannot be malignant until they are active. The available methods to deal with cancer cell tumors nowadays are given in the form of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy.

    If we take chemotherapy on how to fight those cancerous cells it certainly damages the non-cancerous cells as well as the cancerous ones. Of course it should be considered the side effects and the consequences of the diving immunity system that could on many cases lead to infections or in worse cases, death.

    In my wife’s case, unfortunately, the chemotherapy hadn’t worked that is why the tumors got bigger in size in the lung; besides, she developed tumors in different parts of the body. I have first thought of how to encase and put in cage those tumors so they do not get any bigger. But, We know that cancer cells are being moved through the blood and lymphatic system in the body. That is why it seems impossible to encage the tumor.

    I have thought of another way which is to treat tumors by a cancer cell, the question may raise is how?

    If we take a look at my wife’s case, the chemotherapy did not work on her as either the tumors were too aggressive and malignant to break down or the chemotherapy was not the one that can make a means of fighting the cells because it simply does not interact with the cancer cells and then to dysfunction them.

    Now, if we take a non-active cancer cell from the organ, which is affected by an active cancer that had already made a tumor, then activate it to become a cancerous cell. Now out of the body in an experiment, in a mutilation or to modify its elements from the protein taking means of feeding (chlorophyll) and other genetic part contents in the cell so that it corresponds with the chemical drug’s elements of the chemo in such a way that the chemo could dysfunction it as soon as they interact.

    Now we have a single cancer cell that corresponds chemically with the specific chemo. So this single cancer cell is now modified functionally that is not similar to the cancerous cells which have already made the tumor. By implanting this single cancer cell, is going to be the main individual cell that is going to rebel in the cancer tumor and thus it is going to change the functionality of the cancer cells in the tumor from the core on to outward.

    On the outside of the tumor, the chemo that is now corresponding with the single cancer cell is ready to interact with the implanted cell that has already changed on the way out the surrounding cancerous cells.

    Hence, the whole process will look like a malignant individual cancer cell has dominated and takes its space in a cluster of cancerous cells from the central position. More importantly, I believe that only the activated stranger (single cancer cell) is fed in order to sustain amongst the other cancerous ones until it has made some company cells to have a certain level of defense. This feeding could be making it hard to achieve as to how to feed one single implanted cell amongst a cluster of cancerous cells, however, I do not think this is a sheer impossible fact to stop it from being happened as I am certain through measures a cell could be made receptive or rejecting to what is being offered to it.
    please have your comment?

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    How would one find a HRT doctor who specializes in the use of pellets near Asheville, NC?
    The facility I have been driving to for over 10 years is in Augusta, Georgia. He is kind, but very expensive and the drive is about 4 hours and my car is feeling the ill effects of overuse.

    HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) pellets used for the treatment of loss of hormones. Mine due to the removal of ovaries and such 13 years ago because of familial ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      kool i live near asheville n.c!!!!

      its cold and haunted!

  33. QUESTION:
    Where can I get detailed information about hormone therapy?
    I have read a lot of stuff but I still don't some things before I start transition:
    When I start hormones which part of my body is going to change faster (breasts, buttocks,etc)?
    Are they going to have an effect on my feelings? I mean are they going to make me cranky or anything?
    Do I have to take hormones all my life?
    How dangerous are they? What are the serious side effects?
    Are they going to have an effect on my face?

    • ANSWER:
      I've been on hormones for no more than 5 weeks and I've already noticed my skin is softer and my complexion has cleared up.

      No... Your emotions change (usually for the better) but its not like you'll be withdrawing from cigarettes or anything
      =p

      Yes... you'll have to take them your whole life

      They're really dangerous if you don't have a doctor supervise you. You get at a really high risk of blood clots and stroke and cancer and other cardiovascular things.

      They make your face look more feminine, my friends already claim to see a difference in the way my face looks
      =S

      Heres a great video:

  34. QUESTION:
    My dad has stage 4 prostate cancer, how long does he have to live?
    Hes been diagnosed for 2 years now and is on hormone therapy only. They have given him other treatments already except surgey. My dad takes bone scans now, so that is a concern from the family.

    Is there a time frame for patients with prostate cancer stage 4? He is 81 years old. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on several factors, like the Velocity of it's growth, whether or not it has metastasized, and of course the type of treatment he is taking. The hormone treatment is rather misleading since it really means they are stopping his male hormone testosterone from being produced in his testicles and blocking the testosterone from entering the cells that have androgen receptors. This kind of treatment only arrests the growth of the cancer for a few years but doesn't cure it. If he has radiation treatment it can kill all of the cancer cells in his prostate or cryo surgery which freezes the cancer an d both are good cures. Of course the surgically removal of the prostate is a good cure if it hasn't spread outside of the prostate gland. At 81 yr of age the doctors might be thinking he will dies from something else before the cancer kills him but I'm not in favor of this option for a cancer patient. You can find all the information you want on the following site and it's the clinic where I was treated and cured of prostate cancer 9 years ago. http://www.rcog.com/ which stands for Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia and is located in Atlanta, GA. With the right treatment your dad can live to die of old age. BTW, those bone scans are to see if it has spread to his bones and if it hasn't the cancer is probably still confined to his prostate and he should seek another treatment besides that Hormone Ablation treatment.

  35. QUESTION:
    I am 24 and recently had a hysterectomy,how can I reduce the hot flahes?
    My doctor offered hormone replacement therapy,but I refused because it can cause cancer.He also offered Birth control cause it also has hormones in it.But I refused it cause it can make you gain weight.I'm looking for some thing natural.

    • ANSWER:
      the hormones, though have been reported to be a catalyst to somes cancers, is not that dangerous, they will monitor you, & to be safe take also the progesterone, if th e dr tells you its needed.

      Soy products are rich in ingrediants for menopausal women. & if you go to Swanson.com , they can really assist you as to what herbs to take & have very reasonable prices.

      Black currant oil ,,or evening primrose oil capsules, & many other things are out there, but get a health expert to help you.

      Meanwhile,carry something you can use as a fan. & Drinking LOTS of ice water helps.

  36. QUESTION:
    How can cancer cells be killed without damaging the good cells ?
    Besides using surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, cryotherapy, immunotherapy or hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      If you could figure this out, you would win many awards.

      Good luck.

  37. QUESTION:
    How safe is hormone replacement therapy?
    Just how safe is it for a woman over 53 to take Hormone Replacement Therapy, have heard two GP give different opinions on this

    • ANSWER:
      I am sure there are a lot of dangers like most drugs.

      a search should turn up these

      here is one article..the institute of health did a study and said the risk of taking it outweigh the benefits as is correlated with increased breast cancer, strokes, Alzheimer's etc..also can be made of horse urine which also increases the risk

      http://www.ehow.com/about_5467345_dangers-hormonereplacement-therapy.html

      why not try a natural product..

      My sister had a lot of problems with hot flashes and was NOT a believer in natural treatments at all being in the health field but in desperation she tried this cream below I recommend and she told me all of them went away after she began using ti and was very happy and surprised that it worked so well

      It looks like this and may be found at some health food stores or online

      http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDoTCil0RPJnkAfdGJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dnatural%2Bprogesterone%2Bcream%26ei%3DUTF-8%26fr%3Dytff1-tyc%26fr2%3Dtab-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D2&w=300&h=320&imgurl=www.raysahelian.com%2Fimages%2Fprogesterone.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.raysahelian.com%2Fprogesterone.html&size=21.1+KB&name=Natural+Progesterone+Cream+by+Source+Naturals&p=natural+progesterone+cream&oid=5ced1e16b6ba7a381811faabf2d007d7&fr2=tab-web&fr=ytff1-tyc&tt=Natural%2BProgesterone%2BCream%2Bby%2BSource%2BNaturals&b=0&ni=32&no=2&tab=organic&ts=&sigr=11c5i2fme&sigb=13s3hj9c1&sigi=11bee8lui&.crumb=SjKDKKhlzhI

      another super great product is Dr Schulze's female formulas and his products are I feel are the best on the market

      https://www.herbdoc.com/index.php/Our-Products?cid=15

      click on product info for each and find the one.s you feel best apply ..be sure to click on each of the tags at the top of the popup..how it works why you need it and so forth to be sure you read all the info on it (you would want either female formula or female shot not female plus which is more for pms than menopause)

      and more info on these are found here

      http://curezone.com/schulze/handbook/female.asp

      I never took anything and other than some hot flashes in peri- menopause that I did not realize what they were as AI was so young I have had no symptom,s at all and never took drugs or natural treatments and have been 12 years since menopause.So putting all these women on this for years and harming them is so not necessary not with these natural treatments.

      why take a risk..if you are the one who winds up with breast cancer which I have had and it is not fun or strokes yikes it will prove to be a costly mistake more than buying these products would be

  38. QUESTION:
    How do we convince insurance company to approve treatment they denied?
    I am looking for help from anyone that has had to battle the insurance companies in order to get the treatment they DESERVE.My Father (56) has been diagnosed with prostate cancer that has metastasized to his hip bones. His original PSA was 184. He started hormone therapy in February and with hormone therapy it has dropped to 60 and then 26.6, and hopefully lower; but haven't gotten the latest results yet. His Gleason score is 9 (5+4). His biopsies showed that the prostate had undifferentiated carcinoma (meaning that the cancer was solid all the way through).He has started seeing Dr's at City of Hope and has signed up for a clinical trial using hormone therapy and Helical Tomo Therapy. The Helical Tomo Therapy is looking like it is going to be his best opportunity to fight this cancer. This type of radiation spirals around the entire tumor and "hits" it from hundreds of different angles as it travels around. Blue Cross Blue Shield has denied the treatment, how do we fight this???
    They said it is just too expensive. That is their only reason.
    The clinical trial part of it is that is is hormone therapy combined with this Helical Tomo Therapy and the treatment last for 32 or 36 weeks (I don't remember exactly). He receives the hormone therapy for only that many weeks. At the point when his PSA level reaches the lowest the begin the radiation. At the end of the trial he comes off of the hormone therapy and they watch him to see if his PSA rises again. This type of radiation is the standard that they use for prostate cancer at City of Hope. I just found out that they will treat the prostate cancer with it, just NOT where it has metastasized to the bone.
    I just wanted to say thanks to everyone for all of the info and ideas. Panda, thank you so much! sound like you know from first hand experience. I cannot believe some of the decisions they are allowed to make about other people's lives and family members!

    • ANSWER:
      My son has a very rare abdmoninal sarcoma that does not follow any known protocol. Because of this he is frequently denied benefits including a treatment we feel may have saved his life. What we did, and what you need to do is file for an appeal. Continuously.

      Even though my son was a stage IV with no known 'cure' available, the insurance company would deny the benefit based on being 'medically unnecessary'. At first we were just too horrified not to react emotionally, but we soon learned that if we talked calmly to enough people that eventually they would approve the benefit based on 'compassionate need'. We did need to go through two appeals for one denial. One thing you need to do is ask specifically for an expert in your fathers type of cancer to review the treatment plan. We asked that our insurance company provide us with the reviewers name and credentials too. Once we had someone review the case who understood what we were up against his benefits were paid.

      Another option is to contact your states insurance bureau to register a complaint. And, you should also put a call into your local and state representatives (the last thing they want is bad publicity).

      Turn to a lawyer only as a last resort. It is best to just try and reason with the insurance people first. You might also check to see if your father can have a 'case worker' help you manage his insurance (the company provides a case worker who can help guide you through some of the process - although they can't determine benefits).

      Don't give up. Keep after the insurance company, especially if you feel they should cover this expense. Get your fathers medical team to back you on this, have them write or talk to your Dads insurance provider.

      It's a lot of work sometimes and we're still at it. It helps to keep a notebook and write everything down too, any correspondence, who you talk to, and the dates. I keep a huge notebook and keep all insurance and billings in plastic sleeves arranged by date. Works really well.

      Good luck. I know what its like, just keep cool and go after what you deserve.

  39. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between liver cancer and liver tumors?
    Is liver cancer the same as a liver tumors? And if so, is there any way to get rid of it without using needles?

    • ANSWER:
      Some growths or tumours are non cancerous and are called benign because they will not spread to other parts of the body and they are not fatal on the whole. A cancerous growth often needs to be removed and/or treated by chemotherapy or radiotherapy to kill off any remaining cells because they tend to grow out of control and perhaps spread to other organs in the body, and may if left untreated prove fatal.

      Many cancers are treated by surgical removal followed by a course of chemotherapy and sometimes radiotherapy as well. Other cancers which are slower growing and less likely to cause too much trouble may be treated only with radiotherapy and drugs such as hormone therapy. A needle is only usually used to draw out some cells from suspect growths and lumps so that they may be examined under a microscope to see whether they are benign or cancerous. Then the doctor will decide what type of treatment is necessary. You cannot get rid of tumours by using needles.

  40. QUESTION:
    What do you guys think about taking hormone replacement therapy?
    I am asking this for my mother. Her doctor wants her to stay on hormone pills for the rest of her life, but she is worried about breast cancer, and only wants to take the lowest dose for a short amount of time (couple years). Should she stand up to her doctor? PS She is NOT in a high breast cancer risk group

    • ANSWER:
      If your mother feels uncomfortable with "traditional" hormone replacement therapy, she should ask her doctor about bio identical hormones. They are developed with products from plants. If her doctor is unfamiliar with them, she can call a compounding pharmacy and ask the pharmacist to recommend a doctor in your area. A compounding pharmacy will "tailor" your mother's hormones to suit her needs.

      A couple of words or warning about bio identical hormones. They may not be fully covered by your mother's health insurance and can be expensive. And, since they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, there is no way to know if they are actually "safer" than traditional hormone replacement therapy.

      Hormone replacement therapy is essential for women. As long as your mother has periodic examinations, and since she is not at high-risk for breast cancer, I would suggest she consider hormone replacement therapy.

  41. QUESTION:
    Harmones seem to play a part in heart disease. Estrogen seems to be good and testerone negative. My question?
    has anyone done a study to determine how hormone therapy has affected transgender people? I would like to know if estrogen shots could benefit people with heart disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Interesting question...
      We do know that estrogen has cardioprotective effects (testosterone does not specifically have negative effects on the heart, it just lacks the protective effects.)

      Among young otherwise healthy women who've had radical hysterectomies ("surgical menopause") the hormone replacement therapy (HRT) still provides the cardioprotective effects. After natural menopause, long term estrogen-only HRT is linked with gynecologic cancers. (Note: Including progesterone in HRT for post-menopausal women helps prevent the increased cancer risk.)

      As I'm sure you're aware, the transgendered population is unfortunately under-represented in scientific studies. But we can extrapolate the data above to very reasonably infer that trasgendered individuals who receive HRT also would benefit from the cardiovascular "protection" of estrogen.

      All of that said, while estrogen has cardioprotective effects it is generally not considered any kind of "treatment" for cardiovascular disease. (Not sure if that was what you were asking?) We don't take hormone treatment lightly, because the interplay/feedback mechanisms among hormones are in delicate balance. So any time you include hormone therapy in a protocol, you have to be aware of (and manage) the trickle-down effects you'll have on the multitude of systems throughout the body.

  42. QUESTION:
    What are your thoughts about Prescription Hormone replacement therapy after a full hysterectomy?
    Hi.

    I'm 29 years old, and last April i underwent a full hysterectomy. Since then, I have been on Premarin and Estratest. I have also gained roughly 30 pounds as well, and these hormone replacements seem to be the culprit. I have been (of my own choice) off them for 2 weeks now, and suffer only mild to moderate symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats etc), however, I am a little nervous that perhaps I am weening off to early? Any ideas?
    No, it was not a cancer risk, I had massive cysts that were removed over the years. After the last surgery, the pain was too great, and my tubes suffered too much damage. My ovaries were also taken over by cysts too.

    • ANSWER:
      I would say consult the advice of your gynecologist before going off of your hormone replacement. But sometimes the cons outweigh the pros of taking the hormone therapy so its really up to you to do the research on whether or not you want to go off of it. I really think 29 is young for a hysterectomy though, was it done for cancer risks?If so I would definitely go off of it.

  43. QUESTION:
    question for Physicians or anyone who knows much about hormones?
    I have read information that estrogen is key in the youthful glow of womens skin & full lips etc
    also I have read that excess of it has been linked to breast cancer
    so, how would the estrogen in contraception pills or menopausal hormone therapy have an effect?
    do they enhance the appearance of youthfulness &/or increase the risk of breast cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Interesting thing about the bc pill and cancer. It increases the risk of some cancers and lowers the risk of others. Research shows the pill increases the risk of breast and cervical cancer but it decreases the risk of ovarian and uterine cancer. Another factor that influences risk is whether the pill is a combination pill (estrogen and progesterone) There are many sites you can read up on this, here is one of thousands.

      http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=2572

  44. QUESTION:
    What do you do to prevent yourself from getting cancer?
    My mother passed away in year 2000 because of breast cancer, after 11 years of survival. Actually, in the depth of my heart, I am very much worried about the cancer that often said to be genetic. Does anyone have similar life experience with me? What do you do to stop your mind from worrying and to prevent yourself from getting cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry to hear about your mother. Do you know whether the type of breast cancer she had could be genetically passed on? Only 5– 10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors; my oncologist was able to assure me me mine wasn't. It may be that your mother's was random like mine and the majority of cases.

      If it was hereditary then you need to see your doctor about being tested for the faulty gene that is responsible, if you haven't already. Even if you have the gene, it doesn't mean you will definitely get breast cancer.

      The other known risk factors for breast cancer are:

      Getting older. This is the greatest risk factor - approximately 80% of breast cancers occur in post-menopausal women (women aged over 50 years).

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)
      .
      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      These are only risk factors though; ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors.

      As for diet etc, there is no evidence that any product or food is linked to breast cancer, but some evidence that a low fat diet may help in prevention. All the other talk on here about diet is speculation - I was a vegan who ate organic, juiced exercised, never smoked - and I got grade 3 breast cancer.

      Find out if you're at risk genetically; check your breasts regularly and try not to worry otherwise.

      Sorry again about your mum; you never really get over it do you?

  45. QUESTION:
    How do I start off my persuasive speech on breast cancer?
    Im a lot better with informative speeches...Why I cant tell you but, I am having the worst time coming up with an persuasive speech and my topics on breast cancer. How do I start off my persuasive speech on breast cancer? And what do you think my three persuasive topics should be. Please help!!!!
    The speech is for my oral communications class I am speaking to a variety of students with different majors not particulary in the health care field. Breast cancer is just a topic I choose to prepare a speech on

    • ANSWER:
      latoya,
      I gave part of this answer to a similar question some time ago and I repeat it here for you. Having presented many lectures in my time, you have to limit your ideas in accordance with the type of audience that you expect to present your speech to. Health professionals would expect a different presentation than members of the general public.

      I would make a few points on the subject - Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include+++++++etc.

      Other risks, which you can change, include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy, taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts+++++etc.

      If all you intend to include are symptoms, risk factors and treatment, then your task will be much easier than if you intended to include with the treatment, symptoms and risk factors, details of the tests, diagnosis and causes.

      If you are a health professional, you might gain some information on the format of lectures on this subject from your medical library, if you are not in the medical profession, help might be gained from the reference department in your local public library.

      I regret that it is almost impossible to advise you in this matter, mainly due to the lack of detail and the discussion that would be needed to ascertain all the facts in order to arrive at a specific answer.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  46. QUESTION:
    A friend of mine has stage 4 breast cancer and arthritis in the spine. How long does she have to live?
    She has been diagnosed with breast cancer. After all the necessary tests have been taken the doctor seems suspicious that the cancer has spread to the spine. What is the survival rate? How long does she have to live by taking the additional tests and medicine?

    • ANSWER:
      With Stage IV, even though the prognosis is terminal, there's a wide variety of survival times once a woman has been diagnosed with it. Just look at Elizabeth Edwards. She was diagnosed with Stage IV sometime around the end of 2005, and it's barely noticeable. But survival stats are worthless, because it depends on many factors, the main one being whether she tested positive or negative for hormone receptors. If she tested positive, she can be treated with anti-hormonal therapy in addition to chemo, which is a huge plus. Other factors include age and especially the type of cancer she has.

      Bones are the most common place for breast cancer metastases to land, so while the spine sounds scary, (and probably painful) it's something they'll treat until the mets are driven back. In general, bone mets are considered less serious than soft tissue mets, which most Stage IV BC patients ultimately get.

  47. QUESTION:
    How long should I wait after cancer to have a baby?
    This really sucks cause my husband and I were planning to have our next baby about now when I got diagnosed with cancer. I am currently going for chemotherapy right now. After my chemo is done, how long is it recommended that I wait?

    • ANSWER:
      Discuss this with your oncologist.

      It depends on the type of cancer, if it is hormone receptive and the type of drugs used in your chemo.

      One woman in my breast cancer support group had a small, contained tumour that was not hormone receptive, so in conjunction with her oncologist and Dr made the decision to have a baby after surgery and before starting drug therapy.

      She and her daughter are both doing well, with her daughter having celebrated her 2nd birthday!

  48. QUESTION:
    What effect do hormones have on liver cancer?
    On terminal liver cancer do hormones slow it down? shrink it? Confused!
    Hormones as in the medication kind. I think It's similar ones to Arimidex but they work a little differently.
    I'm wondering If they prolong life and if so by how much....

    • ANSWER:
      If it is a hormone dependent liver cancer eg secondaries then hormone therapy is worth a try .The cancer growth will not only slow down but it may regress.

      Good Luck.

  49. QUESTION:
    What are the strangest things you heard that can cause breast cancer?
    I 'm doing a report for health class. My topic is "strange myths about the risk of breast cancer" If you know anything that seems strange or stupid that people think can give them breast cancer, let me know. And if you know it's true or false, please send me Links if you have any. The only thing I can find is on antiperspirants, i need some more strange ideas. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There are so many, most of which are repeated here on YA regularly

      You are right, anti-perspirant and deodorant don't cause breast cancer:
      http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/healthyliving/cancercontroversies/deodorants/
      http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/bc_myths/antipersp.jsp

      Another rmyth is that blows, bumps or pinches to the breast cause it:
      http://www.netwellness.org/question.cfm/11349.htm
      http://www.swedish.org/17384.cfm

      A link between abortion and breast cancer is a myth; junk science and propaganda from the anti-choice lobby. The broad scientific consensus is that no such link exists.

      This excellent article gives the facts:
      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1374/is_2_62/ai_83794478
      also
      http://www.nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/abortion-miscarriage

      Frequently on this board there are questions about bras and breast cancer - sleeping in a bra or wearing an ill-fitting, underwired or padded bra are common myths and NOT causes of breast cancer.

      There have been recent bogus scares about water in plastic bottles - frozen, left in cars etc - causing bc; all nonsense:
      http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/medical/a/bottled-water.htm
      http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/petbottles.asp

      Someone asked on here yesterday if french fries caused breast cancer!

      I often see people saying on here that breast cancer is largely, mainly or entirely genetic. It isn't; only 5 -10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors.

      There is currently a common belief that dairy products cause breast cancer, mainly because of the book 'Your Life in Your Hands' by Jane Plant, which made the claim. There is no real scientific evidence that this is true, and in fact I offer myself as evidence that it isn't - I had been vegan for over 8 years when i was diagnosed with bc.

      In fact, if you are discussing myths about breast cancer you may want to include all claims about diet and lifestyle. There is no evidence that any food contributes to any cancer. Any claim that it does is speculation and reflects the fears and prejudices of the person making the claim. It's often less scary for someone who hasn't had cancer to 'blame the victim' - put cancer down to avoidable life style factors like diet, stress, lack of exercise etc - than it is for them to accept that cancer is a largely random disease that can strike any of us at any time.

      The causes of breast cancer aren't known; there are known risk factors, but these ARE risk factors not causes - ticking one, some or all these boxes does not mean you will get breast cancer, and many people who are diagnosed with breast cancer have none of these risk factors other than the first and/or second.

      The greatest risk factor for breast cancer is being female -over 99% of those diagnosed are women.

      The second greatest is getting older - 80% of those diagnosed are over 50.

      5-10% of breast cancer cases are due to hereditary factors.

      The other known risk factors are:

      Having children at an older age or not at all. The more children a woman has may also slightly lower her risk. Breast-feeding helps protect against the disease. The longer a woman breast feeds her children, the more she lowers her risk.

      Starting periods at a younger than average age (under 12) or having a late menopause (after 55)

      Taking the contraceptive pill or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) causes a small increase in risk. However, the risk gradually returns to normal after you stop taking them.

      Being overweight (especially after the menopause).

      Regularly drinking more than 1 unit of alcohol per day slightly increases the risk of breast cancer.

      Having a previous diagnosis of breast cancer increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.

      Thanks for the interesting question. If I remember any more myths as the day goes on, I'll add them

  50. QUESTION:
    How much longer can my dad live with Prostate Cancer?
    So my dad is in his 60's and he has prostate cancer and he has been going in for treatment. What I would like to know is if someone has prostate cancer can you live while undergoing treatment or will it kill you overtime while going in for treatment? If you have prostate cancer how long can you normally live?

    • ANSWER:
      If prostate cancer is caught early enough (which it normally is), there is a high likelihood that your father will pass away from something else. Especially if he has had treatment. Sometimes, not all that often, there is a type of prostate cancer that is hormone refractory and will not respond to radiation or the hormone therapy. This is the kind that will get out of control fairly quickly.

      If he is undergoing treatment, I assume you mean radiation therapy and/or hormone therapy? As long as he is getting treatment, has routine PSA checks and stays on top of his follow-up, he should be okay from the prostate cancer standpoint.

      Good luck to him with his treatments! Hope everything turns out okay.


cancer hormone therapy

Mtf Hormone Replacement Therapy

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Looking for an Endocrinologist for MTF hormone replacement therapy?
    Im looking for an Endocrinologist in the Dayton or Cincinnati area who deals with Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for MTF transexuals. So far my search has lead me to a lot of dead ends. Most of the people I have talked to do HRT but not for transgendered people or they do not do self pay.

    Hopefully someone will be able to help me narrow down my search.

    Thanks,
    Kyle.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you seen a gender therapist yet?

      The usual course is to see a gender therapist first. They will evaluate you and diagnose you as being transsexual. Then they will refer you to an endocrinologist. The therapist usually knows the local doctors who will prescribe HRT.

      A list of gender therapists can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html
      .

  2. QUESTION:
    How do i begin Hormone Replacement Therapy?
    I've finally decided to begin my transition (male-to-female) and i need to know how to begin, as i understand i need to begin with Hormone Replacement therapy and i wanted to know how i should go about doing that in Idaho (specifically, i live at the university of idaho at moscow). Thank you all in advance ~<3

    • ANSWER:
      Do what Tyler said and also read this guide, It will explain side effects, changes, dosages etc etc

      http://transhealth.vch.ca/resources/library/tcpdocs/consumer/hormones-MTF.pdf

      this Pdf will guide you through the processes of obtaining hormones

      http://transhealth.vch.ca/resources/library/tcpdocs/consumer/getting_hormones.pdf

  3. QUESTION:
    Does mtf hormone therapy make you infertile ?
    I want to go on male-to-female hormone replacement therapy (just to soften my face and have more of a feminine shape) - however I didnt go through with it as I heard it makes you infertile - I've come across some transgender woman who, however stop hormones for a short period and then conceive a child normally (without sperm banking) is this true ?

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Shane with one further caution: Some people don't get any facial change from hormones at all.

      So you want to "soften your face" at the risk of:

      Possibly permanent sterility

      Loss of normal male sexual function

      Shrinkage of your penis and testicles

      Difficulty getting an erection or maybe even loss of the ability to do so.

      Loss of upper body strength

      Increased risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (which can kill you)

      You must be very desperate to think this is wise.

  4. QUESTION:
    Help i need a place to do hormone replactment for me and im only 13 and im transgender?
    i am 13 and MTF trasngender and looking for hormone replacement therapy. every place i look at they all say 18 does any one know were i can get this and i live in whangarei in new zealand. Please only positive answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, we all want to be positive and supportive of your condition. But you cant always have what you want. At least not right away. As i'm sure you know at 13 your not at the age of consent and need your parents approval for treatment and you also need the doctor and therapist approval to start HRT. It doesn't seem fair but its actual a good thing in the long run and that's what we and you really want.

      Things are changing rapidly when it comes to treatment. I know at your age nothing is going to be fast enough but believe it or not, In your case, there really is tons of time to start HRT. I have heard of some countries ( Australia? ) putting younger Transkids on drugs that will stop any further physical changes until they believe you are ready to begin transitioning. Perhaps that 's a direction you can look into for a while until everything gets sorted out.

      Keep the faith, If its right for you it will happen

  5. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for an MTF transsexual to enlarge her penis?
    I'm planning on getting hormone replacement therapy and I want a nice big penis to go with my feminine appearance. If it is, how do I do it?
    I want to be a shemale porn actress.

    • ANSWER:
      Not even a funny troll.
      A real MTF transsexual woman does not want, need, desire, or use as pre-op a penis. That is for a transgender shemale type.

  6. QUESTION:
    How hard would it be for a transgendered 16 year old to find a job?
    Im not going to stop being bitched at until I find a job.

    do you have any idea how hard it would be for a 16 year old MtF transsexual to find a job? in a place like tennessee? Im pretty passable, my voice is still a little off tho.
    thank you :)

    I live as a female full time and take hormone replacement therapy, so yeah i cant go as a boy.

    • ANSWER:
      You'll never know until you try.

      There are many jobs where you don't need to talk much. I don't see why your Transsexualism even has to be an issue, but knowing you Denver, you'll find a way to make it one.

  7. QUESTION:
    How to secretly be more feminine?
    As a guy who hopes to go through Hormone Replacement Therapy (MtF),does anyone have tips on how to be more feminine?
    I want to be as feminine as I can without effectively sitting there being an obvious cross-dresser with makeup, because where I come from I'll just get mocked for that.

    So, any tips?
    I already wear shapewear tights to help me feel feminine, and I'd be willing to do anything else related to clothing provided it wasn't shockingly obvious.
    It doesn't have to be clothing related specifically, if anyone has any ideas :)

    • ANSWER:
      day to day when i cant fully dress as karen i wear nice underwear as only i know about it.i mix up my clothes and wear mens skinny jeans with a womans top but one thats not too feminine.my nails are always kept nice and i use a clear nail varnish to give them a shine but not stand out too much.i also have a messenger bag that could be a mans or a womans bag.
      hope some of this helps.

  8. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have advice on trans gender people MTF my baby's father is a transwoman?
    & I need advice on how people with experience on the subject have handled the situation. I have a 2 year old daughter and I am concerned about how she will process this in the long run. We are not together anymore as of last month. He/she is on hormone replacement therapy. Any advice would help in having difficulty accepting all of this. But I realize everyone is entitled to live there lives how they want.

    • ANSWER:
      History show us that children under 10 have no problem dealing with a parents that has transitioned. It is the ADULTS that have the problem. ADULTS have lots of learned prejudices whereas children don't.

      So don't teach your child prejudice. Teach them to love and accept everyone, including their other parent. There is nothing wrong with having two mothers.
      .

  9. QUESTION:
    Does hormones prevent my voice from breaking?
    If i take hormone replacement therapy will it prevent my voice from breaking?? I know that HRT does'nt reverse the affects of when your voice breaks, im 16 and a transwoman MtF, So if u know the answer thanks....Btw my voice is very feminime so im scared of it breaking!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Other have answered the question, but…

      HRT isn't going to happen without your parents support and consent.

      Do you have that?

      If so, see a gender therapist, if you aren't already, to be evaluated.

      After the evaluation they will refer you to an endocrinologist.

      See what I'm getting at? This stuff takes time, so get going!

      In case you need it a list of some gender therapists can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html
      .

  10. QUESTION:
    Are effects of mtf hormone replacement therapy permanent?
    I am considering getting an orchiectomy but it's just that the picture of it really creeps me out even though there is anesthesia....don't get me wrong if I could get rid of my testicles magically I would it's just the whole "cutting" part.

    Also I don't understand how hormone replacement therapy works??? There is so many things about it online.

    First of all I already look very feminine.
    But if I took female hormones for a long time would that eventually create permanent effects on me? I know this sounds weird but I wish I would not be able to get erections and masturbate....

    TO SUMMARIZE is it worth actualy having an orchiectomy or will female hormones eventually create the same effect on me as an orchiectomy would?

    • ANSWER:
      If you want full feminisation you've going to need both. Here's a little booklet which explains what the hormones do and don't do: http://transhealth.vch.ca/resources/library/tcpdocs/consumer/hormones-MTF.pdf

  11. QUESTION:
    do i go through mood swings during hormone replacement therapy?
    i am a MtF transsexual, and i am about to start my estrogen pills and testosterone blockers. will i go through mood swings as a result, either monthly, weekly, daily, ect?

    • ANSWER:
      I found that people tend to exaggerate the effects of HRT...

      I've been on it for two months and my mood is that of a typical 15 year old I guess. Its not like one second I'm rainbows and bunnies and the next second I want to kill the first person I see.

      I'm an emotional person but thats just how I've always been.

  12. QUESTION:
    How much do hormones to transition cost?
    How much do hormones to transition cost? Mtf?..... I've heard it's a long process to get them which is why people self medicate, do u get the same effects self medicating ?

    • ANSWER:
      How much does HRT cost?

      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minimize the risks of HRT. Without a doctor it is impossible to know if you're taking too much or not enough estrogen.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.
      In general they put younger people on pills.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.lauras-playground.com/forums/index.php?showforum=12

      Hope this helps.
      .

  13. QUESTION:
    How to start hormones for mtf without a therapist?
    I just want to know how can I start mtf hrt without a therapist, I live in Birmingham al and I am 22 and I dont want to wait until its to late, can anyone help me...

    • ANSWER:
      Disclaimer: hormone replacement therapy without supervision from a doctor can be extremely dangerous. You should get your levels checked regularly to make sure you are within the healthy limits, and a doctor will best know what those levels are.

      Now that I got that out of the way, I googled inhousepharmacy. They even have a section for HRT for transsexuals. It'll get to the US in about 2 weeks time. Then contact an endocrinologist and show them that you can get the drugs. They should prescribe them as per the recently released standards of care for transsexuals by WPATH.

      Please go to a doctor ASAP about this. I took a certain dosage that I thought was normal for most transsexuals, and I ended up with very high estrogen and I can't seem to get them down. Now I get morning sickness and headaches. They suck!

  14. QUESTION:
    What will female hormones do to my body?
    Since i am MtF and I am 18 I was wondering if I could get good results. I would like to know what it will do to my body exactly, like will get C cup breasts as my mum is C cup?

    • ANSWER:
      Are you seeing a gender therapist?

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Are you seeing an endocrinologist for your hormone replacement therapy? Please do not self-medicate, that's playing Russian roulette with your health.

      I would join an online forum and talk with others who are transitioning. This on specializes in young transitioners:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      In general you probably won't be as large as your Mom, even if you start at 18. Starting young is no guarantee of good results. The one term your need to remember is:

      YMMV (your mileage may vary)

      Good Luck!

      Lots of general information can be found at these sites:

      http://www.LynnConway.com

      http://www.TSRoadmap.com

  15. QUESTION:
    How can I go about starting the track for a MtF transition?
    I'm 16. This is something I've had to deal with for a long time, and I'm pretty certain about it. I'd like to go ahead and start hormones as soon as I can. What are some things I need to do? Who do I need to talk to?

    • ANSWER:
      First, you need to come out to your parents.

      Next, if you live in the US and your parents are supportive you should see a gender therapist. A list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      They will evaluate you and diagnose you as being transsexual. Then, if your parents consent, you may be referred to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

      You can find a lot of useful information at these sites:

      http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/conway.html

      http://www.TSRoadmap.com

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      Good Luck!
      .

  16. QUESTION:
    How much is MTF Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) ?
    How much would the different hormones be for a 16 year old transgender(I have parent consent)?

    • ANSWER:
      How much does HRT cost?

      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minimize the risks of HRT.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.Susans.org/forums click "transsexual talk"

      That should get you started.
      .

  17. QUESTION:
    Is the passability of a transwoman more dependent on luck or surgical skill?
    Forgive me for any lack of sensitivity I may be displaying on this question, but I've noticed some extreme variations in how "passable" MTF's are. Is this usually a result of differences in surgical skill or is it just the genetic lottery?

    • ANSWER:
      Well there are a few factors that can all be pretty important. Her skill with makeup and dressing in general and her ability to move and talk and basically act like a woman is one. Then hormone replacement therapy can play a big part and how well it serves her is basically dependent on genetics. Then there is the surgical skill, which can feminize the face/remove adams apple, construct a vagina and often make the breasts larger since a lot of transwomen aren't happy with their hormone produced breasts. THAT is very dependent on skill. Some people get really really good results from that while others just don't have access to the really skilled surgeons and so they don't get as good results, unfortunately. Overall genetics or luck is pretty important but one of the most important factor can lie in how early the woman gets to start transitioning. If she hasn't begun or finished puberty the chance of passing completely is pretty good because then she can take estrogen and doesn't have to suffer the effects of male puberty and have her shoulders get wide, and grow facial hair etc. Taking female hormones from the get go generally works a lot better before puberty.

      Anyways, the women you have noticed are probably still in the process of transitioning. The ones that can pass completely are the ones you never notice,lol.

  18. QUESTION:
    What Hormones or hormone blockers would a 15 year old MTF trandfemale take?
    hi my childs 15 and she Male to female transgender. what hormones or hormone blockers exactly would she have to take. ive been to the Dr and shes flabbergasted. we have a appointment soon with the endrocronoligist. i just want a ruff sketch of what my daughter will be put on. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      If you're in the USA the usual course is:

      1. See a gender therapist and be evaluate and diagnosed.

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      2. When the therapist believes you are ready they will write a letter of referral to an endocrinologist.

      3. The endocrinologist will evaluate your health, do lab tests, discuss options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy and see you for regular follow-ups.

      4. None of this can happen without parental support/consent.

      That's all I can say, sorry.
      .

  19. QUESTION:
    What exactly are the steps a MTF must undergo to fully transition in the united states?
    I want to know so I can start putting together a timeline and list of priorities..

    • ANSWER:
      1. see a mental health therapist to confirm your diagnosis of gid and get a referral to an md for hormone replacement therapy.
      2. see the md (or do) and begin hrt.
      3. continue hrt and counseling, seeking a referral for surgery (2 are needed).
      4. transition to full time living in the gender of choice for 1 full year.
      5.with referrals (2) from mental health professionals, find a qualified surgeon with expertise in this area.
      6. have gender reassignment surgery performed.

      also not listed above but needed are a.) legal name change, and b.) new birth certificate with proper gender and name denoted. with these you can obtain other id's needed as drivers license and marriage certificate if needed.

  20. QUESTION:
    mtf hormones at 25 what changes would i see if any?
    im a 25 mtf in the start of my transition. thinking about starting hormones. what changes would i see. am i to old to start them. and will i see any female traits develope such as my body shape and breasts.

    • ANSWER:
      You should:

      Already know

      or

      Discussed this with your doctor.

      The fact you're asking here is suspicious and seems to indicate you're planning on self-medicating. NOT a good idea. Hormones can be dangerous and even fatal and should only be taken under the direct supervision of a physician experienced with hormone replacement therapy.

      If you are for real join an online support forum:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      And talk with your gender therapist:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

  21. QUESTION:
    I am a guy who wants to become a girl by mtf, but i want to keep my penis. What do i do?
    i keep thinking in my head that i want to become a girl, but i keep having this thought of losing my penis and i dont want that to happen. is there a way so i can become a girl and act like girl, but keep my penis?

    • ANSWER:
      The first step of the sex change transition is HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy).
      HRT will make you physically female except for your private parts.

      If you want to be physically female but keep your penis, you can simply choose not to get Sexual Reassignment Surgery (which rearranges your penis into a vagina and clitoris). Many transgendered women do this, if they can't/won't get the surgery. However, post-HRT penises are limp, small, and won't hold an erection very well.

      You can also just wear women's clothing/jewelry/makeup and such instead. There are plenty of pre-op, pre-HRT transwomen who can easily pass for a biological women with the right clothing/makeup/etc.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can a Mtf pre op start taking male testosterone ?

    • ANSWER:
      Estrogen is the hormone that a pre-op and also a post-op MtF (transsexual woman) would take.

      Testosterone is the hormone that a pre-op and also a post-op FtM (transsexual man) would take.

      MtF and FtM almost always start their respective hormones replacement therapy long before they have any surgeries.

  23. QUESTION:
    How does a MTF sex change work?
    Let's keep this short: I have an 18-year-old friend who is biologically male, and has wanted to be a girl since she was in elementary school. She's talked to be about it too, and I want to help her, but I don't really know much about this material. How does a MTF sex change work? Do you first have to take hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      You asked: " Do you first have to take hormones?"

      What's the point of transition if you don't? Hormones help make your body more like it should have been. If you want to have sex reassignment surgery you MUST be on hormone replacement therapy.

      I hope you realize that transition (aka "sex change") is a long, expensive, medically monitored process that takes years. Nobody transitions overnight or via one operation. There are a million and one details to attend to. The first thing is you need to see a gender therapist:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      You can also find lots of information about gender identity, transsexualism and transition here:

      http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/conway.html

  24. QUESTION:
    What hormones, drugs etc would be prescribed to a 19 year old mtf transexual?
    What stage in the transition would they be prescribed and would they be collected from a local chemist or from the Gener id clinic.
    I havent suddenly decided to change sex btw :-) looking for some info for a book idea i have
    I just an idea of what would be prescribed and when just so it seems real to a casual reader, what would commonly be given to a young mtf who had already been through the inital stages of assesment and was now living 24/7 as a female

    • ANSWER:
      It varies. Depends on if the patient is ready, whether the therapist thinks they're ready, and the type and dose of hormone replacement therapy varies widely as well.

      There is no one-size fits all answer.

  25. QUESTION:
    MTF Transgender - I want to start on hormones, how do I start?
    I know a few steps, but I'm unclear of.

    (It's possible to start on hormones without a therapist's letter, I choose this route)

    1. Where do I meet a physician? How do I contact them?
    2. How much usually do prescribed hormones cost?
    3. How much does it cost to have me monitored? And how often do they monitor me?
    Oh yeah, and I believe I don't have health insurance, and I'm 19 and a half.

    • ANSWER:
      If you're in the USA the first step is always seeing a gender therapist. A list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Don't think you can skip this step because and endocrinologist will want a letter of referral from a gender therapist before they'll take you on as a patient.

      A gender therapist will evaluate you and diagnose you as being transsexual. Then at some point, hopefully rather quickly, they will refer you to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

      2. Costs involve with HRT depend on a number of variables:

      Method of administration (pills, patches, shots, gel, implant)
      Dosage
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Insurance or not
      Retail big box pharmacy or compounding pharmacy (injectables)

      Shop around to find the best deal. My injectable estrogen and supplies (syringes, alcohol pads, band-aids) cost about 5/year. I pay for my injectable out of pocket because it was actually MORE expensive using insurance!

      3. Again, costs vary a lot. Just seeing my endo is approximately 5. If they do lab work that adds a couple hundred dollars to the cost of the visit. Whether insurance pays or not depends on how the doctors office codes the visit. If they code it as GID/transsexualism many will refuse to pay, whereas if it's coded as a hormone imbalance or some such they will. YMMV (your mileage may vary).
      .

  26. QUESTION:
    what effects will happon if a mtf transexual tacks female hormones?
    what effects will happon if a mtf transexual tacks female hormones
    im mtf transexual can anyone tell me i want to start hormones
    im 16 and a harf
    how can i get on hormones can anyone help me

    • ANSWER:
      Without parental support and consent you cannot see a gender therapist or start hormone replacement therapy. So your first order of business is coming out to your parents and convincing them of the need to see a gender therapist. If you are successful a list of gender therapists can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Also maybe these video will help them:

      Barbara Walters 20/20 Special on Transgender Children: My Secret Self

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Utpam0IGYac

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8F9CaPyQz8&feature=related

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1W17z6KeiNY&feature=related

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSkQlWUX_eI&feature=related

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ib_yE5WILJc&feature=related

      However, if you think things could get violent or if you could be thrown out into the street, maybe not coming out would be the choice for now.

      What will hormones do? At your age pretty much the same thing it does to other girls. Things like:

      Fat redistribution to a more female pattern (hips, butt).
      Smoother, drier skin.
      Breast development.
      Better hair.
      Decrease in body hair.
      Some softening of facial features.
      Loss of some upper body strength
      Some shrinkage in the genitals.

      Mentally:

      Change in sexual response.
      Subtle change in all the senses.
      Increased emotional lability.

      And all of these things are YMMV (yor mileage may vary), everyone is different.

      What hormones won't do:

      They can't make you shorter.
      They can't change yor voice.

      If your voice has already dropped you will have to spend many hours retraining your voice. With enough effort anyone can develop a good female voice.

      Additional useful links:

      http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/conway.html

      http://www.TSRoadmap.com

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      Step #1 is coming out and seeing a gender therapist.

      Good Luck!
      .

  27. QUESTION:
    Where can a TG woman meet women for romance?
    Now I don't fully know where I am under the transgender umbrella. I'm not a cross dresser, which is a man who identifies as a man dressing like a woman, I'm not so distraught over what I was born with that it has to go, but I plan on undergoing hormone replacement therapy, getting every procedure I can to have a more feminine body, basically get the things puberty should have given me and get rid of as many things as possible that it shouldn't have given me along with making every effort for a legal name and gender marker change.

    Since I fall into that grey area where I'm not content to leave things as they are, physically or legally speaking, but couldn't care less if other parts were corrected dating becomes a bit difficult.

    In fact, in my case it seems to come down to two possibilities. Bi-curious men who want a fling because they want to know what it's like to be with a man but tell themselves "it's not gay if she looks like a woman" and bi-curious women who want to see what it's like to be with a woman who tell themselves "it's not gay if she has boy parts."

    The issue is that I want more than a fling. Straight women seem to run the gambit between not acknowledging me as a woman (thinking I'm a straight male who likes wearing women's clothing) and rejecting me because I identify as a woman. Lesbian women don't want to be with me because of what's between my legs.

    The misconception that all MtF like men and all FtM like women compounds the issue and people who would otherwise accept me as female end up saying "you can't be a woman if you don't want to get rid of what's between your legs."

    So the question is, where can a transgendered woman find women who will both accept her as a woman and not be put off by her little birth defect? Night clubs around here aren't an option because the bouncers will turn you away if they even suspect that you're trans. There are plenty of bars around here without bouncers but if they don't like what walks through the door every last customer in there will become a bouncer. The internet has turned out to be a dead end, too.
    I've tried paid sites thinking people would be more sincere since they were paying for it. They weren't, and adultfriendfinder seemed to me, during my time there, to be for flings and hook ups.
    tsdating is a trap. It's set up to draw us in but most of the men go in via findashemalelover. I've checked both sites out. The only real difference is the color scheme. Having only signed up for one site I was able to access my account from both.

    It's a trap because it's presented to us as a dating site. However, we're advertised as "shemales" to the men. Men don't go out looking to date a "shemale." They watch "shemale" porn and want to act out any fantasies it may have put in their head, which means flings and hookups.

    Any site that calls us "shemales" should be avoided. That's a term used predominantly in the pornography industry.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally you'll want to look for LGBT-friendly places, either online or offline. I'm not sure I'd go for a specifically transgender dating site because often it is just for flings. You may find that it's hard to be accepted in lesbian establishments, but you should try to put yourself out there anyway and keep trying.

      Actually, I met my girlfriend at a small comic event. Most people at the event, which involves putting on costumes/costume makeup, happened to be LGBT. So who knows, you can find someone who was not intending to find a trans lesbian partner in the first place. I'm bisexual, I can't help that, but I assure you that having been with her for a year that I completely see her as a woman and she trusts me.

      Honestly, please see both bisexuals and lesbians as viable partners because as long as they can be in a committed relationship with you and are attracted to women, you have nothing to worry about. She's not worth being with you if she doesn't accept that you're transgender. Never date a straight woman because you're not a man.

      It's okay to identify as transgender/transsexual under the trans umbrella even if you don't feel bottom dysphoria. There's no one true trans narrative. You may later or you may never, but it sounds like you are transgender/transsexual from your desire for other transitional aspects. Not having SRS won't necessarily impede your transition either. Canada for instance still allows trans women to go on HRT and change their names without getting SRS.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have a mtf transition at sixteen?
    Hi I'm almost 16 and I've known all my life that I was dif. I've always wanted to be a girl and another thing is how do I start

    • ANSWER:
      there is no rule that you must start transitioning at this age or so bt they always say the sooner the better as it is the best way for the society to accept u as ur inner self u r 16 n it is better if you start transitioning right from this very moment and sooner you start hrt (Hormone Replacement Therapy) the better results u get i started transition at 18 n HRT a mnth ago i'm 19 at present

  29. QUESTION:
    Where do I go to for MTF transition ?
    I've been sure I want to transition for a while now, but I kind of have not a single clue where to go to.
    I live in South East Texas. ( the most liberal county in all of Texas so the support has been high :D)
    I've searched online for endocrinologists in the area that deals with HRT for trans genders. (menopausal women are in good hands in this area. That's always good to know).
    I need somebody covered by my insurance too. I don't even care that I might have to drive all the way to Houston, Austin, or Dallas. Help Please? :)

    • ANSWER:
      You asked: "I kind of have not a single clue where to go to."

      The first thing you need to do is be seen and evaluated by a gender therapist; a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.com

      They will evaluate and diagnose you and then, at some point, refer you to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The therapist should know the local endocrinologists. If they don't you can find a list of some at TrueSelves.com.
      .

  30. QUESTION:
    How much does the MTF surgery cost?
    How much does it all cost usually?
    Like, top and bottom?
    Also, how different would it be in say, 2-3 years?
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      everyone is different, it depends on what you need.

      FFS (facial feminization surgery) 20-45k

      SRS (sex reassignment surgery) 10-25k

      and those cost will probably only go up in the future.

      however, there is a LOT more to transition than surgery. first there's therapy. therapy is usually continued up to and sometimes through surgery (a couple years at least). 120-150/hr for a therapist. then there's HRT (hormone replacement therapy) which cost money as well. and you need to see an endocrinologist for HRT and the lab testing, kaching. and facial hair removal via electro and/or laser (8-10k). and legal costs (anywhere from 0-2000). a wardobe. then there are things you can't put a cost on: loss of family, friends, employment and much much more.

      transition is much more complex than people realize.

  31. QUESTION:
    how do i start HRT MTF (Hormone replacement therapy for male-to-female )?
    im 20 and ive wanted to do MTF for a long time but ive always been to scared to and well didn't know how to start. i know a little bit like talking to a therapist and being on hormones for awhile and stuff like that but how do i start what kind of doctor do i need to talk to can i just talk to a regular doctor. i don't know i just need help please and thank you to all that do.

    • ANSWER:
      You're from the UK. Read Diane's answer to this question:

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Ajg2sGYZ1IyUFjJfs6s0w5Hty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20100503042254AAYiO5v&show=7#profile-info-TsGB3vtKaa

      She gives information and useful links.

  32. QUESTION:
    Why can someone not have HRT and smoke?
    I read that if you have hormone replacement therapy and a smoking habit that it can be deadly or have terrible consequences.
    What could happen to someone who has HRT and smokes? Why is it so discouraged?
    (This is not for me personally. I'm a writer, trying to write a MTF character.)

    • ANSWER:
      of all the many, many consequences of smoking...when on hrt the increase in relative oxygen to carbon dioxide numbers in the pulmonary system increase the chances of almost every negative consequence....and necessarily inhibit the effectiveness of the treatment.

      i do some writing myself and would be interested in reading your character...if you'd like to share.

      much love and hope. pj

  33. QUESTION:
    how does a mtf transition go what are the steps?
    i know the cost and it takes a long time but what really happens and for how long?

    • ANSWER:
      there is no one answer. people do it at their own pace and in a way that they feel comfortable with..

      you'll need to see a therapist well versed in gender issues.
      you'll need to, eventually, start hrt
      you'll need to gain at least some r.l.e. living full time in your target gender.
      then select a surgeon you feel comfortable with and have g.r.s.

      these are just the fundamental steps. how you do them, what pace you go at....it's all up to you and how you feel you are progressing.

      personally, i found my transition to be exhilarating....fabulous.....it's been a wonderful time for me. i've learned to express myself honestly, without fear, shame or guilt....that's basically what's happened to me. i wouldn't trade this experience for anything....it's taught me to appreciate life more, to experience true joy and happiness....it's taught me how precious is harmony, how joyful the music of my life can be.

      from day one of my transition life has gotten better each and every day....that's six and half years now...and it shows no signs of letting up.

      if you are transsexual, it's like adding color to black and white tv. it's like adding poetry to music....it's work....but it is so very precious work, loving work, joyful work. truly, a work of love.

      much love and hope. pj

  34. QUESTION:
    during mtf hrt does the fat from the stomach get distributed to the breast or thighs?
    Please explain to me what changes i can expect from male to female hormone replacement therapy in like 6 month to 2 years. If you have the time please be specific. I'm super serious about this so no bashing me. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I wish I had a dollar for everytime I've seen this question; I'd be rich!

      Sorry, but the answer for all things transition related is

      YMMV (your mileage may vary)

      Usually in the first 2-4 weeks (sometimes in only 1 week) you'll start getting sensitive nipples. This is followed by nodules forming behind the nipples. And later still actual breast development. Pain varies tremendously. I had hardly any and others had lots. Just remember every female on this planet has felt the same!

      Other things you'll notice in time:

      Loss of male sexual function

      Increased emotional libidity

      Skin softening and skin drier (get some moisturizer)

      Increased adipose (fat) layer over most of your body.

      Fat redistribution to a more female pattern

      Reduction in body hair (facial hair unaffected)

      Some loss of upper body strength

      Skin more easily damaged/bruised

      Other possible things:

      Nails become more brittle

      Loss of a bit of height (loss of muscle around spine causes disk compression)

      Feet may shrink a bit (one half shoe size)

      Pupils may changed color (it happened to me)

      Changes in taste, smell and touch

      Hair regrowth in areas previously lost (no miracles though)

      Increased facial fat may soften facial features

      Sterility

      and more.

      It's impossible to be time specific as everyone is different.

      If you're "Super serious" have you spoken with a gender therapist yet?

  35. QUESTION:
    Please help! Australian MTF Transsexual reproductive options?
    I understand once I go on (HRT) Hormone replacement therapy that I will become sterile. I have always wanted kids, so what are the options for me to store my sperm in Australia and get it back once I have found a woman to have children with?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not from Australia, but I'll be darned if I let that other person be your only answer!

      I would try talking to someone here:

      http://www.gendercentre.org.au/

      If they can't answer you they can probably suggest someone who can.

  36. QUESTION:
    What are all the surgeries in a sex change?
    I think I'm under the Thailand section, which is good because I heard you guys know what your doing.
    So what hospital would you recommend? This is MTF.
    What are all of the surgeries needed? And if you could put the price after it in USD, it would be greatly appreciated. So here's the question again, what are all the surgeries in a sex change?

    • ANSWER:
      This is not the Thailand section.

      You asked: "What are all the surgeries in a sex change?"

      Depends on what you need. Some people don't get any surgery and others get multiple ones. However, transition (aka "sex change") always starts by seeing a gender therapist; a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      They will evaluate you and diagnose you and then assist you during your transition. Gender therapists in the USA usually run 0-150/hr.

      Next, they are a million and one details involved with transition besides surgery. Like coming out to your family, friends and employer. Facial hair removal is another must and that should be started ASAP because it takes a long time to finish (and gets expensive). You will need to build a new wardrobe. At some point your therapist will refer you to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and that costs money. When you're ready to start living full-time in your identified gender you need to do a legal name change. That can be expensive and times consuming as well. Then after living full-time for at least a year your therapist may recommend you for bottom surgery. You will also need a second therapist to also sign off on that recommendation as well. Depending on where you go bottom surgery can run anywhere from 10k-26k.

      You can lots more general information at these sites:

      http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/conway.html

      http://www.TSRoadmap.com
      .

  37. QUESTION:
    what can i expect to happen when i start hormones?
    hi guys and gals i was just wondering if anyone knows of the short term and long term effects of taking mtf hrt(hormone replacement therapy) thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      from what i have heard you should expect your voice to start softening up and lose the gruffness to it it might go a bit higher pitched, you should start developing breasts, and your waist may start pulling in to create a softer line, you may find yourself getting more emotional an weepy as the female hormones take a hold, it will be like going through puberty but from a females point of view, the only difference is you won't get periods ( you lucky thing) i am not sure if you will be more prone to osteoporosis as you get older, the best thing you can do is talk to your doctor and they will explain it all so much better than we can, i only know what i have seen on the television ( i find the documentaries on sex change really interesting) and i am not an expert, good luck with the whole process, i hope it all works out for you, i also hope that you find the peace in life you are looking for,

  38. QUESTION:
    Can Someone Please Give Me The Proper Definition Of 'Hormone Replacement Therapy'?
    I could never grasp it.

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is used by people who have low or declining rates of hormones that they need in their bodies. It is also used by FTM and MTF trans people to achieve the look and characteristics that they want to portray themselves as. HRT is called hormone replacement therapy because the hormones are not produced naturally, but are taken in some form such as pills, gels, injections, and more.

  39. QUESTION:
    Could Birth control pills replace MtF hormone replacement therapy?
    im not trying to replace HRT but my Psychologist wont give me HRT for another 3 months so i was wondering if i could get a head start
    im 17 for the record

    • ANSWER:
      No. There isn't enough estrogen in birth control pills to do anything, and without a hormone blocker, estrogen alone isn't enough anyway. Some birth control pills don't even contain estrogen, they are just progesterone.

      You are young. Three more months isn't going to make any difference, and besides, you have to wait three months according to the WPATH Standards of Care, which I assume your therapist is following. If you eventually intend to seek SRS, you must follow these rules anyway, so be patient.

      I know all too well the impatience you're feeling, but don't worry... it's all going to happen soon enough, and you will be amazed once it does. Something this important is worth doing right. I would've given almost anything to have Transitioned at your age.

  40. QUESTION:
    Mtf transsexual after orchiectomy? Will I need female hormones?
    My doctor has not yet checked my estrogen and testosterone levels but I am really feminine I tried telling people I'm straight as an experiment in the past they would just laugh.

    So I heard an orchie can result in osteoporosis but if I already have high estrogen levels is it possible that I might not even need to get replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      yes you will need estrogen, you will not have high enough levels of estrogen to keep you up, plus you will have osteoporosis

  41. QUESTION:
    is there any doctors in evansville that do hormone replacement therapy for mtf transition?
    i beeen trying my ever lil heart out trying to find a dr. near me only one i can find is indy and thats 4hrs from me and i cant get anyone willing to drive that far for me:(

    • ANSWER:
      i don't know anyone in evansville, but i'm sure there are. just start calling offices and asking.

      if you have no luck there i know of a couple in bloomington i can put you in touch with....it's a little closer than indy.

      email me...pennyjane4@yahoo.com

      much love and hope. pj

  42. QUESTION:
    Where can I find advice on transitioning (MtF)?
    I've decided that the key to my transgender feeling are that I am a transsexual and I've decided to pursue transition I'm hoping to start therapy very soon and hopefully hormone replacement therapy sometime in the summer. However I have loads of questions. Usually I post my questions on a forum for tg people based in the UK, but sometimes, their answers only pertain to situations in the UK and not the US, so I'm hoping to find a good forum with other transsexual women who can answer my questions. Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.lauras-playground.com/

      Also try the links on Clone's profile:
      http://answers.yahoo.com/activity?show=65QqZBnjaa

  43. QUESTION:
    If I wanted to become a woman when I get older how would it work. I'm 14 mtf transexual?
    I want to know how female I would look and sound. Also how I would feel

    • ANSWER:
      Nobody "becomes" female.

      If you're a transsexual woman you were born female where it counts: the brain.

      To answer your question: It varies widely; a lot depends on how masculinized your body becomes before transition. And everyone is capable of retraining their voice (unaffected by hormone replacement therapy).

      The first step of transition is always seeing a gender therapist; a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html
      .

  44. QUESTION:
    How do I get hormones for MtF HRT.?
    Also how much would it cost and how long would it take.

    • ANSWER:
      Step number one is seeing a gender therapist. A list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      After an evaluation and being diagnosed as being transsexual you will at some point be referred to an endocrinologist for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

      Cost of hormones varies a lot. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.Susans.org/forums click "transsexual talk"

  45. QUESTION:
    Survey: Would you date a MTF transsexual?
    MTF (Male-to-Female) transsexuals are people who were born biologically male but have or will become female by undergoing procedures such as gender reassignment surgery, breast augmentation, laser hair removal, and hormone replacement therapy.

    Would you ever consider dating one of these individuals?

    Please include your gender and sexual orientation, as well as yes/no/maybe.

    For Example: "Male - Straight - Yes"

    Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Female - Straight - No I wouldn't, I am not a lesbian.

  46. QUESTION:
    MtF is it dangerous to do excercise geared more towards post op MtF transsexuals if i'm pre-everything?
    I found these exercises that are mostly for post op mtf transsexuals who want to feminize their body and well i'm 15, and pre-everything and i've been doing these exercises for quite some time now and I myself feel as though they're actually helping cause it appears as though i'm starting to get the hourglass shape that I want but i've heard that since I haven't taken hormones yet and i'm pre everything that I should REALLY be careful or something like that, so i'm wondering if its true? .-.

    (I asked this earlier but only got 1 answer and it wasn't all I needed to know so thats why i'm re asking XD)

    • ANSWER:
      Testosterone bulks up mussel, keep that in mind, hrt will cause mussel loss to a more female level without strength training. I don’t think this matters too much unless you get into body building, it all depends on what you want now and then.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hormone_replacement_therapy_(male-to-female)#Metabolic

      only got 1 answer Yeah but you know that was the best answer LOL

  47. QUESTION:
    what is the minimum age for hormone replacement therapy?
    if a 13 year old guy feels that he is a female trapped in man's body, and he wants to start transtion, how old he has to be before doctors would agree to put him on estrogen hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      There isn't any standard rule. It used to be you had to be 18 before doctors would consider treating you because they feared lawsuits, and many doctors are still that way, but not all.

      To get hormonal therapy in general, normally a therapist evaluates the person, certifies that they're trans and mentally stable enough to deal with the social stress of transition (or that the stress of *not* transitioning outweighs it), and writes them a letter saying so. Take this letter to an endochrinologist (hormone doctor) and they write the actual perscription. A growing number of therapists and doctors will now provide treatment to people under 18.

      The big thing though, is that a minor needs parental support to legally go on hormonal therapy. But if a 13 year old trans kid has supportive parents, they can find therapists and doctors willing to help them, especially if they live in/near a large city.

      Besides estrogen therapy, for prepubescent minors there's also the option of just going on anti-androgens (for mtf kids) or anti-estrogens (for ftm kids). These temporarily halts puberty before much damage is done, and buys time.

  48. QUESTION:
    transsexuals and blood donations?
    i am a MtF transsexual, i have never had sex with anyone of any sex. but i am going through hormone replacement therapy. i do not have any blood conditions. will i be able to sell blood to blood shelters? or will they refuse me because i am a transsexual?

    • ANSWER:
      i donated blood regularly at red cross blood drives during even the times when i was on a full regimen of spiro and estradiol. i listed these meds and nothing was ever said, so i assume they aren't harmful to the blood.

      i think you might be talking about blood plama donations, which is slightly different, but if you call the plasma center they can tell you if the meds might interfere with the process. the fact that you are transsexual should have no bearing at all.

      hope it works out for you....a little xtra cash during this time can really help!

      much love and hope. pj

  49. QUESTION:
    How long does a MtF transition last?
    like how long would it take until its complete?

    How long would I have to be on hormones?
    Thanks, I just wanted to make sure.

    • ANSWER:
      I think you know these answers already.

      1. It takes as long as it takes. Due to limited resources some people are never able to fully transition. Typically, for those of us who do have the resources, it takes 3-5 years. My transition took 4.5 years.

      2. You are on hormones for life. After SRS your body will produce almost no hormones and thus hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is vital to ward off osteoporosis and many other conditions. Your body needs hormones in sufficient quantities to maintain homeostasis.

  50. QUESTION:
    How much does change sex mtf cost?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on what you mean by "sex change".

      If you're simply talking about "the surgery", it can be had for anywhere between 10k-25k.

      However, the operation is but the final physical step of the process we call TRANSITION.

      Transition also includes:

      Therapy (dozens of sessions)
      A new wardrobe
      Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
      Elimination of facial hair (laser and/or electrolysis)
      Possibly laser for body hair
      Legal costs
      And more.

      Those costs add up to many more thousands of dollars.

      And then there are possible indirect costs:

      Loss of family
      Loss of marriage
      Loss of access to children
      Loss of friends
      Not welcome in your church anymore
      Housing discrimination
      Insurance discrimination
      Job loss
      Discrimination by healthcare people
      Lack of available resources to transition

      The direct costs of my transition were approximately ,000.*

      Despite all that hundreds of thousands of people have successfully transitioned. So when someone says "it's a choice"… Why would anyone choose to go through all that if they didn't have to?

      * Costs in countries with national healthcare will be much lower.
      .


mtf hormone replacement therapy

Alternatives To Hrt

The breast enlargement pill. It seems to be somewhat of a buzz word, if not still a little taboo to talk about, since there are still so many skeptics and naysayers who refuse to believe that any pill can enlarge a person's breasts. They are the ones that say only surgery can enlarge the female (or male) breast. While this degree of skepticism is understandable, it quite simply is not true.

There are many women out there who have successfully enlarged their breasts anywhere from one half to one and two cup sizes (and even more in rare cases), by utilizing a breast enlargement pill. Take Chinese women for example. According to the American Cancer Society, China has the best breast health record worldwide. China's traditional medicine does not promote the use of mammograms or synthetic (man made) hormones such as Hormone Replacement Therapy for women lacking estrogen balance in their body as we do.

Chinese women actually have numerous methods for breast enlargement and breast beauty, and it is not such a taboo subject as it is here in the U.S. Special herbal teas help increase circulation to enhance breast firmness. Herbal patches are used as well as therapeutic breast massage, acupuncture and magnet therapy for healthy breast development and maintenance.

You can actually find several Chinese beauty shops that offer breast beautification and enlargement services such as breast stimulator machines and herbal creams and tinctures (formulas) to enhance bust size. It is clear that Chinese women are more open about desiring beautiful breasts and/or enlarging their size or enhancing their shape, but they are also much more willing and open to employ natural methods than have surgery, since traditional Chinese medicine has employed the use of herbal remedies and special natural methods of healing.

Breast enlargement pills can take two forms. One is the more common of the two, and that is the herbal breast enlargement pill. Herbal pills actually rely on phytoestrogens, or plant derived estrogens, to facilitate stimulation of the mammary glands and produce a swelling of the breast tissue. This method works for many women, but there are some guidelines to follow, and they do not always work on every person, since it depends on the person's body, metabolism, and general interaction with the phytonutrients in the pill.

The second type of breast enlargement pill is generally classified as "non herbal" in nature, and may employ a variety of methods to enlarge the breast by stimulating the gland responsible for breast development more directly, or by stimulating healthy cell regeneration. These types of pills may be animal or plant based, depending on what type you choose.

The consensus seems to be that women generally respond to the non herbal breast enlargement pills better than herbal, although some women may actually respond to a comprehensive blend of herbs better than a non-herbal preparation. Again, this really depends on the individual's body type and body chemistry, their daily diet, and a host of other lifestyle habits and biological differences.

Whatever method you choose, whether is be surgery or not, breast enlargement pills can really be an excellent surgery-free option to women desiring breast augmentation. Not only that, it can help "put some extra padding" on women who currently do have implants, to create a more natural look, feel and contour.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there an alternative to hrt for the menapause?
    Im going through the change and need help as im getting all the symptoms of the menaouse - hot flushes mood swings etc. Is there a treatment out there that works - i dont want to take hrt as there is a history of breast cancer in my family.

    Tjhanks for answering.

    • ANSWER:
      Evening primrose oil.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some alternative ways to treat menopause symptoms without using any hormone replacements?
    I really do not want to use any HRT therapy, even bio-identicals. Can you recommend a type of Dr. to see that can treat menopause symptoms without a prescription of some type?

    • ANSWER:
      I was told years ago by a dental hygenist that when hot flashes and mood swings begin to up the intake of calcium. This I have done for nearly 10 years. What a difference this has made! I breezed through menopause. It really works for me. So, I tell all women about it. With calcium, you want to be sure you are getting a 2:1 ratio of calcium to magnesium. Be sure if you are taking at least 1200 mg of calcium a day, that you get at LEAST 400 mg magnesium. The very best form of magnesium is magnesium glycinate with the Albion chealate process. Unfortunately, this is not found in every store and for sure it is not found combined in calcium supplements. I got mine on line. A good calcium supplement is better than none though. You also want to be sure you are getting enough Vit.D and Vit.D3 is the best form of that. Vit D helps the body absorb calcium as does magnesium. You can get the best VitD from the sun. 15-20 minutes a day is usually sufficient. Those who live in mid-northern states probably do not get enough sun in the winter, which means we have to supplement. Calcium is always in combination with magnesium, so one has to add a tablet of the gylcinate form of magnesium to reach the correct daily ratio. Women in this stage of life need 1500 mg of calcium, 400-700 mg of magnesium and 800-1000 units VitD3. Try this and see if you notice some changes within a week or so. If you notice some loose stools gradually add the magnesium. Many women I know also use wild yam extract cream which is a natural product women have been using for centuries without problems. Try the calcium trick first. If it doesn't work then add the cream. All one usually needs of this is 1/4 tsp once or twice a day rubbed on the thin areas of the skin. Directions where, are found on all containers of wild yam cream. Another thing I have found that works for me is a product found here: www.stemcellfacts.info I would try these first before looking for a naturopathic doctor or a holistic doctor. I do consult these doctors once in a while for other matters, but I have had no problem with menopause once I added the calcium program. When you get everything in balance, IF you should have a hot flash again, look to adding a bit more calcium for a day or two. Good luck! Let us now here how it is working for you.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are alternatives to horomone therapy after hystorectomy?
    I just underwent a complete hystorecomy. Due to illness, everything was taken, including my ovaries. I am looking for alternatives to hormone therapy because of the risks involved with this therapy, such as bloodclots and stroke. What are the alternatives available to me, besides hormone replacement therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      You should see a Homeopathic Doctor......but I know FOR A FACT that the herbal supplement combo of Soy and Black Cohash works. I work at an OBGYN office and the doc prescribes that all the time. Its why you never see many Asian women with hairy faces or excessive wrinkles after menopause - soy is a heavy part of their diet.
      Plus the progestin in Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is know to cause blood clots in some women.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is there a better alternative to alendronic acid for an osteoporosis sufferer who has came off HRT?
    The health clinic advised coming off HRT,( which was by far the most effective treatment), due to recent carcinogenic effects, however the side effects of alendronic acid, which I am now on are horrendous. I am now quite desperate and looking for an answer to this question.

    • ANSWER:
      Organic Maca is a brilliant natural alternative which osteoporosis suffers. There is some info on my therapy website.....www.natures-harvest.co.uk

  5. QUESTION:
    Can aching muscles in arms be related to side effects of HRT?
    My doctor started me on HRT, estrogen and progesterone last week. I have been on for about 7 days now, and the last 4 days, my arms having been aching with no relief with OTC pain medicaitons. Could this be related to the hormones? Should I be concerned about it or wait to see if it goes away?

    • ANSWER:
      I am surprised that your doctor is still recommending HRT when there are so many alternatives out there. You will however have to do your own research......

  6. QUESTION:
    Is there an alternative tablets to the Hormon replacement therapy.?
    My wife has partially come off the HRT tablets but she perspires quite substantially at night is there an alternative to the HRT tablet that would be helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      A naturopath recommended Remifemin (black cohosh) for my mother. It is available in pharmacies in Australia.

      Very few studies on this, but there was a short one done by Monash Uni here.

      http://womenshealth.med.monash.edu.au/documents/effect-safe-black-cohosh.pdf

  7. QUESTION:
    Birth control pills after a hysterectomy?
    I had a total hysterectomy in 2007. I've tried different HRT's but they do not work for me. My GYN recently put me in the birth control pill as an alternative to HRT. I'm on my last week of my pack (which would normally be the week you get your period). I've been feeling moody, sad, achy back, more hungry than usual, etc... Is it possible I could be PMS-ing without the P?

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    when does Premarin take effect in your system?
    I just started HRT and taking Premarin 1.25mg daily for menopause 3 days ago. Since then I haven't had any effects from it yet. When will the medicine kicks in my system? Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Please don't use premarin, it is made from the urine of pregnant horses, it is obtained in a very cruel way, there is an alternative, please ask your Doctor.

  9. QUESTION:
    Just what are the benefits of hormone replacement therapy?
    I was taking hrt but decided to stop because of the possible side effects, which include breast cancer and ovarian cancer. I don't really notice a difference since I have been off and was wondering just what are the benefits.

    • ANSWER:
      HRT is supposed to keep you having the benefits of the hormones (estradiol and progesterone) that your ovaries are not producing anymore after menopause. Those benefits include preventing bone loss, and protection against atherosclerosis, which can lead to cardiovascular problems. It can also alleviate some of the less damaging side-effects of menopause, ie hot flashes, vaginal dryness, bad skin condition, ect.

      It is true however that it can promote breast and ovarian cancers because in most cases, these cancers grow in presence of estrogens and progestagens.

      If your family has a history of BC or OC, it is a very good decision to stop taking hrt.

      However, some alternative, still experimental hrt's are being developped which use a medication called a SERM (Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator) combined to the hormone DHEA, rather than estrogen & progestagen. The SERM (a type of medication that is also used against breast cancer) has a good effect on bone & artheries while having the reverse effect on breast and uterus.

  10. QUESTION:
    How can I lower my testosterone levels without medication or surgery? Are there any ways?
    I'm a mtf transsexuaI that needs an out. I know that meds and surgery are the most effective but I'm looking for temporary alternatives until I can get on HRT.

    • ANSWER:
      Truthfully, no. Hormone levels are regulated by the pituitary gland, which always seeks to maintain homeostasis. Your genetics determine what your testosterone levels are, and they can't be reduced without introducing a chemical into the body to either block the testosterone receptors, or stop the testes from producing testosterone.

  11. QUESTION:
    Which HRT is safe for me with strong family history of cancer.?
    I am 37 and have had a hysterectomy and my ovaries removed. My dr is not sure which HRT to advise me to take. My mum had 2 different types of breast cancer and i am at moderate to high risk of developing it too. I also only have 1 functioning kidney! I only need it to prevent osteoporosis.Please can anyone with medical background help me.

    • ANSWER:
      With your history it really isn't advisable to take hrt. Since you aren't taking it for menopausal symptom relief, you would be much better served by taking one of the medicines specifically to prevent or control osteoporosis. Have you had a base line bone density test yet/ If not, your Dr. should order one now so that you can track your bone health and be sure your preventative medicines are working adequately. I am concerned that your Dr. couldn't advise you properly on HRT. i think it would be advisable for you to find a new Dr. who can more adequately speak to your health issues/concerns. If you should develop difficulty with menopausal symptoms there are alternatives to HRT that would be safer for you to take. ie; vaginal estrogen creams that don't cause systemic risks etc. Be aware that herbal menopausal replacements can carry some of the same risks to women with your health history, always check with your (new I hope) Dr. before starting any over the counter supplement. Good luck to you.

  12. QUESTION:
    Will Hormone replacement therapy make my migraines worse?
    I have been taking premique cycle for six months. I had migraines before, but only every now and then. Now I seem to have 4 or 5 a month, and it,s getting quite upsetting. Is my HRT making them worse?

    • ANSWER:
      It is quite possible. There are many causes of migraines, and hormones are one of them. That is why most initial migraine headaches appear in puberty. I strongly suggest that you discuss this with your doctor, and see if there is an alternative for you.

      Of course, I am rather wary of HRT because my mom is a breast cancer survivor and we believe her tumor was caused by HRT.

  13. QUESTION:
    What should I use to get my' jet black' hair to 'blech blonde/white'.?
    I tried using a bleach but my hair went completely ginger. Should I go to the hairdressers or is there a cheaper alternative. Also after I have bleached I am putting in a pale purple shade over the top. Any ideas of what product I should use? Should I strip it? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best. Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.
      Hair strippers are chemical treatments which are intended to strip out artificial color pigment with less risk or damage to the hair. The chemicals used are called reducing agents.
      Certain 'metal' strippers containing sodium sulphoites are sold for reducing hair dyed with metallic dyes, as these dyes react violently with tint stripper containing hydrogen peroxide-the subsequent reaction may cause so much heat that the hair gets dissolved.
      Example: So i just put Colour B4 on my hair to try and remove my black dye so my hair it's natural colour which is dark blonde. so i've just dried my hair and there's still dark patches on it. and in some places it's gone ginger. i have garnier pre lightener. should i use it? there's no way my hair could look worse than it is now lol.

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  14. QUESTION:
    Are there any pharmacies on the internet offering online consultations for Phentermine prescriptions?
    I used to purchase my Phentermine from Custom HRT, but apparently they are no longer in business, or at least not on the internet. I do NOT want a Phentermine alternative. Thanks for responding!

    • ANSWER:
      See if you took phentermine before and gained the weight back, its because you didnt continue or even exercise and didnt watch your diet after you lost the weight. I think you need to learn about diet and exercise and do it instead of taking pills.

  15. QUESTION:
    Why is it so difficult to find a tennis partner in Denmark?
    I travel frequently to many different countries and usually I can find a tennis partner, or a tennis coach as an alternative, using the internet. In Denmark I have not yet been successful in finding a tennis partner using the internet. 55 year old married male intermediate player in need of excercise in the Horsholm/Vedbaek area

    • ANSWER:
      Did you try contacting the tennis clubs?

      Hørsholm:
      http://www.hrt-tennis.dk
      (They have drop-in games and a tennis partner search site, no-one on it, though)

      I couldn't find a website for Vedbæk tennis club, but their address should be:

      Vedbæk Tennisklub, Olesti, 2950 Vedbæk.

  16. QUESTION:
    Tell me your experience with male HRT please?
    When did you start hormone replacement therapy? Any negative side effects? Would you recommend it or should guys look for alternative ways of reaching normal testosterone levels? Tell me anything and everything you want about HRT. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have a close friend who has been doing HRT for several years; his body doesn't produce sufficient testosterone so he uses prescribed testosterone gel which gives him energy, makes him alert, and increases his sexual drive. A side effect is that when applied to the chest area, the skin sometimes gets irritated and turns red. At one time, his doc overprescribed the daily dosage resulting in my friend's sexual overdrive that he was using cam/chat sites all too frequently.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  18. QUESTION:
    FEMALES!!! Is there any good herbal remedies that can help terrible hot flushes during the menopause?? ?
    Im 49 and the hot flushes have kicked in big time.how long do these generally last for?someone told me about 10 years ago to try alternative medicine because it really worked for her.please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Soy is the number one ingredient to help prevent menopausal symptoms. Japanese woman rarely suffer from hot flushes due to the high amount of soy in their diet. My mother used a product called phytolife by blackmores (containing soy phytoestrogens) and after a few months of mild symptoms, there was no more symptoms for the next three years until she no longer needed to take it. The vast majority of women will experience menopause from 2 to 10 years. Strongly recommend avoiding HRT replacement therapy due to significant health risks such as breast cancer and blood clots.

      Phytolife >>>
      http://www.blackmores.com.au/products/phytolife

      Good news for menopausal women: You can avoid hot flashes by changing your diet>>>
      http://www.naturalnews.com/019412.html

  19. QUESTION:
    Can lack of female hormones make you aggressive and angry?
    After having a radical hysterectomy 2 years ago I am angry all the time.
    Do you think the operation was the cause,as I no longer produce oestrogen.
    I cannot take HRT for other health reasons-and have tried all the usual alternative therapies.
    o o-i have reported you-in the hope others will be warned.

    • ANSWER:
      Any dramatic cut or fluctuation in hormones will most likely effect your mood. As a natural remedy, I would suggest vigorous exercise [without much heavy lifting!] and cardio to both release endorphins and any harboring aggression. Also, indulge in relaxation therapy; something as simple as spraying lavender essential oil near your pillowcase can do wonders! Personally, I suffer from panic attacks, which I find are not very different from rage. To quell them, I take the deepest breath I can, hold it for as long as I can, then slowly release it. Focusing on my breathing really takes my mind off of my fears. I hope I was of some help!

  20. QUESTION:
    Apart from HRT - does anyone know a good remedy for menopausal hot flushes?
    I am plagued with hot flushes in the evening and night and have trouble sleeping.

    • ANSWER:
      there is a lot of help for you , ask any herbalist, or see a doctor of oriental medicine or ayruvedic
      see suzannesomers.com books at any barnes and noble stores
      call a compounding pharmacy and ask them who the doctors are in your area that test and balance hormones
      feelingfff.com thehallcenter.com

      lots of trolls and anti alternatives here at this site

  21. QUESTION:
    Why is it so difficult for people to research better ways to health instead of relying on prescription drugs?
    We live in a sickness society instead of a wellness society for the most part. Deep down people know what is good for them and what isn't. Why is it easier to get prescriptions from the doctor instead of reading and researching other options. For example take Black Cohosh for hot flashes instead of HRT's. When you do your homework you will find that not all Black Cohosh products are alike and when you use a product without active ingredients the product will not do in the body what it was meant to do. Which will then turn one away from alternative treatments and they return to prescription drugs because one did not do the necessary homework. I am at the best health that I've ever been. Instead of going to the doctor's office several times a month I go maybe once or twice a year for a check-up because I've done my homework. Do you want to be free of prescription drugs ruling your life? Do you believe in hope? I know the secret to Health and Wellness. Ask me, I dare you!

    • ANSWER:
      Why? Humans have insurance.

      If there was insurance for farm animals, then farmers and ranchers would not give vitamins and supplements to their livestock. Instead, bulls would have triple bypass surgeries and gall stone surgeries.... Successful ranchers give minerals, vitamins and supplements to their animals. Look on the bag of dog food for goodness sakes.

      We're getting there though. Just like you, I too am a nutritional supplement distributor. We help people with their wellness, both physically and financially.

  22. QUESTION:
    What natural/herbal remedies can I use for hot flashes?
    I have already tried black cohash and it didn't work for me. My doctor recommend HRT but I am trying to find an alternative due to the risks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have heard that chasteberry might be another way to help with hot flashes, but I would recommend checking with a health food store as well to see what they say.

  23. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had success with Red Clover Isoflovanes helping balance hormones or regulate periods?
    have been on red clover on the advice of my gynaecologist for 6 weeks now and just had my first 28 day cycle in ten years. wondering if it's related (hoping). wondering if anyone can share success stories. HRT just made me even sicker.

    • ANSWER:
      I began the peri-menopause period about 1 year ago. My periods began coming every 2 - 3 months where before it was very regular at every 28 days. I knew when this time came that I would not even consider HRT so I began doing the research on alternative therapies.

      I found a website at www.askdr.helen.com and filled out their short questionaire that helps you to determine which hormone cream you should use. I use the Bio-Identical progesterone cream. The progesterone comes from the wild yam and is all natural. They carry one with the Red Clover and one without. I use the one without. Red Clover is used to help treat the symptoms of hot flashes which I don't get.

      The cream is very inexpensive and I only need to use 1/8 tsp. rubbed into the skin twice a day, so the jar last a long time. Within the following month of using this cream I had a period and am now regulated to having them every month. Also, the cream is only used on days 12-26 counting the first day of your period as day one.

      Dr. Helen Pensanti is located out of Newport Beach, California and has worked for years developing her products. I did notice that I began to have very heavy periods when using the cream. I emailed Dr. Pensanti and she wrote back telling me to only use 1/8 tsp. of the cream 2x/day. Once I cut back I have had no further problems. I was very pleased to know that I could email questions and actually get answers.

      I'm always happy to hear when others use alternatives to HRT.
      I personally don't wish to risk my health as I have a 7 year old son I need to be around for a long, long time. Yep, I was 39 years old when I had him!

      I'm sure the Red Clover is helping. You might want to check out the website I listed above and read through Dr. Pensanti's site. It's quite informative.

  24. QUESTION:
    Has anyone heard of thyrosol and the use for hair thinning in young women?
    Went to a Home show in Michigan, and talked with a alternative medicine woman who spoke of thyrosol and her practice in Michigan. She showed an example how daily vitamins didn't break down in our system, and the difference with a more natural alternative medicine.

    • ANSWER:
      yes i have heard of it my hair is starting to get thin but mine is gone that way due to hrt treatrment

  25. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  26. QUESTION:
    How does one deal with the night sweats due to menopause?
    I refuse to go on hormone therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Alice, until now they found no real alternative to HRT.
      I read that Yoga decreases the frequency of hot flashes for many women and also that ispflavone (soy) is helping. But
      to entirely get rid of hot flashes I am afraid its just the HRT (I am suing it for many years, couldn't stand the hot flashes night and day).

  27. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of alternatives to HRT?
    My mum is going through the menopause but HRT makes her ill, she's been trying to struggle through it without help but its got to the point where she can't take it any longer. Does anyone know of an alternative?

    • ANSWER:
      YES
      I SEE A DOCTOR OF NATURAL HEALING
      hrt made me very ill
      and at times disfunctional
      my doctor is in phoenix and connecticut
      but she would be required to do a saliva test
      that gives a more accurate level for her hormonal level
      the urinanalysis does not give enough
      also her thyroid needs to be checked too
      you didn't say her age group either
      and that makes a big difference
      I don't know what part of the world you are in
      but don't settle for regular medicine as it won't help her

  28. QUESTION:
    i have trichotillophagia, what things can i do at home to prevent, slow it down or stop it?
    home remedies? don't want to buy anything. my councillor knows i have trichotillomania but doesn't know i ingest it. im planning to tell her after the holiday but that's a week away and im scared i'll ingest too much of my hair DURING the holiday, so any help?

    • ANSWER:
      pujj Kuch,
      There are no home remedies for trichotillomania or trichotillophagia, its requires mind management and will power. It is difficult to suppress the urge to pull and/or eat. You can choose to get involved in crafts to keep you busy. Style your hair in a ponytail, or shorten the length of your hair. Involve your family to make you aware of your pulling and eating actions. Usually, the patient with trichotillomania/ trichotillophagia does not present for treatment until, on average, two years after the hair pulling or eating has begun. Traditional treatment for trichotillomania/ trichotillophagia involves psychological or behavioural therapy, or medication. Behaviour modification, especially with children, helps the child to increase his or her awareness of the hair pulling or eating. Behavioural therapy may be as simple as acknowledging the problem and instituting a plan for desensitization of the behaviour. Habit reversal training (HRT), a cognitive behavioural therapy, has been successfully used in the treatment of trichotillomania/trichotillophagia. Under HRT treatment the patient acquires increased awareness of his or her actions and learns alternative behaviour to the hair pulling or eating. HRT has been employed in group therapy. Addressing the behaviour of trichotillomania/ trichotillophagia in a group setting is helpful so the patients realize that they are not the only ones with this problem. This experience also improves social interaction, as isolation is common among patients with trichotillomania/ trichotillophagia. Medication to correct biochemical imbalances in the brain is a common component of trichotillomania/ trichotillophagia treatment. But since drug trials in children and adolescents have been limited, behavioural therapy is often instituted alone first, prior to using medication. But for some with trichotillomania/trichotillophagia, behavioural therapy is more successful when drug therapy helps reduce the urge to pull or eat hair etc. For these individuals, relapses are more frequent when pharmacotherapy is reduced or discontinued. There are no drugs which specifically treat trichotillomania/trichotillophagia. The drugs used to treat this disorder have been developed for treatment of other psychiatric problems. The drug which has been the most successful in treatment of trichotillomania/trichotillophagia is clomipramine (Anafranil), a tricyclic antidepressant. Since it is hypothesized that serotonin activity is abnormal in trichotillomania/trichotillophagia, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly given to improve symptoms.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  29. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to use a BIRTH CONTROL PATCH prior to losing virginity?
    Hi, I am a 22 year old virgin who's planning to lose it to my boyfriend soon. Do you think it's a smart move to start on the patch already before actually doing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  30. QUESTION:
    Which natural product is working for hot flashes?
    I lost my left ovary to cancer couple of years ago. I wake up so often during the night and it's hard to go back to sleep again. I am against prescription drug which doctor would give me.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      There is two ways to go in the treatment of hot flushes. Allopathic or Naturopathic.

      As hot flashes are the main symptom of menopause, the favorite treatment by your treating doctor will be the Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). On the other hand, the use of herbs for hot flashes is more of alternative way. The basic are herbs such as the Licorice root, Panax ginseng, Black Cohosh and Wild yams. In lite cases, one can experiment with the combination of those.

      If the case of your problem is more deeply seated, then the use of special mixes is the right way to go.

      Out of those, the best ones (in my opinion) are: Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma Longifolia), Kacip Fatimah (Labisia Pothoina) and Akar Serapat (Paramignya Polyne) mix.

      Or...
      Shu Di Huang, the steamed and dried form of Sheng Di Huang which does tonify the blood with hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, pale complexion, palpitations, nocturnal emissions, insomnia, irregular menses, uterine bleeding and post partum bleeding. It also does foster Yin – kidney Yin deficiency with constant thirst, steaming bone disorder, tinnitus, premature graying.

      Or...
      Sheng Di Huang as one of herbs for hot flashes, Sheng Di Huang is mainly used to clear the heat, cool the blood and foster Yin for production of body fluid.
      Sheng Di Huang is used for high fever, constant thirst, red tongue, bleeding due to excessive heat in the blood and promote body fluids. Sheng Di Huang is used for Yin deficiency with damage of body fluids by excessive heat, symptoms such as mouth dryness, low fever, constipation, throat pain.
      Also is used for sores in mouth and tongue, irritability, insomnia and malar flush.

      One supporting factor is also the Wu Wei Zi which is mainly used as an astringent preparation to decrease perspiration, benefit kidney to calm heart and benefit Qi to produce fluid.

      Now you have the information but the footwork must be done by you.
      As each of us is an individual, we do respond differently to even the best medication in the world.

      The only way now is the trial and error. To be under the supervision of experienced Naturopath wouldn't hurt you either.

  31. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms for deficiency of estrogen?
    What is the best medicine/treat for it?

    • ANSWER:
      Sign and Symptoms of Low Estrogen Levels:

      Rapid pulse rate
      Bloating
      Fatigue that worsens during the day
      Constant fatigue, lethargy and fatigue on light exertion.
      Short-term memory failure
      Poor Memory
      Hot flashes
      Joint pain, swelling and stiffness
      Decreased Sex Drive
      Depression
      Headaches
      Osteoarthritis
      Low Back Pain
      Dry skin
      Vaginal Dryness
      Recent unexplained weight gain
      In the past, women looked to synthetic hormones to remedy the symptoms of low estrogen levels. Recent studies showing clear dangers associated with synthetic hormone replacement therapy spurred a renewed interest in HRT natural alternatives.

      There are a number of food and herb sources that provide plant-based phytoestrogen for HRT natural alternatives that can combat the cause of symptoms of low estrogen levels by naturally supplying the body with estrogen forms readily processed by the body. By addressing the effects of estrogen deficiency with HRT natural alternatives, women reduce their risks of HRT related side effects, conditions and diseases.

      Although menopause is the time of estrogen deficiency and symptoms of low estrogen levels, premenopausal women can also have estrogen deficiencies and symptoms of low estrogen levels. In either case, HRT natural alternatives are well advised.

  32. QUESTION:
    How do you stop a tic?
    I take medication for ADD and it gives me a couple tics. Every few sends I tense up my chin, or squeeze my eyes really tightly, or crunch up my nose and forehead. Im not sure if people notice it very much, but it gets really annoying and I'm kind of getting self conscious about it-any suggestions on how to stop?

    • ANSWER:
      I have loads of tics too because I have tourette's. Unfortunately, there isn't a whole lot you can do about it :/

      You could start a sport, yoga, or try habit-reversal therapy (HRT) - this is where you do the complete opposite of the tic you feel coming. So with the eye clenching, open them as wide as you can. See a specialist.

      Another alternative would be to start a new medication, but only do this if nothing else works. Don't be self conscious, they're less noticeable than you think and nobody really cares if someone has a few tics :)

  33. QUESTION:
    does any body know what to take for the menopause without resorting to pills from the doctor. Also?
    is excessive sweating whilst only doing the housework, hoovering etc part of the menopause?, i have heard people sweat at night but most days i really don't have to work hard in the home before i am dripping in sweat. please help if poss.

    • ANSWER:
      The trouble with herbal alternatives such as plant oestrogens is that no one knows what the long term implications of using them are, the studies are just not being done. It has taken more than 20 years of studies into the long term effects of conventional HRT, and doctors are even now not totally sure of how the risk benefits stack up.

      Homeopathic preparations are of course useless, since none of them have effects beyond placebo.

      Perhaps there is still an argument for conventional therapy as it can at least be said it is the devil we know.

  34. QUESTION:
    I need advice on MENOPAUSE & alternative to HRT?
    Complete hysterectomy, some hot flashes (mild at the moment) especially on my upper arms. Dr suggested a mild HRT. He thinks I am stupid for hesitating HRT. Are there any alternatives which do not thin your blood?

    • ANSWER:
      I just weathered my way through the menopause, as did my friend after her hysterectomy.

      My neighbour swore by black cohosh!

      Be guided by how you feel as far as accepting HRT or not.

  35. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  36. QUESTION:
    What can I do to lower my testosterone?

    Yes I'm Transgendered. Transsexuals are fully post op and had their sex changed. I'm not gonna have operation. I still want to talk to a gender therapist about things before even messing around with my body.

    • ANSWER:
      Antiandrogen drugs act as an antagonist for testosterone, preventing it's effects on the body (some drugs for male pattern baldness do this). However, they also have side effects such as reduced sex drive and swollen breasts.

      Why do you want to reduce testosterone? Are you transsexual and looking to undergo reassignment surgery? If that's the case, you should speak to a gender therapist before doing anything yourself.

      Are you having trouble handling your sex drive? Or is it something else, like body hair? There are definitely alternatives to whatever you believe testosterone is doing to you.

      Edit: I see. Have you visited Laura's Playground? The site is a very useful source of information for transgendered and transsexual members of the LGBT community. Here is a page on their site with gender therapists you can check: http://www.lauras-playground.com/gender_therapists.htm

      Your gender therapist will recommend HRT, where you will take the above-mentioned anti-androgens as well as estrogen pills. Here is more info: http://wiki.susans.org/index.php/Hormone_replacement_therapy_%28male-to-female%29

  37. QUESTION:
    why can't women be given estrogen and progesteron to prevent menopause?
    is it possible to give women suffering from menopause estrogen and progesteron in order to stop bad effects of menopause on them?
    if so,then why there'r still women suffering from it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can take to prevent menopause. Hormones are given to women to ease the symptoms they are having while they go through menopause. Many women choose HRT or alternative treatments to stop all of the side effects. You don't have to suffer because there is lots of things that you can do to ease the side effects.

  38. QUESTION:
    If a transsexual isn't allowed to do the transition because of an illness, then what will happen?

    for example a heart disease which a transsexual can't use hormones and go with surgeries because of that.

    • ANSWER:
      It does happen. I've seen it happen twice with transwomen who abused hormones and ended up with liver damage. That prevented them from either hormone therapy or surgery. In both cases, they lived as women without the benefits of HRT or surgery. Not an ideal situation, but better than the alternative.

  39. QUESTION:
    Had total hysterectomy. Looking for advice re menopause. Can anyone give me some advice?
    I have just had a total hysterectomy and am beginning to have hot flushes. I am not sure about taking HRT and I would rather try alternative therapies. It has been 6 weeks since my surgery and I am still off work. Can anyone give me advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Were you not given advice at the time? Talk to your gynaecologist about this

  40. QUESTION:
    So what can I expect during menopause?
    I just got my test results today to say I am in my menopause. I am 49. So far I've had no symptoms or discomfort. Is this a sign that I might skip all the uncomfortable side effects, or is it too soon to say? Also what kinds of supplements are best for calcium and what kinds of exercise can I motivate myself to do, as I really hate it?

    • ANSWER:
      During the perimenopausal transition, a woman's estrogen levels decrease, leading to the typical symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, problems with concentration or mood, vaginal dryness...the list goes on. Some options for relief include hormone replacement therapy (HRT), an alternative medical therapy, or herbal remedies

  41. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used black cohosh for hot flashes?
    I would rather not take HRT and I have been reading about black cohosh for hot flashes and night sweats.Has any one used the black cohosh and how did it work for you? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      ry alternative medications in yahoo
      i been having problems also

  42. QUESTION:
    menopause..best natural alternative to hrt for sweats and tiredness please?
    been diagnosed as menopausal..well i suppose it comes to us all
    tried hrt and didn,t get on with it.caused more discomfort than cured
    what can i take for the hot sweats and tiredness..i can curl up and sleep anytime of the day and erratically at night
    prefer something "natural"..but have read about liver damage etc with some of the herbal remedies like black cashosh
    any help appreciated...thanks

    • ANSWER:
      yes its something we all have to go through?but touch wood for me so far but I do know that reflexology does help very much and swimming if you can go Evan once a week and this will help strengthen the bones and muscles?also evening primrose but our grandmothers had to grin and bear it and then there was nothing I do hope this helps you Rozy and that you feel better soon try not let it get you down take care hope your son had a good holiday and is back safe and sound.

  43. QUESTION:
    Every month Since December I have two days where I am constantly being sick. What could it be? I?
    I have also noticed my hair falling out. I have a medium sized bald patch at the back of my head. Im 27. I am a veggie but apart from this I am pretty fit, I regularly exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Hormonal Imbalance in Women

      Estrogen and progesterone are the two most important female hormones. A hormonal imbalance occurs when the ratio of these two hormones deviate from their normal levels. Most commonly, estrogen is the one that tends to increase and this is known as 'estrogen dominance'. This may cause hormonal imbalance in teenage girls as well. So, what causes hormonal imbalance in young women? Hormonal imbalance in young women is caused due to the following reasons -
      •Over nutrition
      •Malnutrition
      •Erratic lifestyle
      •Early onset of menopause
      •Phytoestrogens present in food
      •Use of birth control and contraceptive pills
      •Stress and tension
      •Thyroid problems
      •Ovarian failure
      •Environmental chemicals
      In older women, hormonal imbalance is caused mainly due to menopause and can be identified on the onset of menopausal symptoms.

      Women may start experiencing hormonal imbalance when they are in their 30s or 40s.

      Symptoms and Effects of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Listed below are some of the symptoms and effects of hormonal imbalance in young women and hormone imbalance symptoms teenagers.
      •Uterine fibroids
      •Water retention/bloating
      •Irregular periods
      •PMS
      •Atherosclerosis
      •Polycystic ovary syndrome or ovarian cysts
      •Fibrocystic breasts
      •Endometriosis
      •Night sweats
      •Vaginal dryness
      •Diminished sex drive
      •Mood swings
      •Irritability
      •Cyclical migraine headaches
      •Obesity or sudden weight gain
      •Chronic fatigue syndrome
      •Premenstrual asthma
      •Hormonal headache
      •Hair loss
      •Short-term memory loss
      •Lack of concentration
      Identifying Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      Apart from the above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in young women, an accurate way to diagnose hormonal imbalance is a basic blood test. You should look for follicle stimulating hormone levels, estradiol, thyroxine and thyrotropin levels in the blood test reports.

      Treatment of Hormonal Imbalance in Young Women

      It is possible to treat hormonal imbalance and the associated disorders of hormonal imbalance in young women. Treatment needs to be administered, depending upon the cause of hormonal imbalance. The cause needs to be treated along with the hormonal imbalance. Hormonal imbalance caused due to thyroid malfunctioning, is treated by administering a daily dose of natural or synthetic hormones. These hormones regulate the thyroid gland which then produces the appropriate levels of hormones. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is another form of treatment used to treat hormonal imbalance, caused due to ovarian failure.

      Other alternative treatments include consuming nutritional supplements, inculcating healthy lifestyle habits like, avoiding alcohol and smoking, consuming a healthy diet and incorporating exercise into the daily routine. It is also essential to maintain optimum weight levels to treat hormonal imbalance. Many lifestyle changes and going for a natural hormone imbalance treatment for teen girls or young women can help.

  44. QUESTION:
    what causes night sweats during menapause and how long will they last?
    have recently stopped having periods. been having night sweats for at least 3 years now am 45 years old when will this end?

    • ANSWER:
      Have you tried such things as changing your diet? Try to incorporate some soy, or take some soy tablets. It can take a while for your body to settle down - but I suggest trying all the possible natural alternatives you can, rather than hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

  45. QUESTION:
    What other methods can you use besides taking birth control pills since studies show the pill bc is?
    causing cancer. Or is their a bc method that is safe

    • ANSWER:
      Congrats for taking charge of your own health!

      All hormonal birth control methods have the same cancer risk as bc pills. Hormonal methods include The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. They all administer the same hormones by different delivery methods. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      NOW TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION
      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, contraceptive sponges, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin).

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html

  46. QUESTION:
    I am in my late forties, had a complete hysterectomy, so I need to take HRT...?
    Ofcourse there is so much negative about hormone replacement therapy...I am considering a "natural" HRT. Can you gals out there give me your thoughts on this?

    • ANSWER:
      It's a tough call...HRT vs. natural alternatives. There is a lot of controversy surrounding HRT in terms of heart attack, stroke and cancer associated with taking hormones. However women find that it takes care of their symptoms efficiently and quickly rather than the slower route through natural alternatives which, some women have felt little to no noticeable relief. I market natural products to Naturopathic Doctors and have worked with them quite extensively. My suggestion would be to speak with an ND (Naturopthaic Doctor), but at the same time work with your GP as well. The key is to try and find a balance between nutrition and medicine that will work with your body to help get you through this stage of life with as little discomfort as possible, but most importantly, get you through without any serious side effects. I am also in my forties, and still stuck with all the working parts, but am starting to experience the onset of that lovely phase, so I sympathize. Please look at both alternatives and find a balance...protect yourself. Good luck to you.

  47. QUESTION:
    Any remedies for peri menopause hot flashes at night? I have 3 to 4 each night and am getting really tired.?
    I am interested in natural remedies first then prescription if I have to. But I have concerns about HRT and possible side effects or risks associated with taking it.
    Also anything that others have found make them worse too I would like to hear about.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you sure it's menopause and not the night sweats associated with lymphoma? Good luck with some of these- check the last one- that might be what you're looking for.

      http://www.menopause.org/default.htm

      This link provides wicking clothing as relief:
      http://www.haralee.com/store/

      Hot-Flash Relief In a Nasal Spray?
      http://www.webmd.com/news/20000427/hot-flash-relief-in-nasal-spray

      Hot Flash Relief - An article by an MD- doesn't look too helpful: http://bellaonline.com/articles/art17482.asp

      Effexor XR- an antidepressant with hot flash relief properties.
      Paxil may help as well.

      Hot-Flash Relief- Time Magazine article:
      http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,997466,00.html

      Non-Hormone Therapies Offer Some Hot-Flash Relief
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=61331

      All About Hot Flashes
      http://www.breastcancer.org/bey_cope_meno_hotFlash.html

      Alternative Medicines for Hot Flash and Night Sweat Relief
      http://www.healthwayrx.com/womenshotflashrelief.htm

  48. QUESTION:
    I am taking Prozac for my depression and going natural (no HRT) for my menopause, is that right? wondering.?
    I am caregiver to my adult disabled daughter who lives with me still.

    • ANSWER:
      You have to make that decision for yourself. These are my expiriences with prozac for PMS. There are other alternatives, depending on what you're open to.

      Initially, no side effects. When they tried to increase the dose, I could hardly get out of bed. Over the years, I started to notice that it suppressed most all feelings and that events that happened that I should have significant feelings about... I had none (like someone dying).

      I stopped it cold turkey (bad idea) and felt fine for a month, then had a week of dizziness, lightheadedness, shaking, lethargy. After that I was fine.

      I see a homeopath for general overal health as well as my physician. Homeopathy has helped me more than anyone else ever has. Counseling has been huge for me also.

      If you are prescribed an anti depressant, please make sure you get the counseling to go along with it.

      I am a nurse and strongly believe Anti depressants are handed out too freely as a bandaid without the counseling that can actually make a difference in the long run.

      The medication will definately take the edge off your symptoms, but is not dealing with the underlying causative issue.

  49. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used a product called serenity by Wellsprings? It's an alternative to HRT in cream form.?
    I'd like to know if anyone found it good or if they had any side effects. I can't take HRT and so am looking for an alternative. My doctor just said that I couldn't take HRT because of my history of cancer and that I would have to leave things to nature eg. hot flushes, weight gain, under active thyroid, early osteoporosis, ageing more quickly etc.

    • ANSWER:
      I used something similar just to help extend my cycle. I found it very good. I suggest you give it a try, or check links, Dr Marion Gluck does 'nature identical' hormone replacement. You know that HRT is mainly oestrogen? The creams try to replace progesterone, which diminishes as eggs are no longer produced. There is a very good book available to which I will put a link.
      There was an interesting article in the Readers Digest recently about HRT which said 'you can get nature identical hormones on the NHS, oral progesterone Utrogestan and patches /creams with bio indentical oestradiol, such as Estrogel and Estradrem. Hormonin with give the three oestrogens in bio indentical form'.
      If you can ask the library for back issues of Readers Digest it was April 2009 or their website (to ask for a back issue?) is http://www.readersdigest.co.uk/magazines.php

      The last link is 'what doctors don't tell you' and if you search on progesterone cream or other things it may bring up some information.

      I know this isn't exactly answering your question, going a bit off topic, but hopefully it is useful!

  50. QUESTION:
    When does a woman generally begin the menopause? Is it necessary to involve a doctor and is it possible.......
    to go through it without having major symptoms? I'm 41 and after 30 years of regular, heavy periods, I am delighted to find they are becoming lighter and shorter. My mother suffered horrendously and had an emotional breakdown during her menopause, does that mean I'll suffer emotionally too? I've had 3 children and no longer have the urge to reproduce so don't see the menopause as a loss of femininity. How do I make the transition as smooth as possible without HRT or doctor's intervention?

    • ANSWER:
      The average age at menopause is now about 51, but there is a lot of variability.

      The effects of the menopause also varies greatly, some women just stop having periods and have no other physical or mental symptoms. Others may have several years of emotional problems, flushes and sweats.

      If you are unlucky enough to fall into the second group HRT is still the best symptomatic answer, Beta blockers and Clonidine sometimes help a bit as alternatives.


alternatives to hrt

Natural Relief For Menopause Symptoms

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can I ease my menopausal symptoms naturally?
    I have menopause symptoms and they are full blown. Its driving my crazy trying to deal with it everyday. Also I have a milk allergy which doesn't help. Can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      There are natural and herbal remedies to help deal with the symptoms of menopause.

      Here are a few other suggestions for easing the transition…

      1. Add soy to your nutritional plan.
      2. Eat a diet rich in leafy green vegetables as well as more fruits.
      3. Get adequate amounts of daily exercise including
      both cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.
      (See more under Osteoporosis prevention)
      4. Add vitamins and minerals to your daily diet. Calcium, Vitamin D
      and Magnesium aid in strengthening your bones and
      preventing Osteoporosis.

      Fore more information for natural menopause relief I suggest you visit this site.

      http://bestproducts.awardspace.com/menopauserelief.html

  2. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  3. QUESTION:
    Women: What menopause symptom remedies do you recommend?
    There is a bewildering array of herbal remedies on the shelves, and they are pretty expensive.
    Can you please tell me which ones you have tried?
    Which ones have relieved which symptoms?
    (I suffer from mood swings, depression, breast tenderness, and overheating.)
    Did you experience ill-effects from any of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Dr. John Lee is an advocate of NATURAL progesterone to treat both peri-menopause and menopause. Go to the health food store and get Life Flo Progesta Care. Here are some other brands that have the amount of progesterone recommended by Dr. Lee: http://www.johnleemd.com/store/resource_progesterone.html

      Hope this brings some relief to you. All the best

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some natural supplements and foods to help with depression?
    We are what we eat. And I think pharmaceutical fixes are not always the answer. Can anyone suggest natural remedies for combating depression and anxiety?

    • ANSWER:
      Eliminate potential food allergens – If you suspect that there is a link between food sensitivity and your state of mind, try eliminating the allergen foods from your diet to see if this brings relief. The usual suspects are dairy products, wheat (gluten), corn, preservatives, and food additives. Your doctor may also suggest tests for food sensitivities.

      Eat antioxidant rich foods, including fruits (such as blueberries, cherries, oranges and tomatoes), and vegetables (such as squash and bell peppers).

      Vitamin B6 is believed to work in the brain similar to valium-like drugs - hence its importance in your diet as food or as supplement. Mainly, women taking oral contraceptives or with premenstrual tension or going through menopause require good amount of B6.

      Many herbal and homeopathic remedies have been shown to significantly reduce the symptoms of depression without the unwanted side-effects.

      The most commonly used as natural remedies for depression are Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's Wort) which has been called “nature’s Prozac” and Passiflora which is one of nature's best natural tranquilizers.

      Many people around the world have now turned to this more natural approach of regaining the subtle balance of brain chemicals and rejuvenating the body and mind for all round natural health. Natural remedies for depression that include homeopathic remedies can also be of great benefit and are free of side effects as well.

      You may get more info here http://www.healthherbsandnutrition.com/remedies/d/depression.htm

  5. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if your mom is going through menopause?
    I don't even know if I spelled the word 'menopause' right, but how do you know if your mom is going through it? What are some signs?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom would experience hot flashes, night sweats and chills which are the common menopause symptoms. Such symptoms are extremely uncomfortable where most women definitely looking for a relief to ease the discomfort. Try an all natural health product for such condition just like Hot Flash Freedom.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the most natural thing to take to regulate hormones during the first stages of menopause?
    I have some of the early symptoms, a few hot flashes and a couple of missed periods but nothing too bad so far. I just want to find out if there is anything natural that will help balance things so that all my hard workouts and correct eating will not be counteracted by the imbalance of hormones. Thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend all natural Menopause Balance Complex. It uses compounds found in plants called phytoestrogens to ease mood swings, sleeplessness, and hot flashes associated with menopause.

      Also, Menopause Balance Complex Cooling Lotion. It's a blend of natural ingredients that offers soothing relief and can help reduce the often dramatic sensation of skin temperature fluctuations common in women in their late 30's, 40's and beyond. It's progesterone-free and may be used as often as needed without side effects.

      Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are some good natural remedies for female AND male menopause.?
    I am beginning menopause and dont really want to do the hormone replacement thing. Are there any good otc natural remedies to help with the many symptoms? also, lucky us, my husband, I believe is going through male menopause, are there any mens' otc help? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of women get relief from Remifemin which continas black cohosh.

      Can't help your husband. Are you sure he's going through menopause? Could he be going out in sympathy? A friend's husband would feel things on her behalf (no joke) and the doctor told her that it was so bad that he would likely feel the labour pains when she gave birth.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is there anything natural that stops hot flashes?
    My mom is going through menopause and is experiencing hot flashes that are really bothering her. She is too afraid to take any kind of drugs so I was wondering if there is anything natural she can do to stop the hot flashes and if there is what and where can she get it?

    • ANSWER:
      One of the best ways to reduce hot flashes and many other symptoms of menopause is regular exercise. You can also find relief from hot flashes by paying careful attention to the clothes that you wear. Avoid things that are made from wool, synthetics, or silk. Try to wear clothes made from breathable fabrics like cotton instead. To reduce night sweats, you can also use cotton sheets on your bed. If you are looking for a natural supplement to help reduce hot flushes, there are many alternatives, such as Hot Flash Freedom, to prescription drugs. Whatever natural therapy you choose, stick with it faithfully and you should see results.

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the health benefits of taking Omega 3 daily?
    Also, what amount is good to fight depression?

    • ANSWER:
      * Number 8 mentions depression *

      1. Breast cancer protection: Research shows women with a high intake of fish oil fatty acids have up to 50% less chance of getting breast cancer, which is a major concern for most women. DHA is a natural anti-inflammatory that stops cellular transformation and kills off cancer cells.

      2. Relief from menstrual cramps: Unpleasant PMS symptoms are often the result of a fatty acid imbalance. Omega 3 fish oil relieves monthly pain and cramping known as dysmenorrhea.

      3. Improved fertility: Studies show that infertility is directly related to the amount of fish oil you consume. Fish oil balances hormones, improves hormonal levels and increases blood flow to the uterus. The more Omega 3 fatty acids you get the greater your odds of conceiving.

      4. Healthy babies: Fish oil is essential to a healthy pregnancy diet, facilitating healthy placental blood flow and the efficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen between mother and baby.

      5. Preeclampsia prevention: The high blood pressure during pregnancy, which is known as preeclampsia, can be very dangerous. The omega 3 fish oil fatty acids help maintain healthy blood pressure and greatly reduce any health risks for both mother and child.

      6. Full term babies: Fish oil fatty acids also lower the danger of premature birth. This insures during pregnancy stages a baby has fully formed lungs and reaches a healthy birth weight.

      7. Baby's brain development: A child's brain is especially dependent on the fatty acids found in omega 3 fish oil. For example, DHA has been found to ensure proper brain development and to increase a child's intelligence. It also improves eyesight and the development of motor skills.

      8. Less postpartum depression: Studies show women with a higher consumption of fish oil suffer significantly less postpartum depression. This means better times for both mom and baby.

      9. Minimized menopause problems: By greatly improving hormonal balance, fish oil fatty acids can dramatically reduce menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and mood swings.

      10. Protection against osteoporosis: Having high levels of fish oil fatty acids has been shown to lower your risk of osteoporosis, which is an especially high risk for women after menopause.

      11. Reduced risk of heart disease: Heart disease kills more women prematurely than any other disease, including breast cancer. And the danger increases after menopause. Omega 3 with EPA and DPA is your best defense. Fish oil helps lower triglycerides, lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol naturally. And it's an essential part of an all around heart healthy diet.

  10. QUESTION:
    PMS and mood swings is impacting my life, is there a way out?
    Hi Girls,
    I work in a multinational bank and am an IT professional. I feel that PMS causes mood swings, listlesness and mood swings.
    At home i don't get along with my parents and often fight over petty things.
    Is there a way to reduce the pms symptoms they last till 2 weeks and vanish with onset of my periods.
    I am 32 , virgin. I did not have PMS until 2-3 years ago.
    Help me some one?

    • ANSWER:
      if it is symptoms of PMS which can be terrible, they have ruined my week before! To rid yourself from this pain At Last Naturals has as this gel natural gel made with yam roots that helps balance your system by releasing phyto-progesterone into your system.

      http://www.atlastnaturals.com/categories/PMS-%26-Peri-%7B47%7D-Menopause-Relief/

  11. QUESTION:
    Does a person with estrogen dominance have to stop drinking coffee to balance hormones?
    Does a person with estrogen dominance have to stop drinking coffee to get better?

    • ANSWER:
      During the years leading up to menopause, a woman’s hormone levels may fluctuate, resulting in hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, vaginal dryness and other common premenopausal discomforts. Symptoms of "estrogen dominance"—a term popularized by the late John R. Lee, M.D., a leading researcher and author on the subject of hormonal fluctuations—may respond well to natural remedies and lifestyle changes.

      Progesterone
      Progesterone, like estrogen, is manufactured in the body and during most of a woman’s reproductive years; her body produces both of these hormones in a balanced ratio. When estrogen levels spike, however, she may benefit from a natural source of progesterone to bring her estrogen levels under control.

      Wild yam cream, available in health food stores, is the main source of natural progesterone, replacing its synthetic counterpart, progestin, which is available only by prescription. By extracting the active ingredient, diosgenin, from wild yams, this plant-based formulation may be more readily accepted by a woman’s body. A dosage of 20 to 30 milligrams (mg) per day applied topically to the skin may offer relief of perimenopausal symptoms due to estrogen dominance. Any woman currently under a doctor’s care for her symptoms should consult her physician about starting a natural progesterone replacement regime. At higher dosages, side effects may include drowsiness, temporary water retention and yeast infection.

      Some natural supplements may assist in reducing the symptoms of estrogen dominance, including a daily dose of up to 1,000 mg of grape seed extract, up to 4 grams of taurine or a daily capsule of fish oil (derived from deep-water fish). Adding a calcium supplement may also help protect a woman’s bones.

      Diet and Lifestyle
      A healthy low-fat diet may minimize symptoms. Choose foods high in natural fiber, such as carrots, celery, and whole grain cereals and breads, while reducing or eliminating caffeine and alcohol.
      Embark on a regular exercise routine that includes at least 30 minutes of gentle aerobic exercise daily, such as brisk walking, swimming, aerobics or indoor cycling class. Clear any new exercise program with your doctor before beginning.

  12. QUESTION:
    What can I take to increase my libido?
    I am interested in increasing my libido, is there some pills for that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello loptr,

      In today's fast-moving life, there is so much to take care of. Rent, bills, installments, deadlines, etc., and if you are a woman, the responsibility of a family, children, healthy diet, everything becomes so much that you just want to get home in the evening and rest. Of course, sex is the last thing on your mind at such times. So what should you do if you want to change your situation? What can you do to enhance your libido? There are many ways in which you can gain back the lost sex drive, both natural and medicinal.

      Causes of Low Libido
      Loss of libido is a common problem in women. Almost half the women population lose interest in having sex, though they do not have problem reaching orgasm. There can be many causes for this loss, both physical and psychological. Some of them are:

      The Psychological Reasons
      There are many psychological issues like tension, stress, depression and anxiety that lead to loss of interest. Some deeper problems like sexual abuse, rape, latent same-sex attractions are also responsible. Difficult living conditions and childhood trauma are some more psychological causes for the loss of interest.

      The Physical Reasons
      The most common reason that causes loss of sexual interest is drug and alcohol abuse. Diabetes, anemia and use of tranquilizers are also responsible for it. Many women also feel lack of interest in sex after pregnancy and childbirth. Contrary to general belief, menopause does not affect the desire to have sex.

      Natural Libido Enhancers
      Though there are some pills and medicines that can be used as libido enhancers, here are the natural remedies that can be easily used and are very effective. There are many helps that can be used to enhance the sex drive.
      •Ashwagandha is a herb that increases sexual energy. It is equivalent to ginseng and is quite effective.
      •Ginkgo biloba is a vasodilator and helps to increase blood flow to the genitals by increasing the levels of nitric oxide in the blood.
      •Epimedium sagittatum which is commonly known as horny goat weed also produces same effects of sexual simulation.
      •Hops extract is an estrogen enhancer and helps alleviate vaginal dryness. It increases lubrication to the genitals and provides relief from menopause symptoms.
      •Damiana extract helps to relax the body, alleviating stress and tiredness and helps to balance the hormones in females.
      •Ginger is also helpful in keeping the heart healthy and it increases the blood flow.
      Other Remedies
      Apart from the herbs mentioned above, there are other natural ways to increase the sexual urge and desire. It is a known fact that fragrances are good turn-ons for both men and women. For women, citrus, fruity and vanilla fragrances that are subtle and enticing, work best. Other fragrances like rose, sandalwood and cucumber are good mood enhancers as well. Another good way to enhance your sex life is food. Yes, food. The most famous of all aphrodisiac foods is of course the sensuous chocolate. Women are generally not able to resist the temptation of chocolate both dark and milk. Along with it, caviar, red wine, oyster, aromatic fruits like grapes, peaches and strawberry and dry fruits like resins and grapes are all tried and time tested mood enhancers for women.

      Mood enhancers help to induce desire and increase the libido. If you can get all that without any side effects, what more do you want. Conducive atmosphere, a low stress life and peace of mind are some other factors that keep the brain fresh and body rejuvenated during love making. Females who encounter issues related to loss of libido must not rely excessively on medicines but they must include natural ways in their lifestyle to get back their normal sex drive.

      TAKE CARE! Mama Bear

  13. QUESTION:
    Any ideas on natural meopause relief for my wife? Will an herbal menopause remedy help?
    She's in her early 40's and has gradually been getting hot flashes, night sweats and as always - MOOD swings. ;)

    • ANSWER:
      An herbal menopause remedy has the ability to support estrogen balance in the body and treat a number of menopause related symptoms such as hot flashes, mood swings, and vaginal dryness.

      For natural menopause relief, See the webpages cited below for more info and where to buy:

  14. QUESTION:
    Do any female animals experience menopause?
    If so, at what age do they experience it and what are the signs of menopause in say for example a rabbit.

    If not, how can you tell that an animal is to old to conceive a baby animal.

    I am mostly wondering about rabbits but I also want to know about any animal.

    • ANSWER:
      Humans (female) are a species that experience menopause. Info follows:

      Menopause
      Menopause is quite simply the final pause of menstruation. This phase of a woman's life is part of the natural aging process. It is not a disease or a disaster. Your ovaries slowly reduce the level of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) they produce and child bearing is no longer an option. For many women this is a big relief. Generally speaking, health professionals agree that 52 is the average age when full menopause takes affect. The full age range is between 42 to 56.

      Menopause is preceded by perimenopause and followed by post menopause. All three stages come with their own telltale signs with considerable overlap from one to the other. So, unlike the beginning of your period, which seems to happen in a single moment of time, menopause is very wishy washy. Full menopause is considered to be in effect when you have not had your period for a full year.

      Menopause is not experienced by all women in the same way. Much depends on the individual's diet, lifestyle, genetics and attitudes held by the woman, her family, culture and society about aging. If you come from a world that does not respect older people, and is narrowly focused on youth, your menopause transition period may be more difficult to navigate. However, you may also experience deep personal growth and a strong sense of liberation.

      Be aware that our commercialized society will try to medicalize your symptoms. Be wise. Look for natural alternatives before getting on the pill band wagon. Weigh the risks and benefits carefully. Become your own authority.

      There is a home-use test that you can take to determine if you are perimenopausal or fully menopausal. U.S Food and Drug Administration approved kits measure Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland. FSH levels increase temporarily each month to stimulate your ovaries to produce eggs. When you enter menopause and your ovaries stop working your FSH levels also increase. The test will provide a FSH level reading so that you can determine what stage of "the Pause" you are at.

      As for rabbits, this study may interest you:

      Lack of difference among progestins on the anti-atherogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol: a rabbit study
      Peter Alexandersen1,3, Jens Haarbo1, Pieter Zandberg2, Jørgen Jespersen1, Sven O. Skouby1 and Claus Christiansen1
      1 Center for Clinical & Basic Research, Ballerup Byvej 222, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark and 2 Department of Vascular Pharmacology, N.V.Organon, Molenstraat 110, 5340 BH Oss, The Netherlands

      3 To whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: pa@ccbr.dk

      Abstract
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      BACKGROUND: Progestins in combination with estrogen are believed to have different effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different oral contraceptive formulations on the development of experimental atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity. METHODS: A total of 160 sexually mature rabbits were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to equally large groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) ethinyl estradiol (EE 70 µg/day, oral), (iii) desogestrel (DSG 525 µg/day, oral), (iv) gestodene (GSD 262.5 µg/day, oral), (v) levonorgestrel (LNG 525 µg/day, oral), (vi) EE + DSG, (vii) EE + LNG, or (viii) EE + GSD. After 31 weeks of treatment, aortic accumulation of cholesterol and vascular vasoreactivity (in vitro) were determined. RESULTS: Progestins alone did not reduce the accumulation of cholesterol. EE alone or in combination with a progestin reduced the accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (P < 0.0001). Isolated vessels from EE-treated animals relaxed significantly more to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine than did placebo (P < 0.001), whereas vessels treated with EE plus a progestin showed an intermediate response. CONCLUSION: The progestins investigated can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE.

      Key words: atherosclerosis/estrogen/progestins/rabbits/vascular reactivity

      Introduction
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The question of whether oral contraceptive (OC) formulations increase the risk of arterial events (such as myocardial infarction) in younger women remains unsolved. Several recent case–control studies have reported an increased risk of myocardial infarction in women using OC compared with non-users (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Lewis, 1998; Dunn et al., 1999; 2001; Farley et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001; Rosendaal et al., 2002), although other recent data have not confirmed this observation (Sidney et al., 1998). Recent European studies have indicated that OC use is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, in contrast to US studies that found no increased risk among OC users (Lewis 1998; Sidney et al., 1998). Only a few studies have directly compared the effect on myocardial infarction of OC formulations containing a second-generation progestin (levonorgestrel) with those containing third-generation progestins (desogestrel or gestodene) (Jick et al., 1996; Lewis et al., 1996; 1997; World Health Organization, 1997; Dunn et al., 2001; Tanis et al., 2001), but they were all designed as case–control studies; the reported relative risk in these studies varies (between 0.3 and 1.8), and the numbers are small.

      The relative preponderance in venous events (e.g. deep venous thrombosis) as compared with arterial events (e.g. myocardial infarction) in pre-menopausal women is gradually equalized as the menopause is reached, so that the relative frequency of these events is close to 1:1 in peri-menopausal women. Since OC are prescribed for millions of pre-menopausal (and peri-menopausal) women who use these formulations for many years, it would be of the utmost public health importance to establish even a small increase in the relative risk. Therefore, the issue of OC in relation to arterial disease is highly relevant. It should be borne in mind, however, that it is possible that for both OC and HRT users, there may be prothrombotic mechanisms in relation to arterial as well as venous complications that are not necessarily based on atherosclerosis, but that are reflected in the population-based studies. Primary (Rossouw et al., 2002) and secondary (Grady et al., 2002) prevention studies of HRT have failed to show cardioprotection in post-menopausal women.

      We report here the results from an experimental study in rabbits of atherosclerosis designed to investigate the effect of estrogen (ethinyl estradiol, EE) in combination with levonorgestrel (LNG), desogestrel (DSG), or gestodene (GSD) on vascular reactivity, lipoprotein metabolism, and the aortic accumulation of cholesterol.

      Materials and methods
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Study design
      A total of 160 sexually mature female rabbits of the Danish Country strain (SSC:CPH) were obtained from Statens Serum Institute, Denmark. They were individually housed at room temperature (20 ± 2°C), a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%, and with a 12 h light cycle. The study was conducted in the animal facilities at the Center for Clinical & Basic Research (CCBR), Ledoeje, Denmark. After a 2 week period of acclimatization, the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy to inhibit intrinsic production of sex hormones (Alexandersen et al., 1998). One week after surgery, the rabbits were then randomly assigned to one of the following eight treatment groups: (i) a cholesterol-rich diet (320 mg/day), either given alone (placebo), or together with (ii) EE (orally, 70 µg/day), (iii) DSG (orally, 525 µg/day), (iv) GSD (orally, 262.5 µg/day), (v) LNG (orally, 525 µg/day), (vi) EE continuously combined with DSG (doses as above) (EE + DSG), (vii) EE continuously combined with LNG (doses as above) (EE + LNG), or (viii) EE continuously combined with GSD (doses as above) (EE + GSD). We did not include a sham-operated group in this study as it was previously shown that sham operation per se in rabbits results in a mean accumulation of cholesterol that was not statistically significant from that of the non-treated control group (Haarbo et al., 1992). Hormone doses used in this study were chosen based on previous experience with these doses (the McPhail test in rabbits; EE, LNG and DSG) (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) or from in-house studies (GSD). The EE dose used was kept constant in all EE groups throughout the study period (31 weeks). We used the rabbit to evaluate the effect of sex steroids on atherogenesis because it is known to be a useful model of experimental atherosclerosis (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Sulistiyani et al., 1995).

      Key effect variables of the study comprised aortic atherosclerosis (i.e. fatty streaks and plaque formation), and vascular reactivity (primary key variables); and body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins, uterus wet weight, hepatic cholesterol content, uterine estrogen receptor content, liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count (secondary key variables).

      The study was approved and overviewed by the Experimental Animals Committee under the Danish Ministry of Justice. All procedures complied with the Danish guidelines for experimental animal studies.

      Rabbit chow
      Each rabbit was fed 100 g of chow per day throughout the entire study. The cholesterol-rich chow was prepared by first dissolving the hormone or the combination of hormones (all provided by N.V. Organon, The Netherlands) in ethanol (96%; 0.50 ml per animal per day), then mixing with maize oil (Unikem, Denmark). Another mixture was prepared by dissolving cholesterol (SIGC-8503; Bie & Berntsen A/S, Denmark) in maize oil by slow heating. The hormone solution and the cholesterol solution containing maize oil (total daily intake of maize oil was 8 ml per animal) were then mixed manually together with the pellets (Altromin 2123, Brogaarden, Denmark), as previously described (Alexandersen et al., 1998). Food consumption was monitored weekly by weighing remaining chow. All animals had free access to water.

      Blood samples
      Blood samples were taken at baseline (week 0) and in weeks 6, 14 and 30. Blood samples were collected from a lateral ear vein on fasting animals (24 h) and analysed at the CCBR laboratory (Ballerup, Denmark) immediately after collection, except for the progestin concentrations that were assessed at Organon.

      Safety variables
      Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, leukocyte count (Sysmex K-1000; Toa Medical Electronics, Inc., USA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) (Cobas Mira Plus; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., F.Hoffmann–La Roche, Switzerland) were determined in weeks 0, 6, 14 and 30.

      Serum lipids and lipoproteins
      Total serum cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured enzymatically by kinetic colorimetric methods (Cobas Mira). Ultracentrifuged lipoproteins were determined regularly throughout the study as described in detail elsewhere (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992; Alexandersen et al., 1998).

      Serum progestin concentrations
      A kinetic study was performed after 16 weeks of treatment to determine the serum concentrations of the respective progestins. Blood samples were taken before dosing, and then again 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h after dosing, but taking only two samples per animal in each group (providing 40 samples per group), to give an impression of the pharmacokinetic profile of these compounds. These hormone concentrations were determined at Organon’s laboratories.

      Desogestrel
      DSG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng DSG per ml plasma DSG and its internal standard (IS), an analogue of DSG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 325.4 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 147.2 for DSG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.1 for its IS.

      Gestodene
      GSD study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of GSD per ml plasma. GSD and its IS, an analogue of GSD, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Hypersil BDS C18 column. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 311.0 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.1 for GSD and m/z 339.10 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.20 for its IS.

      Levonorgestrel
      LNG study samples were determined according to a validated assay. The limit of quantification for this study was 1.0–200 ng of LNG per ml plasma. LNG and its IS, an analogue of LNG, were isolated from 0.1 ml of rabbit plasma by SPE with C-18 cartridges. The plasma extracts were analysed using an API 365 LC-MS-MS system. The liquid chromatograph was equipped with an analytical Luna Phenyl Hexyl column. Ion spray was applied as ionization technique, monitoring m/z 313.3 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 109.2 for LNG and m/z 339.20 (M + H) with fragment ion m/z 229.10 for its IS.

      Aortic accumulation of cholesterol
      Necropsy (week 32) was done with an i.v. injection of 1–2 ml of mebumal (pentobarbital) 20% solution. The thoracic aorta (just above the aortic valves to the level of the diaphragm) was dissected free, and the connective tissue adhering to the adventitia was then carefully removed under running saline. The aorta was cut longitudinally and the luminal surface was rinsed with saline. The vessel was fixed at the corners with pins onto a piece of paper on a corkboard. The tissue was separated in two parts (a proximal and a distal part) at the level of the first intercostal arteries. The proximal part was utilized to strip the luminal layer containing the intima and part of the media from the underlying media/adventitia. The proximal part was weighed and stored at –20°C until analysed. For analysis, the luminal layer of the aortic tissue was minced and the lipids were extracted chemically with chloroform and methanol (2:1, vol/vol) over 24 h. The lipids were separated from the proteins (Haarbo et al., 1991). The total aortic cholesterol content in the tissue specimens was measured enzymatically after the fraction containing cholesterol had been taken to dryness by heating and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of 2-propanol. The amount of protein in the aorta was measured as described by Lowry (1951). The weight of the heart was recorded.

      Morphometric analysis of aortic plaque area
      The aorta (comprising the ascendant part, the arch, and the descendant part, from the aortic valves and to the first intercostal artery) was opened longitudinally and rinsed in 50% ethanol and dyed in Sudan Red for 1 min. Each aortic tissue dyed was projected onto a horizontal surface with a projecting videocamera (JAI 2040 Protec, Japan) and videotaped under microscope (Zeiss Stemi 2000/C, Germany). The images obtained were then digitized (ImagePro Plus, USA) to determine the surface involvement of atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) and the total area occupied by the atheroma plaque (see below). Surface involvement by atherosclerosis in an animal was assessed by tracing the contours of the lumen expressed as percentage of the total aortic area. Summing the degree of surface involvement per animal and dividing by the number of animals in the group, the mean degree of surface involvement by atherosclerosis in a treatment group was calculated. Sudan Red was found not to significantly interfere with chemical determination of aortic accumulation of cholesterol (data not shown).

      Preparation of aortic rings and tension monitoring
      Isolated vascular segments (3–4 mm transverse sections) from the thoracic aorta were prepared from the newly killed rabbit (Furchgott and Zawadzki 1980). Five to ten rabbits randomly selected from each group were used. The rings were immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs’ solution and cleaned under careful protection of the endothelium. The Krebs’ solution consisted of (mmol/l): NaCl 118.0, KCl 4.7, CaCl2 2.6, MgSO4 1.2, KH2PO4 1.2, NaCHO3 24.9, and glucose 11.1. The isolated rings were mounted in the organ bath on two parallel and horizontal stainless steel wires (40 µm in diameter) inserted into the lumen of the vessel. The bath contained Krebs’ solution at 37°C, carbonized with 95%/5% of O2/CO2. One hook was fixed, and the other connected to a force transducer measuring the isometric tension of the ring (Myograph 400; JP Trading A/S, Denmark). Initially, the rings were stretched to a basal tension of 2.0 g and allowed to equilibrate for 45 min. From other experiments, it was found that a basal tension of 2.0 g developed the maximal active tension in the rings (data not shown), and the basal tension was therefore increased to 2.0 g before each experiment and allowed to equilibrate for ≥30 min. The rings were then contracted twice with a 126 mmol/l K+ Krebs’ solution, which is identical to Krebs solution, except that Na+ in the Krebs’ was exchanged with K+ on a molar basis. The experiment began with repeated contraction with phenylephrine to 40% of their maximal contraction with high dose potassium (126 mmol/l). Cumulative dose–response curves to acetylcholine were then obtained in the concentration range of 10–8 to 10–5 mol/l. The rings were washed and allowed to relax. The vessels were then stimulated with phenyleprine again to 50% of the maximal contractile response to 126 mmol/l of K+ , and dose–response curves were subsequently obtained for sodium nitroprusside (4x10–8 to 1.3x10–5 mol/l).

      Liver accumulation of cholesterol
      The amount of cholesterol accumulated during the study was determined after homogenization of a liver biopsy taken at the time of necropsy. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations were assessed after homogenization and adjusted for hepatic protein similarly as described for aortic cholesterol determinations (Haarbo et al., 1991).

      The uterus and endometrial tissue
      The bicornuate uterus was cut at the level of the vagina and beginning of the salpinges, removed and the wet weight determined. A sample of endometrial tissue was excised and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at –85°C until analysis. For analysis, the endometrial tissue was homogenized and centrifuged at 800 g. The supernatant was then further centrifuged at 105 000 g, and the obtained supernatant (cytosol) was used for determination of cytosolic estrogen-binding capacity by steroid-binding assay with dextran-coated charcoal separation (Thorpe, 1987). The estrogen-binding capacity was adjusted for the protein concentration in the cytosol (Bradford, 1976). The 800 g pellet was washed, the nuclear receptors extracted by 0.6 mol/l KCl (Thorpe et al., 1986) and the nuclear estrogen receptor content determined by an enzyme immunoassay (Abott Laboratories). The inter-assay variation of the estrogen-binding capacity and the estrogen receptor (immunoassay) and protein determination were 7, 6 and 5% respectively. All analyses were done without knowledge of the treatment group.

      Statistics
      The mean levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins during the treatment period were calculated as the area under the curve (AUC). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the primary and secondary key variables. If ANOVA indicated statistical significance, Student’s t-test was used to compare groups against the placebo group using Dunnett’s correction for multiple comparisons. The relationship between aortic accumulation of cholesterol and the averaged serum total cholesterol (and lipoprotein) level was determined by correlation analysis. Dose–response curves for acetylcholine were performed for each treatment group (n = 5–10), and ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences among groups at each concentration of acetylcholine. Linear correlation was performed between accumulation of cholesterol and vascular response to acetylcholine. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to investigate the significance of serum lipids and lipoproteins and of other non-lipid-mediated effects of the hormone treatments (independent variables) on the accumulation of cholesterol (dependent variable), and to study the degree of endothelial dysfunction (dependent variable) after correction for aortic accumulation of cholesterol and treatment (independent variables). All statistical analyses were performed with 5% as the level of significance.

      Results
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      Table I gives the baseline characteristics for the eight study groups in terms of body weight and serum lipids and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). There was no statistically significant difference among groups for any variable tested. During the study, all groups significantly increased the body weight by 20% (P < 0.05). Treatment with DSG, GSD, or LNG did not significantly affect the average TC concentration (Table II). However, treatment with EE or EE plus a progestin significantly lowered average TC concentrations. Changes in TC were paralleled by modifications in the atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-C, IDL-C, and VLDL-C) (ANOVA: P < 0.001 for all), and all hormone treatments (progestins alone or in combination with EE) significantly increased average HDL-C concentrations (ANOVA: P < 0.001).

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      Table I. Baseline characteristics

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      Table II. Mean (SEM) serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations calculated from the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC)

      Cholesterol feeding per se resulted in an extensive aortic accumulation of cholesterol (nmol/mg wet weight) and this was significantly attenuated by long-term treatment with EE (P < 0.0001) or EE plus a progestin (P 0.5}.

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      Figure 1. Individual values for the aortic accumulation of cholesterol (µmol/mg wet weight) (upper part of the figure) or the morphometric data based on the area of the aortic arch covered by plaque (lower part of the figure) in the eight groups. EE = ethinyl estradiol; DGS = desogestrel; GTD = gestodene; LNG = levonorgestrel. Rabbits treated with EE alone or in combination with a progestin (DSG, GSD or LNG) had significantly lower accumulation of cholesterol and atherosclerotic plaque than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference between the progestin groups and the placebo group. ***P < 0.0001 (analysis of variance).

      Morphometric analysis of the plaque covering the surface of the thoracic aorta revealed that there were significantly more atheromatous lesions in the placebo group than in the EE and the EE + progestin groups (P < 0.001 for all groups versus placebo) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). This still held true after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P < 0.0001).

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      Figure 2. Representative samples of the aortic arches used for morhometric determination of the area covered by atherosclerotic plaques. Upper panel shows examples from the placebo group (cholesterol feeding alone; placebo), and the ethinyl estradiol (EE) group; whereas the lower panel shows examples from each of the EE + progestin groups. There was significantly less plaque accumulated in the EE group and the EE + progestin groups compared with placebo (P < 0.0001). Numbers indicate animal identifications.

      Figure 3 shows the EC50 to acetylcholine for the various treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with EE and EE plus a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than controls. The response to two physiological doses of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) in precontracted vessels is shown (centre and bottom). Vessels treated with EE relaxed significantly more to acetylcholine than control vessels or vessels with a progestin alone (P < 0.05). Moreover, combining EE with a progestin relaxed the vessels significantly more than control vessels but to a lesser extent than with EE alone. Vasorelaxation to physiological concentrations of acetylcholine (1.0x10–7 and 3.2x10–7 mol/l) correlated significantly and inversely to aortic accumulation of cholesterol (r = –0.39 P = 0.002 and r = –0.37 P = 0.004 respectively). To study the influence of increasing accumulation of cholesterol on the endothelial dysfunction evaluated by vascular reactivity in vitro, ANCOVA was done. We found that treatment with EE significantly and independently of aortic accumulation of cholesterol restored vasorelaxation {for EE: estimate [mean (SEM)] was 49.3 (10.4)%, P = 0.0001}, whereas the other treatments with EE plus a progestin or a progestin alone [DSG, –7.7 (9.2)% (not significant); GSD, –8.5 (9.1)% (not significant); LNG, –3.2 (9.7)% (not significant); EE + DSG, 17.7 (9.4)% (P = 0.065); EE + GSD, 13.2 (10.2)% (not significant); and EE ± LNG, 17.0 (8.8)% (P = 0.058)], or accumulation of cholesterol per se [–0.1 (0.2)%] did not.

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      Figure 3. The EC50 values for acetylcholine of isolated vessels for the treatment groups (top). There was no significant difference between groups, but treatment with ethinyl estradiol (EE) alone or combined with a progestin tended to have lower EC50 values than the placebo group. Long-term treatment with EE alone or combined with a progestin relaxed precontracted vessels to two physiological doses of acetylcholine [1.0x10–7 mol/l (centre) and 3.2x10–7 mol/l (bottom) significantly more than control vessels (black bar; P < 0.0001)]. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      The uterine wet weight was significantly higher in EE-treated animals than in controls (P < 0.0001; Figure 4). Progestins had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with any of the progestins significantly increased the wet weight indicating that the progestins with the doses used were not able to completely abolish the stimulatory effect of EE on this target organ (Figure 4). The uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor (ER) concentrations were significantly lowered in the EE group (P < 0.0001) and also in each of the EE plus progestin groups (P < 0.001–0.0001) relative to the placebo group, but also the progestins alone resulted in reduced concentrations compared with controls (P < 0.001) (Table III). For the nuclear ER concentrations there was no significant differences for any of the treatment groups, but all were lower than the control group.

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      Figure 4. Uterine wet weight for the rabbits according to treatment. The wet weight was significantly higher in ethinyl estradiol (EE)-treated animals than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Progestins themselves had a neutral effect on uterine wet weight, while EE in combination with a progestin all significantly increased the wet weight (P < 0.0001). Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

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      Table III. Hepatic cholesterol content and uterine cytosolic and uterine nuclear estrogen receptor content (fmol/mg protein)

      Safety aspects in relation to the study
      Figure 5 shows that the rabbits receiving EE or EE plus a progestin had concentration peaks for the progestin between 1 and 8 h after administration, as based on the kinetic study. The differences in the area under the curve for LNG versus DSG, and EE + LNG versus EE + DSG respectively, indicate a difference in the serum concentrations of these two progestins and may, in part, reflect difference in protein binding. Nevertheless, the serum concentrations of LNG in rabbits are similar to those reported for women (Kook et al., 2002).

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      Figure 5. Mean concentrations in serum (ng/ml) of the various progestins alone or when combined with ethinyl estradiol. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

      During the last 6–8 weeks, the animals and particularly those in the EE group ceased increasing in body weight probably as a result of general health deterioration, and in the EE group a significant number of rabbits (n = 8) did not complete the study. Autopsy of these animals suggested a toxic estrogenic effect of the liver (liver cirrhosis) and of the uterus (probably deciduocarcinoma) by macroscopic examination, as previously reported as a consequence of exogenous estrogens (Janne et al., 2001). Due to decay of the internal organs the precise cause of death could not be determined in most cases. Table IV summarizes the percentage change in ALAT, haemoglobin, and white cell count. In the EE group, eight rabbits died prematurely (mostly after week 20). The temporary increase in ALAT (week 6) in the LNG, EE + DSG, EE + GSD, and EE + LNG groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment, but never fully returned to pretreatment values (Table IV). The general health of the animals in the EE group as determined by the haemoglobin, red blood cell count and haematocrit (not shown), and clinical appearance deteriorated in the last period of the study, probably as a result of a toxic effect of the EE dose used.

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      Table IV. Mean (SEM) percentage changes from baseline in liver enzyme concentration, haemoglobin, and white cell count

      Discussion
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

      The principal results of this experimental study was that EE either alone or in continuous combination with one of the progestins used, i.e. LNG, DSG or GSD, significantly inhibited the aortic accumulation of cholesterol relative to placebo (cholesterol-feeding alone), whereas treatment with progestin monotherapy had a neutral effect on atherogenesis, irrespective of the progestin used. After adjustment for lipids and lipoproteins, there still was an apparently inhibitory effect of EE on aortic accumulation of cholesterol suggesting a lipid concentration-independent mechanism of action for EE on atherogenesis. A previous study in non-human monkeys also found that animals treated with EE in combination with LNG (as a triphasic OC formulation) had significantly less iliac artery atherosclerosis than control animals (Kaplan et al., 1995). Extrapolating experimental data to the human situation should be done with caution, but only two population-based studies have been specifically designed to investigate the role of second versus third generation OC formulations on the risk of myocardial infarction (Dunn et al., 1999; Tanis et al., 2001). In the study by Dunn et al., the relative risk was found to be increased with third generation compared with second generation OC formulations [OR, 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7–4.8)], whereas in the study by Tanis et al. the relative risk was found to be decreased with third generation compared with second generation formulations [OR, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2–1.1]. In addition, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking and arterial hypertension) seems to be crucial for development of myocardial infarction in women taking OC (World Health Organization, 1997; Farley et al., 1998; Lewis, 1998; Petitti et al., 2000; Tanis et al., 2001). In fact, the WHO study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in non-smoking women with no other cardiovascular risk factors who also reported blood pressure check before starting use of combined OC. Controlled, randomized studies are therefore clearly needed, although these studies will be of a considerable size taking into account the expected low incidence of myocardial infarction in pre-menopausal women (Crook and Godsland, 1998), and consequently such trials are very expensive to perform. Therefore, until clinical data on vascular endpoints are available, experimental animal studies may provide important clues in terms of the effect of various OC formulations on atherogenesis.
      Data on the direct effect of OC formulations on the human arterial system are lacking (Kuhl, 1996). We found evidence that the OC formulations used in this study had a direct effect on the arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of precontracted aortic rings was increased in the EE plus progestin groups, although less than in the EE group alone as compared with placebo. EE’s significant effect on restoring vasorelaxation was found to be independent of the accumulation of cholesterol in the aortic wall. However, we also found that the addition of the progestins influenced the estrogen-induced vasorelaxation (Figure 3), although by an unknown mechanism of action. Recently, in a study of precontracted rabbit jugular veins, EE, LNG, DSG and GSD were reported to induce relaxations in vessels with intact endothelium (Herkert et al., 2000). However, this area warrants further investigation.

      It is well known that cholesterol-fed rabbits show alterations in their lipoprotein metabolism that differ from the human situation (Haarbo et al., 1991; 1992). Combination of EE with a progestin in this study reflected the estrogenic effect. Furthermore, the three combined treatments lowered serum lipids and the atherogenic lipoprotein levels significantly and similarly to EE monotherapy. In contrast, treatment with a progestin alone did not affect these variables differently from the controls, in accordance with earlier findings (Haarbo et al., 1992). In women, OC frequently increases serum triglycerides (Gevers Leuven et al., 1990; Kuhl et al., 1990; Leuven et al., 1990; Lobo et al., 1996; Cheung et al., 1999).

      The dose of EE was selected to reflect serum concentrations of EE in peri-menopausal women taking OC. However, the duration of the present study was longer than in many previous studies (20 weeks). Among the animals receiving EE alone, 40% died after only ≥21 weeks of treatment, whereas animals given combined treatment did not die prematurely. This suggests that the accumulated estrogen dose may have been too high and/or the study too long, as also indicated by the safety variables of the EE-treated animals at week 30 (Table IV), but also that adding a progestin was able to negate this toxic effect. Progestins were used in equipotent doses (i.e. in combination with EE they inhibit endometrial stimulation equally in humans) relative to each other. The selected dose of the progestins (µg per kg body weight) was chosen based on previous experience (van der Vies and de Visser, 1983; Sulistiyani et al., 1995; Zandberg et al., 2001) and in-house studies (in Organon), but may be considered as high doses. All three OC formulations significantly decreased the concentration of the cytosolic ER concentration relative to controls, suggesting that these formulations affect the endometrium through a down-regulation of the cytosolic ER. Addition of a progestin in this study also down-regulated the ER although less than found for EE, and when combining EE with a progestin, the estrogen component dominated the ER regulation. It should, however, be emphasized that the lack of modifying effect of the progestins relative to the EE dose on the endometrium should not be taken as a lack of progestogenic effect, since the primary intention was to investigate the effect of these hormone combinations on atherosclerosis and arterial responsiveness.

      A type II statistical error is not likely to have occurred in our study. However, the accumulation of cholesterol (and amount of fatty streaks) in the EE group was significantly lower than that of the placebo animals. For a type II error to occur, the null hypothesis (that there was no difference in aortic accumulation of cholesterol between the EE and the placebo group) would not be true, and despite this, we would obtain a non-significant result, i.e. a ‘false negative’ result.

      In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in ovariectomized cholesterol-fed rabbits, the progestins investigated (LNG, DSG, or GSD) can be combined with EE without attenuating the anti-atherogenic effect of EE, partly by decreasing atherogenic lipoproteins, and partly by a direct effect on the endothelium, modulating the aortic vasomotor response in vitro.

      References
      Top
      Abstract
      Introduction
      Materials and methods
      Results
      Discussion
      References

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      Lewis, M.A., Heinemann, L.A., Spitzer, W.O., MacRae, K.D. and Bruppacher, R. (1997) The use of oral contraceptives and the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction in young women: results from the Transnational study on oral contraceptives and the health of young women. Contraception, 56, 129–40.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

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      Poulter, N.P., Chang, C.L., Farley, T.M.M., Kelaghan, J., Meirlk, O. and Marmot, M.G. (1997) Acute myocardial infarction and combined oral contraceptives: results of an international multicentre case–control study. WHO Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception. Lancet, 349, 1202–1209.[CrossRef][ISI][Medline]

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      Sidney, S., Siscovick, D.S., Petitti, D.B., Schwartz, S.M., Quesenberry, C.P., Psaty, B.M., Raghunathan, T.E., Kelaghan, J. and Koepsell, T.D. (1998) Myocardial infarction and use of low-dose oral contraceptives: a pooled analysis of 2 US studies. Circulation, 98, 1058–1063.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

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      Tanis, B.C., van den Bosch, M.A., Kemmeren, J.M., Cats, V.M., Helmerhorst, F.M., Algra, A., van der Graaf, Y. and Rosendaal, F.R. (2001) Oral contraceptives and the risk of myocardial infarction. N. Engl. J. Med., 345, 1787–1793.[Abstract/Free Full Text]

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      World Health Organization (1997) Details?

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      Submitted on December 13, 2002; resubmitted on February 20, 2003; accepted on March 25, 2003.

      This article has been cited by other articles:

      T. Hayashi, T. Esaki, D. Sumi, T. Mukherjee, A. Iguchi, and G. Chaudhuri
      Modulating role of estradiol on arginase II expression in hyperlipidemic rabbits as an atheroprotective mechanism
      PNAS, July 5, 2006; 103(27): 10485 - 10490.
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  15. QUESTION:
    how long does breast tenderness last after you stop the pill?
    i only used it for one month but have been having breast tenderness and fullness for three months now. Had 2 light periods since and some irregular bleeding now.

    • ANSWER:
      Also try:breast tenderness pregnancy,causes of breast tenderness,breast tenderness menopause,
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      more....Search resultsCauses of breast pain (mastalgia) - Women to Women ...
      Learn about the causes of breast pain (mastalgia) and its relation to concerns about breast cancer from a noted authority on breast health, including natural remedies ...
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      Breast pain: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
      Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness. References. Valea FA, Katz VL. Breast diseases: diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant disease.
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      Mastodynia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Mastodynia, mastalgia or mammalgia are names for a medical symptom that means breast pain (from the Greek masto-, breast and algos, pain). Pain can range from minor ...
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      Breast Pain (Sore Breasts, Mastalgia) Causes, Treatment, and ...
      What do I need to know about breast pain?Many women have breast tenderness and pain, also called mastalgia. It may come and go with monthly periods (cyclic ...
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      Reasons for Breast Soreness | eHow.com
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      Breast Tenderness | Signs of Pregnancy | Pregnancy Symptoms ...
      Breast tenderness is often the first sign of pregnancy for many women. Get tips on how to alleviate this pregnancy symptom at BabyZone.
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      Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling: MedlinePlus ...
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  16. QUESTION:
    Why do I get PMS feelings even though I am Menopausal at 55 yrs. old . What to do to stop this?
    Every month I get the PMS headaches and feeling of coming on a period, even though I don't bleed. What is up? Will this ever end. I need to hear from people out there with similar concerns. My head is heavy now.

    • ANSWER:
      It is about your menopause and you low hormones, maybe due to your body going crazy of the decrease of hormones, you have a very low level of prostaglandines, giving you this sympthoms. Prostaglandines are the guilty one for pms and period pains.
      Don´t worry, it is normal and you dont´have to go to your doctor for it.
      -Eat tofu it is has progesterone that can help you.
      -Exercise
      -Try to take few red meat
      -Take flaxx seed everyday it has omegas that help you with postaglandines, it lows the levels.

      Herbs
      There is growing evidence that some herbal remedies may help alleviate menopausal symptoms. The most commonly used herbal remedies for menopausal symptoms are black cohosh, St.-John's-wort, valerian, ginseng, dong quai, and evening primrose oil.

      Reducing your intake of caffeine helps in menopause relief as well. Herbal teas, and using onion, garlic and lemon instead of salt should help as well. One study at UCLA noted that garlic halted the advance of heart disease in post-menopausal women

      Flax Seed's Benefits Contribute to Menopause Symptom Relief
      A flood of recent flax seed research underscores the benefits flax seed has on healthful living. The idea isn't new. Specifically, scientists, nutritionists and physicians studying menopause have determined that the high fiber and lignan content of flax seed products can offer natural menopause treatment. Products supplied by North American Nutrition can have a large impact on menopause, along with a preventative role concerning certain cancers.

      Good luck! ;D

      Good luck! ;D

  17. QUESTION:
    I have sore breasts this is abnormal for me before my period?
    its the week before my period and my breasts are very sore and heavy...this is abnormal for me. is it likely that i could be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      You get breast tenderness before your period is due it is called premenstrual syndrome

      http://www.34-menopause-symptoms.com/breast-tenderness-during-menstruation-period.htm

      Symptom Relief

      There are a few things you can do to relive the discomfort of tenderness and swelling of the breasts.
      Wear good breast support. Make sure to wear a good bra with support. Not wearing a bra can make breast tenderness worse, regardless of breast size. This is especially important during exercise. Bras/support will help to make breasts feel contained, helping to minimize soreness.
      Exercise. Sometimes just getting outside and moving around can help to relieve breast pain. Making exercise a regular part of your daily regimen, can help to relieve many symptoms of PMS.
      Hot or cold treatments. Some women feel better icing their breasts to relieve the pain. Others say heat and hot pads make a difference. Try them out and see which is best for you.
      Ibuprofen. Taking a pain reliever right before your period can make a difference in relieving cramps, breast pain and swelling. However, it is not recommended to take a pain reliever regularly, so limit it to key times of the month. Note, that ibuprofen should not be taken if you are pregnant.
      Change hormones.Check with your doctor about changing your birth control pill or your hormone replacement therapy if this applies to your situation.
      Visualization and breath-work. Imagining your breasts in a weightless state, in warm gentle heat or something like that helps many women minimize the breast pain. Deep breath work can help too.

      Diet and breast tenderness

      There is no doubt that diet makes a difference for breast pain. Some foods are known to trigger pain for some women and not others. Review this list of key suspects, and try eliminating one at a time to see if your symptoms improve.
      Salt. Too much salt and sodium is known to make breast tenderness worse. This leads to additional water-retention and swelling which then leads to additional breast pain. Try to eliminate high sodium foods from your diet at least a week before your cycle begins.
      Fat. Studies have shown that women who limit high fat foods in their diet have a serious decrease in breast pain. Eliminating heavy fats and animal products can lend to greater overall health which should help to minimize all PMS symptoms.
      Sugar. For many people sugar contributes to breast tenderness and to the 'ropey' feel that breasts often get the week before menstruation begins.
      Caffeine. Many women complain that caffeine can make breast tenderness worse. In fact, caffeine generally contributes to breast lumpiness at any time of the month. It is especially recommended to avoid caffeine all month round if you have lumpy breasts, and for the week leading up to your period if you only have breast pain.
      Move excess fluid from the body. It is important to drink lots of water to help remove the excess fluid from your body. And it is also helpful to take an natural diuretic to help the body flush excess water out.
      Add B, E and A vitamins. Studies suggest that taking a multi can help with PMS symptoms and thus breast tenderness. There is a likely a link between the intake of the B-6 vitamin and body's ability to metabolize estrogen.

  18. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever tried Black Cohosh for menopause?
    Sleepless nights, fatique, thinning hair, mood swings= Menopause for me. Any advice will be appreciated I thinking about using Black Cohosh, but I need to know if some had used it and what is their opinion. Other options will also be appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      If you are concerned about taking HRT then this article may be of some help to you.
      Use a step ladder approach to your health. Diet: First eat a health diet, limit coffee and alcohol as it can increase hot flashes. Exercise 1/2 hour a day with a walk at min. This helps your well being and increases certain hormones levels. Use vitamins and herbs such as estrogenic like from plants, doug quai, black cohosh, licorice, red clover or wild yam extracts. Any one of them can help, but do not use all at once or combine them. It is a waste of resouces. You can try one and see if it helps and switch to another one if it doesn't. You can add chaste tree berry or vitex, which is the only documented herb that shows in your blood life to increase progesterone. You can blend vitamins and herb's together, but be sure not to use more than one phyto-estrogen. When symptoms change or this is not effective enough, begin using a natural progesterone cream (aka wise women essentials a bio indentical cream) which will help the whole body and systems. If you are like me then you will be thinking 'I don't have the time, ability, resources to round up all these wonderfull natural ingredients. Well you could find the answer in Menozac.

      Menozac is Help from Mother Nature Menozac  is a botanical formulation containing a blend of natural herbal extracts. These are plants from Mother Nature that specifically ease your transition. They provide effective menopause relief, from the onset, and through the duration of typical menopause.
      Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals. These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body’s hormonal balance.
      Your grandmothers and great grandmothers learned how to make this life transition smoothly, by studying the plants. Their long history is being shared with you in the Menozac formula.
      For more information about Menozac then Click Here

  19. QUESTION:
    Can someone please share your experience on a partial hysterectomy..where they remove only the uterus?
    Is there any bleeding after recovery? if you keep the ovaries what happens...do you get menopause symptoms? I'm 37 but have a uterine fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Hysterectomy is nothing but removal of the uterus. Once your uterus is removed menopausal symptoms start setting in even if you keep the ovaries. At your age are you sure you do not want to add to your family or bear children in future. If so then this procedure will put an end to your chance of bearing kids. You have not mentioned the number of your tumors and its size. If your uterine tumors are small in size and numbers it is best to make use of remedies to shrink fibroids naturally. Natural treatment will give you permanent relief from fibroids without any side effects.

      http://ezinearticles.com/?Remedies-for-Shrinking-Fibroids-Naturally&id=5035182

  20. QUESTION:
    what is it called when a lady cant have childen anymore?
    u know when they have the hot flashes and stuff.. What is it called
    I totally forgot and I cant figure it out!

    • ANSWER:
      Topical bioidentical estradiol may be a good option for women experiencing menopausal symptoms.
      SAN DIEGO, December 12. Why all the recent media buzz about bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones have the same molecular structure as hormones produced naturally by a woman's body. The hormone 17-beta-estradiol, for example, is structurally identical to the estrogen produced by the ovaries. This prescription hormone is clinically proven to relieve the hot flashes and night sweats associated with menopause.

      Learn about an FDA-approved bioidentical estrogen.For many women, topical formulations of bioidentical estrogen may be a good alternative to pills. Applied once daily to the skin, topical estrogen bypasses the liver and is delivered directly into the bloodstream via the capillary system in the deep layers of the skin. This method of transdermal delivery ensures a steady, consistent dose for optimal relief. And unlike patches, topical estrogen leaves no sticky residue on the skin and cannot fall off.

      "Topical estrogen has helped many of my patients who are good candidates for estrogen therapy get effective, round-the-clock relief from their hot flashes and night sweats."

      ...commented Dr. Jane Bening, who practices obstetrics and gynecology in San Diego.

      Millions of women are bothered by frequent hot flashes and night sweats. These disruptive symptoms can build slowly over time as a result of the natural menopause process—or can occur suddenly after the surgical removal of the ovaries (as part of a hysterectomy). Fortunately, estrogen therapy (ET) can provide significant relief for women experiencing menopausal symptoms.

  21. QUESTION:
    when me and my partner have intercourse my lower abdomen hurts?
    my doctor seems to thinks it's chlamydia, but i'm showing no other symptoms of it.

    • ANSWER:
      Almost every woman experiences discomfort during sex at some point in her life. But many suffer in silence for years because they're embarrassed to ask for help or because they've been told it's all in their heads. While sexual pain can be a symptom of stress, depression, or some other psychological problem, there are a number of physical conditions to rule out before heading for the therapist's couch. See if any of the following describes your problem.

      Infection

      Sometimes pain during sex is the first sign of an infection. Vaginal yeast and bacterial infections can reduce lubrication and irritate the opening of the vagina, and will usually be accompanied by itching or an unusual discharge or odor. A urinary tract infection will hurt most when you urinate but can also cause pain during sex because of the pressure on a tender, inflamed bladder. Abdominal pain with intercourse may be a symptom of the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia. Left untreated, chlamydia can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which causes inflammation and scarring that can make sex unbearable. Once diagnosed, most infections are easily treated with antibiotics or, in the case of yeast, antifungal creams or pills.

      Endometriosis

      About 5 million American women have this painful condition in which tissue from the lining of the uterus grows into areas outside of the uterus such as the vagina or pelvis where it becomes inflamed. More than half of these women report pain with intercourse. Endometriosis can usually be treated with drugs that temporarily suppress estrogen production or surgery to remove the wayward tissue. Birth control pills can also help. Using the woman-on-top position or limiting intercourse to the week or two after you menstruate may also minimize the discomfort.

      Interstitial Cystitis

      When you feel as if you have a urinary tract infection, but antibiotics won't make it go away, the problem is probably interstitial cystitis. Experts don't know what triggers this condition, in which your bladder becomes chronically inflamed, leading to severe pelvic pain that tends to worsen during sex. Like vulvodynia, this condition is difficult to diagnose and treat. Sufferers may find relief from one of a variety of treatments, such as the drug Elmiron, but no single therapy seems to work for everyone. The woman-on-top position may help you avoid the discomfort that comes with deep penetration.

      Vulvodynia

      If burning pain at the opening of the vagina has made sex impossible but your doctor can't find a cause, you may have vulvodynia, a condition in which part of the vulva is chronically inflamed. No one knows how many women suffer from it or what first sets off the pain, which may be a constant torture or may flare up just during sex. Experimental treatments include cutting certain foods out of your diet or learning to use a biofeedback device to control muscle spasms that may be contributing to the pain. Surgery to remove the inflamed skin has resolved the problem for some women, but should be considered only as a last resort.

      Hormones

      If you're breastfeeding or approaching menopause, your sexual discomfort may be due to hormonal changes. In both cases, falling estrogen levels can dry up your natural lubrication and make your vaginal tissue fragile. New moms may want to use a drugstore lubricant until their estrogen levels return to normal when they stop breastfeeding. Older women with this complaint may consider going on hormone replacement therapy or using an estrogen cream.

      Doctors are pretty accurate when diagnosing you. I would take what he says serioulsy. You may not know you have chlamydia because the signs and symptoms of pain and fluid discharge. Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. Each year, nearly 3 million people in the United States are infected with chlamydia. The disease affects both men and women and occurs in all age groups, though chlamydia is most prevalent among U.S. teenagers.

      Chlamydia isn't difficult to treat once you know you have it. If it's left untreated, however, chlamydia can lead to more-serious health problems.

      Symptoms
      Chlamydia may be difficult to detect because early-stage infections often cause few or no signs and symptoms that might alert you to see your doctor. When signs or symptoms do occur, they usually start one to three weeks after you've been exposed to chlamydia. Even when signs and symptoms do occur, they're often mild and passing, making them easy to overlook.

      Signs and symptoms of chlamydia infection may include:

      Painful urination
      Lower abdominal pain
      Vaginal discharge in women
      Discharge from the penis in men
      Painful sexual intercourse in women
      Testicular pain in men

  22. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken Amberen for Menopause? If yes, can it be taken with other antidepressants like Cymbalta?
    I am thinking about taking Amberen for hot flashes, mood swings, etc but I already take Cymbalta to control my OCD and aniexty levels. I want to know if there would be an interaction? It says no, cause its natural but you never know and I was hoping someone who took it and another antidepressant at the same time might of had problems or not? please help, can't find info on interactions.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not a doctor, but my partner Sassy is in the middle of menopause - complete with hot / cold flashes during the day and night sweats at night. She was on estrogen for about 38 years (and has a family history of cancer), so when the doctors told her she had to come off estrogen we did a lot of research. Ultimately, we put together a web page (below) with a few comments and possible solutions for night sweats and hot flashes. Perhaps what we've found will help relieve some of your symptoms, whatever your doctor's diagnosis turns out to be.

      Another suggestion is to talk to your pharmacist to get their thoughts - frequently they're a great place for information - hidden in plain sight! Hope you find relief.

  23. QUESTION:
    What are some remedies for hot flashes?
    My daughter is 41 years old and has been suffering with hot flashes for years. She has several other conditions and is on a lot of medications. She needs something that wont impact her current medication.

    • ANSWER:
      Hot flashes and night sweats are two symptoms of menopause that can really affect a woman's quality of life as the natural levels of estrogen decline. And, Senay says, there's no question that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is an effective way to provide relief. The problem is that the symptoms of menopause often recur if the treatment is stopped. More evidence suggests that the commonly-prescribed combination hormone therapy is not a good idea for long periods of time.

      See the resource also

      Of course, as with all therapies, there are some risks involved. The public usually takes herbal therapies in the form of supplement pills, not as a preparation made directly from the herb by a trained herbalist. Keep in mind that herbal supplements are not as closely regulated as prescription drugs. The amount of herbal product, quality, safety, and purity may vary between brands or even between batches of the same brand.

  24. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used bio-identical hormones to treat menopause?
    I found some affordable ones online at www.AgelessApple.com and supposedly they're safer than regular hormone regimines. Does anybody know anything about them?

    • ANSWER:
      I was reading through some articles about the menopause and I noticed that some people have a very positive attitude towards this difficult time of life for women.  I read that the menopause should not be regarded as an illness or a disease. It is simply an occurrence wherein the woman is entering her second phase of feminine life.
      Of course, these women are experiencing a gradual discomfort because of the transition...this is only natural. If there are telltale signs of menopause symptoms, you can opt to procure some treatment in order to minimize the feeling of discomfort. But it is important to remember that any kind of treatment will not prevent you from undergoing menopause process, especially when your age is already falling from and between 48 - 55 years old.
      It will only help you to deal a lot easier with menopause symptoms or relieve the  majority of their major discomfort effects. Your lifestyle might also need some changing especially your smoking, eating, drinking, and sleeping habits in order to minimize the severity of menopause symptoms.
      What can herbs do to treat menopause symptoms?
      There are many types of reliable herbs available that can treat menopause symptoms. They can maintain women's healthy life even when menstruation process causes a lot of discomfort and decline in their health aspect. With herbs carefully and religiously applied you may not only alleviate those various forms of discomfort but you will also maintain your healthy life. Two basic types of herbs for menopause Phytoestrogenic herbs These are the herbs or plants that contain natural phytoestrogen, a type of chemical compound, which is similar to the women body estrogen. These herbs work by replacing the lost natural body estrogen with the plant hormones, phytoestrogen. Aside from this, there are other elements of phytoestrogenic herbs that are considered beneficial to menopausal women such as amino acids, vitamins and minerals.
      Generally, these herbs are an alternative to disorders relating to low hormonal/estrogen levels. Most popular phytoestrogenic herbs: Ginseng. Used to improve your overall vitality and energy, this is a dried root from one of the Araliaceae herb species. Ginkgo. Used to enhance memory, prevent memory-related diseases such as Dementia, Alzheimer's and others. This herb is one of the oldest herbal medicines used in China. Dong Quai. Most effective in treating gynecological complaints caused by the change in hormonal production. Red Clover. Diseases treated are skin disorders and bronchitis, asthma and spasmodic coughing. Black Cohosh. Symptoms treated include depression, night sweats and hot flashes. Non-estrogenic herbs In contrast with the phytoestrogenic plants, non-estrogenic herbs, as the name suggests, are those plants that do not produce estrogen chemical structures.
      These plants are widely recognized by the doctors and medical experts because of their effectiveness to relieve women's menopause symptoms. Furthermore, they are considered completely safe and do not provide side effects. The right non-estrogenic herbs contain nutrients that can nourish endocrine system, eventually balancing your hormonal levels. With the proper application, occurrences of the loss of hormones will be reduced as they can promote your body to naturally produce the needed healthy level of estrogen hormones, without the distracting side effects. Specifically, non-estrogenic herbs will provide relief to the following disorders relating to menopause symptoms: - majority of the menopause symptoms - hormonal imbalance - osteoporosis or bone mass loss - infertility - sexual intercourse problems - cardiovascular disease It is important to note, however, that even these herbs are a natural treatment you need to research on the kind of plant that you are going to take as not all of these will relieve and alleviate you from those menopause symptoms.
      There are herbal plants that can cause many other side effects, may it be minor or major. It has been written that Menozac has been developed as a natural alternative support, formulated with the best-known combination of well-researched phytoestrogen botanicals.   These plants have a long history of helping to relieve menopausal symptoms and supporting the body's hormonal balance and a natural alternative to HRT.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is passion flower the best herb for anxiety?
    It seems to be working ok for me.

    • ANSWER:
      The list of herbs for anxiety is long. Anxiety, nervousness, restlessness, depression - whatever you call it, it's an unpleasant sensation. Down through the centuries, many herbs have been used for their effect in curbing anxiety. It seems that most homegrown herb teas have a positive effect on the nerves.

      Perhaps it is simply the act of sitting down with a hot cup of tea that helps the anxiety. Be that as it may, here are some of the traditional remedies for this common malady.

      Peppermint
      One of the simplest herbs for anxiety is peppermint. It is easy to grow and very good tasting. Use one teaspoon of the dried herb or about a tablespoon of the fresh leaves to a cup of boiling water. Let the herb steep for 5 minutes. Sweeten with a bit of honey if desired. Enjoy the tea in a quiet room and then go lay down.

      This is one of the best natural treatments for a nervous headache or the stomach ache that results from nerves.

      Melissa (Lemon Balm)
      There are several other common plants among the mints that are useful herbs for anxiety. One of these is melissa or lemon balm. It has a refreshing lemon scent that tastes wonderful in tea.

      It is not one of the best herbs for drying but it is easy to grow, so you can have fresh leaves for tea during the temperate months.

      Catnip
      Catnip is also a mint that has a history of being used as a nervine. It is not as delicious in tea, but your cat will love you for growing it. It is an old-fashioned remedy for insomnia that can also help an upset stomach.

      Scullcap
      Scullcap is a mint as well. It would be called the best of the herbs for anxiety by many. Unlike the mints we've mentioned, it does not have a good flavor. In fact, it's downright bitter. But it is very tonic and healing to the nerves. It helps with insomnia, but does not knock you out like some other herbs do.

      It can even help prevent panic attacks. It is safe enought to be used during pregnancy, but this does not keep it from being effective. Try not to brew it for over five minutes if you want to keep the bitterness to a minimum.

      Chamomile
      Chamomile is not a mint, but otherwise it is similar among the herbs for anxiety. Its little daisy-like blossoms makes a delicious relaxing tea. It is so good at calming anxiety that it might just put you to sleep.

      Passionflower
      Other herbs that are often used with chamomile in relaxing blends are hops and passionflower. Both of these can promote sleep. Passionflower is considered a mild sedative.

      Feverfew
      Feverfew is a relaxing herb that is related to chamomile. It is good for getting rid of an anxiety related headache. It can even handle migraines for some people.

      St John's Wort
      St. John's Wort is useful in cases of anxiety, but it's real value is as an antidepressant. If you are anxious and depressed, try this jewel among herbs for anxiety. Give it two or three weeks of daily use and see if you don't feel better.

      Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng)
      Eleuthero or Siberian ginseng is often included in anti-anxiety herbal combinations. It is an energizer but also relaxes and nourishes the nerves. If the mints or chamomile tend to put you to sleep, you might like to try eleuthero for your anxiety symptoms.

      Another of the herbs for anxiety that relaxes and energizes at the same time is the Ayurvedic herb ashwaganda. It strengthens and tones all the systems in the body.

      Kava Kava
      Kava kava is often named among herbs for anxiety. It is a powerful muscle relaxer and analgesic. It has come under scrutiny for safety so you might want to use kava cautiously. Sometimes women who are struggling with nerve issues related to menopause get great relief from this South Pacific island herb.

      You should not take it for more than four months at a time. (It may be off the market in some countries.)

      For those who don't like drinking tea, a relaxing sleep pillow or eye mask can deliver relaxing help through the aroma of herbs for anxiety.

      To make the pillow, sew around three sides of two 8 inch square pieces of thin cotton or silk. Turn to the right side and stuff the small pillow with a mixture of dried lavender, hops, and chamomile blossoms.

      For an eye mask, cut two rectangular pieces of silk (recycle an old blouse) that are 3-1/2 inches by 9 inches. With right sides together sew around the perimeter, leaving one short end open. Stuff with a mixture of flax seed (for weight) with lavender and hops. Sew up the final edge.

      Now lie down and place the pillow near where you can inhale it, or place the eye mask across your eyes. The silk will feel nice and cool. It can be placed in the refrigerator if you need more cooling. Now relax with these herbs for anxiety.

      ////////////////////////////////////The Passion Flower/////////////////////////////////
      The Legend. Legend has it that in 1620 a Jesuit priest in Peru came across the plant we now know as passion flower. Enthralled with its beauty, that night he had a vision likening its floral parts to the elements of the Crucifixion or Passion of Christ. The five petals and five sepals became the ten apostles (omitting Peter and Judas). The three pistils became the nails of the cross; the purple corona (or filaments) was the crown of thorns, and the stemmed ovary was the Lord's goblet.

      The Plant. The passion vine (Passiflora) has travelled widely since then, and is considered a houseplant on the prairies. This climbing vine can grow very quickly under favorable conditions, reaching up to 6 m (20 ft). It is often trained around a hoop, on netting, or on a trellis, supporting itself with spiral-like tendrils.

      The flowers are 7.6 cm (3 in.) in diameter, opening from flat oval buds and flowering from summer to early fall. The ten petals (actually five petals and five sepals) are usually white but may also be red or purple. In front of the petals are fine, colorful filaments that are purple at the base, white in the middle and blue at the tip. Five golden anthers and three brown stigmas are in the center.

      The stems are wiry, dark green and angular, and the deeply divided leaves can be up to 10 cm (4 in )wide. Yellow or orange fruit up to 12.7 cm (5 in,) in diameter may develop under favorable growing conditions. The fruit is many-seeded, and some varieties are edible.

      Care. The passion flower is best suited to a sunny room or greenhouse. Ideally, it should have 4 hours of bright, direct sunlight daily throughout the year. However, it may sun scorch in summer if placed too close to a south or west window. The plant may be summered outside.

      In spite of its "passion" for bright light, it prefers temperatures on the cooler side (12.7-18.8C), especially in winter. It will tolerate slightly warmer temperatures in summer but is more likely to become infested with spider mites and may not have as attractive a shape. Cooler temperatures (10C) in winter will allow it a rest period.

      Keep your passion vines evenly moist (but with good drainage) while actively growing. Beginning in late August, let them dry out a bit between waterings but never completely.

      Fertilize every two weeks with 20-20-20 plus micro-nutrients from spring through fall while the plants are actively growing. Use a loam-based potting soil and keep it slightly pot-bound. Passion vines tend to flower more freely when confined.

      Top dressing rather than repotting is sometimes advised. Repot every 2 years in late winter or early spring, allowing the plant to recuperate for a week in a cool shady area before putting it back in a sunny location.

      Prune passion vines to within 15 cm (6 in.) of the soil or to 6 to 8 buds in early spring and a few weeks prior to repotting. This should encourage flowering on the new growth.

      Varieties. The blue passion flower (Passiflora caerulea) is one of the best for growing indoors and is one of the most readily available. It blooms in April, with white petals and sepals and a ring of filaments that are purple, white and blue. Height may be up to 6 m (20 ft). It will flower when still young, even in a small pot. "Constance Elliot" is all white and blooms more freely.

      The red passion flower (Passiflora coccinea) has deep orange to scarlet petals and filaments that are pale pink at the base, gradually becoming purple.

      Passiflora x alato-caerula is only 1.8 m (6 ft) in height, free-blooming, has pink petals and a fringed corona of purple, white and blue. An added bonus is its fragrance.

      Dispassionate Propagation. Passion flowers are usually propagated by stem cuttings taken in late spring or early summer. These should be 7.6-10 cm (3-4 in.) long and taken just below a leaf. Remove the next lower leaf and dip the end of the cutting in a rooting compound. Place in 7.6 cm (3 in.) pots in an evenly moist mixture of peat moss and coarse sand. Cover the entire pot with a plastic bag to retain humidity and put it in good but indirect light. The cuttings should root in three to four weeks. Seed is a more difficult method of propagation and the resulting flowering is more variable and less dependable.

  26. QUESTION:
    I am 45 yrs old, I am not pregnant, not having periods for 2 months, should I start taking hormones now?

    • ANSWER:
      Please don't take hormones if you don't have to. Some women have menopausal symptoms that are so severe that only hormones can give relief, but for most women menopause is a natural transition. It is not a disease and doesn't require medical intervention.

      The risks of taking hormones far outweigh any benefits. You would be putting yourself at risk for heart attacks, stroke and breast cancer. Of course the decision is yours alone to make with your doctor, but if I were you I would look for other ways to ease whatever discomforts you may feel during the change.

      I took hormones for five years, and it was awful. I felt like I had PMS every day of the month. That's because if you have your uterus, you need to take progesterone with estrogen. Progesterone is the substance that increases naturally just before your period comes. It gives you tender breasts, bloating and irritability. I would have preferred hot flashes to that!

      It's been over 10 years since I took anything, and I am doing just fine without hormones. I'm sure you will, too. Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    Where can I find good information on adenomyosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Adenomyosis

      Adenomyosis is a medical condition characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue (the inner lining of the uterus) within the myometrium (the thick, muscular layer of the uterus).

      The condition is typically found in women in the ages between 35 and 50. Patients with adenomyosis can have painful and/or profuse menses (dysmenorrhea & menorrhagia, respectively).

      Adenomyosis may involve the uterus focally, creating an adenomyoma, or diffusely. With diffuse involvement, the uterus becomes bulky and heavier.

      Causes
      The cause of adenomyosis is unknown, although it has been associated with any sort of uterine trauma that may break the barrier between the endometrium and myometrium, such as Cesarean sections, tubal ligation, pregnancy termination, and any pregnancy.

      Some say that the reason adenomyosis is common in women between the ages of 35 and 50 is because it is between these ages that women have an excess of estrogen. Near the age of 35, women typically cease to create as much natural progesterone, which counters the effects of estrogen. After the age of 50, due to menopause, women do not create as much estrogen.
      Diagnosis
      The uterus may be imaged using ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Transvaginal ultrasound is the most cost effective and most available. Either modality will show an enlarged uterus. On ultrasound, the uterus will have a heterogeneous texture, without the focal well-defined masses that characterize uterine fibroids.

      MR provides better diagnostic capability due to the increased spatial and contrast resolution, and to not being limited by the presence of bowel gas or calcified uterine fibroids (as is ultrasound). In particular, MR is better able to differentiate adenomyosis from multiple small uterine fibroids the uterus will have a thickened junctional zone with diminished signal on both T1 and T2 weighted sequences due to succeptibility effects of iron deposition due to chronic microhemorrhage. A thickness of the junctional zone greater than 10 or 12 mm (depending on who you read) is diagnostic of adenomyosis (<8 mm is normal). Interspersed within the thickened, hypointense signal of the junctional zone, one will often see foci of hyperintensity (brightness) on the T2 weighted scans representing small cystically dilatated glands or more acute sites of microhemorrhage.

      MR can be used to classify adenomyosis based on the depth of penetration of the ectopic endometrium into the myometrium.

      Treatment
      Treatment options range from use of NSAIDS & hormonal suppression for symptomatic relief, to endometrial ablation or hysterectomy for a more or less permanent cure.

      Those that believe an excess of estrogen is the cause or adenomyosis, or that it aggravates the symptoms, recommend avoiding products with xenoestrogens and/or recommend taking natural progesterone supplements.

      Other considerations
      The differential of abnormal uterine bleeding includes

      endometrial polyps
      submucosal fibroids
      endometrial hyperplasia
      endometrial carcinoma
      post-menopausal atrophy
      In a younger woman, considerations should be broadened to include

      spontaneous abortion
      ectopic pregnancy

  28. QUESTION:
    i want to know tha treatment and precautions for headache and migraine?
    im sufferin in severe migraine. i took many treatements. but ,still im suffering. i want to know the best treatments for migraine i need ur advice. that will help me to cure

    • ANSWER:
      A migraine headache is caused by hormonal fluctuations which
      cause blood vessels in the head and neck to contract and then
      dilate. The first phase, or contraction phase, may last minutes,
      hours, or days. During this phase, symptoms can be spots in
      front of the eyes, difficulty concentrating, and cold fingertips
      and hands. This is called an "aura". Many people recognize this
      phase of their headaches; many others don't notice any symptoms
      at this time. Some people who think they don't have an "aura"
      can learn to recognize it.

      When the blood vessels dilate, the headache pain starts.
      Apparently the hormones over-react. Instead of just going from a
      contracted state back to normal, the blood vessels dilate much
      wider than normal, causing pain. Other things also happen about
      the same time: swelling of the brain, release of certain
      chemicals, and perhaps muscle tension. These things add to the pain.

      The following are natural remedies:

      1) Chiropractic trement
      2) biofeedback
      3) Aupuncture, aromatherapy, and myotherapy
      4) multivitamin treatments.
      5)food sensitivity, increassed blood sugar
      6) nutritional supplements
      7) herbs
      8) sex hormones.

      Most of the treatments in this FAQ are used to prevent migraines
      from happening. This section describes things you can do when
      you're in pain, to reduce the pain.

      -- Have a bath or shower.
      -- Lie down to rest in a dark room.
      -- Avoid bright or flashing light.
      -- Put something cold on the back of your neck, such as
      a cold, wet cloth; or alternate hot and cold cloths
      where the pain is.
      -- Put a cold compress on your forehead and your feet in a
      container of warm water.
      -- Have a drink of water or natural juice, especially tomato juice.
      -- Have some food, or a nutritious drink, if you
      haven't eaten for a while.
      -- Massage your own face, head, neck and shoulders, or get someone
      else to do those and your back. Relax your muscles.
      -- Press on two pressure points at the back of the neck. These
      points are about two inches apart, just below the base of
      the skull. Press for a minute or two. This releases
      endorphins that help against pain.
      -- Massage or press on the fleshy area between thumb and
      forefinger.
      -- Gently lean the head to left or right to stretch the neck muscles.
      Massage and relax any tense muscles.
      -- Avoid sources of stress. Cancel activities so there's less
      to worry about.
      -- Avoid exercise during a headache if it makes throbbing pain
      in the head and neck worse. On
      the other hand, generally exercise improves health, and
      it may help you relax during a headache.
      -- Take some niacin (a form of vitamin B3). Taking enough
      niacin to cause a flush (blood rushing to the skin) can
      provide relief from headache pain, but this much niacin
      can also have side effects (flush, nausea, heartburn,
      liver damage, etc.) Niacinamide doesn't have such bad
      side effects, but isn't as much use against migraines, either.
      Smaller, safer amounts of niacin are also helpful.
      Niacin can trigger a migraine, though.
      -- Take some vitamin C, vitamin B6, choline, tryptophan and niacin
      and/or magnesium.

      .Common migraine triggers include:

      Hormonal changes. Although the exact relationship between hormones and headaches isn't clear, fluctuations in estrogen seem to trigger headaches in many women with known migraines. Women with a history of migraines often report headaches immediately before or during their periods, and this corresponds to a major drop in estrogen. Others have an increased tendency to develop migraines during pregnancy or menopause. Hormonal medications, such as contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, also may worsen migraines.

      Foods. Certain foods appear to trigger headaches in some people. Common offenders include alcohol, especially beer and red wine; nuts, aged cheeses; chocolate; fermented, pickled or marinated foods; aspartame; overuse of caffeine; monosodium glutamate — a key ingredient in some Asian foods; certain seasonings; and many canned and processed foods. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger migraines.

      Stress. A hard week at work followed by relaxation may cause weekend migraines.

      Sensory Stimuli- bright blights and sunglare can produce head pains. So can unusual smells -including pleasant smells such as flowers and perfumes. and unpleasant odors such as paint thinner and secondhand smoke.

      Changes in wake-sleep pattern- either not enough sleep or too much sleep may trigger migraines in some individuals.

      physical Activity- intense exercise even sex can trigger migraines.

      A change in the environment-- a change of weather, season, altitude levels; barometric pressure or time zone can promote migraine.

      Medications some meds have headaches as side effects.

      High blood pressure can also cause headaches. so will hypoglycemia or hunger

  29. QUESTION:
    Not feeling in the mood for intercourse. How can I change that?
    Been like this for about 3 weeks now and I don't know how to change it. My husband and I have tried everything (well almost) But still. Don't think it's an age thing as I'm not even that old. Don't want to try the doctor because it's too awkward. It's awkward asking on here too but not as much

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Low Libido
      Loss of libido is a common problem in women. Almost half the women population lose interest in having sex, though they do not have problem reaching orgasm. There can be many causes for this loss, both physical and psychological. Some of them are:

      The Psychological Reasons
      There are many psychological issues like tension, stress, depression and anxiety that lead to loss of interest. Some deeper problems like sexual abuse, rape, latent same-sex attractions are also responsible. Difficult living conditions and childhood trauma are some more psychological causes for the loss of interest.

      The Physical Reasons
      The most common reason that causes loss of sexual interest is drug and alcohol abuse. Diabetes, anemia and use of tranquilizers are also responsible for it. Many women also feel lack of interest in sex after pregnancy and childbirth. Contrary to general belief, menopause does not affect the desire to have sex.

      Natural Libido Enhancers
      Though there are some pills and medicines that can be used as libido enhancers, here are the natural remedies that can be easily used and are very effective. There are many helps that can be used to enhance the sex drive.
      •Ashwagandha is a herb that increases sexual energy. It is equivalent to ginseng and is quite effective.
      •Ginkgo biloba is a vasodilator and helps to increase blood flow to the genitals by increasing the levels of nitric oxide in the blood.
      •Epimedium sagittatum which is commonly known as horny goat weed also produces same effects of sexual simulation.
      •Hops extract is an estrogen enhancer and helps alleviate vaginal dryness. It increases lubrication to the genitals and provides relief from menopause symptoms.
      •Damiana extract helps to relax the body, alleviating stress and tiredness and helps to balance the hormones in females.
      •Ginger is also helpful in keeping the heart healthy and it increases the blood flow.
      Other Remedies
      Apart from the herbs mentioned above, there are other natural ways to increase the sexual urge and desire. It is a known fact that fragrances are good turn-ons for both men and women. For women, citrus, fruity and vanilla fragrances that are subtle and enticing, work best. Other fragrances like rose, sandalwood and cucumber are good mood enhancers as well. Another good way to enhance your sex life is food. Yes, food. The most famous of all aphrodisiac foods is of course the sensuous chocolate. Women are generally not able to resist the temptation of chocolate both dark and milk. Along with it, caviar, red wine, oyster, aromatic fruits like grapes, peaches and strawberry and dry fruits like resins and grapes are all tried and time tested mood enhancers for women.

      Mood enhancers help to induce desire and increase the libido. If you can get all that without any side effects, what more do you want. Conducive atmosphere, a low stress life and peace of mind are some other factors that keep the brain fresh and body rejuvenated during love making. Females who encounter issues related to loss of libido must not rely excessively on medicines but they must include natural ways in their lifestyle to get back their normal sex drive.

  30. QUESTION:
    What do you do to get relief from symptoms of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Estrogen hormone level decreases when a woman begins menopause and this trigger a lot of physical changes. Some of the common symptoms that women going through menopause experience are irregular menstrual cycle, hot flashes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, mood swings, fatigue, vaginal dryness and unexplained weight gain, among others. Women have the option to take prescription drugs, such as estrogen replacement, progesterone creams, vitamin supplements etc. or try natural remedies to relieve the symptoms. There are natural remedies available in the form of herbal supplements or tea that can reduce hot flashes and night sweats. Herbs like Don Quai, black cohosh and licorice root contain natural plant estrogen that can help balance women's menopausal hormones. You can also try acupressure. It can help fight fatigue and also reduce hot flashes. It is best to consult your doctor before you take any supplements. Women also have to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle. If you want to learn more about the signs and symptoms of menopause, how it affects women and how to find relief here's some help...

  31. QUESTION:
    what is the treatment for fibroid, other than operation in utrous?
    Is there any medicine to dissolve it with out going for an operation

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on how old you are. Uterine fibroids feed off estrogen, so if you are nearing menopause they typically shrink on their own. However if you are experiencing pain or discomfort, and not near menopause there is little you can do other than surgery to actually get rid of the fibroids. Some patients experiencing some relief of symptoms with chiropractic care believe it or not. One type of adjusting technique in particular called Sacral-Occipital Technique (SOT) if you are really interested in a natural way to attempt to treat the fibroids and they are not very severe, I would suggest finding a chiropractor in your area who practices SOT. Be sure you keep monitoring symptoms and continuing to go to your GYN as this isn't typically a curative situation, but more of a co-management to avoid surgery situation. Not anything in the line of medications I'm aware of, but that would be something to ask your GYN.

  32. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of acne? a Natural way.?
    I want to try some natural ways to get rid of acne. Maybe some things around my house some natural herb or something thats not medical that i could use to get rid of acne. I suddenly have been getting a extreme amount of acne on my face, and it is really bothering me.

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Friend,

      Acne Cures: Is there a Natural Acne Cure that Works?

      Are there natural acne cures that work or is it a new age myth? Is there a permanent cure for acne or are all acne sufferers sentenced to the Sisyphean battle of tackling the ‘on the surface’ symptoms? Is there an honest, natural and safer alternative to the endless use of over the counters and to the nasty side effects inflicted by conventional drugs, creams and topical acne treatments?

      There's a lovely metaphor describing acne among other chronic diseases and the way modern medicine deals with these afflictions: If you manage to kill all the mosquitoes around a stale pond using chemicals, for a little while there will be no mosquitoes.

      But since the source of the problem (what causes the mosquitoes to appear) is still there – the stale, disgusting pond where mosquitoes can find food and fertile ground for laying their eggs – mosquitoes will always come back!

      The same thing happens with your acne!

      Without eliminating the source of your acne condition, you will never get rid of your acne. Without fixing the internal problem that is causing your acne, you may find temporary relief, but your acne will always come back until you do something fundamental to eradicate the cause from within...until you make the pond (your body or internal system) a place where ‘mosquitoes’ cannot exist.

      Ultimately, every disease results from a breakdown within your body. All major diseases and chronic conditions are warning signs of something very fundamentally wrong inside. Deepak Chopra refers to this as "The violation of simple laws of nature that make our body function."

      The very surprising truth is that you are lucky for having acne. Let me explain...Acne, like constant headaches, irritable bowel syndrome or dandruffs is only a small message from your body that something is wrong internally and should be addressed and corrected.

      Now, there are two choices you can make - you can:

      1.Ignore that message - big mistake! The internal imbalance that caused your acne will, in most cases, turn into a chronic condition. Now instead of just having acne you'll start having other hormonal imbalance or toxic overload related symptoms in addition to acne. Because the internal problem is not fixed, the disease symptoms get more and more intense.

      2.Listen to your body and start fixing the internal problem that causes your acne to appear in the first place; you will not only get rid of your acne you will also achieve beautiful, healthy, even toned clear skin complexion, re-balance your body and prevent future hormonal or toxic overload related conditions.

      The simple truth is...you are out of balance. We now live a 'far-from-natural' lifestyle. There are over 300 synthetic industrial chemicals present in our bodies that did not exist 50 years ago. We are filled with toxins from the food, and medication we ingest and use.

      By fixing the internal condition that causes your acne in addition to adopting a healthy lifestyle (healthy diet & mindset, cleanse & detoxify, hormonal balancing etc.) you will put your body back into balance – holistically - your acne will cease to exist and you feel as healthy and attractive as ever!

      It doesn't matter what type of acne you have. Whether you suffer from: acne vulgaris, acne Conglobata, acne Rosacea, Acne Fulminans, Blackheads, Whiteheads, Papules, Pustules, Nodules or Cysts: The principles required to cure your acne are basically the same. The "holistic" ways of treating people have been around for thousands of years, and they absolutely work whether you have teen or adult acne; whether you suffer from acne on your back, shoulders or chest or if you suffer from female related acne such as menopause acne or acne due to monthly cycles.

      Mike Walden is a certified nutritionist, independent medical researcher, natural health consultant and author of the #1 best-selling e-book, "Acne No More- Open The Door To An Acne Free Life." Mike has written dozens of holistic health articles and has been featured in ezines and print magazines, as well as on hundreds of websites worldwide. For information on Mike's Holistic Clear Skin program, Visit our site today!

  33. QUESTION:
    PLEASE SUGGEST HOME REMEDIES FOR HOT FLUSHES DURING PRE MENSTRUAL STAGE?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Black Cohosh

      Black Cohosh is a plant used widely in Europe for treating menopause and hot flashes. Studies show Black Cohosh to be just as effective as pharmaceutical estrogen in providing hot flash relief and one study showed Black Cohosh was effective at preventing excessive sweating.

      2. Flaxseed Oil

      Fatty acids, such as those found in flaxseed oil, have been thought to be effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. Flax contains plant lignans which are similar to estrogen, possibly causing estrogen levels to stabilize in menopausal women.

      3. Evening Primrose Oil

      A general tonic for women’s reproductive health, evening primrose has a cooling effect on the skin and regulates the production of estrogen. It can act as a sleep aid due to its high gamma linolenic acid count, and increased prostaglandin production.

      4. Chickweed Tincture

      Daily doses of this herb have been reported to lower both the number and severity of hot flashes.

      5. Red Clover

      A plant containing high amounts of phyto-estrogens known as isoflavones has been shown to help reduce the intensity and frequency of hot flashes.

      6. Homeopathic Remedies

      Homeopathic treatment options such as Ferrum phosphoricum (good for reducing redness), Belladonna (an excellent herb for sporadic, rapid hot flashes), Sanguinarina (counteracts hot flashes on the face, neck and ears) and Kali Phosphoricum.

      7. Other Western Herbs

      Other similar-acting plants include sarsaparilla, spearmint, licorice root, damiana, chasteberry, wild yams, motherwort, and red raspberry leaf.

      8. Sage

      Try drinking a few cups of organic sage tea daily. Sage tea can be found at your local grocery store or online. Besides providing hot flash relief, sage helps with digestion, infant diarrhea and headaches.

      9. Vitamin C

      Some women have found that bioflavanoids found in Vitamin C can help reduce the frequency of hot flashes. In order to get hot flash relief, I would recommend eating more foods with Vitamin C.

      10. Vitamin E

      Studies have shown that antioxidants in Vitamin E play a significant role in reducing the symptoms of hot flashes.[1] In order to get hot flash relief, take the recommended dosage of a Vitamin E supplement or eat more foods with Vitamin E.

      11. Natural Progesterone Cream

      Most women are actually estrogen dominant due to the amount of soy in foods. In most cases of menopause doctors actually prescribe more estrogen. I highly recommend using a cream to help balance menopausal hormone levels and to reduce hot flashes.

  34. QUESTION:
    Are there any remedies to stop my husband's excessive sweating?
    Me and my husband are 22, and we have been together for six years, he has always had a problem with sweating so bad that it just literly runs and drips off him-this is happening all over his body and it doesn't take much to get it going (like 75% weather or spicy food, sometimes just doing the dishes he breaks a sweat) He is in good shape and all around a healthy guy (he is army active duty so he has to be!) anyway, it is really starting to take a toll on him, he gets so frustrated from it dripping in his eyes at work, and is so exhausted in the evening...everything i have found or looked up has to do with excessive sweating just in certian parts of the body, does anyone know what this could be or what we could do to help it?

    • ANSWER:
      Sweating is a natural phaenomenon necessary for the regulation of an individual's body-temperature. The secretion of sweat is mediated by a portion of our vegetative nervous system (the Sympathetic Nervous System). In some people (approximately 1% of the population), this system is working at a very high activity level, far higher than needed to keep a constant temperature. This condition is referred to as hyperhidrosis.

      Causes:
      1. Underlying diseases/illness:
      * Hyperthyroidism or similar endocrine diseases
      * Endocrine treatment for prostatic cancer or other types of malignant disease
      * Severe psychiatric disorders
      * Obesity
      * Menopause
      2. Hyperhidrosis without known cause (=primary or essential hyperhidrosis)
      This is a far more frequent condition, generally, localized in one or several locations of the body (most often hands, feet, armpits or a combination of them). It usually starts during childhood or adolescence and persists all life. Nervousness and anxiety can elicit or aggravate sweating, but psychological/psichiatric disturbances are only rarely the cause of the disorder.

      Treatment:
      In secondary hyperhidrosis, the underlying condition should be treated first. Patints on hormonal therapy for prostatic cancer (castration, LHRH-analoges) with disturbing sweat attacks can get relief by the administration of antiestrogens (ciproterone acetate).

      In patients with primary hyperhidrosis or for symptomatic treatment of heavy sweating in patients with secondary hyperhidrosis, not treatable otherwise, the following methods have been adopted. In psychiatric patients with hyperhidrosis, successful treatment this symptom often reduces the tendency towards emotional distress.
      ANTIPERSPIRANTS

      Usually recommended as the first therapeutic measure. The most effective agent appears to be alluminum chloride (20-25%) in 70-90% alcohol, applied in the evening 2-3 times/week. Generally, this treatment is sufficient in cases with light to moderate hyperhidrosis but has to repeated regularly.

      IONTOPHORESIS

      Can be tried if antiperspirants have not lead to the desired result. This method consists in applying low intensity electric current (15-18 mA), supplied by a D/C generator, to the palms and/or soles immersed in an electrolyte solution. The procedure has to be repeated regularly, initially in 20' sessions several times/week, gradually stretching out the interval between treatments to 1-2 weeks. The results vary: many patients, suffering from light or moderate hyperhiderosis, are happy with the method, some may consider it too time-consuming or inefficient, and comparably expensive. It is difficult to apply in axillary, and impossible to use in diffuse hyperhidrosis of the face or the trunk/thigh region.

      Equipment, specifically designed for the treatment of hyperhidrosis at home or in the physician's office, is commercially available from different suppliers.

      DRUGS

      There are no specific drugs available against profuse sweating. Psychotropic (mostly sedative) and/or anticholinergic drugs are often tested but show usually too many side-effects before any noticeable result can be achieved. Hence, they are, as a rule, not recommended. In those few cases who suffer from profuse sweating on the trunk (but not the extremities), a low dose of anticholinergic agent can slightly alleviate the symptoms without rendering life unsupportable from side-effects (dry mouth, accomodation difficulties of the eyes, etc), but a dosage necessary to normalize the amount of sweating will rarely be tolerated.

      BOTULINUM TOXIN

      A family of toxins produced by a bacteria known as Clostridium botulinum. This toxin is one of the most lethal poisons known, interfering with the effect of the transmitter substance acethylcholine at the synapses (the contact point of a nerve ending with another nerve cell or a muscle) and leading to progressive paralysis of all muscles in the body, including the respiratory muscles. In extremely low doses, botulinus toxin has been adopted in cases with localized muscle hyperactivity (lid spasms, torticollis, etc), resulting in a reduction in transmitting impulses to the muscle. Initial reports have been published regarding the use of botulinum toxin in hyperhidrosis. It seems to work adequately in axillary hyperhidrosis, lasting for 6-12 months depending on the dosage (0.5-1.0 Units/cm2;). A drawback are the costs of this treatment which has to be repeated at regular intervals, but the side-effects seem to be negligible if dosages are kept low.

      SURGERY

      * Excision of the axillary sweat glands

      Patients with axillary hyperhidrosis who are unresponsive to medical therapy can be effectively treated by excision of the axillary sweat glands. If sweating extends beyond the hairy portion of the axilla, several skin incisions may be needed, sometimes resulting in formation of hypertrophic and/or constrictive scars.

      * Sympathectomy

      - The principle of sympathectomy is to interrupt the nerve tracks and nodes (ganglia) which transmit the signals to the sweat glands. Basically, this can be achieved for all locations in the body, but only the nerve nodes responsible for the sweat glands of the palms and the face are accessible without the need for a major surgical procedure. Today, the treatment of choice for moderate to severe palmar and facial hyperhidrosis (but also axillary, especially if combined with palmar sweating), consists in a surgical procedure known as Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy. This minimal-invasive endoscopic technique has been developed in recent years in a few hospitals in Europe, superseeding Conventional Thoracic Sympathectomy, a very traumatic procedure performed in the past. The endoscopic technique is very safe, if performed by a surgeon experienced in this type of procedure, and leads to definitive cure in nearly 100% of patients, leaving only a minimal scar in the armpit.

      - Individuals with combined hyperhidrosis of the palms and soles have a good chance to improve the sweating of their feet after an operation aiming to suppress sweating of the hands. Isolated plantar hyperhidrosis can, however, only cured by Lumbar Sympathectomy, an open abdominal procedure.

      - Diffuse hyperhidrosis of the trunk or general sweating of the whole body cannot be treated by surgery.

      OTHER TREATMENT OPTIONS

      * "Alternative Medicine"

      In the experience of the author, many patients, disappointed by the treatment offered by their doctors, have tried different methods of alternative therapy including homoeopathy, massage, acupuncture and phytotherapeutic drugs, in almost all cases without noticeable improvement.

      * Hypnosis

      There are no systematic studies on this method. Few patiens have tried it, reporting poor results on palmar hyperhidrosis.

      * Psychotherapy

      Very limited effect in the absolut majority of patients. Psychological problems are in most cases a consequence of hyperhidrosis, not the cause. Hence, psychiatric or psychopharmacologic therapy cannot cure this disorder, at most it may help the patient to accept living with the problem.

  35. QUESTION:
    Mother has gone through menopause, now she keeps on sweating. Why is that?
    How can you help the sweating?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause, Stress, Night Sweats And Weight Gain

      In Menopause the first signs that you experience is the triggering of night sweats and hot flashes. Finding relief is to recognize why and what is happening to you. Most women go through this problem which sometimes lasts for a couple of years. You need to observe and make a note of when your hot flashes and night sweats occur. When your stress levels are high you may notice that it happens more often.

      Some of the cause is finances, a teenager, having problems with your partner or maybe a spouse who is cheating on you. Night sweats and hot flashes become more if you consume too much alcohol, smoke or drink caffeine excessively. If you are worried and are anxious then these symptoms trigger frequently. Stress and anxiety are also a part of menopause. You experience more symptoms of menopause when your hormones fluctuate and your estrogen levels keep declining until you feel you are exhausted.

      It can become worse in the night and even turn into an irritation in the middle of the night. Some women are kept awake the entire the night, soaked in sweat from head to toe. With hot flashes automatically disrupted sleep patterns leave you like a wash cloth the following morning. It makes it worse if you also have to deal with it in the daytime as well. It will leave you fatigued and exhausted.

      You may fall asleep in the office ore keep nodding and wishing you could just have had one good night of sleep. No woman wants to have her body form into the shape of an apple. This is what happens with weight gain during menopause and it depends on your dietary intake. Eat a health diet, take natural supplements and exercise but first make sure you check with your physician before doing any for of weight training to build loss of muscle or any other exercise.

  36. QUESTION:
    What did women do for menopausal symptoms (i.e. hot flashes, etc.) prior to hormonal replacement therapy?
    I am curious about what women may have done (prior to say thirty to forty years ago) because I have such incredible relief from extreme perimenopausal/menopausal symptoms (namely extreme hot flashes and mood changes) with the use of plant based hormones estrogen and progesterone.

    • ANSWER:
      I use a natural hormone estrogen called estradial. I also drink a lot of soy milk. I've had no luck with over the conter natural products. I guess a lot depends on if this is a natural menopause, or if it is from a surgical menopause. Sudden menopause from surgery is harder to control.

  37. QUESTION:
    can a women be sexually aroused if she has had complete hysterectomy?

    • ANSWER:
      Reclaiming Your Lost Libido - According to NIH-sponsored survey in Journal of the American Medical Association 43% of women report recognizable sexual dysfunction. Problems range from not having orgasms to no sexual desire at all. 35% of estimated 40 to 50 million women who have sexual dysfunction have no/low sexual desire - what the experts call hypo-active sex drive, (HSD).
      Libido Can Be Reclaimed - "Sexual dysfunction made of relationship conflicts, emotional issues, past traumas, hormonal imbalances & physical responses such as pain, arousal, or orgasm problems," Emerging research revealing that libido is neither all in your head/body, "Reclaiming desire takes mind-body approach customized to each woman's symptoms - No magic cure & no one set solution." Uncovering Sex Squelchers - What symptoms related to fantasies, arousal, vaginal dryness, genital sensation, & orgasm. When did libido problems begin? Problems sudden or gradual? What was going on when interest in sex took a nosedive? Leading libido killers: - Post-childbirth & breastfeeding, woman is exhausted & sleep-deprived. Pelvic nerves & muscles may have been damaged during delivery, which lowers genital sensitivity. BF lowers levels of estradial, hormone responsible for keeping urogenital tract lubricated & supple. This can make penetration painful. BF also raises prolactin hormone, which suppresses sexual desire & lowers testosterone - hormone in both genders that stokes desire. Onset of menopause, estradial is reduced with natural/surgical menopause (removal of ovaries, via hysterectomy) testosterone production drops by up to half, may trigger sudden dip in sex drive, loss of pubic hair, diminished sensitivity in clitoris, nipples, weakened ability to climax. Antidepressants & other drugs - birth control pills, blood-pressure lowering drugs, oestrogen replacement, stress, juggling job/childcare, marital problems, death in family, change of location - all can overload adrenal hormones, deplete energy, jump start over-secretion of prolactin & may lead to depression - major contributor to HSD. Remedies that Restore Spark - Adjust your meds, you may need to switch to higher oestrogen birth control pill or use barrier contraceptive. Gradually lower SSRI dose or try Wellbutrin (bupropion) which boosts production of dopamine, a chemical messenger linked to sexual desire. Restore vaginal lubrication - prescription oestrogen regimens provide effective relief. Dubbed "hormone of desire," testosterone replacement has become focus of intense study. While no preparations are as yet FDA-approved, studies show that women nearing or beyond menopause, oral or topical testosterone may help switch on sexual urges & re-sensitize genitals. May also boost energy & well-being & override libido-lowering effects of SSRIs. Important to note that "we don't have long-term randomized clinical studies & there have been no conclusive studies on testosterone in younger women," Because testosterone has potential to change HDL (high density lipoprotein - "good" cholesterol) & LDL (low-density lipoprotein - "bad" cholesterol), cholesterol levels should be monitored carefully. Women at risk for heart or liver disease may not be good candidates for testosterone. Women at risk for breast cancer should avoid testosterone since a % of this hormone converts to oestrogen, believed to fuel certain breast cancers. Patches, Creams, & Troches - Testosterone can be prescribed in pill, patches, creams, suppositories & lozenges (also called troches) in compounded or synthetic forms. Non-pill preparations that bypass liver may be best place to start. A six-week trial is generally recommended. Here are two options: Under tongue troches. "Testosterone lozenges can be used intermittently as kind of jump-start for libido,". "For example, take lozenge after dinner in preparation for sex that night," Topical cream - An prescribed array of creams & gels that can be rubbed directly on vulva. "Methyltestosterone does not get converted to oestrogen so these preparations may be theoretically safer," Preparations range from 1% to 2%. If you have right dosage for your body, effects of creams can kick in as early as a half-hour later.Testosterone replacement need not be long-term. "Once sex behaviour has shifted, you can stop testosterone & see how sex goes without hormones," .Work on it as couple - When she turns off sexually, mate may feel undesired, may withdraw, causing her to shut down further. "Couples need to find ways to reconnect verbally/non-verbally outside bedroom," Sensual pleasures - dance lessons, pedicure or even massage, exercise such as yoga squats, lunges & lifting - helps blood flow in pelvis & clitoris. Yoga helps open body to sensations & can boost your body image.

  38. QUESTION:
    Any medical minded buffs out there?
    I have been going through the menopause for a year or so now and thought that these horrible sweats would subside eventually. Unfortunately, they are getting worse, not only in the night, I now have them most of the day and it's interfering with my everyday life and work.. I have not opted for hormone replacement, so is there anything, other than that, which will calm these sweats down?? Also, is there a time limit that I should be looking forward to?? Thanks, I would really appreciate any decent advice...

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, these symptoms and discomfort are very typical, and they do take a while, there is not a set "time limit".

      Most "natural" remedies do not seem to be as effective as HRT, from what I had read and heard. But then some women swear by them.

      Check this out:

      HOT FLASHES: HERBAL AIDS

      Herbal remedies for women with hot flashes include

      1. plants that cool the system, such as chickweed, elder and violet;
      2. plants that nourish or increase oxygen utilization in the liver, such as dong quai, dandelion, Ho Shou Wu (polygonum multiflorum) and yellow dock; and
      3. plants rich in phytosterols, such as black cohosh.31

      Herbs and supplements found helpful by Dr. Susan Lark in her medical practice include dong quai, black cohosh, blue cohosh, unicorn root, fennel, sarsaparilla, red clover, wild yam root, yam, bioflavonoids and vitamin E. Dr. Michael Murray finds the four most useful herbs for treatment of hot flashes to be dong quai, licorice root, chasteberry (vitex) and black cohosh.

      Hot flashes deplete vitamin B, vitamin C, magnesium and potassium. Frequent use of red clover or oatstraw infusions will help replace these needed nutrients,31 or these nutrients can also be found in food, or taken as supplements.

      Dong quai is an emmenagogue that has been found very helpful for menopausal problems such as regulation of hot flashes, and it is reported to help relieve mental and emotional upset.35

      Dong quai has been shown to both contract and relax uterine muscles in anaesthetized dogs, cats and rabbits. The contractive (excitatory) ingredient is felt to be a water and alcohol soluble, non-volatile oil component, whereas the relaxing (inhibitory) component is considered to be a volatile oil with high boiling point. This, not an estrogenic effect, is felt to be the mechanism underlying the effectiveness of dong quai in dysmenorrhea.34

      The effectiveness of dong quai in treating hot flashes may be due to stabilization of blood vessels.19 However, if you feel hot much of the time dong quai may not be your ally.31

      Chaste berry (Vitex) has been found to affect pituitary function and has many uses, particularly in regulating hot flashes and dizziness. Beneficial effects in menopause may be due to its role in altering LH and FSH secretion.19 Vitex lowers estrogen levels and increases progesterone levels, thus keeping bones and vaginal walls strong. Daily use enhances progesterone and luteotropic hormone but inhibits others such as FSH and prolactin. It also increases production of the brain chemical dopamine. It contains flavonoids, glycosides and micronutrients, but lacks phytosterols, making it a slow-acting tonic. Results become evident after 2-3 months of use, and permanent improvement requires a 1-year commitment.4

      Black cohosh was widely used by the American Indians and later by American colonists for relief of menstrual cramps and menopause. Recent scientific investigation has upheld the effectiveness of black cohosh as a treatment for dysmenorrhea and menopause. Clinical studies have shown extracts of black cohosh to relieve not only hot flashes but also depression and vaginal atrophy. In addition to these vascular effects, black cohosh reduces LH levels; thus the plant has a significant estrogenic effect.19 The use of 10-15 drops once or twice a day for several months significantly reduces LH but not FSH. Black cohosh has also been found to aid digestion by increasing digestive juices; use 3- 5 drops with meals.31
      Contraindications: Do not use black cohosh if you have menstrual flooding or suspect you may be pregnant. The irritating effects (headache, dizziness, visual disturbance, nausea) of black cohosh and other members of the buttercup family are more common and more troublesome in preparations made from dried, powdered roots. Given its estrogenic component, pregnant and nursing women should probably avoid the herb. Some herbalists extend this warning to women with estrogen-dependent cancer and women who are taking birth control pills or estrogen supplements after menopause. The same precaution applies to individuals with certain types of heart disease or those taking sedatives or blood pressure medications.

      Motherwort has been found to lessen the severity, frequency and duration of hot flashes, ease stressed nerves, relieve anxiety, and relieve insomnia. For best results with hot flashes, use this herb frequently for 3 months. A common dosage for hot flashes is 15-25 drops of tincture, 1-6 times a day. Do not use if you are experiencing menstrual flooding as motherwort can aggravate this.31

      Licorice root contains a saponin-like glycoside, glycyrrhizin (glycrrhizic acid)33 and has historically been used for a variety of female disorders and also as an expectorant and antitussive in treatment of respiratory tract infections and asthma. It is believed to reduce estrogen while increasing progesterone and is used for this reason by Dr. Michael Murray in his cli

  39. QUESTION:
    What causes mood swings...feel great one minute anxious the next then moody/sad/lazy & so forth all day long..
    Is there anything mental and/or natural that will help mood swings in a 45/F. Everything in my life is good except my roller coaster mood swings.

    • ANSWER:
      This is such a tough question to answer, not knowing anything about your mental and physical history! There are so many possible causes for mood swings, but hormones are usually the culprit. The problem is figuring out the source of these unruly hormones in order to ease the problem.
      There are several possibilities here, but first things first-you're not going bonkers. The fact that you're recognizing these mood swings for what they are means your mental condition is pretty sound. So that is always a relief.
      Menopause? You're about the right age. If that is a possibility then you might want to try Estroven or other herbal menopause relief products from a health food store. The symptoms of menopause can be an off and on thing for as many as ten years!! You can also check with your doctor, just to be sure everything is on the up and up with the ole reproductive system.
      If your weight is a little too high, a little too low, or you've noticed any major weight changes (that you haven't been doing anything to cause) you want to see your doctor. There are all kinds of minor issues with the body that can cause mood swings and the symtoms can be subtle. The endocrine system is a complex system spread throughout your body and sometimes it goes wacky for a bit. But no worries, those problems are usually easily corrected!
      If you're just feeling stressed out or bugged by something then I agree with the other answer, clean your house, take a walk, make sure you are eating a nice healthy diet and getting a little work out every day. Watch your diet for something you may have missed (like caffeine) if your body has become secretly dependent on something and you unwittingly took that out of your diet it could certainly cause your shifty moods.
      Good Luck!!

  40. QUESTION:
    If I bled does it mean I had my period?
    I recently had a pregnancy scare and I was waiting for my period to come and then it did. Well what I thought was my period did. Then I read about it, that a lot of women mistake the bleeding for their period. It says that very early in a pregnancy women sometimes bleed or have spotting. And I'm not sure which one it was. But also something really important, I was PMS-ing and my boobs were soar and I had mood swings, things like that. So if it WAS the spotting and I am pregnant would I still have PMS-ed and everything?

    • ANSWER:
      take a pregnancy test or go to your doctor and just be sure...

      Symptoms of PMS can be terrible, they have ruined my week before! To rid yourself from this pain after you find out the results from your test... At Last Naturals has as this gel natural gel made with yam roots that helps balance your system by releasing phyto-progesterone into your system.

      http://www.atlastnaturals.com/categories/PMS-%26-Peri-%7B47%7D-Menopause-Relief/

  41. QUESTION:
    i am 45 years old and i have been diagnosed with fibroids . i am starting to feel the symtoms of menopause.?
    i just want to know should i have surgery and remove the fibroid or should i just let nature take it course and go through menopause and the bleeding will stop all together.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      You seemed to have done a lot of research on the treatment options available to you.

      For women approaching menopause ( which can happen anytime between 45-50 years it is best to adopt the wait and watch approach. With the onset of menopause the levels of estrogen in your body will automatically decline and stop your fibroids growth.

      Are the fibriods symptoms bothering you? If so for relief from pain and discomfort caused by fibroids you can consider natural remedies for fibroids treatment. These are simple cures based on diet, exercise, weight control and herbal medication to shrink fibroids naturally and prevent the growth of new tumors.

      http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Select-Type-of-Treatment-For-Fibroids-Which-Will-Suit-You-the-Best&id=4788711

  42. QUESTION:
    What are the first signs of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      One of the first signs of menopause is a change in periods. They may become less regular or be lighter. Some women have short times of heavy bleeding.

      Eighty percent of American women experience hot flashes during perimenopause. Most flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They should disappear within a few years after menopause.

      Body tissue in the genital area becomes drier and thinner as estrogen levels change. Around the time of menopause, your feelings about sex might change. It's generally recommended to still use birth control until you have gone 1 year without a period, if you do not want to become pregnant.

      Feeling tired, trouble getting to sleep, waking up early, and being bothered by night sweats are common symptoms.

      Menopause is a natural process that every woman experiences and if signs aren't severe, you may not need treatment. For some women, time will fly by without any problems. However, the majority of women need some level of intervention to help with the annoying symptoms.

      One of the biggest decisions is whether to take hormone replacement therapy. While many women find great relief with this form of treatment, new controversial information about HRT has been revealed.

  43. QUESTION:
    Does any one have a home remedy for Hot Flashes.?
    Dr. has taken me off Prempro since I've been on it for so long. The hot flashes just won't leave me. Am struggling to sleep at nite. Have had this problem for more than 20 yrs. The gyne sez some people never get rid of them and I guess I'm 1 of them. Have tried Soy stuff(which my Male G.P. suggested) and Cohase.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the webmd site, hope it helps............

      Managing hot flashes

      Most women experience hot flashes at some point before or after menopause, when their estrogen levels are declining. While some women have few to no hot flashes, others have them numerous times per day. If hot flashes are disrupting your sleep or daily life, you are no doubt looking for relief. Fortunately, you have a number of self-care and medical treatment options that can help you manage your symptoms.
      Key points

      * However disruptive and frustrating they may be, hot flashes are not a sign of a medical problem. They are a normal response to natural hormonal changes in your body. Hot flashes usually subside after the first or second year following menopause, when estrogen levels stabilize at a low level.
      * Tobacco use, heavy alcohol use, and stress tend to worsen hot flashes. By avoiding these risk factors, exercising regularly, and eating well, you can prevent or reduce hot flashes.
      * The body-mind connection is a powerful element of hot flashes and emotional symptoms. Rhythmic breathing exercises (paced respiration), which help you meditate and relax, can effectively reduce your hot flashes.1, 2
      * Treatments that may either reduce or stop moderate to severe hot flashes include short-term, low-dose estrogen (hormone therapy), certain antidepressant and blood pressure medications, and the herb black cohosh.

      How can I manage hot flashes

      You can manage hot flashes by making certain lifestyle choices. You can also take daily medication. Some measures help prevent or reduce hot flashes, and others can make you more comfortable when you're having a hot flash. If you are looking for additional treatment measures, you have a few options to choose from.
      Lifestyle choices for preventing or reducing hot flashes

      Eat and drink well, and avoid smoking.

      * Limit your intake of alcohol.
      * Drink cold beverages rather than hot ones.
      * Eat smaller, more frequent meals to avoid the heat generated by digesting large amounts of food.
      * Eat plenty of low-fat, high-fiber foods.
      * Do not smoke or use other forms of tobacco.

      Stay cool.

      * Keep your environment cool, or use a fan.
      * Dress in layers, so you can remove clothes as needed.
      * Wear natural fabrics, such as cotton and silk.
      * Sleep with fewer blankets.

      Reduce stress.

      * Get regular physical exercise.
      * Use relaxation techniques, such as breathing exercises, yoga, or biofeedback. Using a breathing-for-relaxation exercise called paced respiration has been shown to significantly reduce hot flashes and emotional symptoms.1, 2

      Medical treatment options for hot flashes

      * Short-term, low-dose hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can reduce or stop hot flashes and other perimenopausal symptoms by raising your body's estrogen level. Use the lowest dose needed for the shortest possible time and have checkups every 6 months. This is because HRT causes breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and dementia in a small number of women. These risks may be different for younger menopausal women.3, 4 There are as yet no firm safety guidelines for HRT use by healthy women. If you have a history of cardiovascular disease or breast cancer, avoid using estrogen for hot-flash relief-other options are available.
      * Estrogen-progestin birth control pills (before menopause) can reduce or stop hot flashes and other perimenopausal symptoms by evening out fluctuating hormones. If you are older than 35 and smoke, have diabetes, or have a personal or family history of cardiovascular disease or breast cancer, avoid using estrogen for hot-flash relief-other options are available.
      * Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant medication can reduce the number and severity of hot flashes by improving the brain's use of serotonin, which helps regulate body temperature.5 Side effects are possible. This type of medication is a good choice if hot flashes, irritability, or mood swings are your only perimenopausal symptom.
      * Clonidine, a high blood pressure medication, can reduce the number and severity of hot flashes by lowering blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure is safe for some women and not for others.6 This type of medication is a good choice if hot flashes are your only perimenopausal symptom, especially if you have high blood pressure.
      * Black cohosh may reduce or prevent hot flashes, depression, and anxiety as well as low-dose estrogen does.7, 8 As with HRT, have a checkup every 6 months when taking black cohosh. Research on human cells and on animals suggests that black cohosh doesn't cause the same cancer changes that estrogen does. But it's best to be cautious until long-term studies are done.8
      * Some women eat and drink a lot of soy to even out hot flashes and other perimenopausal symptoms. However, studies show mixed results about whether soy phytoestrogens are clearly effective, particularly when taken as a pill. This may be because the active ingredients in soy are not well understood.9

      Here is the link in case you want to research more options...............

      http://www.webmd.com/menopause/Managing-hot-flashes

      Here is the link to all articles at webmd on hot flashes.

      http://www.webmd.com/search/search_results/default.aspx?query=hot+flashes&x=20&y=6

  44. QUESTION:
    About Menopause and Constipation?
    I would like to know if your Mom knows the Natural Feminelle product from Biotanic Company is worth it's price? I feel really sick.
    I am depressed because I am taking , Generic Paroxetine(Paxil) but I have more than 5 months than it does not work .I believe Paroxetine makes me get very severe constipation I feel like I am going to explode. I have bloating all the time.

    Thanks for your attention.

    Very concerned Mother.

    • ANSWER:
      You have several questions rolled into one. :-)

      First of all, most medications lead to constipation. A good natural solution is Herbal Fiberblend. It's a combination of psyllium fiber and herbs that gently but very effectively gets things going and cleanses your bowels and helps them get healthy.

      Just mix it in a small glass of water or juice twice a day. You'll be thrilled with how much better you will feel. It is well worth the price.

      If you do take Herbal Fiberblend, don't take it at the same time of day as your medications - wait about an hour between them.

      For menopause, I highly recommend Renewed Balance. Renewed Balance is a natural progesterone cream that is safe and really helps reduce the symptoms of menopause.

      My mom used natural progesterone during her menopause and still use it post menopause.

      I haven't started menopause yet, but I've been using natural progesterone cream for about 8 years and have found Renewed Balance to be the best of the bunch so far.

      Hope you get some relief soon.

  45. QUESTION:
    I think my Mom is going through menopause and it's driving me insane!?
    We're like the best of friends and last week we were completely fine and all of a sudden this week she is being a complete WITCH! To me, my brother, my sister-in-law and even get mad at the kids for no reason even if they scream one notch past her tolerance.... We all just wanna get out of here and away from her, what can we do to calm her crazy a$$ down?!?!?!?!? Is there like pills i can buy her and tell her to take that will stop her insane mood swings? lol HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Dear,
      Sometime this will happen in menopause. Her mood is swing. Please give her support and if possible try to give her lost of vitamins that will help her to get relief from menopause symptoms. Even you can give her natural menopause supplement. Natural supplement is effective without any side effects. Take care of her and give her emotional support.

  46. QUESTION:
    Painful PMS followed by painless period?
    I'm 21. I've never had symptoms of PMS before, but this month I had pains and feelings of depression (very bad, not me!) for about 10 days. Also I usually have a painful period, but I don't feel anything while having it. Is this odd?

    • ANSWER:
      i wouldn't worry about it there are sometimes that you can have pains and other times you wont have it at all.

      It sound like symptoms of PMS which can be terrible, they have ruined my week before! To rid yourself from this pain At Last Naturals has as this gel natural gel made with yam roots that helps balance your system by releasing phyto-progesterone into your system.

      http://www.atlastnaturals.com/categories/PMS-%26-Peri-%7B47%7D-Menopause-Relief/

  47. QUESTION:
    was gum bleeding one of your pregnancy symptoms ?
    my gums bleed when i get preg and im bleeding throuout the pregnancy as soon as im no tpreg it stops, i have not bleeded since dec13 07 when my baby was born sleeping and now i started to bleed again thi smorning when i brushed my teeth. im not excited or anything im 6 dpo and this was my first clomid round along with metformin when can i test.

    • ANSWER:
      pregnant women are really prone to gum diseases. hormones trigger gum disease, during pregnancy there is an increase in the level of your hormones. it does not only happen during pregnancy but also during or before menstruation and menopause.
      gum disease if left untreated may cause a more serious dental problem. to gain relief from discomfort pay extra attention to your oral health hygiene, brush and floss daily as to prevent bacteria build up. use natural oral health care products that will aid the bleeding and prevention of further infection. and if any case that the situation gets worst you may visit your dentist for professional recommendations.
      to know more about dental health issues during pregnancy you may visit http://www.themouthdoctor.com

  48. QUESTION:
    hot flashes, how much is too much?
    I recently started having hot flashes that are embarrassing and happen many times through out the day. is there any relief? I started taking an over the counter med for menopause symptoms but no Relief yet. Im hating this so much. people stare as I got sweat pouring down my face. I take a shower and cant put make up on without it sweating right off, help me i'm too young for this

    • ANSWER:
      Your hormones are going awol, hormone replacement can work but if you are having no other symptoms i would steer clear...my aunt was having similar problems and she went down the natural route i think she saw a Chinese herbal specialist who told her menopause is a lack of something. your hormones are changing so much your body needs the right tools 'ie vitamins and minerals to do the job properly she had to change her diet eat lots of good fats avocado, olive oil, coconut oil etc and eat lots of greens he also gave her herbs she is 99.9 % better she has embraced the new life change co's she says she feels good. If you believe or not worked for her if you don't want to see a herbalist at least start with the good fats and lots of raw veggies. Oh and she also said she had to have a low intake of carbohydrates bread pasta, even sugar is a carb (which i did not know) etc as these interfere with hormones especially the ones that control insulin.
      When she told her doctor she was seeing a herbalist he just laughed.

  49. QUESTION:
    does anyone know if there is a natural cure for endometriosis and if not what can be done for the pain?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment for endometriosis has varied over the years, and there is still no absolute cure. If you don't have any symptoms, and you're not planning to have any (more) children, then no treatment is necessary, just regular checkups. If you have only mild symptoms, and infertility is not a factor, simple painkillers like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen may be all that's needed.

      For severe symptoms, depending on where the growths are located and their size, your doctor may recommend a hysterectomy and removal of the ovaries. Before you decide whether this is indicated, get a few separate opinions from other doctors. Although hysterectomy is considered a definitive cure, research has shown that women who undergo a hysterectomy for endometriosis sometimes experience a recurrence of the disease.

      Conservative surgery involves removing the growths themselves, rather than any reproductive organs. One procedure, which was shown on The Learning Channel's "The Operation," is called operative laparoscopy. Through a laparoscope, surgery is done with a laser, a cautery, or small surgical instruments. Again, as with more radical surgery, recurrence is common after this procedure. Conservative surgery is the treatment of choice for women under thirty-five who are diagnosed with endometriosis in the early stages and who want to have children. About 40 percent of these women will go on to conceive. After conservative surgery, between 20 and 50 percent of endometriosis patients will need more radical surgery.

      If you're infertile or don't wish to get pregnant, simply going on a progestin-containing oral contraceptive or a progesterone supplement, such as Provera, may control your endometriosis. This works for as long as you're taking the synthetic hormones, and sometimes the therapy can force endometriosis into remission for months or years after going off the hormones.

      If that doesn't work, your doctor may recommend you take the drug danazol (a testosterone derivative). When a low dose of danazol is taken (roughly 100 to 200 mg per day), many women experience relief as well as a scanty menstrual flow. But there are "androgenic" (or progesterone-related) side effects to danazol, which include weight gain, acne, muscle cramps, unwanted hair growth, voice-deepening, water retention, and occasionally, liver problems since the liver has to metabolize this drug.

      If you're not having success with danazol, there is a slightly more severe treatment with a GnRH, which is often used in fertility treatments. This drug "copies" your natural GnRH, thereby shutting it down and throwing you into a sort of "controlled" menopause. Synthetic hormones introduced into your body as "copies" are called analogues or agonists. GnRH is administered through injection, as a pump spray, or nasal spray. Brand names include Lupron, Synarel, or Zoladex. GnRH is strong medication and should only be considered in very severe situations.

      If you decide to have surgery to treat endometriosis, GnRH therapy is sometimes recommended for about two to three months prior to surgery to dry up your menstrual flow.

      Pregnancy As a Cure

      Believe it or not, pregnancy does cause endometriosis to go into temporary remission, because you don't ovulate when you're pregnant. Furthermore, permanent remission of endometriosis has been known to occur after childbirth; the growths in this case shrink, and the pain associated with the disease stops. The problem is, the longer you have endometriosis, the greater your chance of becoming infertile. If you have been diagnosed with endometriosis, are planning to have children, and are in a position to have a family (that is, you have a supportive partner and are financially stable), then getting pregnant is a good idea. In other words, why wait? In addition, the disease may also worsen with time.

      Pregnancy as a prescription is not feasible in many cases. Infertility may have already set in, while many women don't have the means in place to have a child. Even under the best of circumstances, women with endometriosis have a higher risk of ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage. One study found that full-term pregnancies and labor are more difficult when the mother has endometriosis.

      Menopause

      In general, menopause does cure endometriosis, which is why a hysterectomy is performed. But a severe case of endometriosis can be reactivitated if you begin hormone replacement therapy or continue producing hormones after menopause, which is common. In fact, the oldest woman to be diagnosed with endometriosis was age seventy-eight. Some doctors suggest no replacement hormone be given for about three to nine months after menopause or a hysterectomy procedure.

  50. QUESTION:
    herbal supplements solution to fibroids?
    non surgical options that have been tested and certified by physicians .

    • ANSWER:
      Natural treatment includes a whole foods diet with the elimination of estrogen containing meat and dairy products, plenty of phytoestrogen foods including soy, flax, and other beans and grains, vitamin and mineral supplementation including plenty of Vitamin C, betacarotene, vitamin E, B vitamins and magnesium.

      Pelvic circulation and energy can be increased with kegal exercises and alternating sitz baths. Acupuncture and massage can also increase circulation and energy. Emotional work should focus on expressing creativity.

      Herbal treatment for fibroids involves balancing hormones, increasing circulation and elimination, reducing bleeding and managing pain.

      To correct hormonal imbalance-
      Vitex- helps to normalize hormonal production and ovulation through its effects on the pituitary gland.
      Dosage- Liquid extract- 1/2 teaspoon each morning,
      Dry herb in capsules- 500 mg each morning
      Standardized extract-225 milligrams of an extract standardized for 0.5 percent agnusides

      To improve elimination-
      Dandelion-a very good nutritive herb with high levels of vitamins and minerals. Dandelion improves liver function, helping to metabolize hormones.
      Dosage-Liquid extract- 1 teaspoon three times a day
      Dry herb in capsules- 1000 mg three times a day

      To improve circulation and decrease bleeding-
      Witch hazel- a good astringent herb to help with excessive uterine bleeding
      Liquid extract- 1/4-1/2 teaspoon three times a day
      Dry herb in capsules-250-500 mg three times a day
      Caution- only use witch hazel intended for internal use, witch hazel preparations intended for topical application should not be taken internally.

      Relief of pain-
      Wild Yam-a good antispasmodic
      Liquid extract- 1/2-1 teaspoon every 2-3 hours as needed for pain
      Dry herb in capsules- 500- 1000 mg every 2-3 hours as needed for pain

      Sometimes it is recommended that you "wait and see" what will happen. This approach is most practical when menopause is not far away and when symptoms are limited. Fibroids generally continue to grow until menopause.


natural relief for menopause symptoms

Treatments Of Menopause

If you are wondering what is involved in obstetrics, you should first know that it is the term for the care of pregnant women. Therefore, anything that you would expect during prenatal visits should be something that an obstetrician will do. Find out the typical tasks that someone in obstetrics should be experienced at so that you know what you can expect from your appointments.

One of the first screenings run by most doctors in this field is the test to make sure that you are in fact pregnant. This is usually a urine test, but some offices run blood tests, especially if you are one of the few women whose body does not have enough hormones early in pregnancy to get a positive result on a urine test. After this screening, your doctor should tell you the results, and may send you to a lab to find out just how high your hormone count is. The result of this type of test can tell doctors if your pregnancy is progressing properly, or if you might be about to suffer a miscarriage.

You can also expect your obstetrician to send you to an ultrasound technician to get a sonogram of your baby around six weeks gestation. This allows the obstetrics office to determine how far along you are, and whether you are having just one baby or multiples. You will usually also see the heartbeat at this appointment, letting you know that the pregnancy is likely viable at this point.

If your pregnancy continues to progress normally, you will return to the doctor's office at least once per month for the first eight months. You can expect the obstetrician to send you for at least one more ultrasound, usually to determine the sex of the baby and make sure there are no abnormalities. You will also likely take part in various screenings to ensure that you and your baby are healthy. Many of the tests are optional and are just for your peace of mind, but others that screen for conditions that are dangerous to the baby and can be treated if found early are required. This often includes the gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus tests.

Having an idea of what obstetrics usually involves is advised so that you know that your doctor is doing everything possible to ensure the health of your child. It will also let you know ahead of time what to expect from your appointments. If you do not experience most of these screenings and checkups from your doctor throughout your pregnancy, it may be time to change physicians.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can Fluoxetine be used to treat menopause?
    How is the antidepressant Fluoxetine used in the treatment of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Fluoxetine:
      Therapeutic Category: Antidepressant, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor.
      Use: Treatment of major depression; treatment of binge-eating and vomiting in patients with moderate-to-severe bulimia nervosa; obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

      No relationship between menopause and fluoxetine.

      If we offered you a miracle remedy that prevents after effects of "Menopause" would you buy it? Certainly you would. You won’t find it in a Pharmacy but at the Grocery Store.

      Try the Natural Cures for Menopause.

      Treatment: Although menopause cannot be avoided, it can be postponed for as long as 10 to 15 years and it can be made a smooth affair when it comes, with a proper nutritional programme, special supplements and the right mental attitude. When a woman is affected by the menopausal change to any marked extent, it is a sure sign that her body is in a toxic condition and in need of a thorough cleansing. For this purpose, she should undergo a course of natural health building treatment. Diet is of utmost importance in such a scheme of treatment. In fact the problems at menopause are often much more severe than that at puberty largely because the diet has been deficient for many years prior to its onset, in many nutrients such as protein, calcium, magnesium, vitamins D, E, and pantothenic acid. The diet should be made up from three basic food groups, namely (i) seeds, nuts, and grains (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits. The emphasis should be on vitamin E-rich raw and sprouted seeds and nuts, unpasteurised high quality milk and homemade cottage cheese and an abundance of raw, organically grown fruits and vegetables. Plenty of freshly made juices of fruits and vegetables in season should also be included in this diet.

      All processed, refined and denatured foods, such as white sugar, white flour and all articles made with them, should be completely eliminated. Take special supplements such as vitamins C, B6 and pantothenic acid, which have a specific property of stimulating the body’s own production of estrogen or enhancing the effect of the existing estrogen. During menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can result in a severe calcium deficiency. For this reason, a larger than usual intake of calcium may help greatly. Vitamins D and F are also essential for assimilation of calcium. Any woman having difficulty at this time should supplement her daily diet with 1,000 units of natural vitamin D, 5000 milligrams of magnesium and two grams of calcium daily, which can be supplied by one quart of milk. During the menopause, the need for vitamin E soars 10 to 50 times over that previously required. Hot flashes, night sweats, and other symptoms of menopause often disappear when 50 to 100 units of vitamin E are taken daily. The symptoms recur quickly if the vitamin is discontinued.

      Of late, it has become popular to take estrogen to prevent or postpone menopausal symptoms. Although hormone therapy is apparently successful and will, in many cases, help the patient to feel and act younger, it cannot be recommended in all cases because of its carcinogenic effect. If, however, estrogen therapy is undertaken, it should never be administered at the same time as vitamin E therapy. Ingestion of estrogen and vitamin E should be separated by several hours. Beet juice has been found very useful in menopausal disorders. It should be taken in small quantities of 60 to 90 ml at a time thrice a day. It has proved much more permanently helpful than the degenerative effects of drugs or synthetic hormones. Carrot seeds have also been found valuable in menopausal tension. A teaspoonful of the seeds should be boiled in a glassful of cow’s milk for about 10 minutes and taken daily as a medicine in this condition.

      Plenty of outdoor exercise, such as walking, jogging, swimming, horse riding, or cycling, is imperative to postpone menopause. Other helpful measures in this direction are avoiding mental and emotional stress and worries, especially worry about growing old, sufficient sleep, and relaxation and following all general rules of maintaining a high level of health. The healthier a woman is, the fewer menopausal symptoms she will experience.

      The menopause can be made a pleasant affair by building bodily health and a sane mental outlook. From puberty to menopause, a woman has been somewhat of a slave to her female glands. At specified intervals she was inconvenienced by her menstrual periods. She bore children, enduring the pain and discomfort of pregnancy. Menopause relieves her of this bondage to her femininity. She can now experience some of the happiest days of a woman’s life. A whole new life is given to her, if she is wise enough to prepare for it and accept it as such.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any suggestions about treatments for menopause other than hormone replacement therapy?
    My mom is 50yrs old and she has been going through menopause since last Jan. She uses progestercare cream from the health food store but she doesnt want to do hormone replacement therapy or premprose because they increase the risk of breast cancer. Her doctor is telling her that she will develop osteoporosis if she doesnt get on some sort of HRT though. Can anyone give her any advice on what to do? Are there any natural ways that anyone has tried that worked? And does anyone know if not going on HRT can really cause osteoporosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is on the right track using natural progesterone. It's the ONLY substance that has been shown to REBUILD bone, from the inside out.

      (Natural progesterone does NOT cause cancer like synthetic HRT does. In fact, it helps protect against cancer.)

      Estrogen (in the synthetic HRT) only delays bone breakdown, and it only works for four to five years. The problem is that it actually stops the bone from performing its natural cycle - breaking down old bone and rebuilding new to replace it. If old bone is not being broken down, there is no new bone being rebuilt! After five years on HRT, bone will be brittle.

      Have her read Dr. John Lee's book "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause". He explains it very well!
      He also gives guidelines for finding a quality progesterone cream. She may want to compare the one she's using to his recommendations.

      Your mom's doctor is not fully informed. Dr. Lee says, "You can educate your doctor, or find a new one."

  3. QUESTION:
    Can Fluoxetine be used to treat menopause?
    How is the antidepressant Fluoxetine used in the treatment of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      No. It cannot. I am 15 years old and I take fluoxetine, and my mom was getting my prescription and she and the pharmacist were joking around about menopause. My mom is only 38, but she was saying like "oh hopefully this will help when i have menopause" and the pharmacist advised her it wouldn't work.

      Also, it isnt so much an antidepressant. It just makes you more active, so you CAN get happier. Doctors sometime prescribe it to overweight kids so they get active and lose weight.

      I think you may need to find a different option.

      Have a great night!

  4. QUESTION:
    Are bioidentical hormones available in the Netherlands?
    Can anyone tell me if Bio-Identical hormones for the treatment of menopause available in the Netherlands?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a new one for me, and difficult to find out more to be honest.

      Given the lack of info (in Dutch as well) then I would say that it is not common (if at all) in the Netherlands, but I guess the only person that can really confirm it is your GP

      In the meantime there is a thread about it on Expatica which makes for interesting reading http://forum.expatica.com/Bio-Identical-hormones-t110145.html&pid=807433&mode=threaded#entry807433

      Sorry I couldn't help more, but I know very little about it, and hopefully someone else can offer some more info

  5. QUESTION:
    What is a natural way to deal with menopause?
    I had cancer of the cervix, and the radiation treatment threw me into early menopause. What is a natural alternative to hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, and I have read all the latest info about natural alternatives to hormones, nothing really helps. The only remedy (partly a remedy) was to take some of the anti-anxiety medication like Prozac etc. Of course there are natural anti depressants (look at this site)
      http://www.menopause.realage.com/content.aspx/topic/17
      but I am not sure how well they alleviate the symptoms. I wish I kept these medical journals I get to give you the reference. If I find it I will let you have it.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are the best treatments and products for endometriosis?
    Does anybody know of anyone who was cured by a specific treatment, product, or diet that had endometriosis? Or does anybody have any advice that would be helpful? Anything that can at least minimize or stop the pain? Please let me know, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      When I was diagnosed with Endometriosis many years ago, it was already so bad that my ovaries were on the verge of rupturing so I had to have emergency surgery. The doctor removed one ovary and left the other teeny partial ovary so I wouldn't go into menopause at such an early age. He also removed massive endometrial tissue from my uterus and almost every other internal organ. Before the surgery Naproxen (Alleve) really helped but it was prescription strength back then.

      I remember hearing back then that a pregnancy would "cure" it but I don't know anyone (including myself) that would choose that option and I am sure it involves much more along with the pregnancy.

      My daughter was diagnosed too and had a laproscopy done to see how far along the disease was and it so bad that she had to have a total hysterectomy at age 27.

      It is a scary thing to go through but just like many other health issues, an early diagnosis helps a lot! Talk with your doctor about your questions and concerns because there may be other treatments out there now that weren't available when it happened to me or to my daughter. Good luck to you and please find out all that you can before the major worry sets in!

  7. QUESTION:
    Have you had any relief from menopause symptoms WITHOUT any HRT?
    I am interested in learning about treatments without any type of hormones. I do not even want the bioidenticals. Please let me know if you have tried anything else for hot flashes, dry skin, dry mouth, irregular sleep patterns, stiffness, etc. Thank You very much.

    • ANSWER:
      Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  8. QUESTION:
    How do you know when will you be menopause?
    I had my first period when i was 12. Can we calculate the estimated time of our menopause? Somebody told me to add 30 to the age I had my first period and that'll be my age to be menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      34 Menopause Symptoms

      Menopausal symptoms affect about 70% of women approaching menopause. Typical menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes or night sweats, are caused by changing hormonal levels in the female reproductive system. Almost all women notice early symptoms while still having periods. This stage of gradually falling and fluctuating hormone levels is called perimenopause, which often begins in the early 40s.

      The symptoms of menopause usually last for the whole menopause transition (until the mid 50s), but some women may experience them for the rest of their lives. The most common symptoms are: Hot Flashes, Night Sweats, Irregular Periods, Loss of Libido, and Vaginal Dryness.
      However, there are a variety of treatments that can be considered to deal with these symptoms.

  9. QUESTION:
    What happens when a person doesn't take their menopause supplements?
    What happens when a female/male does/doesnt take it?
    What are some of the major signs of withdrawal?
    What do menopause supplements help with?

    • ANSWER:
      hormones are the only effective treatments to deal with menopause. Withdrawl will cause the return of menopausal symptoms.
      Hormone treatments effectively prescribed in the right dose will eliminate the great majority of unpleasant symptoms. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are the main ones but these can be supplemented with low dose DHEA and melatonin for insomnia.

  10. QUESTION:
    What was the first question you asked your mother the day she found out you were going through menopause?
    Because my mother will start going through menopause soon and I want to prep some questions for her to ask Grandma.

    • ANSWER:
      A person came to Allah's Messenger (may peace be upon him) and said: Who among the people is most deserving my companionship (of a kind treatment from me?) He said: Your mother. He, again, said: Then who (is the next one)? He said: It is your mother (who deserves the best treatment from you). He said: Then who (is the next one)? He (the Holy Prophet) said: It is your mother. He (again) said: Then who? Thereupon he (The Prophet (peace be upon him)) said: It is your father.

      http://youtu.be/PInPedCLGFo

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you know when menopause is over?
    After years of hot flashes, night sweats, hormone replacement treatment, bad nerves, ........ After starting hormones they symptoms slow down almost don't know they are there. How do you know when it is over and you can stop taking the hormones? Or is this a life style for the rest of my life?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the deal, from a guy with 5 sisters (all at various stages of menopause), and a partner who's had to wrestle with hot flashes / night sweats after coming off HRT at 61 -- I'm not sure the symptoms are ever done. All it takes is for your hormone levels to get out of whack, and you're off the the races. OK, maybe you shouldn't call it menopause, but anything from head trauma to bad diet to an overly warm shower can take you past the tipping point and light up a hot flash. So maybe menopause doesn't last forever, but some of the symptoms seem to. So watch your diet, exercise, do all the things you should be doing - but keep a small fan handy, use wicking pajamas, etc. My partner and I actually put together a web page with a number of issues attendant to the symptoms of menopause at the link below.

      Oh - and finally - in addition to the remedies we listed on the web site, her OB/GYN suggested that she try venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor) - and it stopped her hot flashes and night sweats almost immediately - although it did cause a dry mouth as a side effect. It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms, and there are a lot of doctors who don't know of this benefit. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may stop the hot and cold flashes and night sweats. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary, however - or it may not work at all. If you'd prefer to avoid drugs, visit the web page below for other ways to attack the beast. Hope your symptoms stay at bay!

  12. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  13. QUESTION:
    What are the first signs of menopause?
    I am 47 years old and my periods have become very heavy. They have always been very light. Is this a sign that I am starting to go through menopause? What can I expect next?

    • ANSWER:
      it could be...everyone is different when it comes to the first stages of menopause - usually you have changes in your cycle (some get heavier and more frequent, some are the opposite) accompanied by symptoms of hormonal changes (moodiness, achiness, fatique, hot flashes, sweating). Talk to your doctor - if you're interested in hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), this can relieve some of the symptoms you're experiencing (as well as help to prevent bone loss that can occur during menopause). Some women will continue to have abnormal, irregular periods for years before they actually hit 'menopause'. Others will progress quite quickly...again, talk to your doc, they can give you an idea of where you are by testing the functioning of your ovaries (which excrete estrogen), as well as give you some treatment options.

      here's some general menopause info:
      http://www.fbhc.org/Patients/Modules/menopause.cfm

  14. QUESTION:
    how can you tell the difference from bipolar and menopause?
    my mother has always been a bit pissed off. I need to find out if it's menopause or bipolar disease. if bipolar, how would you get your mother to get checked out by a psychiatrist?

    • ANSWER:
      Bipolar Illness
      Bipolar Disorder: Mania and Mixed Episodes
      Bipolar disorder is an illness bipolar illness of severe mood swings. It is also called manic depression. If you have this bipolar illness illness, you may have periods of severe high or low moods. These periods may impact your day-to-day functioning.

      The high moods are called acute mania. They can make you feel restless, grouchy, or very happy. The low moods are called depression. They can make you feel very sad.

      Some people can have a mixed state. That’s when you have acute mania and depression at the same time.

      Both women and men get bipolar disorder in equal numbers. The disease is usually first seen in adults 18 and older.

      Technically, menopause is the stopping of periods or menses. The average age is 52; however, a woman’s menopause can occur at any point between her 30’s and her 60’s. This time in a woman’s life can be dramatic or quite simple — it is different for each woman — but every woman does stop having periods. Some people call it adolescence in reverse — a rocky time of fluctuating hormones and emotions. Perimenopause is usually the two to five years beforehand, but sometimes women have symptoms for 10–15 years before stopping their periods. When symptoms arise at a young age it is commonly called early menopause.

      Menopause symptoms can range from mild hot spells at night to constant dripping sweats all day and night. Some women spot for a few months, others bleed heavily for years. These symptoms are caused by hormonal imbalances and changes — not necessarily estrogen loss. They are also related to diet, lifestyle and genetic factors. Many menopausal women seek forms of menopause treatment that do not work and create even greater hormone imbalance.

      i hope this helps

  15. QUESTION:
    When to seek infertility treatment with different circumstances?
    My circumstances are a little different than most. One circumstance being in my late 20's I donated eggs two times (which i have read takes away years of fertility), and two, my mother went through menopause at an extremely early age (before 40). I am now 32 and trying to conceive with no luck. When should I seek help?

    • ANSWER:
      first try to follow recommendations concerning How to get Pregnant Fast (during minimum 6 months) - discover below

  16. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a good support group for young women going through surgical menopause?
    I am 29 and underwent a complete hysterectomy last december i have no ovaries or anything left. I am truly suffering with extreme severe hot flashes constantly and sweating alot as well. I would like to talk to others like myself who are young and experiencing severe menopause symptoms caused by surgical menopause.
    I live in a very small town. We have no groups like that here. I was wanting to meet other women online to discuss this problem. People who are going through this as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I can relate to your situation. I had a complete hysterectomy also when I was 27 and also live in a small town.There is just no support groups out there for young women like us! I can give you some advice on certain things.First of all you need some Hormone Replacement Treatment for those Hot Flashes and Mood Swings,Second you need to give yourself time to heel,it takes usually around a year for your body to get back to normal,so don't rush things.One more thing (Always Remember...Your Still Are and Always will be A Complete Woman) Please feel free to contact me anytime!! I do know what you are going through.

  17. QUESTION:
    What Is The Negative and Positive Feedback In Menopause?
    Can someone please tell me the positive and negative feedback for hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, ovarian follicles, gnrh, fsh, lh and oestradiol in menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause Scoop’s Free Menopause Social Network is a place where people interested in the topics of menopause, menopause causes, menopause signs, menopause symptoms, menopause treatments, early menopause, male menopause, and menopause effects can meet each other, invite friends, and join groups, while gathering and sharing first-hand information and experiences. Users can set up their own groups, participate in forums, engage in online chat, see the latest research, and enjoy menopause humor.
      Like Facebook, The Free Menopause Social Network is an online community of internet users. The only difference is that the community’s interest is geared around interacting with each other on subjects relating to menopause. Also like Facebook, it is a place where you can update your friends on your feelings and experiences and they can do the same for you. Not only is it a place to research facts, but it is also a source of entertainment, whether it is from the human interaction between friends or from the collection of humorous videos and links provided by the network.
      Once you have subscribed to The Menopause Social Network you can immediately begin to socialize, ask questions, get answers, read research, join groups, invite friends, share stories, and feel better about your own situation. The friends that you can make are just one of the many benefits to The Menopause Social Network. Another one of those benefits includes diversity because the network gives individuals from all around the world access to each other. This means that although you may be in the United States, you could develop an online friendship with someone in Denmark or India. Not only will you make new friends, but you just might learn a thing or two about how menopausal symptoms, menopausal treatments, and menopausal effects are dealt with in other cultures and learning is always a good thing.
      As mentioned, The Menopause Social Network often involves individual forming their own groups or sub groups around a particular topic of interest, geographical proximity, or some other attribute. As long as they have an interest in menopause, anyone can become a member, no matter what their hobbies, beliefs, or views are. However, once you are inside the network, you can begin to create your own circle of friends and eliminate members that do not share your interests or goals.

      http://menopausescoop.com/

  18. QUESTION:
    what happens if my cervical cancer has not gone after treatment?
    I am 27 years old and I have recently undergone chemo and radiation therapy for cervical cancer and i am still waiting for my results. i was just wondering if anyone knows of my options if the treatment has not worked this time round. What if it is still there but has shrunk? would i have to undergo another round of chemo or would they just do a hysterectomy as i have already had two rounds of chemo and radiation? Can anyone please help me?
    if i have the surgery to remove the cervix would that mean that i would not be able to have children?

    • ANSWER:
      Please feel free to email me, and I can send you my regularly used email address (not the yahoo one) if you need to talk.

      I just turned 28 and I just found out last month that my stage 2B cervical cancer was gone. It had spread into lymph nodes and tissues in my pelvis. I was diagnosed in July, I was 27 also. I feel like your doctors should be informing you better because I don't know of any radiation and chemo treatments for cervical cancer which are fertility sparing. I did not have a hysterectomy, I still have my uterus AND cervix, as well as all of my other "parts" BUT my eggs were all destroyed throwing me into menopause at 27. This ALWAYS happens unless you have ovarian transposition and your radiation avoids the higher area above your pelvis (mine did not because it was in lymph nodes higher up) and on top of it, cervical cancer chemo is often Cisplatin which almost always causes infertility. If one doesn't get you, sadly the other probably will. And thats just the egg issue. I was lucky to have a few weeks to have them frozen before starting treatments. But even after all of this, I've done extensive research on the possibility of carrying my own child in the future, and I have found that this had never been successfully done, ever. There are cases of women with smaller doses of radiation, smaller than those used for cervical cancer, who occasionally are able to sustain pregnancy. Usually they are childhood cancer survivors for lymphoma or other cancers through the body and even then, it's not very common for them to be able to carry a pregnancy successfully. Removal of the cervix is called a trachelectomy and it's used for women who don't get chemo and radiation, but just have the cervix removed so that they can carry a pregnancy. If the surgeon doesn't get clear margins during the surgery (they test the edges of the removed cervix for signs of cancer) then they will proceed to do a hysterectomy because that means that the cancer has gone too high into the endocervical canal for a trachelectomy. BUT after chemo and radiation theres no way to have children naturally anyways.

      To answer your question correctly otherwise, I need more information. Why did you get chemo and radiation? Usually this is done because it's advanced stage, stage 2B or later like mine was. Any earlier, and theres a good chance you are getting a radical hysterectomy with complete lymph node dissection and removal in the area affected. Those lymph nodes are tested for cancer and then if any test positive, you will likely then get chemo and radiation or sometimes just radiation alone but chemo reduces recurrance A LOT.

      What stage is your cervical cancer?

      If the cancer is contained to the cervix after treatment (or was it contained to the cervix before treatment, and they for some reason did chemo and radiation anyways?) then you can have a hysterectomy to remove the residual cancer.

      Now here's the scary part...which had me on pins and needles for months. IF the cancer is spread outside of the cervix, into nearby tissues or nodes, theres a radical surgery they do, which usually involves removal of abdominal organs including possibly (and usually) complete hysterectomy, oophrectomy (ovaries removed), part of your bowels or intestines, tissues and muscles affected, and even sometimes the bladder, other affected organs which cancer would likely be in such as a kidney, etc. This is considered salvage surgery and it's used in the most desperate of situations as a last hope to save a patient who hasn't responded well to radiation and chemo.

      Most of the time, I found out that we will receive the max dose of radiation for cervical cancer, I know I did. That means that you cannot receive radiation to the same area ever again, as long as you live. This also scares the hell out of me. They can do pin point radiation elsewhere in the body should it ever happen, but not full radiation because theres a max that the body can handle without becoming toxic :/ Also theres a max dose chemo, although typically they use chemosensitization for cervical cancer which is not a high dose. Mine was a double dose because they thought I could handle it physically but it was still considered a fairly low dose.

      Also what do you mean by 2 round of chemo and radiation? For my treatment, I received a total of 8 weeks of chemo, radiation internal and external.

      Mondays were chemo days, every monday for 8 weeks.

      Then I did 8 weeks of external beam radiation, and the last week or 2 (can't remember) I received a total of about 5 internal brachytherapy radiation treatments.

      I wish I could give you more solid answers but I need more information. Please email me if you want to talk about this more. I have a few young cervical cancer friends I've met thru forums such as this and we support eachother, there are not many young cervical cancer survivors out there willing to talk, or so I've found when going thru my treat

  19. QUESTION:
    What do you do if your mom is going through menopause?
    Okay im a teenager with a mom who i think is going through menopause. seriously its hell. she picks on me all the time and doesnt give a break. she has weird moments which i never saw b4. how do you deal with this?

    • ANSWER:
      What you can do is to communicate openly with her about her physical and emotional condition. You may suggest her to talk about her symptoms and how they affect her mood with other women who experience menopause before. Try to establish some mutual rules for resolving family issues and avoiding unnecessary conflicts.

      You also can suggest her to take some herbal menopause treatment like the one mention in our website which will help her to relief menopause symptom.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can hair loss treatment such as Rogaine be used to help facial hair growth?
    I am a 22 year old man and my facial hair is still fine and patchy. I only have to shave about once or twice a week. Could rubbing a hair loss treatment for baldness onto the face every day cause my facial grow to grow out thicker and faster? If so, how long until the effect is noticeable? Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Like menopause, the story of unwanted facial hair is often all about estrogen, or to be more precise, the relationship between levels of estrogen and testosterone. Since rogaine will take over on the hormonal imbalance that it happening on your body it will likely cause some unwanted hair to grow. But typically, any rubbing treatment that was originally made for scalp care won't be effective if it will be use on some facial purposes.

  21. QUESTION:
    Having a period two times a month,is this related to menopause?
    How can I stay healthy even though symptoms of menopause seem to effect me with arthritis in my knees?

    • ANSWER:
      Try an all natural health product like Hot Flash Freedom instead of using chemical based treatments for your symptoms in order to stay healthy while treating such discomfort.

  22. QUESTION:
    How difficult would it be to get pregnant as a thirtysomething?
    My ob-gyn told me today that my age (mid 30's) was nothing to worry about in regards to being fertile and that the average age of menopause was 51. She didn't endorse me getting the ovarian reserve test (to test how many eggs I have left). How difficult would it be to get pregnant as a thirtysomething year old woman? I want to know if I should relax or start planning. Thanks for your advice!

    • ANSWER:
      I've known lots of people pregnant in their 30s. And some have to keep trying, and trying. Some resort to spending all of their money on medical treatments, when they could just adopt. If it's something you want, give it a whirl, but keep your wits about you..

  23. QUESTION:
    What is the condition called where a female cannot engage in sexual intercourse?
    I am trying to figure out what the condition is called when a female is told by her doctor that intercourse is not possible. I think it has to do with inflammation around the vaginal region. There is no cure for it and treatments sometimes do not work. There is surgery that can be performed with a 93% success rate. Although I know all of this information, I cannot remember the name of the condition. Any help?

    • ANSWER:
      pray about it because unless you are a eunuch, i dont know what else to say.....is it that you have never engaged sexually or that you are getting older and sex is now impossible? The older women get, esp during menopause, the vagina tends to become inflamed and sex is less enjoyable to women...i dont know the details of your problem so maybe if you were more specific

  24. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  25. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  26. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with women going thru menopause?
    I'm pretty sure my mom is going through menopause right now because she is really irritable and moody and she's giving my dad the silent treatment because he got mad at her. Today was her birthday but she didn't even want to eat the cake we got her. I'm really pis$ed off about this and I want my family back. Anything I can do or do I just have to wait it out?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is the period marked by the natural and permanent cessation of menstruation. A woman begins to see changes in her menstrual cycles usually between the ages of 45 and 55. It's the time in a woman's life that the function of her ovaries begins to cease. Most people recognize this as the "turning point".

      Some women may have few or no first signs of menopause, while others experience multiple psychological and physical symptoms. The symptoms and severity of them varies significantly from woman to woman.

      Every woman's experience will be different but some of the common first signs of menopause are:

      -Irregular Periods -Hot Flashes -Problems with the Vagina and Bladder -Loss of Sex Drive -Fatigue -Mood Changes -Headaches -Sleep Problems -Water Retention

      Can you imagine having to deal with all that and nobody understands what you’re going through?

      Spend some time and talk to her about your concerns (Your Mom’s Health and Well Being). Show empathy for her. The more you can learn on your own about this change, the more your mom will open up to you about it.

      This could help tremendously.

  27. QUESTION:
    Could you recommend a really good womens clinique in UK?
    I need to consult about early menopause (infertility) problems and I am 25 now. So this is not a usual case and not every GP can consult me well. I would appreciate it if you could recommend me a quality professional doctor, any place in UK is good, London, York or Leeds prefered. Many thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      There's no need for a private clinic. Ask your GP to refer you to the relevant consultant at a hospital (you should get a list online to choose from). GPs don't normally carry out infertility treatments or deal with early menopause problems directly. If you're Up North, then LGI may be on your local list.

      If you are a member of BUPA, then ask them for a referral to a suitable hospital on their list.

  28. QUESTION:
    When does fertility start to decrease?
    I'm 28 now and have one beautiful daughter. But, we're not planning to have another child anytime soon for a number of reasons. But, there is a part of me that still wants to have another (biological) child. So, at what age do the chances of getting pregnant start to fall or drop dramatically? What are the chances of getting pregnant past 35 w/o the use of any fertility treatments? Does anyone know where I can find reliable information or statistics??? Thanks in advance for taking the time to answer my question!

    • ANSWER:
      More women today find they want to put off pregnancy until their careers are well established, or until they've gotten more life experience. However, research shows that pregnancies in women over the age of 35 suffer from more problems than those in younger women. How great are the risks compared with the benefits, and what do you really need to be concerned about?
      How Old is Too Old to Have a Baby?
      According to the Mayo Clinic, a woman's fertility peaks between the ages of 20 and 24. However, fertility rates remain relatively constant through the early 30s, after which they begin to decline:

      At age 30 to 35, fertility is 15 to 20 percent below maximum. From age 35 to 39, the decrease is 25 to 50 percent. From 40 to 45, the decrease is 50 to 95 percent.

      Technically, any woman who has not gone through menopause, and who does not have other reproductive problems, can become pregnant. Successful pregnancies have been reported in women as old as 59.

      Pregnancy Risks After 35
      The risk of miscarriage increases after age 35; by the early 40s, more than 50 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage. Many of these occur at an early stage and may not even be detected, or may be mistaken for a late period. The majority of these miscarriages are due to the chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

      Other age-related factors affecting fertility include less frequent and/or irregular ovulation, and endometriosis, in which tissue that attaches to the ovaries or fallopian tubes interferes with conception.

      When they do get pregnant, women older than 35 may have a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and placenta previa. There is also a potentially higher risk of having a baby with low birth weight, and of chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome.

      Aiming for a Positive Pregnancy
      Although older women may find it somewhat harder to achieve pregnancy, the overall outcomes are excellent. In fact, birth rates for mothers in their 30s and 40s have increased dramatically over the past 25 years. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the birth rate for women age 35 to 39 nearly doubled between 1978 and 1998. Between 1981 and 1997, the birth rate for women in their 40s increased 92 percent.

      If you're over 35 and thinking of getting pregnant, a few simple tips will help minimize the risks:

      Start taking prenatal vitamins
      See your doctor for prepregnancy checkups
      Eat well
      Exercise regularly
      Cut out nicotine, alcohol, and drugs

      Finally, if you don't succeed in getting pregnant within six months, see a reproductive endocrinologist (fertility specialist) to discuss next steps.

      Sources: The Mayo Clinic Complete Book of Pregnancy and Baby's First Year (Morrow, 1994); March of Dimes: 888-MODIMES, www.modimes.org, www.nacersano.org

      The information on this Web site is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child's condition.

      Content courtesy of American Baby.

  29. QUESTION:
    How can women have periods yet unable to conceive?
    My great aunt had her period (before menopause of course), and she tried to conceive, but she was unable to have kids but her husband had 3 kids before her though, so we don't think it was him? How is this so?

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps her fallopian tubes were scarred and the ova couldn't make it through. Perhaps she simply didn't produce ova that were capable of fertilization. There are folks who are infertile for reasons that are never really discovered. In fact, the majority of couples in fertility treatment are infertile for unknown reasons. It is also always in the realm of possibility that the three children did not belong to the uncle. After all, prior to DNA testing, fatherhood was a matter of faith and not science. The only person you could be sure of was the mother. And in these days of donated ova, and test tube babies, even that isn't a promise anymore. It might also have been the uncle in question had troubles that weren't made public. One never really knows, unless you happen to be told. And in those days, you didn't ordinarily discuss it except with the doctor.

  30. QUESTION:
    My wife will be going through menopause soon what should I expect?
    Because of Cancer treatment and a hysterectomy after that my wife will be going through menopause, pretty soon. The cancer treatment gave me a preview but the hysterectomy will be the full on thing. What should I expect? How can I be supportive?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause typically occurs in women between the ages of 45 and 55 year old. Symptoms include irregular periods, heavy bleeding, hot flashes, disrupted sleep, headaches, dry eyes, vaginal changes (dryness), hair loss, weight gain and a loss of interest in sex. Someone women may also experience extreme emotional distress. Some women also have short term memory loss, lack of focus and irritability. Some women describe feelings of “fuzzy thinking” and the inability to multi-task. Some also experience increased feelings of anxiety, fatigue and depression. Also, women should be cautious of extreme or drastic mood swings.

  31. QUESTION:
    What options are available to fix Hair Loss for Older Women?
    I am a 50yr old women and I am losing hair in a few spots in my head and I wanted to know what are some great products or treatments available to help me with new growth in those affected areas. I am trying to avoid wigs.

    • ANSWER:
      Find the 'cause' before you can find the solution, then eliminate them. Your hair will improve. Remember, whatever it was that caused them to fall out in the first place, it took months even years to get in your system, it will takes years to flush them down, so don't expect miracles overnight.

      So many reasons for hair loss:

      Supplements, steroids, hereditary, hair dyes perming, straightening, diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/

      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      They also say you normally lose 100-200 hair a day, but I don't. I lose about 7-8 every time I brush it, so that's about 100 per week, give or take.About 23-25 if I shampooed/brush my hair, which is every 4th day.

      The majority of hair problems here are from girls in their 30s, asking how to care for their damaged hair, what product to make their hair grow, why their hair falls out, and why their shampoo or conditioner don't work. Women between 60-80 have that same problem, but it took them years to get there. And those same 30 & under girls are giving advice here? Now, I'm answering more problems re: hair fall or hair not growing from girls under 15. Go figure!

      Even the cheapest shampoo can do magic for your hair, so it must be what you're doing AFTER you wash it. Shampoos and vitamins might make your hair look and feel healthier, but they won’t put more hairs on your head.

      According Dr. Melissa Piliang, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Americans spent an estimated 6 million on hair loss products last year, and chances are some of that money was not well spent. Don’t let charming salon owners, seductive ads or fancy gimmicks convince you otherwise.

      Source(s):
      Hair DX
      I know hair. I am in my early 60's, and I've been having menopause, and I am not experimenting hair loss, for those who said I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to hair. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy long hair. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing. What you see on my profile is what I have now. It's as thick as when I'm in my teens.
      Stress, seldom. I went through stress when both parents died, plus sister taking me to court & selling the house, on my own and still no hair loss here!

  32. QUESTION:
    What kind of product should one uses to stop her hair from falling off because of aging?
    This is for older women whose hair start to fall off. Any recommendation on good brand of Shampoos and Hair Treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many reason for hair loss.. in old age also the reason are related to hormones . Ladies might exp hair loss after menopause..

      there are some very successful product out there which have proven there effectiveness even in old age.. check out the links below

  33. QUESTION:
    Can a multivitamin help with female hair thinning, or do I need a specific vitamin for this?
    I have noticed I can see my scalp on the very front of my head, I always had thin hair but not this bad. I am not in menopause or anywhere close to this so that is not the cause, is there a vitamin supplement that can help?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamins won't help. Check with your family doctor first as some conditions like low thyroid can cause hair thinning. Do you use curling irons, flattening irons, hot blow dryers? They can cause hair damage and thinning. The most common cause is inherited female pattern balding, for which their is no treatment.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  35. QUESTION:
    My period have stopped from one year is this a serious condition?
    Due to some mental tablets treatments, my periods have completely stopped from one year. I am 40 years. Is this a serious condition and could it turn to cancer or something else serious?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be menopause
      Pl consult a gynaecologist

  36. QUESTION:
    Why would my feet hurt and feel stiff without having an injury and continue to feel worse over the last month?
    My feet started feeling stiff going down stairs in the mornings some months ago. My right foot now feels like it's been injured - it hasn't and is painful to bend and hurts in the arch area. My toes are stiff to bend and my feet ache even when they are resting and not weight bearing. I am a relatively fit woman of 50, going through menopause and am about 10 kilos overweight. I like walking and am continuing to do so as I can't bear not to!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Helen,

      Arch pain is the term used to describe symptoms that occur under the arch of the foot. When a patient has arch pain they usually have inflammation of the tissues within the midfoot. The arch of the foot is formed by a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes.
      This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics and transfer of weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful.

      Plantar Fasciitis
      The most common cause of arch pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is the name that describes inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain early in the morning and pain with long walks or prolonged standing.
      Arch pain early in the morning is due to the plantar fascia becoming contracted and tight as you sleep through the night. When awakening and walking in the morning, the fascia is still tight and prone to irritation when stretched. When walking or standing for long periods, the plantar fascia becomes inflamed and painful.

      Treatment of plantar fasciitis is best accomplished with some simple stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications, and inserts for your shoes.
      ___________________________________________________________________________________
      Ankle pain is an extremely common complaint with many causes. It is important to accurately diagnose the cause of your symptoms so you can get appropriate treatment. If you have ankle pain, some common causes include:

      •Arthritis
      Arthritis causing ankle pain is much less common than degenerative changes in other joints. However, ankle cartilage can wear away and is often quite painful. Ankle arthritis is most common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or in patients with a previous injury to the ankle joint.

      •Sprains
      Ankle sprains cause an injury to the ligaments around the ankle. Sprains can cause significant ankle pain, as well as swelling and a feeling as though the joint may 'give-out.'
      •High Ankle Sprain A high ankle sprain is a specific type of ligament injury to the ankle. In a high ankle sprain, the ligaments on top of the joint are injured. The treatment and rehabilitation from a high ankle sprain is different from a usual sprain.

      •Tendonitis
      Tendonitis can occur in any of the tendons around the joint and cause ankle pain. Tendonitis occurs when the tendons, the attachments of muscles to the bone, become irritated and inflamed.
      •Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
      Posterior tibial tendonitis cause ankle pain on the inside part of the joint. If left untreated, posterior tibial tendonitis can lead to significant walking problems.

      •Achilles Tendonitis
      Achilles tendonitis causes ankle pain in the back of the joint. Achilles tendonitis is the most common type of tendonitis around the ankle joint.

      •Fractures
      Ankle fractures are a common type of broken bone. However, there any many different types of ankle fractures and each of these must be treated individually. Some ankle fractures can be treated like sprains, and others require surgery.

      •Cartilage Damage
      The cartilage of the ankle joint is susceptible to injury if you sustain an ankle sprain, fracture, or other traumatic injury. Cartilage injuries can run the spectrum from a limited area of damage to more widespread ankle arthritis.

      •Gout
      Gout is an uncommon cause of ankle pain. However, in patients who have a diagnosis of gout, it must be considered as a cause for new ankle pain.

      YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO CHECK INTO THE POSSIBILITY OF THIS BEING SIGNS OF DIABETES.

      Take care! Mama Bear

  37. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these hairs on my chin?
    I have hair on my chin! I have tryed plucking them and facial remover but within a few days they are back. My gyno told me I had started early menopause, could this be the cause? Any ideas on how to get rid of them or at least slow the growth?

    • ANSWER:
      you could try bleaching them and trimming them really short or just keep plucking them. i wouldn't recommend shaving because that will make them thick and stubbly :(

      if you have the money, you could get them removed with a laser treatment

  38. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  39. QUESTION:
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in th?
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in the subordinate group? Or did physicians simply see women as an easy target for success? Also, what may have been some of the unintended consequences that came out of this widespread medicalization? And by "medicalization" I mean, the process by which human conditions and problems come to be defined and treated as medical conditions, and thus become the subject of medical study, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. Thanks for any thoughts or ideas!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Female bodies are overmedicalized. Menarche is not a medical issue, yet menopause is.

      Pregnancy can become life-threatening. But in general, we approach this natural passage as if some crisis were imminent.

      Men's bodies could use a bit more medical attention. Rather than look at erectile dysfunction as a symbol of waning masculinity and prescribing a pill, they should consider it as a symptom of perhaps a larger systemic problem.

      Not a doctor but still ... I do see what you are saying.

      No I do not think that there is some conspiracy to keep women down. I think it is the opposite. I think that too many women died in the past of childbirth, and they are over cautious.

      Yes, there is also a massive industry surrounding women's bodies and women's health products. Absolutely there is. From Insurance policies, to publishers, to baby accessories, to bras, tampax ... you bet!

  40. QUESTION:
    what is a good sight to find info about early menopause?
    I have 12 of 15 signs of early menopause but I have not had any kind of surgery or other procedure to send me into early menopause. please help me.
    I need a good source so i'm not driving myself crazy. i am only 29.

    • ANSWER:
      The best "sight" would be in the face of a great gynecologist--one who is very experienced with 10+ years, preferably a female gyn. A great one may confirm that is it rare, but not impossible at age 29, or that you just have something else. The suddenly on/off, heavy/light, short/long, etc., spotting might be perfectly normal, but if there's another reason, it is paramount that you follow the advice of that great gyn. Don't be afraid to ask how long any have been a gyn; it's to be expected, and if any gets upset, you don't want them to work with your body anyway. Additionally, try to breathe easily while you research on the internet and READ ALL THE SITES for all the information out there because they're not designed just for YOU, but for everyone to get those parts that are applicable to her and ignore those that aren't. Your body won't necessarily follow the IDENTICAL path in this area that others do. Each can be very different, like yours seem to be. It would be interesting to know how you determined those "12-15 signs," but try not to believe those relatives and friends until you see that great gyn. If necessary, see up to 5, like I did with my uterine tumors; the 5th one was the only one with the CORRECT diagnosis and treatment! Try not to "go crazy," because if it's actually menopause, you need to save that for all those likely "hot flashes." If it is really menopause, do whatever you need to do to stay comfortable--YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

  41. QUESTION:
    Natural remedies to prevent early menopause and increase a sperm count?
    I am tired of of all S h i t t y treatments, and need to know , is there any natural remedy?
    For your information.. my age is 29 and my husband's age is 35.. is that too old for a treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to see a doctor about these things. "Natural " remedies are useless for most things....why would you even bother with them, if you are trying to conceive at the end of your fertile life ...see a fertility specialist.

  42. QUESTION:
    Could peri- or menopause be making me feel masculine?
    This is a repeat. I got one good answer the last time, but I wanted to post this during a higher traffic time to see if anyone else had suggestions. 'm a 41yo woman. Lately, much to my chagrin, I've been feeling a sort of hypermasculinity. I also have acne along my jawline, which I've read can indicate an excess of androgens. Could both of these things be indicative of menopause? Are there any natural, vegan, non-hormonal remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      "Hypermasculinity" could mean many different things, so I can't address whether perimenopause can make you feel masculine. It can certainly make you aggressive and irritable due to hormone imbalances.

      Many women in perimenopause, due to testoserone imbalances, can experience acne. Just like being an adolescent again.

      It sounds as if you've educated yourself well on perimenopause and menopause. (Perimenopause is the years leading into menopause, which is defined as having gone one year without menstruation).

      It's always interesting when women want "treatment" for menopause, since it's a natural transition. However, the hot flashes, insomnia, weight gain, acne, irritability, mood swings, libido changes, and skin/hair changes can be disturbing. All these signs/symptoms certainly don't feel natural.

      Some women find that the herb black cohosh (marketed as Estroven and Remifemin) helps these signs and symptoms. You may want to visit the websites for these; sometimes they offer free samples.

      After almost 8 years of perimenopause misery, including dozens of daily hot flashes, palpitations, and weight gain, I am now on hormone replacement therapy. Most of my signs/symptoms have improved. HRT does have its dangers, though, so my physician and I are monitoring my health very carefully.

      If you decide to check out black cohosh, be sure that it doesn't affect any medical conditions you may have or any other drugs you may be taking. Herbs may be all-natural, but they still can have adverse effects.

  43. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know of any treatment for arthritis following chickungunya- homeo or ayaurveda or whatever?
    My mother who is 57 got chickungunya a year back and is still suffering from severe joint pain and swelling, arthritis due to chickengunya. Anybody who has gone through the same , please advise on what treatment would help? Does taking long periods of rest help?

    • ANSWER:
      HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT FOR RHEUMATISM / ARTHRITIS without any side effects or complications of any sort, (Arthritis including Gout, Arthritis Deformans/Osteoarthritis and Rheumatism) :-

      Pain knee joints, worse by movements; better initial movements, continuous pain in joints, worse while rising from seat; pain in heels, worse by movements. Cassia Sophera 30X, 4 hourly

      Acute attack of gout of joints of the feet.Pain with bright red swelling Aconite Nap 200, 2 hourly

      Pain with inflammation, worse by movements. Bryonia Alba 200 or 1M, 6 hourly

      Complaints worse after rest and exposure to cold Rhus tox 200 or 1M, 4 hourly

      Complaints worse during menstruation; beginning at the time of menopause; more in hands and feet Caulophyllum 30X, 4 hourly

      When the origin of complaints is gonorrhoeal; worse during day time. Medorrhinum 1M. fortnightly (3 Doses)

      When the origin of complaints is tubercular Tuberculinum k, 1M fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of small joints with red or pale swelling; tenderness and shifting pains; worse by motion. Main remedy for gout during cold weather Colchicum 30X, 4 hourly

      When Rhus Tox cease to work; pain is worse in cold damp weather and better by movements Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, 6 hourly (6 Doses)

      Nodosities in the joints with gastric complaints. At last nodules become painless (Rheumatoid Arthritis). Tongue whitish thickly coated Antim Crud 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Complaints of feets and ankles; stiffness Drosera 200 fortnightly (3 Doses)

      Complaints of long bones; contraction of ligaments Causticum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain worse at night; in wet weather; Rheumatism of large muscles Cimicifuga 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism; worse in damp cold weather. Gout.Pain in limbs and hip joints Natrum Sulph 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain travels downwards affecting the large part of a limb and passes through quickly along course of nerve Kalmia Lat 30X or 200, 6 hourly

      Pains worse during rest, night and warmth, better by cold, open air and movements Pulsatilla 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain :- violent; bruised or as if sprained ; cannot bear touch, feels somebody coming near him may touch him and hit the affected part Arnica Montana 200, 4 hourly

      Gout of great toe and joints with swelling; soreness and drawing pain on stepping; worse in warmth, pressure and motion. Pain travels upwards; better cold compresses Ledum Pal 200, 4 hourly

      Gouty nodosities of joints; tearing pain and extremities and contraction of the muscles Guaiacum 30 4 hourly

      Chronic nodosities of joints; hands twisted, out of shape due to deposits of water of soda Ammonium Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      Gouty complaints with offensive urine Acid Benzoic 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      When there is red sand in urine in gouty patients Lycopodium 30, 4 hourly

      Severe pain with enlargement of the joints; worse during rest and when storm approaches Rhododendron 200 or 1M, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Almost a specific for gout (to drain out uric acid and urates) Urtica Urens Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 -10 drops in hot water

      Arthritic deformans (chronic rheumatoid, particularly of fingers) Picric Acid 30X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pains or arthritis after checked diarrhoea Abrotanum 30 or 200 4 hourly (6 Doses)

      Specific for pain with numbness; Pain so severe patient says that he would prefer death than the pain Chamomilla 200 or 1M, 1/2 hourly (3 Doses)

      Pain appear diagonally as right arm and left leg with sensation of cold, numbness and tingling Agaricus Mus 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      In weak persons; burning pain with chilliness, feels better by heat, while eating, and worse in cold open air Capsicum 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Unbearable pain; rigidity and stiffness. Superiority / inferiority complex Platina 1M, weekly (3 Doses)

      Pain flies like electric shock; due to exposurse of damp cold weather. Better by warmth and rest Phytolacca 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Rheumatic pain, worse after washing clothes, doing laundry work Sepia 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain in long bones; may be due to injury or rheumatism Ruta Grav 200, 6 hourly

      Pain worse on slightest touch specially after loss of vital fluids like excessive bleeding, diarrhoea, vomiting China Off 6X or 30, 3 hourly

      Pain in the small joints of extremities with swelling. Backache, worse in the morning before rising Staphysagria 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Pain heels; better by putting most of the weight on them Berberis Vulgaris Q (Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8 - 10 drops

      Stiffing pain in all parts of the body; worse by movement Stellaria Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 8-10 drops in warm water

      Rheumatic pain without swelling; pain joints; worse at night Iodium 30X, 4 hourly

      Osteo-arthritis of large joints with degeneration. Pain, swelling, stiffness and tenderness of joints; worse by motion (cracking joints) and cold ; better by warmth O.A.Nosode 1M, weekly (6 Doses)

      Chronic muscular rheumatism of back and neck. Intense pain along with sciatic nerve. Numbness alternates with pain Gnaphalium 30X or 200, 4 hourly

      Muscular atrophy; rigidity and stiffness Strychninum 3X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Rheumatism accompained with skin ailments and itiching; cannot walk erect Sulphur 200, 10 min (3 Doses)

      Rheumatism of knee joint; with round worms Natrum Phos 6X or 30, 4 hourly

      For defective bony growth; better by warmth and worse by cold Calcarea Flour 12X or 30, 4 hourly

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms.
      No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.

      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      For more information on Homeopathic Treatment of ARTHRITIS/RHEUMATISM/GOUT etc please check these articles :-
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/arthritis...
      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/rheumatis...

      Best of health to you my friend get well real soon.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  44. QUESTION:
    How many hairs lost in a day would mean you have 'hair loss'?
    Im approaching the menopause and Im sure my hair is thinning a bit. It seems finer also and there are about 6-8 hairs that come loose after hair washing or styling. Do I have hair loss???? If so what can I do about it.

    • ANSWER:
      6 - 8 hairs a day is not significant. However if this is a change from what is normal to you there are things you can do. I am a 44 year old woman and am peri-menopausal. I began losing a significant amount of hair each morning when I showered. I don't know how many but I know it was a change from what was normal for me. I began taking Macafem (maca root), biotin, and MSM supllements, and I switched to Organix coconut milk shampoo and conditioner. Once a week I do a pure coconut oil treatment on my hair (leave oil on for one hour & wash out) I started these changes about a month ago and have noticed a decrease in hair loss and also have new hair growth. Hope this helps

  45. QUESTION:
    Can partial seizures occur once a month regularly and last for the whole day recurring about every hour?
    My friend has been having them since her menopause started. Her EEG and MRI were normal and her doctor says it is depression.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the Ontario Epilepsy website
      http://www.epilepsyontario.org/client/EO/EOWeb.nsf/web/
      which describes as many seizure types as there are(a lot!). I looked up both partial seizures simple and complex. Then I looked at this types. The key here is that these are rooted in emotional issues, there is no EEG abnormality and that medication for epilepsy is ineffective. Since she only gets the seizures once a month, it could well be tied into some kind of menstrual issue surrounding menopause. I hope this helps you out.

      Psychogenic Seizures

      (Pseudo-seizures)

      Psychogenic seizures are not classified as a form of epilepsy. They affect between 5 and 20 percent of people thought to have epilepsy. Psychogenic seizures can occur at any age, but are more common in people under the age of 55. They occur 3 times more frequently in women than men. They may arise from various psychological factors, may be prompted by stress, and may occur in response to suggestion. It has also been found that such disorders may be self-induced. They may be used to get attention, to be excused from work, to collect financial compensation, or merely to escape an intolerable social situation. They seldom occur in the absence of others. Trauma related to physical illness has been found to trigger these seizures in elderly individuals. People with early-onset psychogenic seizures often have a history of sexual abuse.

      Psychogenic seizures can be characterized by features common with epilepsy like writhing and thrashing movements, quivering, screaming or talking sounds, and falling to the floor. Psychogenic attacks differ from epileptic seizures in that out-of-phase movements of the upper and lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, and side-to-side head movements are evident. However, psychogenic seizures vary from one occurrence to another and are not readily stereotyped. Indicators like pupillary dilation, depressed corneal reflexes, the presence of Babinski responses, autonomic cardiorespiratory changes, tongue biting and urinary/fecal incontinence are more probable with epilepsy and are not usually manifested in psychogenic seizures.

      Psychogenic seizures may last a couple of minutes or hours, ending as abruptly as they began. Anxiety may be experienced prior to an attack, followed by relief and relaxation afterwards, leading some to postulate that psychogenic seizures may occur as a direct response to stress in order to relieve tension. Afterwards, patients usually have a vague recollection of the seizure, without the usual postictal symptoms of drowsiness and depression.

      It is difficult to differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures. However, one highly reliable indicator of a psychogenic seizure is eye closure during the seizure; when people with epilepsy have seizures the eyes tend to remain open. Still, statistics indicate that, in 20-30% of cases, epileptologists are incorrect in attempting to distinguish one from the other. Although psychogenic seizures are not caused by electrical discharges in the brain and thus do not register any EEG abnormalities, they are often mistaken for epileptic disorders. It is also possible to have both psychogenic seizures and epilepsy. Most patients with psychogenic seizures are misdiagnosed and consequently treated with epilepsy drugs or other epilepsy therapies, sometimes with severe and fatal side effects.

      Medications are ineffective in the treatment of psychogenic disorders. Patients who are diagnosed with psychogenic seizures are usually referred to a therapist, to learn to control stress and become familiar with coping techniques. Since the vast majority of psychogenic seizures operate on a psychological level, behavioral manipulation methods may be used.

  46. QUESTION:
    How aware are you of your fertility?
    Women could be told how many eggs they have left in their ovaries by a simple blood test that could be sold over the counter. Australian researchers say the ‘egg timer’ blood test will cost about £38 and could revolutionise family planning and fertility treatment.
    But how aware are you of your fertility? Would you like to know how many eggs you have left?

    • ANSWER:
      My concern isn't with my eggs, it's with my fallopian tubes. I only have one left.
      I do think I'd like to know more about my fertility, but not now. I've already been blessed with two healthy children, while we would like another, I'm not sure I could handle being told that it may not be possible. I need to have hope :-)

      One of my friends was told last year that her fertility was done, she was already well into earlly menopause, aged only 37. She's due to have a little boy in May :-D

  47. QUESTION:
    How can one treat high blood pressure?
    This is for a 48-year-old woman who seems to be going through menopause, and seems to be a worrier.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of High Blood Pressure
      It is important to take steps to keep your blood pressure under control. The treatment goal is blood pressure below 140/90 and lower for people with other conditions, such as diabetes and kidney disease. Adopting healthy lifestyle habits is an effective first step in both preventing and controlling high blood pressure. If lifestyle changes alone are not effective in keeping your pressure controlled, it may be necessary to add blood pressure medications. In this section you will learn about blood pressure-lowering lifestyle habits and blood pressure medications.

      Lifestyle

      Following a Healthy Eating Pattern
      Reducing Salt and Sodium in Your Diet
      Maintaining a Healthy Weight
      Being Physically Active
      Limiting Alcohol Intake
      Quitting Smoking
      Other Factors Affecting Blood Pressure

  48. QUESTION:
    How can I make my hair look better before my wedding?
    I have quite thin hair that is brittle and always has split ends. I really, really want to improve its condition before my wedding in August 2011. Does anyone have any advice? It seems to fall out a lot, which I don't help because it feels so coarse that I continually run my hands through it in an attempt to smooth it out, and I end up pulling more hair out.

    Can anyone recommend a product/home treatment that will make my hair softer/shinier/thicker?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you say you have thin hair and it's brittle, has split ends? Treat your hair like that of a baby's hair, LOTS OF TLCs. I know you're an adult now with adult hair, but there are symptoms for bleaching, hair straightening, relaxing, crimping hair even to normal hair types. Imagine that happening to your hair, I mean as you've experienced already no product can improve your style. That's another reason why the hair industry is a billion dollar business, but they do not give money back guarantee for damaged hair or hair loss due to 'abuse', and hair loss happen more to people with thin or coarse hair.

      You have several problems with your hair here, let's go each one:

      1. Split Ends: Even healthy hair like mine get split ends, due to normal hair brushing & styling. Hair protectant doesn't protect hair 100%. Like sunscreen, you still get sunburned. Same with hair, as you've already experienced. Spend 5-10 mins. trimming your hair strand per strand, section by section when the sun is shinning so you'll understand how the hair is split in several places, and not always at the end, even somewhere in the middle. Do it yourself trim, is the best. Use a 2" folding shears for trimming. Allowing healthier hair to take over. Then 2x a year, get a good trim.
      It may grow very slowly or none at all if you've straightened your hair in the past.

      2. Thin hair comes from your good genes, You can set your hair in plastic curlers, after you towel dry, then curlers, briefly dry, take the curlers out & style as usual, or finger comb. Shampoos that says it makes your hair more volume, it's all marketing gimmicks to get your attention, it is a billion dollar business. Plastic curlers have been used for over 5 decades in the fashion & hair business. They're still being used today

      3. You hair fall out a lot: touching your hair has nothing to do WHY your hair falls out. Reasons why hair falls out easily: Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs), steroids, hereditary, hair dyes, perming/relaxers, straightening (have read many on YA HAIR, and have responded to them since 2009), diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/
      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      4. To get healthier, softer, shinier hair: Eliminate the chemicals and heating tools to style your hair. You get all your vitamins & minerals & proteins FREE from the good foods you eat from Mother Nature, not made by man, and no shampoo can help grow hair, not even those made for horses. Horses don't abuse their hair, using heating tools, and they eat better than people, but it won't add more hair & make their hair longer faster.Shampoo intended for animals may contain insecticides or other medications for treatment of skin conditions or parasite infestations such as fleas or mange. These must never be used on humans.

      Prenatal vitamins don't make your hair grow. Pregnant women have to start taking care of their bodies when they're pregnant, meaning stop smoking, drinking, dyeing or perming their hair SO OF COURSE their hair start growing again. But it has nothing to do with their hair, it has something to do to help the development of their unborn child.
      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php

      Any OTC Shampoo and conditioner formulated for your hair texture. None is better than the other, and salon is not better than OTC. Shampoos are meant to clean and conditioners are meant to condition curly/wavy, chemically treated & damaged hair.

  49. QUESTION:
    Can I go through menopause at 32 years old?
    I am 32 years old.. About 5 years ago I had an IUD put in and my periods stopped. I had the IUD removed in December of 2005 and got pregnant in Feb of 2006. After I had my baby I got another IUD and then a little while later had my tubes tied. So I haven't really had a period in 5 years. I am having symptoms of menopause. Could I be going through menopause this early?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you could be going through early onset menopause. There are even gals in their 20's that are going through menopause. You need to go to your doctor and ask for a FSH blood test. This test will tell your hormone levels and what stage of menopause you are in. If you have symptoms then discuss the treatments with your doctor.

  50. QUESTION:
    Can a teenage girl develop breast cancer?
    I understand that this question has been asked many times, but I am not asking because I am concerned for my health. I am simply curious. Also, I apologize in advance if this question evokes memories of loved ones lost to this awful disease.
    So, could a teenage girl develop breast cancer? And if she could, would treating it be easier/harder than treating an older woman for the same disease at the same stage? Lastly, what are some treatments that the girl may receive to try and rid her of the cancer?
    Thank you all in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      I am glad to see that you are curious about breast cancer and the actions you can take to help reduce your risks.

      First off, yes, teenagers can get breast cancer. The likelihood of developing breast cancer under the age of 30 is low, accounting for only 0.5% of cancers but it is possible.

      Treating breast cancer for a teenager, man, or women is the same, the best course of action would be discussed between you and your doctor but may include chemotherapy, radiation, mastectomy, etc. This all depends on what stage you are in among other things.

      The good news is that there are things you can do now to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer in the future. This includes eating a healthy diet, getting 30 minutes of exercise per day, limiting your alcohol intake, and not smoking. Another very important thing is early detection, early detection is key to saving lives because the sooner you can catch the disease the less invasive the the treatments will be. There is not right or wrong way to do this, do whatever feels comfortable for you, I like to use my fingertips and feel in a circular motion around my breasts, armpit and collarbone area for lumps. Keep in mind that not all lumps mean breast cancer, they should be checked by your health care professional.

      Here is a complete list of things to look for: Lumps either in the breast, along the chest bone, and in the armpit area (these lumps do not come and go, but remain and may grow over time), unusual change in breast shape or size, changes in the skin of the breast (dimpling or puckering, thickening and discolouration – “orange peel” effect, redness, swelling and increased warmth), nipple changes (crusting, ulcers or scaling, inverted nipples – if it is sudden and not your norm, nipple discharge, itching of the nipple or breast)
      While these signs and symptoms may be due to other breast conditions, they should be checked by a trained health care professional. Talk to your doctor if you notice any of the above!

      For some women these are not changes but rather they are how they breast normally are, this is important to note, you should become familiar with how your breasts normally are. Breasts will develop and change over time during various stages of life – puberty, menstruation (monthly period), pregnancy and menopause. As a teenager going through puberty, they may notice the following: hair around the nipples, inverted nipples, nipple discharge, sensitivity or discomfort, swelling, tenderness, increased lumpiness, stretch marks, Montgomery bumps, and/or different sized breasts
      Some of these will disappear over time but some remain. What is “normal” for one person may not be normal for someone else.
      Everyone should know what is “normal” for them, and know what changes are normal over the course of the month. If something changes which is unexpected, talk to a health care professional.

      I hope this information helps.


treatments of menopause

Hormone Patch

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    If I was 42 when I had a total hysterectomy, how much longer will I have to endure menopause?
    I was forced into menopause (hot flashes, night sweats) after my total hysterectomy. I use a hormone patch which works very well, but I wonder how much longer I'll have to use it.

    • ANSWER:
      Women who go through surgical menopause will sometimes have menopause symptoms until natural menopausal age.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the average cost of a gender change?
    I need to know roughly how much it's going to cost for:
    ~Breast Implants
    ~The actual change
    ~hormone patches/pills
    ~Speech Therapy (or whatever you want to call it)

    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      I spent 17,000 dollars on surgery (genital surgery only, I did not need breast implants or any other surgery)
      180$ for a name change
      15$ to change my birth certificate ( I also had to change other documents, don't remember how much the total cost was but I will estimate 0)
      Hormones and Testosterone Blockers, over the past 10.5 years I would have spent a few thousand dollars
      whole new wardrobe ( I will estimate 1000$)
      never had speech therapy
      hair removal, between ,000 and 10,000 dollars. I think I may have spent more, it adds up
      therapy : several hundred dollars
      I'm probably between 25,000 and 30000 $$ US

  3. QUESTION:
    What can I do about my attitude problems and mood swings?
    okay, i am 15 and have awful mood swings. i am extremely snappy and blow up at nothing. my mom has to take hormone patches for the same symptoms i am having. however, i had my hormones checked out and they said it was fine. is there anything i can do to improve them just a little bit? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Change your attitude towards positive. Mentally be firm and stable to solve your mood swings.

  4. QUESTION:
    why cant i get my hormone patch to stay on?
    I got a hysterectomy 3 weeks ago and am now on hormone patches which im suppost to put on and replace once a week but mine wont stay on but for about 4 days, any suggestion on how to make it stay on better??

    • ANSWER:
      Yup. I have had patients like that. Try wiping your arm or wherever you are placing it with a clean little alcohol pad before you put it on. Then let it dry.
      Wash and DRY your hands.

      Then put the patch on.

      Sometimes just our skin type, if oily, and the natural oil on our hands (in our skin) makes the patch fall off.

      Hope that helps.

  5. QUESTION:
    my hormone level is very low the count is 150 a normal count is 1000. how do you loose this?
    Does the hormone patch work and what kind of side-effects does it have?

    • ANSWER:
      Find a doctor in your yellow pages who deals with bio-identical hormones. He/she will know exactly what to do for you to get you balanced again.

      It's worth it.

  6. QUESTION:
    Does taking prenatal vitamins after the ortho evra patch help regulate your system?
    Does it help get all those hormones from the patch out of your system and make the process faster to conceive?

    • ANSWER:
      Nope. A prenatal is pretty much just a multivitamin. If you are trying to regulate your cycles I suggest Vitex. I'm not sure there is anything that will get the chemicals from the patch out of your system faster though.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can I donate a leftover prescription drug somewhere?
    I have a leftover prescription drug (still sealed in its package) that I hate to throw out. Is there somewhere I can send it so it can be used by someone who can't afford prescriptions? In case it matters, it's three leftover hormone patches that my doctor prescribed for pre-menopausal symptoms. Didn't use them because he changed my script to something else. Thanks for any info.
    Just to clarify, I'm looking for a *legal* way to "recycle" this leftover prescription - to someone who has received the same prescription from her doctor, but who might not have prescription coverage, or otherwise be able to afford it. I would never just *give* a prescription drug to someone.

    • ANSWER:
      No. Perscription drugs are given by perscription only.

  8. QUESTION:
    What hormones are in the patch or pill for birth control?
    What hormones are in the patch or pill for birth control? How do they prevent pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills usually contain a chemically similar form of progesterone and estrogen.

      The primary mechanism of action stops ovulation. This is achieved by suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, which decreases levels of FSH and LH. Side effects of the pill promote a secondary mechanism, the thickening of the cervical mucus. This makes it harder for sperm to penetrate, effectively making it more difficult for the sperm to reach the uterus and fallopian tubes.

  9. QUESTION:
    I am experiencing abdominal pains and bloating after eating. It keeps me up at night in pain. I have to ?
    take something to help me fall asleep otherwise I am up all night in pain. I am using Alli, I am also using a Hormone patch. I suffer from IBS, but it's never caused so much discomfort. What can I do to eliminate such pain.

    • ANSWER:
      The Alli is probably the culprit. Have you considered discontinuing usage to see if your symptoms improve.

      Your IBS may be gradually getting worse. I would schedule an appointment with my gasteroenterologist for some follow up. Or it may be that your gall bladder isn't functioning properly. Again, only a doctor could tell you. Roughage (like lettuce) and high fatty foods both aggravate IBS and gall bladder problems.

      You should keep a journal of the foods you are consuming, the times you are consuming them and the time when the stomach ache is occurring. The doctor will ask these questions, and it's hard to remember.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to take off the birth control patch for an hour and then put the same one back on?
    I was just wondering. I started the patch today and read online that going in a hot tub can change the level of hormones released from the patch. I was planning on going in a hot tub. Would I be able to take it off, go in the hot tub for an hour, and then put the same one back on if it still has all its sticky-ness? or do i start a new patch and change my "change" date to that day?

    • ANSWER:
      No, its not safe to take off the birth control patch for an hour and then put the same one back on

  11. QUESTION:
    Can using the patch to skip my period make me grow facial hair?
    Well my doctor says it's okay to use the patch for 6 weeks, and then take it off and have a period.. My friend said it can make you grow facial hair, and make your voice deep.. Is that true?

    • ANSWER:
      yes because it means yoyr body isn't producing enough estrogen. Because your body produce both male and female hormones. So when it doesn't produce the amount of estrogen it needs the male hormone shows through causing in your cse facial hair.

  12. QUESTION:
    What will the birth control patch do to you if you put it near your breasts?
    I just got put on the patch and my doc said not to put it near my boobs and I asked why, all she told me was that it's bad. What will happen if I put it near my breast area?

    • ANSWER:
      I asked my mom, an RN, this same question. She said that placing a high dosage of hormones on your breasts is dangerous, because this could increase the chances of cysts and cancer.

  13. QUESTION:
    How long does the birth control patch stay in your system?
    My husband and I are TTC and I have only been on the patch for about 5 months. Last time I got pregnant I was on the patch for around a year and concieved within 3 months of trying. Anyone have any idea?

    • ANSWER:
      Methods like the patch and pill and ring are effective while you use them, and are rapidly cleared from your body once you stop. (That's why you get a bleed at the end of each cycle -- your hormones drop and trigger the bleed.)
      Most women will become fertile within a few weeks of stopping the method. A few women will need a few months for their natural hormonal cycles to return and to start ovulating again.

      This is true whether you are on the method for few months or for 20 years.

  14. QUESTION:
    How do they make hormone pills?
    where do they get the hormones for things like hormone replacement therapy (for menopause) or trans-gender hormones? do they get it from some one else or do they have to make it? and how?

    • ANSWER:
      I think that they have pills but I'm on Vivelle dot patch 0.0375 Mg's. for menopause and they work great.

  15. QUESTION:
    What does testosterone do and when I put the patch on my upper arm how does it enter through my skin?
    My doctor gave me a prescription for a patch that I put on my skin and it had sticky parts to keep the patch in place,who knows how does the patch work and will it make me grow more pubic hair and make my penis fatter and longer.I was told I have little testosterone in me,that is why I have male breast when I am not posed to have them.

    • ANSWER:
      Just warning you about taking it off (I have patches for my ADD), it will hurt a lot the first few times. Are you sure the doctor said the upper arm? Because couldn't people like easily see that your taking some type of medication? Make sure that it wasn't supposed to be on your hip or something. Testosterone is the male sex hormone. How old are you because wouldn't you have learned this in your health class at school?

  16. QUESTION:
    What do you take for menopause instead of hormones?
    I wear a patch. It helps with my mood and legs. What else is there to help? I really don't want to get breast cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      although im not there yet, my gyn says evening primrose oil caps help alot. also, my mom used to take this syrup from a spanish store called syrup of senora montiel. she said it worked wonders for her hot flashes. best of all, these products are all natural. gd luck

  17. QUESTION:
    If i go straight onto the conctraceptive patch after finishing my pack of pills will i have a period?
    I took the pill for two weeks whilst i was on holiday, now i want to go back onto the contraceptive patch, if i go on this straight away will I have a period?

    • ANSWER:
      it's hard to say. I would say that you would most likely have some spotting (at least) because I would think the amounts (and maybe types) of hormones in the patch are different from those in the pill so your body may have to readjust.

  18. QUESTION:
    How much is male to female hormone therapy?
    How much does it usually cost lets say for a full year of hormone therapy? Where can this process be done? What else is required, or is there a page with all this info?

    • ANSWER:
      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minmize the risks of HRT.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.Susans.org/forums click "transsexual talk"

      That should get you started.

  19. QUESTION:
    What if you take one testosterone hormone patch?
    I mean just one, I don't know if I have low or normal amount. Just curious if I just take one.

    • ANSWER:
      One patch won't have any effect on you whatsoever, so save your money.
      If you are over 17 and have gone through puberty, there is nothing wrong with your testosterone levels.
      If you are younger than that, just wait a few years for things to happen, before worrying.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can I take a birth control patch 5 days early to delay my period until next week?
    Okay. I cannot have my period tomorrow, for various reasons, and tomorrow is when I should get it. I took my BC patch off Monday so I could get my period this week, but recently found a few things out that would make getting my period tomorrow horrible. Can I put a new patch on now and just take it off next Monday? Or Wednesday? I've already had no patch on for 36 hours. What should I do??

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to tell you, but putting a new patch on probably won't prevent your period from coming. If it's been off for 36 hours and you expect it to normally come tomorrow, it means the hormone levels in your system are already going low and your uterus is getting ready to expel the lining (your period).

      If you do try, please use an alternate form of birth control for next month in case your cycle gets messed up. And yes, do leave it on for the full week - tomorrow - Wednesday.

  21. QUESTION:
    What are the little spoken of side effects of the birth control patch as opposed to the Mirena IUD?
    I would like to know of any unexpected side effects both users of the birth control patch & Mirena IUD have experienced.
    My mirena is causing me lower left pelvic pain & am scheduled for an ultrasound this weekend.
    I am not quite ready to get pregnant again should I decide to have the Mirena removed & I get severe migraines with birth control pills.
    Besides condoms or abstinence, what else is available?

    *No rude or idiotic responses please, this is a medical type question.*

    • ANSWER:
      If you're not turned off of IUDs entirely, it may be a good idea to see if you can't get a Paragard. I had to have my Mirena removed three months in due to some unexpected and rare reactions, but I had the Paragard inserted shortly thereafter and have loved it ever since. It's been well over two years and I've hardly had any issues with it at all.

      If you can't have normal BCP due to migraines, though, you aren't going to be a candidate for the patch, ring, or anything else like it because it contains the same hormones. You may, however, want to discuss the possibility of progestin-only pills, or POPs, with your doctor. They're suitable for most women who can't take CHCs (combined hormonal contraceptives) due to issues with blood pressure or migraine.

      Other than that, the only non-hormonal options available are things like barrier methods (condoms, sponge, spermicide, diaphragm, etc.) or surgical sterilization, but you've indicated that you probably haven't completed your family yet. So I would ask your doctor about either the POPs or the Paragard. Good luck!

  22. QUESTION:
    How does hormone replacement therapy work? How do they determine what should have?
    I am a guy having difficulty with my girlfriend. She had to have a hysterectomy and for the past three years I have suffered because she said the first time she had hormone replacement it made her sick. So she gave up. She shut out the world and on Valentines day she couldn't tell me she loved me. I blew up and told her she needed help because she has been ignoring my needs and I have tried everything to get her interested again. And her bad habits have made her physically incompatible to me. I am frustrated beyond belief. She hates herself calling herself ugly and fat. And I told one of her girlfriends and she got mad at me saying her parts are her own business and I told her she needs to get over it. If I can have 100 people looking at mr happy for my kidney stones, ONE of her friends can know about her issues and give her some help because guys don't know what to do. I also told her if she wanted something she could ignore she should have went to the humane society and bought a cat! Can hormone replacement help her with being frigid? Can it help her feel the world is a bit more likable? Can it help her lose weight? How do they figure out what hormone mixture she needs?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone replacement CAN help with all of those things, if done right, and if her body is responsive. Hormones are the body's fuel. They're supposed to have them, and without them, there are all kinds of problems. The body produces hormones in amounts and types and at times that are very complex. There are hundreds of different hormones. But when you take hormone replacement, you're taking perhaps 2 hormones. Which you take once per day, rather than having it 24/7, in small, highly responsive amounts. Most doctors don't give a shit. That's why taking HRT can often make you sick. Complicating matters is that the most commonly prescribed hormone replacement is Premarin (horse estrogen from the urine of pregnant mares). It's not the same as human estrogen, plus it overloads you with a large dose when you take it orally, then plummets to nothing throughout the day. It's as if you were told you could eat as much as you want, except that you can only have ice cream, and you can only eat on Tuesdays. It's not natural nor is it how the body works. There are ways to work around this: tell your girlfriend to try estrogen patches. It's the closest you can get to the slow, natural, 24/7 administration of small amounts of estrogen that your ovaries produce. Have her at least try that. Then, encourage her to try testosterone. In Europe, it's standard to give hysterectomized women testosterone. In the US, they almost never do it. But without it, it's like you're castrated. Also, FYI: estrogen plays an important role as a neurotransmitter in the brain. Without it, you can become depressed and angry.

  23. QUESTION:
    How soon after stopping The Patch could you get pregnant?
    I read the medical insert that came with it and checked out the official Ortho Evra site. But I would prefer to hear it from real people!

    I was on the Patch for only 1 cycle. Is it possible to ovulate the very next cycle after only 1 month of use? And more importantly, could the Patch have altered my cycle timing, meaning ovulation at a later date than usual?

    If you have a serious answer, please share it! If you have something funny to say, knock your socks off and go for it. However insulting answers are entirely unwelcome!

    • ANSWER:
      Anything is possible. I know people who have gotten pregnant while ON the patch.....I think it just depends on the way your body reacts to the hormones. I wouldn't worry about your fertility being compromised, but any artificial control of your hormones like that could alter when in the month you ovulate.

  24. QUESTION:
    What happens if you run out of birth control patches?
    I went on a trip and forgot to bring my Ortho-Evra. I'm on the first patch of this pack, so I still have two more weeks to go before my patch-free week (and also, two more weeks to go until I get back home). What will happen? Am I going to get my period soon, or am I going to skip a period? Will I need to start all over again?

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest that you call your doctor's office and have them fax an order for a couple patches to a pharmacy that is where you are vacationing. Then you will be able to take your patches as directed. Failure to take your patches as directed can cause you to get pregnant if you don't use a reliable back up method.
      Like all medication, Ortho Evra does come with risks. It does expose you to higher levels of hormones that the pill does because of the delivery method of the medication. However, like all medication on the market in U.S. it has been evaluated by the FDA and approved by it. Depo Provera also has many of the same risks (including loss of bone density). Speak to your healthcare provider about the benefits and risks of the medications that you are on to decided whether you should stay on them or switch.

  25. QUESTION:
    How dangerous is using Hormone Replacement to stop abnormal menopausal bleeding? ?
    My girlfriend is 47, and is probably going through menopause, but I understand using Hormones can cause a person to have to take blood thinners possibly the rest of their life, among other side effects.

    • ANSWER:
      Not very dangerous, frankly. HRT has gotten a bad rap because it's slightly risky. But it also has benefits. So it's a cost/benefit analysis. It's often quite worth it for some women who are having a lot of menopause problems. I've not heard of women using HRT going on blood thinners. If the person has a clotting problem, they shouldn't be on HRT. But here's something important: oral estrogen does raise your risk of blood clots. But non-oral estrogen does NOT raise risk, so if blood clotting is a concern, then the person taking the HRT should think about using an estrogen patch instead.

  26. QUESTION:
    How much do hormones to transition cost?
    How much do hormones to transition cost? Mtf?..... I've heard it's a long process to get them which is why people self medicate, do u get the same effects self medicating ?

    • ANSWER:
      How much does HRT cost?

      First, are you seeing a gender therapist? You have to see a gender therapist to be evaluated and diagnosed as being transsexual. If you don't have one a list of some can be found here:

      http://www.DrBecky.com/therapists.html

      Next, sometime after you are diagnosed you will be referred to an endocrinologist. The endo will evaluate your health, do some lab work, discuss the options with you, prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and do follow-ups to check your progress and hormone levels. It is important to see an endocrinologist because hormones can be dangerous. Seeing a doctor and doing lab work helps minimize the risks of HRT. Without a doctor it is impossible to know if you're taking too much or not enough estrogen.

      Next, to your original question. This question is much more complicated than you realize. The costs can vary widely depending on:

      Route of administration: Pills, patches, gels, implants or injectables.
      Manufacturer
      Country of origin
      Where you buy it (Retail pharmacy vs. compounding pharmacy)
      Whether insurance is involved
      Dose. Obviously the higher the dose, the more hormones you need.

      In general pills and injectables are the cheapest.
      In general injectables, patches and gels are the safest.
      In general injectables and implants are the most convenient.
      In general they put younger people on pills.

      I would suggest you join an online support group to learn more. A couple such forums are:

      http://www.TrueSelves.com

      http://www.lauras-playground.com/forums/index.php?showforum=12

      Hope this helps.
      .

  27. QUESTION:
    How do the hormones in nuvaring work? what does it do to my body?
    I have just started using nuvaring, and i was wondering what the hormones do to my body to prevent pregnancy? I have heard of two different types of birth control, the type that stops you from releasing an egg, and another kind that stops the egg from attaching to your uterus. I have looked over all my info and on the website and nothing tells me the actual process that happens. Please only answer this question if you know the answer. Thank you! :)

    • ANSWER:
      From my understanding, the nuvaring is NOT an IUD (inter-uterine device) and does obstruct a fertilized egg from attaching.

      It's just a vehile in which a month's supply of hormone's is released into your body. Kinda like a one-stop for monthly birthcontrol. No pills, no weekly patch. But unlike the shot, if you begin to experience adverse symptoms/reactions, it can be removed. As with depo-shot, you have to ride it out and deal.

  28. QUESTION:
    How to get on Hormone Replacement Therapy?
    I'm a 19 year old transgender woman who wants to get started on her hormones. As a college student, I'm not financially well off nor do I want to tell my parents about this until a later time. So I was wondering how I can start hormone therapy without having to pay for doctor visits.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey! Welcome to my world of a decade ago! ;) I started at 19, too, in college, and likewise too afraid to tell my parents yet.

      My solution at the time? DIY. First, you need information. And these people know bloody everything about doing DIY (including all the latest research; I've had three doctors since I did DIY, and not a one of them knew half what the average person on that list did about how to treat transsexuals).

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TsDoItYourselfHormones

      Want a general guide to get started?

      http://www.tsroadmap.com/early/transsexual-hormones.html

      My recommendations? Get on 200mg/d spironolactone (one pill in the morning, one in the evening), a non-oral estrogen (I currently use climara -- you'd use two patches), and a progestin (such as progesterone) to help with breast duct development. Avoid oral estrogens, as they increase the risk of pulmonary embolism and other clotting disorders (although it's mainly a problem for older TSs). With spiro, the main side effect to be aware of is that you retain potassium and lose sodium, so avoid salt substitutes and potassium supplements (you don't want to OD on potassium... although even on spiro, if you're young and have no kidney disease, that's hard to do)

      The spiro will cost you about 70 cents a day. The cost of the estrogen and progestin depends on what form you choose. If you have to cut one thing out, cut out the progestin. If you have to cut out two things, IMHO, also cut the estrogen. The spiro is the most important thing to stay on, as it blocks all further testosterone damage, buying you time until you can afford the estrogen.

      Email me if you have any Qs; I'd be glad to help you with whatever I can. :) I've been there. You're about to start an amazing journey, so fasten your seatbelt.

  29. QUESTION:
    Can you get pregnant from using a expired birthcontrol patch?
    The birth control patch I had put on was expired. I have been having unprotected sex since August it is now September. And I didn't noticed it until the end of August that it was infact expired. My ovulation/most fertile week is[September 9, 2007 to September 14, 2007]. Through the beginning of that week I noticed some spotting during this week. The spotting started on Monday, then happend again on thursday, and then again saturday. The day that I infact ovulate it said on Wednesday, september 12th and i heard it takes atleast 1-2 weeks AFTER ovulation to detect pregnacy. I took a test on the Monday I noticed the spotting and the test came out negitive.

    Could I be pregnant and was it took soon to take a test?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes sorry to say but yes you can get pregs on a expired patch.
      the hormones on is weaken that is why they expire.
      the good news.
      it took me 5 m to ger pregs after going off the patch.
      it takes awhilefor your body to return to normal.

      that might be why you are spotting.

      take a test in a few days.

  30. QUESTION:
    Anyone know the likeliness of getting pregnant on the birth control patch?
    I became pregnant on Ortho-tricyclin Lo (pill) so I decided to try the patch. I have recently found out about two family members that have had babies while on the patch. One child's nickname is Patches. However, I have one that has used it for years and hasn't become pregnant nor had any side effects. I just wanna know the likelihood before I continue use.

    • ANSWER:
      The patch is most effective for women 198 lbs or less. Once a woman is over 198 lbs it is not as effective because the excess fatty tissue interferes with the absorption of the hormones. Remember no birth control is 100% effective!!

  31. QUESTION:
    how long after i take off my birth control patch should i start my period?
    this is my first month using the patch i did the one a week changing it for 3 weeks and i took it off suppose to get my period and havent gotton it yet... is this normal
    what if i get my period a day or two before i am suppose to put my new patch on. do i still put my patch on if im on my period

    • ANSWER:
      yes. You have just tricked your body into thinking it was pregnant. this is why you don't ovulate when your on birth control hormones because why would your body try and get pregnant when it already is. Your body just needs time to adjust to your nature hormones and realize "i'm not fake pregnant any more". just know this is normal and every women is different and reacts differently to different hormones.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can you get your period while on the birth control patch?
    I just started my 2nd week on the birth control patch and normally I would have gotten my period this week. Can you only get your period on your 4th week (off the patch week)? Just wanna be on the safe side so any info would be great! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Birth control (like patches, pills, and injections) work because they keep your hormone levels up, which tricks your body into thinking you're pregnant (because your body won't allow itself to be impregnated when it's already pregnant). When you take the placebo pill or, in your case, take off the patch, your body is like, "Oh, hey. I'm not pregnant. Better get rid of this uterine lining," and you have your period.

      ...long story short, you get your period only when you're off the patch for the week.
      :)

  33. QUESTION:
    What are natural ways to control hormones?
    I have been on the pill for six years- the same one (lo-ovral). I'm rather certain I'm becoming resistant to it having been on it so long: I'm starting to have the same menstrual problems I had before I went on it- heavy bleeding lasting 5+ days, tremendous cramps, total exhaustion, hot flashes, the works.

    But the thing that is bothering me the most is my skin. Mother of God! I had the usual teenage acne flare ups, but never anything like this. I currently have a patch of whiteheads under my ear, two on my chin, and FOUR of the deep, cystic type. I made an appointment to see my dermatologist but can't get in until late November, and can't get in to see my ob/gyn until January. In the meantime, is there anything I can do to get things kinda in balance naturally? I'm taking the best care I can for the acne topically, but I know it's only helping on the surface. Are there any supplements that might help control it and/or the other problems while I wait?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all you CAN get in to see your GYN sooner. You call them and tell them you are having problems with your birth control pills and they will get you in. If all you did was to make an appointment for a routine exam, then of course, you won't be seen until January. You have to tell them you are having a problem. You aren't really becoming resistant to the pills-that doesn't happen. But maybe it is time to switch. There are better pills that have come out in the last few year that still work great and can reduce the acne at the same time.

      Remember if you are 35 or older and a smoker, being on the pill increases your chance at heart disease and stroke.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to use a BIRTH CONTROL PATCH prior to losing virginity?
    Hi, I am a 22 year old virgin who's planning to lose it to my boyfriend soon. Do you think it's a smart move to start on the patch already before actually doing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few links if you'd like to learn more about the Big Announcement on Friday December 15th that, WITHOUT A DOUBT, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) causes breast cancer. Since the time when women were discouraged from taking HRT back in 2001-2002, breast cancer rates have sharply dropped by an unprecedented 7%! In the scientific community, this is a bombshell proof positive of the connection. Note that breast cancer rates originally started increasing rapidly when birth control pills and now other forms of hormonal birth control began to be widely used. Hormonal birth control methods contain the SAME hormones that are also the most widely used in HRT (estrogen and progestin). Hormonal birth control methods include; The Pill, The Mini-Pill, The Patch, some types of IUDs, Nuva Ring, Depo Shots, and Nor-Plant. Hormone levels in HRT are actually lower than levels found in hormonal birth control methods. Consider that on top of the fact that hormonal birth control methods are used by young healthy women with already normal levels of naturally occurring hormones. They’re getting MASSIVE dosages, even with the more modern low-dose pills being used.

      How long will we have to wait before the medical community admits to women that hormonal birth control methods are just as dangerous as HRT? I have a feeling that it will be much longer, as hormonal birth control is considered to be the "holy grail" of "women's reproductive freedom". Never mind that women are dying of breast cancer at alarmingly increasing rates since 1974, around the time when landmark cases were decided and BC pills began to be more widely used. Thirty years later, we are reaping the "benefits" of artificial hormones that are used to suppress and tinker with the natural processes of the female body.

      The female bodily functions of ovulation, pregnancy and menopause ARE NOT ILLNESSES. Medications should only be taken when it's absolutely necessary to prevent or cure ILLNESS, and then ONLY if the benefit outweighs the risks. If you have a medical condition that your doctor wants to treat with hormones, make sure to do YOUR research and challenge his or her opinion. Get a second or even a third opinion. Explore alternative treatments. Doctors are not infallible and in the end, only YOU can determine the best course of action with regard to your health. Only after you’ve exhausted your other options, if it is apparent that hormones are the only treatment that makes sense, then by all means, DO IT.

      If you must practice birth control and cannot try abstinence; condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps used correctly with plenty of spermicide gel or foam, are STATISTICALLY JUST AS EFFECTIVE as hormonal birth control. Condoms also decrease your chances of contracting an STD and they don't work by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg, like hormonal birth control does. If you are pro-life and believe that life begins at conception, this last point should be of particular interest to you. Abortifacient types of birth control also include non-hormonal types of IUDs, which work exclusively by preventing implantation of a fertilized egg…they don’t even ATTEMPT to stop ovulation and subsequent fertilization…and they can cause uterine perforations and other complications. Even if you DON’T have any moral objection to the abortifacient birth control methods, at least stop using hormonal birth control and IUDs for the sake of your own health!

      HOW HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND HORMONAL BIRTH CONTROL METHODS HAVE NOW DEFINITELY BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE CANCER
      http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1025191125.html
      http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/12/15/gupta.breast.cancer/
      ALTERNATIVES TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
      http://www.womentowomen.com/bioidentical-hrt/index.asp?id=1&campaignno=getoffhrt&adgroup=adgroup2&keywords=hormone+replacement+therapy
      http://www.power-surge.com
      HOW SOME TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL CAN CAUSE ABORTION WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE, ALONG WITH INFORMATION ABOUT NON-HORMONAL BARRIER BIRTH CONTROL METHODS THAT ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE
      http://abort73.com/HTML/II-D-2-types.html
      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BIRTH CONTROL AND HOW IT IS ANTI-WOMAN
      http://www.the-edith-stein-foundation.com/articles.asp?col=2

  35. QUESTION:
    Can you be 17 to use the birth control patch?
    I am tired of taking the pill I am thinking about switching to the patch. The patch would be a lot easier to control but I just can't do it with birth control. Can you at least be 17 to use the patch because I read somewhere you couldn't. Would the doctors let me switch to the patch even though I am a virgin? I go the the health department & would they pay for the patch & I might end up switching to health care soon & would they also cover the patch?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes you can. I am 17 and I wanted a paragard IUD and that was one of the first things that was recommended instead of the IUD.
      I don't like it cause I'm scared of it slipping off without me knowing, so I got an implanon instead.
      And you can be a virgin and use it.

      You have to be at least 17 to buy emergency contraception without a prescription, and at least 16 for an IUD, but most other forms do not have an age requirement.

      You may also consider the shot, which you get every 3 months The patch, implant, pill, and shot all have many of the same hormones.
      The shot is supposed to help with periods and even make most of them stop, I had issues with it and it didn't work so well for me.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to spot in between periods while on the ortho evra patch?
    I got my period on oct 13and it ended on the 20th. On the 26th I began spotting with light blood but it was a pinkish red color. Now yesterday it was brown and now today its back to the pinkish red color. I dont kno what I should do? Is this normal or could I be pregnant? Should I take a test? Should i stop the patch? What should I do? Please help :)
    ive been on this for a yr now

    • ANSWER:
      YES IT IS NORMAL. YOUR BODY HAS TO GET USED TO THE HORMONES IT RELEASES. I SPOTTED FOR 11 MONTHS IN BETWEEN THAT TIME.

  37. QUESTION:
    What are those small weight loss ear patched?
    I recently saw some dude in my class with small circular ear patches in his ear & my buddy's mother uses them, too. They are for weight management &/or weight loss, but i do not know what they are called or where to find them.. or how they work. Can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      Iv heard about those ( hormapatches) and the fda doesnt know the long term effects. its putting chemicals/hormones in your body. Can I make a suggestion? It seems like you want to lose weight but not be bothered with all the planning involved. There is a website called heavymotivation.com. they have this custom meal generator among a ton of other stuff. It does all of the work for you and the plan WORKS. You select the foods you like to eat from a list and it generates your menu for the whole day. It knows what portions to make for you to lose weight after doing calculations about your specific body. its so easy, just answer the questions. its 30 bucks for a lifetime membership and if you follow it, it willplan your meals. I lost 18 pounds already on it. they people at my gym told me about it. This may be a good idea for you. Good luck.

  38. QUESTION:
    How good are my chances of getting pregnant right after the patch? PLEASE HELP!!?
    I'm 22 and have been on the patch for about a year. I'm just curious if that will help my chances of getting pregnant that I'm young and have been on the patch for a short time. I'm taking prenatal vitamins as well because I heard that helps with balancing your hormones after the patch.

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    Should a woman be on hormone replacement therapy if she's not having menopause symptoms?
    I have a friend who is using a natural patch on her own, without the advice of a doctor. Could she be putting herself at risk?

    • ANSWER:
      no need at all.

  40. QUESTION:
    What does hormone free birth control mean?
    What does hormone free birth control exactly mean? Like so ure not so hormonal? Or more than usual?

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn't use hormones to prevent pregnancy, but uses other methods.

      Hormonal birth control (the pill, the patch, the shot, the ring, the Mirena IUD, and the implant) all work by releasing hormones (usually estrogen and/or progestin), which in turn causes you to not ovulate, thereby preventing pregnancy (no egg means nothing to be fertilized, ergo, no baby!).

      Hormone-free birth control uses other methods to keep you from getting pregnant, such as killing sperm (spermicide and the Paragard copper coil IUD) and keeping sperm and egg separate (male condom, female condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, sponge, withdrawal).

      Some women experience negative side effects on hormonal birth control (mood swings, decreased sex drive, weight fluctuation, headaches/migraines, etc.) or it is ill-advised for them to take hormonal birth control (if they are smokers, have high blood pressure, etc.), so for them, they may prefer or need to use non-hormonal birth control instead.

      Hope that helps!

  41. QUESTION:
    My puppy has two circular dry patches of skin that he itches. He tested negative for ringworm. What is it?
    One patch is under his arm pit, the other is under his neck. He was tested for fungal infections twice and the results were negative. What else could this be?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be mange or it could be a hot spot, it could also be a sign of hypothyroidism.

      The first is seen primarily in dogs with a compromised immune system - dogs on long-term strong medications, dogs that are malnourished, dogs fighting off or recovering from major diseases or illness, and dogs that are very stressed. Treatment involves killing off the mites with medicated shampoo and improving the dog's overall health.

      A hot spot is most common on dogs with long hair and is caused by moisture, heat, and/or dirt being trapped next to the skin and irritating it. These will be hot to the touch, and are not dry when forming, though the bare patches left behind may be. The treatment focuses on getting lots of air to the affected spot and keeping it clean and dry while it heals.

      The third is a hormonal condition, almost certainly genetic, that affects primarily middle-aged and older dogs. The thyroid controls a lot of hormones in the dog's body and when it is functioning at a lower-than-normal rate, your dog's hair does not get the signal to keep growing or to grow back. Thus, a patch where the hair is being worn away will remain hairless because it doesn't grow back fast enough to replace it. Treatment involves daily medication that simulates thyroid hormones so that his body functions like it should.

      Talk to the vet again, and maybe get a second opinion as well.

      P.S. are these patches where his collar/harness always sit? Does he wear them every day? If so, the hair may just be worn away and you have nothing to worry about.

  42. QUESTION:
    Any hints or old wives tales on how to get pregnant fast?
    My husband and I want to get pregnant. I was on the patch until last month and have done some research online. Most of the sites said that I should wait until I get my first "normal" period. It might be hard (with the hormones from the patch still in my system) to get pregnant quickly. There would be no harm to the baby or myself if we did get pregnant before my first period. We would like to have a baby by the end of the year, but I would have to get pregnant this month to accomplish this.

    Do you have any hints or old wives tales on how to get pregnant quickly?

    • ANSWER:
      read http://www.fertilityfriend.com advice pages and you'll learn a lot about your body and how to tell when you're fertile. Pregnancy only happens 20% of the time, even if you're doing everything 'right' so don't stress it and it'll happen. BD a lot, and make it fun :)

  43. QUESTION:
    What happens when you take in too much testosterone hormone?
    Or what are the effects if you take a patch? lol
    Okay just answer me this, what if you just take ONE patch.

    • ANSWER:
      balls shrink mammary glands enlarge prostate problems

  44. QUESTION:
    What to do about brown patches on face?
    I think it's from taking a hormone replacement, had it before when I was on a certain kind of birth control, I hate it, it's blotches across my forhead and down my temples. The sun brings it out or the tanning bed. Makes me want to avoid the sun completely. I sure hapoe there's a quick inexpensive fix, I don't wear makeup but I'm thinking it might be the answer, please help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had the same problem and itis a hormonal thing. I have tried lots of different and expensive treatment, but the only thing that really worked was going to a dermatologist who prescribed a specially forumlated cream. It was very inexpensive only for a jar that lasts 3 months. Also do not go outside or to tanning beds without SPF 30+ as any sun will cause further damage.

  45. QUESTION:
    Why do I have rough patches on forehead and jowls?
    I'm a 53 year old female. In the past year I have had rough patches on my jowls. I just recently got it on my forehead. Not itchy, bumby or scaly. Eight months ago I started getting dry patches in my ears. Moisturisers don't seem to help.

    • ANSWER:
      changes in hormone levels could be causing your rough patches, it might be better to try a vitamin e cream, wheatgerm cream or something very basic like olive oil. these tend to be better moisturisers for older skin (no offence meant) than a lot of moisturisers that are made for combination skin or younger dry skin.

  46. QUESTION:
    Can a relationship with a partner be saved after it hits a rough patch?
    I have been going out with a girl for about four months now.
    We have been extremely deeply in love, more than i've ever been in my life.
    About a month ago she started treating me really poorly. She blamed it on her hormones from birth control and apologized, but her actions seem to have killed the magic that was once there.
    Now it is rare that we are ever in good moods together.

    Will the magic ever return? When do I know when to quit?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi well let me ask u if she is worth ur attention if not then get out OK?

      Having said that surely u have to take the good n bad that's what makes great relationships if u answered YES then fine if not it's over ♥

  47. QUESTION:
    My birth control patch fell off yesterday afternoon. I am ovulating today - can I get pregnant?
    My patch fell off yesterday afternoon, and my husband and I had unprotected sex last night. I thought I had already ovulated and we were in the clear, but I just counted days and I'm ovulating today. Can I get pregnant from the sex last night or are there still enough hormones from the patch in me to prevent pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      If there are hormones in your system, that prevents ovulation. If it just fell off yesterday I doubt you ovulated and you should be fine.

  48. QUESTION:
    Are skin rashes an allergic reaction to the birth control patch?
    I have been using the birth control patch ( Evra for three month) and i have this rash all over my body and it itches, am not sure what is causing it but i suspect it maybe the patch.

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like you have hives and it most certainly could be the patch. most likely it is not the hormones but the adhesive you are having a reaction to. contact your doctor to discuss switching your birth control method.

  49. QUESTION:
    Why is my hamster loosing hair in little patches toward her tail?
    My hamster's acting normal; she has strength and loves to run around, but recently I have noticed that my hamster is loosing fur in small patches toward her tail. Do you have any idea whats wrong? or What I should do?
    My hamster is having normal stool and doesn't sctratch herself.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, the most likely thing is that she has mites. Hamsters get these all the time. Take her to the vet who can either give her an injection that will get rid of them for a month or two, or they can also give you drops to put on yourself, that you can then do every few weeks to keep her clear for longer (there should be instructions on the pack, if not ask the vet). The only trouble with the drops is you have to weigh the hamster and be careful to give her the right number, which can be difficult on a wriggling animal!

      If the drops aren't working, it could be she has cysts on her ovaries. This happens in female hamsters and upsets the balance of hormones, making her fur fall out. The cysts won't do her any other harm, and there's nothing they can do about them. My hamster has them, but still gets mites, which make it fall out much faster, so I treat her for those. She's nearly 2 now.

      The main thing is not to worry, just take her to a vet. I hope I've been helpful.

  50. QUESTION:
    I want to know the purpose of birth control patch?
    Im wondering what is birth control patch, want to know more about birth control patch, is that anything related with controlling pregnancy?

    • ANSWER:
      It is a patch that you stick to your skin that releases hormones that prevent pregnancy. Each week, you put a new patch on.

      It's like birth control pills.. except in patch form.


hormone patch

Treatment For Symptoms Of Menopause

[STARTVIDEO]

[VIDEO]

[ENDVIDEO]

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone taken herbal oestrogens do they work?
    I am getting symptoms of menopause like night sweats, aches fuzzy head dizzy spells etc, that point to a drop in oestrogen levels, I thought about trying the natural herbal oestrogen replacements, but there are so many. Has anyone taken them and did they actually work?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      In the UK, a recent national guideline from Clinical Knowledge Summaries states that "CKS does not recommend the use of complementary therapies". The reasons include:

      * They have not been shown convincingly to work very well.
      * There is very little control over the quality of the products available, which may vary.
      * Some of these treatments (ginseng, black cohosh, and red clover) have oestrogenic properties and should not be used in women who should not take oestrogen (for example, women with breast cancer).
      * Long-term safety (for example, effects on the breast and lining of the uterus) have not been assessed.
      * Some may have serious side-effects. For example, severe liver damage has been reported with black cohosh and Java. Kava has been withdrawn from the UK market because of concerns over safety.
      * Dong quai and some species of red clover contain chemicals called coumarins, which make them unsuitable if you take anticoagulants (such as warfarin).

      A consensus statement from the British Menopause Society also states ...

      "This guidance regarding alternative and complementary therapies is in response to the increased use of these strategies by women who believe them to be safer and more ‘natural’. The choice is confusing. Evidence from randomised trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is poor. A major concern is interaction with other treatments, with potentially fatal consequences. Some preparations may contain estrogenic compounds, and this is a concern for women with hormone-dependent diseases, such as breast cancer. Concern also exists about the quality control of production."

      For night sweats you could try Clonidine. You need to have a chat with your GP really.

  2. QUESTION:
    Having a period two times a month,is this related to menopause?
    How can I stay healthy even though symptoms of menopause seem to effect me with arthritis in my knees?

    • ANSWER:
      Try an all natural health product like Hot Flash Freedom instead of using chemical based treatments for your symptoms in order to stay healthy while treating such discomfort.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the the best treatment for pre-menapause symptoms apart from hormone replacement therapy?
    I am a lady, 44 years of age and am going through the pre-menapause symptoms especially headaches, hot flashes, irregular periods and digestive disorders. Ive been to my GP and said he can only prescribe HRT if my symptoms get worse and only gave me some pain killers. I understood clearly the reasons why the GP could not prescribe the HRT and i would like to go through the process without them. I have done some browsing on the internet and im trying a few things which are not giving me an immediate relief i need as i have to work almost daily. If there is someone who knows what i am talking about, can they share their experiences so i can learn from them.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.nutrihealth.org/pages/menopause.html

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the signs and symptoms of endometriosis?
    What are the side effects without treatment, and what is the treatment, and how do they diagnose it. Does it always affect fertility.

    • ANSWER:
      From the Endo Research Center (www.endocenter.org):

      "About Endometriosis:

      With Endometriosis, tissue like that which lines the uterus (the endometrium) is found outside the womb in other areas of the body. Normally, the endometrium is shed each month through menses; however, with Endometriosis, these implants have no way of leaving the body. The implants still break down and bleed, but result is far different than in women and girls without the disease: internal bleeding, degeneration of blood and tissue shed from the growths, inflammation of the surrounding areas, and formation of scar tissue result. In addition, depending on the location of the growths, interference with the normal function of the bowel, bladder, intestines and other areas of the pelvic cavity can occur. Endometriosis has also been found lodged in the skin - and even the brain.

      Symptoms include chronic or intermittent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation is not normal!), infertility, miscarriage(s), ectopic (tubal) pregnancy, dyspareunia (pain associated with intercourse), nausea / vomiting / abdominal cramping, diarrhea / constipation (particularly with menses), painful bowel movements, painful or burning urination, urinary frequency, retention, or urgency; fatigue, chronic pain, allergies and immune system-related illnesses are also commonly reported complaints of women who have Endo. It is quite possible to have some, all, or none of these symptoms. Endo symptoms are varied and often nonspecific, so they can easily masquerade as several other conditions, including adenomyosis ("Endometriosis Interna"), appendicitis, ovarian cysts, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, diverticulitis, ectopic pregnancy, fibroid tumors, gonorrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ovarian cancer, and PID.

      Despite today's age of medical advances, researchers remain unsure as what causes of Endometriosis. There is NO CURE, despite the continued propagation of such myths by the uninformed who still mistakenly believe that hysterectomy, pregnancy and/or menopause can "cure" the disease. Invasive surgery remains the gold standard of diagnosis, and current therapies continue to remain extremely limited, often carrying side effects.

      Mistakenly minimized as "painful periods," Endometriosis is more than just "killer cramps." It is a leading cause of female infertility, chronic pelvic pain and gynecologic surgery, and accounts for more than half of the 500,000 hysterectomies performed in the US annually. Despite being more prevalent than breast cancer, Endometriosis continues to be treated as an insignificant ailment. Recent studies have even shown an elevated risk of certain cancers and other serious illnesses in those with the disease, as well as malignant changes within the disease itself.

      Research has shown that genetics, immune system dysfunction, and exposure to environmental toxins like Dioxin may all be contributing factors to the development of the disease. Endometriosis knows no racial or socioeconomic barriers, and can affect women ranging from adolescence to post-menopause. The disease can be so painful as to render a woman or teen unable to care for herself or her family, attend work, school, or social functions, or go about her normal routine. It can negatively affect every aspect of a woman's life; from her self-esteem and relationships, to her capacity to bear children, to her ability to be a contributing member of society.

      The disease can currently only be diagnosed through invasive surgery, and the average delay in diagnosis is a staggering 9 years. A patient may seek the counsel of 5 or more physicians before her pain is adequately addressed.

      Once diagnosed, it is not unusual for a patient to undergo several pelvic surgeries and embark on many different hormonal and medical therapies in an attempt to treat her symptoms. None of the current treatments are entirely effective, and virtually all synthetic therapies carry significantly negative side effects; some lasting far beyond cessation of therapy. The exception to this is excision; see www.centerforendo.com to learn more about excision as the leading treatment.

      Though Endometriosis is one of the most prevalent illnesses affecting society today, awareness is sorely lacking and disease research continues to remain significantly under funded. For instance, in fiscal year 2000, the National Institutes of Health planned to spend .5 billion on research. Of that funding, only .7 million was earmarked for Endometriosis - amounting to approximately $.40/patient. This is in stark contrast to other illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Lupus, which received approximately 5.00 and .00 per patient, respectively. American businesses lose millions of dollars each year in lost productivity and work time because of Endometriosis. The cost of surgery required to diagnose the disease in each patient alone adds greatly to the financial burden of both consumers and companies alike.

      Once erroneously believed to be a disease of “Caucasian career women who have delayed childbearing,” we know that in fact, Endometriosis affects women of all ages, races and
      socioeconomic status. Endometriosis also can and does exist in the adolescent female population. Far from the “rare” incidence once believed, studies have found that as many as 70% of teenagers with chronic pelvic pain had Endometriosis proven by laparoscopy. Other reports indicate that as many as 41% of patients experienced Endometriosis pain as an adolescent. The illness can be quite disruptive and cause significant dysfunction, especially at a time in life when self-esteem, school attendance and performance, and social involvement are all critical. Many adolescents with Endometriosis find themselves unable to attend or participate in classes, social functions, extracurricular activities, and sports due to significant pain and other symptoms of Endometriosis. Sometimes, teens and young women lack support and validation from both the home and the school; told the pain is “in their head,” that they are “faking it,” that their debilitating cramps are “normal” and “a part of womanhood,” that they are merely suffering from “the curse,” or that they should just “grin and bear it.” Their symptoms may also be dismissed as a sexually transmitted disease, which Endometriosis absolutely is not. Failure to acknowledge and address symptoms early in the disease process can lead to significant delays in diagnosis and necessary, subsequent treatments. Lack of support from family and loved ones can also add to the patient’s pain and fear - at any age.

      Recent studies have also shown that Endometriosis may in fact have an even bigger impact on younger patients than older women. One such study discovered that in patients under 22 years of age, the rate of disease recurrence was
      double that of older women (35% versus 19%). The study also revealed that the disease behaves differently in
      younger women; leading some researchers to believe it is a
      different form of Endometriosis altogether. Surgery, considered necessary to accurately diagnose and
      effectively treat the disease, is often withheld from younger patients based on the injudicious belief that early surgery somehow negatively influences a young woman’s fertility. Extensive, cumulative research has shown this concern to be unfounded. What can impact fertility, however,
      is neglecting effective treatment of the disease. Some
      researchers also feel that symptomatic, adolescent-onset
      Endometriosis is most often a lifelong problem that will
      progress to severe fibrotic disease.

      While it is possible to become pregnant with Endometriosis, the key is to obtain early, effective treatment such as that offered by specialty treatment centers like the Center for Endo Care (see www.centerforendo.com to learn about the success of excision as treatment). Hysterectomy is not a cure for Endometriosis. Any disease left behind by the surgeon (whether by design because he or she 'couldn't get it all' or accident because they don't recognize the disease in all manifestations) will continue to thrive and cause pain and symptoms. It does not matter if the ovaries are removed or if HRT is withheld; Endo produces its own estrogen-synthesizing enzyme known as aromatase. Thus, it enables it's own vicious life cycle and sustains the disease process. You would be better off getting all disease truly excised from all locations at a specialty center like the CEC (www.centerforendo.com).

      Due in part to the efforts of foundations like the ERC, research is ongoing in some places as to the causes of Endometriosis and potential cures for the disease. Our organization will continue to push for more widespread research into the many facets of the disease, and ultimately, a cure.

      For more information:

      http://www.endocenter.org/

      Endo Self Test:

      Not sure if you have Endometriosis? While pelvic surgery is the only current way to definitively diagnose it, symptoms can lead you and your doctor to suspect the disease. Review the following and consider if any of these common symptoms apply to you. Review your answers with your gynecologist for further discussion.

      Do you experience so much pain during or around your period that you find yourself unable to work, attend school or social functions, or go about your normal routine? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have any relatives diagnosed with Endometriosis? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you find yourself with painful abdominal bloating, swelling or tenderness at any time in your cycle? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of painful ovarian Endometriomas ("chocolate cysts")? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of miscarriage, infertility or ectopic pregnancy? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you experience gastrointestinal symptoms during your cycle, such as nausea or vomiting and/or painful abdominal cramping accompanied by diarrhea and/or constipation? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of fatigue and/or a lowered immunity (i.e., "sick and tired" all the time)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you have a history of allergies, which tend to worsen around your periods? _____YES / _____ NO

      If sexually active, do you experience pain during sexual activity? _____YES / _____ NO

      Do you suffer from autoimmune diseases or other conditions (i.e., thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, chronic migraines)? _____YES / _____ NO

      Have you ever undergone pelvic surgery like a laparoscopy, in which Endometriosis was suspected but not definitively diagnosed?
      _____YES / _____ NO

      If you have answered "yes" to one or more of these questions, you may have Endometriosis. Talk to your doctor about getting an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment today. Dull aching and cramping can occur during menstruation in many women and teens, due to uterine contractions and the release of various hormones including those known as prostaglandins. However, period pain that becomes so debilitating it renders you unable to go about your normal routine is not ordinary or typical! Pain is your body's way of signaling that something is WRONG. If you are suffering from pelvic pain at any point in your cycle, an Endometriosis diagnosis should be considered.

      Know the Facts:

      - Endometriosis can affect women and teens of all ages, even those as young as 10 or as old as 85!
      - Hysterectomy, menopause and pregnancy are NOT cures for Endometriosis; in fact, there is no definitive cure!
      - Delayed childbearing is NOT what causes Endometriosis; in fact, no one really knows for sure what causes the disease, but research points to multi-factorial origins like heredity, immunology and exposure to environmental toxicants!
      - Endometriosis can only be accurately diagnosed via surgery; diagnostic tests like MRIs and ultrasounds are not definitive!
      - GnRH therapies like Lupron should never be administered in those patients younger than 18 yrs. of age or before a surgical diagnosis!
      - You CAN live well in spite of Endometriosis. WE ARE HERE TO HELP!" ~ www.endocenter.org

  5. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I am going through Early Onset Menopause?
    The only real symptom I have is a screwed up menstrual cycle. I work with menopausal women that say I am about to go through the change. I am only 42. No night sweats, in fact I am always cold.

    • ANSWER:
      You should talk to your doctor but here's some information.
      http://www.epigee.org/menopause/early.html

      Early and Premature Menopause

      When we hear the word menopause, we usually think of older women above the age of 60. Very rarely do we ever think of ourselves. However, menopause is not a stage necessarily relegated to elderly women. Early or premature menopause is more common than most women realize - it affects about 1% of women between the ages of 15 and 45. Early or premature menopause can occur for a variety of reasons, but in the end it leaves an imprint on the lives of all of the women it affects.

      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      Because doctors are finally beginning to recognize the symptoms of menopause in younger women, more and more women are being diagnosed with early or premature menopause. As a result, women who are experiencing infertility or are dealing with menopause symptoms at a young age no longer have to wonder why.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that aren’t functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers’ footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Surgical Menopause
      Surgical menopause involves the conscious decision of forcing women into menopause for specific health reasons. Women who suffer from endometriosis, polyps, or ovarian cancer may have to undergo an oopherectomy (removal of the ovaries) or a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and sometimes ovaries). These surgeries dramatically cut off ovarian function causing estrogen levels to drop suddenly and forcing the woman into menopause.

      Menopause Caused by Cancer Treatment
      Menopause can be caused by chemotherapy or radiation cancer treatments. Chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells but, unfortunately, they also kills healthy cells. Hair cells, digestive cells, and ovarian cells are particularly at risk. Some women who have undergone cancer treatment temporarily enter menopause, while others permanently enter menopause.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the body’s functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen (known as "estrogen crash") in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isn’t so bad – in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are you perimenopause symptoms and treatments?
    I'm 43 years old and seem to be starting into perimenopause. Tonight I have tingling in my cheeks and a hot feeling, although I'm not hot to touch. I don't know if it's symptoms of perimenopause or to do with my thyroid. The thyroid is gone and today they said my thyroid is low so they are increasing the dose. I hope that helps. Has anyone else experienced that with perimenopause? The hot flushing has gone on all evening. I'm tremendously tired lately during the daytime. I don't have health insurance so my doctor is treating me conservativly.

    • ANSWER:
      You periods will change, heavier or lighter or longer or more irregular. Every person's hot flashes may be different. Insomnia is a big part of menopause, even above and not associated with the hot flashes. It seems that I don't need as much sleep as I used to.

      I was always against taking exogenous estrogen, until the hot flashes hit with a vengence. First I tried all the over the counter stuff, which, by the way, does not work in the least. Now that is what I get a "jones" for-my estrogen patches. I always keep an extra estrogen patch in my purse, just in case I need extra.

      I understand that the estrogen pills are not very expensive, as they are not under patent, and they can prescribe the generic ones for you. WalMart sells all generic drugs for four dollars a prescription.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is hair loss a symptom of menopause?
    I turned 49 in August. I've had noticeable hair loss for at least the last 6 months. Wondering if this is a symptom of menopause or if I need to consult my doctor about this.

    • ANSWER:
      it is hard to say! it will be better if you will visit your doctor!!

      anyway as we know hair loss can be caused by many different reasons! There are many causes of loss of hair such as stress, poor nutrition ,medications, thyroid dysfunctions, illness, fungal infections ,hormonal problems, to mention a few.

      year ago I suffered very much from dandruff and hair loss too and I started trying everything you can imagine to stop my hair loss.
      the things that really worked for me was:

      1) Vitamin A - an anti-oxidant which promotes healthy production of sebum in the scalp;

      2) Vitamin E stimulates circulation. Good blood circulation in the scalp is important in keeping hair follicles productive. The 'B' vitamins contribute to melanin, which gives hair its healthy color and also stimulates blood circulation;

      3) massage is also beneficial. Massage stimulates circulation. As already noted, good circulation in the scalp keeps hair follicles active. Experts suggest a few minutes of daily head massage by hand. Circulation through massage may be improved by using a few drops of lavender or bay essential oil in an almond or sesame oil base with massage;

      4) Try rubbing your scalp with garlic juice, Onion Juice or Ginger Juice(you can either of one out of three, Do not mix any of two or three);

      5) also he used herbal treatment - TrichoZed or Provillus (do not use Rogaine - it will not work!)
      Those are a good products that helps prevent hair loss and contains Biotin and the clinically tested ingredients approved by the FDA to help re-grow your hair.! I think it is very important!

      It worked and still works for me!

      I do not know if any pharmacies carry TrichoZed but I do know that you should purchase it directly from the manufacturer and read more about the product here

      http://www.trichozed.info/ingredients.php

      (TrichoZed™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 30 to 45 days. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within 6 months. Further use shall maintain optimal health of your hair.)

      and here

      http://www.provilluss.info

      (Provillus™ will produce noticeable hair growth in 40. A consistent use of TrichoZed™ ensures permanent results within ~5 months.)

      It enhances hair growth by blocking DHT (Dihydrotestostrone) - a major cause of hair loss!

      Also Informative video about Provillus - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ydvCHhbRkk

      good luck!

      not only my own personal experience + working as a family physician

  8. QUESTION:
    How do you know when will you be menopause?
    I had my first period when i was 12. Can we calculate the estimated time of our menopause? Somebody told me to add 30 to the age I had my first period and that'll be my age to be menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      34 Menopause Symptoms

      Menopausal symptoms affect about 70% of women approaching menopause. Typical menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes or night sweats, are caused by changing hormonal levels in the female reproductive system. Almost all women notice early symptoms while still having periods. This stage of gradually falling and fluctuating hormone levels is called perimenopause, which often begins in the early 40s.

      The symptoms of menopause usually last for the whole menopause transition (until the mid 50s), but some women may experience them for the rest of their lives. The most common symptoms are: Hot Flashes, Night Sweats, Irregular Periods, Loss of Libido, and Vaginal Dryness.
      However, there are a variety of treatments that can be considered to deal with these symptoms.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can I go through menopause at 32 years old?
    I am 32 years old.. About 5 years ago I had an IUD put in and my periods stopped. I had the IUD removed in December of 2005 and got pregnant in Feb of 2006. After I had my baby I got another IUD and then a little while later had my tubes tied. So I haven't really had a period in 5 years. I am having symptoms of menopause. Could I be going through menopause this early?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you could be going through early onset menopause. There are even gals in their 20's that are going through menopause. You need to go to your doctor and ask for a FSH blood test. This test will tell your hormone levels and what stage of menopause you are in. If you have symptoms then discuss the treatments with your doctor.

  10. QUESTION:
    Have you had any relief from menopause symptoms WITHOUT any HRT?
    I am interested in learning about treatments without any type of hormones. I do not even want the bioidenticals. Please let me know if you have tried anything else for hot flashes, dry skin, dry mouth, irregular sleep patterns, stiffness, etc. Thank You very much.

    • ANSWER:
      Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  11. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what the symptoms of thyroid problems are?
    My sister told me see was having blood work done because her doctor thinks her symptoms may be explained by a thyroid problem. What are some common symptoms? She says one of her symptoms is her hair falling out. I can't find anything about that symptom as related to thyroid problems!

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid gland, which is in your neck, sets the rate at which you produce energy from your body's stores by the release of thyroid hormones.

      Hyperthyroid
      If you're producing too much hormone, and the gland is overactive, you're said to be hyperthyroid. You'll have too much energy, lose weight, feel warm and may have symptoms such as palpitations.

      There are many causes of an overactive thyroid and you may need blood tests and scans to find out what's responsible.

      The most common reason is when your body's defences falsely recognise your own tissue as an invader and begin to attack it. This is called autoimmune disease and it stimulates the thyroid to produce more hormones.

      If you have a cyst or growth in the thyroid, it may also produce too much hormone.

      Hyperthyroidism symptoms may include:

      weight loss
      rapid heartbeat
      tremor
      excessive sweating
      heat intolerance
      anxiety
      muscle weakness
      goitre
      irregular periods

      Hypothyroid
      If your thyroid is underactive - not producing enough hormone - you'll have too little energy and will feel slow, tired and lethargic. You'll become hypothyroid.

      Again, there are many causes, but for some it seems to be part of the ageing process. Hypothyroidism is especially common in women after the menopause. Look for the following symptoms:

      exhaustion, tiredness, sleep problems
      difficulty concentrating or remembering
      weight gain
      dry hair, skin and nails
      depression or anxiety
      constipation
      poor libido
      breathlessness and swelling of feet
      hoarseness
      cold intolerance
      face swelling and puffy eyes
      in women, heavy periods

      How many people are affected?
      Hyperthyroidism affects up to one in 50 people and is ten times more common in women than in men. It can occur at any age but is most common between the ages of 20 and 50.

      Hypothyroidism is ten times more common in women than in men and usually occurs over the age of 40.

      What's the treatment?
      It's difficult to prevent thyroid illness. Hypothyroidism is treated with thyroid hormone medication. Treatment of hyperthyroidism may involve medication to reduce the production of thyroid hormone, radioactive iodine therapy or a thyroidectomy (removal of part of the thyroid gland).

      This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in July 2006

  12. QUESTION:
    What happens when a person doesn't take their menopause supplements?
    What happens when a female/male does/doesnt take it?
    What are some of the major signs of withdrawal?
    What do menopause supplements help with?

    • ANSWER:
      hormones are the only effective treatments to deal with menopause. Withdrawl will cause the return of menopausal symptoms.
      Hormone treatments effectively prescribed in the right dose will eliminate the great majority of unpleasant symptoms. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are the main ones but these can be supplemented with low dose DHEA and melatonin for insomnia.

  13. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a good support group for young women going through surgical menopause?
    I am 29 and underwent a complete hysterectomy last december i have no ovaries or anything left. I am truly suffering with extreme severe hot flashes constantly and sweating alot as well. I would like to talk to others like myself who are young and experiencing severe menopause symptoms caused by surgical menopause.
    I live in a very small town. We have no groups like that here. I was wanting to meet other women online to discuss this problem. People who are going through this as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I can relate to your situation. I had a complete hysterectomy also when I was 27 and also live in a small town.There is just no support groups out there for young women like us! I can give you some advice on certain things.First of all you need some Hormone Replacement Treatment for those Hot Flashes and Mood Swings,Second you need to give yourself time to heel,it takes usually around a year for your body to get back to normal,so don't rush things.One more thing (Always Remember...Your Still Are and Always will be A Complete Woman) Please feel free to contact me anytime!! I do know what you are going through.

  14. QUESTION:
    How do you know when menopause is over?
    After years of hot flashes, night sweats, hormone replacement treatment, bad nerves, ........ After starting hormones they symptoms slow down almost don't know they are there. How do you know when it is over and you can stop taking the hormones? Or is this a life style for the rest of my life?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's the deal, from a guy with 5 sisters (all at various stages of menopause), and a partner who's had to wrestle with hot flashes / night sweats after coming off HRT at 61 -- I'm not sure the symptoms are ever done. All it takes is for your hormone levels to get out of whack, and you're off the the races. OK, maybe you shouldn't call it menopause, but anything from head trauma to bad diet to an overly warm shower can take you past the tipping point and light up a hot flash. So maybe menopause doesn't last forever, but some of the symptoms seem to. So watch your diet, exercise, do all the things you should be doing - but keep a small fan handy, use wicking pajamas, etc. My partner and I actually put together a web page with a number of issues attendant to the symptoms of menopause at the link below.

      Oh - and finally - in addition to the remedies we listed on the web site, her OB/GYN suggested that she try venlafaxine (a generic substitute for Effexor) - and it stopped her hot flashes and night sweats almost immediately - although it did cause a dry mouth as a side effect. It was originally a prescription drug used to treat depression, but recently it was approved for use in treating menopause symptoms, and there are a lot of doctors who don't know of this benefit. If you're OK with drugs, and your doctor will write the prescription, the venlafaxine may stop the hot and cold flashes and night sweats. Keep in mind that your side effects may vary, however - or it may not work at all. If you'd prefer to avoid drugs, visit the web page below for other ways to attack the beast. Hope your symptoms stay at bay!

  15. QUESTION:
    How long a woman has to undergo pains of menopause?
    I am 49 year old and I stopped mensurating in the last 9 months and I have a horrible experince of menopause. I have hotflush, moodswings, flucuating high blood pressure and some funny feeling in the skin and palputations. Can some one suggest how long this goes on for a woman once it starts

    • ANSWER:
      Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause :-
      Menopause is the medical term for the end of a woman's menstrual periods. It is a natural part of aging, and occurs when the ovaries stop making hormones called estrogens. This causes estrogen levels to drop, and leads to the end of monthly menstual periods. This usually happens between the ages of 45 and 60, but it can happen earlier. Menopause can also occur when the ovaries are surgically removed or stop functioning for any other reason.

      Low estrogen levels are linked to some uncomfortable symptoms in many women. The most common and easy to recognize symptom is hot flashes ÷ sudden intense waves of heat and sweating. Some women find that these hot flashes disrupt their sleep, and others report mood changes. Other symptoms may include irregular periods, vaginal or urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence (leakage of urine or inability to control urine flow), and inflammation of the vagina. Because of the changes in the urinary tract and vagina, some women may have discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse. Many women also notice changes in their skin, digestive tract, and hair during menopause.

      Homeopathic Medicine & Treatment for Pre-Menopause (PMS) & Menopause

      #Lachesis [Lach]
      Suits especially women who never get well from the change of life; "have never felt well since that time." It corresponds to many climacteric troubles, such as haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, vertigo,burning on the vertex and headaches. It is remedy for women worn out by frequent pregnancies, with sudden cessation of the menses, trembling pulse, headache, flushing of the heat and rush of blood to the head, cold feet and constriction about the heart. Amyl nitrite. Flushes of heat at change of life. The 30th potency acts well here. Strontiana carbonica. Flushes of heat with head symptoms relieved by wrapping head up warmly. Sanguinaria. Flushes at climaxis; headache with profuse menses. Caladium. Pruritus at menopause. Aconite. Derangements of circulation at menopause. Hughes also praises Glonoine for these conditions. Veratrum viride. Perhaps no remedy controls the flushes of heat, so annoying to women at the change of life,as well as Veratrum viride.

      #Cimicifuga [Cimic]
      is very often the remedy for the suffering incident to the change of life. There is sinking at the stomach, pain at the vertex and irritability of disposition. The patient is restless and unhappy, feels sad and grieved. Bayes prefers the 6th and 12th potencies to the lower dilutions. It is but just to state that many have been disappointed in the use of this remedy. Caulophyllin 3X. Dr. Ludlam praises this remedy for nervous conditions following the climaxis, when there is "great nervous tension and unrest with a propensity to work and worry over little things." Sepia. Congestion at the climaxis, in characteristic Sepia constitutions, are quickly benefited by the remedy.

      #Bellis perennis [Bell]
      Our English confreres use this remedy quite extensively in what is termed a "fagged womb." The patients are very tired, want to lie down, have a backache. There is no real disease, but a marked tiredness all the time. Carduus is of supreme importance for liver troubles at the climaxis Ustilago. Often rivals Lachesis in controlling the flooding during the climaxis. Vertigo is characteristic.

      http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/menopause-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp
      ______________________________________

      Please read my answer to this question too about Menopause and its Homeopathic Treatment :- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AuDZpbpnTutG2J6Bx5qFoSHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20070813073654AAdv6Ha&show=7#profile-info-eXe749CZaa

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine (Cures Par Excellence)

      I hope this proves to be of help to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  16. QUESTION:
    What are the first signs of menopause?
    I am 47 years old and my periods have become very heavy. They have always been very light. Is this a sign that I am starting to go through menopause? What can I expect next?

    • ANSWER:
      it could be...everyone is different when it comes to the first stages of menopause - usually you have changes in your cycle (some get heavier and more frequent, some are the opposite) accompanied by symptoms of hormonal changes (moodiness, achiness, fatique, hot flashes, sweating). Talk to your doctor - if you're interested in hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), this can relieve some of the symptoms you're experiencing (as well as help to prevent bone loss that can occur during menopause). Some women will continue to have abnormal, irregular periods for years before they actually hit 'menopause'. Others will progress quite quickly...again, talk to your doc, they can give you an idea of where you are by testing the functioning of your ovaries (which excrete estrogen), as well as give you some treatment options.

      here's some general menopause info:
      http://www.fbhc.org/Patients/Modules/menopause.cfm

  17. QUESTION:
    Can acupuncture help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms?
    What are the best alternative methods to help cope with chronic pain and menopause. On HRT but is there a better one for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Chinese Medicine can help with chronic pain and menopausal symptoms. Acupuncture excels on its own for the treatment of pain. However, a combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine is generally more effective for menopausal issues.

      Chronic pain will often *start* responding to acupuncture within the first or second treatment.

      Menopause treatment can take somewhat longer to start showing more lasting positive effects.

      If you are in the United States you can find a board certified acupuncturist in your area at: http://www.nccaom.org

  18. QUESTION:
    What is a natural way to deal with menopause?
    I had cancer of the cervix, and the radiation treatment threw me into early menopause. What is a natural alternative to hormones?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as I know, and I have read all the latest info about natural alternatives to hormones, nothing really helps. The only remedy (partly a remedy) was to take some of the anti-anxiety medication like Prozac etc. Of course there are natural anti depressants (look at this site)
      http://www.menopause.realage.com/content.aspx/topic/17
      but I am not sure how well they alleviate the symptoms. I wish I kept these medical journals I get to give you the reference. If I find it I will let you have it.

  19. QUESTION:
    how can you tell the difference from bipolar and menopause?
    my mother has always been a bit pissed off. I need to find out if it's menopause or bipolar disease. if bipolar, how would you get your mother to get checked out by a psychiatrist?

    • ANSWER:
      Bipolar Illness
      Bipolar Disorder: Mania and Mixed Episodes
      Bipolar disorder is an illness bipolar illness of severe mood swings. It is also called manic depression. If you have this bipolar illness illness, you may have periods of severe high or low moods. These periods may impact your day-to-day functioning.

      The high moods are called acute mania. They can make you feel restless, grouchy, or very happy. The low moods are called depression. They can make you feel very sad.

      Some people can have a mixed state. That’s when you have acute mania and depression at the same time.

      Both women and men get bipolar disorder in equal numbers. The disease is usually first seen in adults 18 and older.

      Technically, menopause is the stopping of periods or menses. The average age is 52; however, a woman’s menopause can occur at any point between her 30’s and her 60’s. This time in a woman’s life can be dramatic or quite simple — it is different for each woman — but every woman does stop having periods. Some people call it adolescence in reverse — a rocky time of fluctuating hormones and emotions. Perimenopause is usually the two to five years beforehand, but sometimes women have symptoms for 10–15 years before stopping their periods. When symptoms arise at a young age it is commonly called early menopause.

      Menopause symptoms can range from mild hot spells at night to constant dripping sweats all day and night. Some women spot for a few months, others bleed heavily for years. These symptoms are caused by hormonal imbalances and changes — not necessarily estrogen loss. They are also related to diet, lifestyle and genetic factors. Many menopausal women seek forms of menopause treatment that do not work and create even greater hormone imbalance.

      i hope this helps

  20. QUESTION:
    How long does menopause last? When will I start feeling better?
    I am 45 and I think I have been dealing with the symptoms for about 2 years do i still have Much longer?

    • ANSWER:
      Go to your GYN and tell what symptoms you are having. She should check your hormone levels with testing. She will tell you about natural hormone replacements, what foods to eat or not to eat and certain vitamins that might help. If she doesn't help you there are other Doctors that will. Menopause may last a long time but with your doctor's help your symptoms might get better to handle. Do some reading up on this subject too. The more knowledge you have about menopause the better you be able to decide what to take or decide what is the best treatment for you.

  21. QUESTION:
    What Is The Negative and Positive Feedback In Menopause?
    Can someone please tell me the positive and negative feedback for hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, ovarian follicles, gnrh, fsh, lh and oestradiol in menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause Scoop’s Free Menopause Social Network is a place where people interested in the topics of menopause, menopause causes, menopause signs, menopause symptoms, menopause treatments, early menopause, male menopause, and menopause effects can meet each other, invite friends, and join groups, while gathering and sharing first-hand information and experiences. Users can set up their own groups, participate in forums, engage in online chat, see the latest research, and enjoy menopause humor.
      Like Facebook, The Free Menopause Social Network is an online community of internet users. The only difference is that the community’s interest is geared around interacting with each other on subjects relating to menopause. Also like Facebook, it is a place where you can update your friends on your feelings and experiences and they can do the same for you. Not only is it a place to research facts, but it is also a source of entertainment, whether it is from the human interaction between friends or from the collection of humorous videos and links provided by the network.
      Once you have subscribed to The Menopause Social Network you can immediately begin to socialize, ask questions, get answers, read research, join groups, invite friends, share stories, and feel better about your own situation. The friends that you can make are just one of the many benefits to The Menopause Social Network. Another one of those benefits includes diversity because the network gives individuals from all around the world access to each other. This means that although you may be in the United States, you could develop an online friendship with someone in Denmark or India. Not only will you make new friends, but you just might learn a thing or two about how menopausal symptoms, menopausal treatments, and menopausal effects are dealt with in other cultures and learning is always a good thing.
      As mentioned, The Menopause Social Network often involves individual forming their own groups or sub groups around a particular topic of interest, geographical proximity, or some other attribute. As long as they have an interest in menopause, anyone can become a member, no matter what their hobbies, beliefs, or views are. However, once you are inside the network, you can begin to create your own circle of friends and eliminate members that do not share your interests or goals.

      http://menopausescoop.com/

  22. QUESTION:
    Can Fluoxetine be used to treat menopause?
    How is the antidepressant Fluoxetine used in the treatment of menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Fluoxetine:
      Therapeutic Category: Antidepressant, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor.
      Use: Treatment of major depression; treatment of binge-eating and vomiting in patients with moderate-to-severe bulimia nervosa; obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

      No relationship between menopause and fluoxetine.

      If we offered you a miracle remedy that prevents after effects of "Menopause" would you buy it? Certainly you would. You won’t find it in a Pharmacy but at the Grocery Store.

      Try the Natural Cures for Menopause.

      Treatment: Although menopause cannot be avoided, it can be postponed for as long as 10 to 15 years and it can be made a smooth affair when it comes, with a proper nutritional programme, special supplements and the right mental attitude. When a woman is affected by the menopausal change to any marked extent, it is a sure sign that her body is in a toxic condition and in need of a thorough cleansing. For this purpose, she should undergo a course of natural health building treatment. Diet is of utmost importance in such a scheme of treatment. In fact the problems at menopause are often much more severe than that at puberty largely because the diet has been deficient for many years prior to its onset, in many nutrients such as protein, calcium, magnesium, vitamins D, E, and pantothenic acid. The diet should be made up from three basic food groups, namely (i) seeds, nuts, and grains (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits. The emphasis should be on vitamin E-rich raw and sprouted seeds and nuts, unpasteurised high quality milk and homemade cottage cheese and an abundance of raw, organically grown fruits and vegetables. Plenty of freshly made juices of fruits and vegetables in season should also be included in this diet.

      All processed, refined and denatured foods, such as white sugar, white flour and all articles made with them, should be completely eliminated. Take special supplements such as vitamins C, B6 and pantothenic acid, which have a specific property of stimulating the body’s own production of estrogen or enhancing the effect of the existing estrogen. During menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can result in a severe calcium deficiency. For this reason, a larger than usual intake of calcium may help greatly. Vitamins D and F are also essential for assimilation of calcium. Any woman having difficulty at this time should supplement her daily diet with 1,000 units of natural vitamin D, 5000 milligrams of magnesium and two grams of calcium daily, which can be supplied by one quart of milk. During the menopause, the need for vitamin E soars 10 to 50 times over that previously required. Hot flashes, night sweats, and other symptoms of menopause often disappear when 50 to 100 units of vitamin E are taken daily. The symptoms recur quickly if the vitamin is discontinued.

      Of late, it has become popular to take estrogen to prevent or postpone menopausal symptoms. Although hormone therapy is apparently successful and will, in many cases, help the patient to feel and act younger, it cannot be recommended in all cases because of its carcinogenic effect. If, however, estrogen therapy is undertaken, it should never be administered at the same time as vitamin E therapy. Ingestion of estrogen and vitamin E should be separated by several hours. Beet juice has been found very useful in menopausal disorders. It should be taken in small quantities of 60 to 90 ml at a time thrice a day. It has proved much more permanently helpful than the degenerative effects of drugs or synthetic hormones. Carrot seeds have also been found valuable in menopausal tension. A teaspoonful of the seeds should be boiled in a glassful of cow’s milk for about 10 minutes and taken daily as a medicine in this condition.

      Plenty of outdoor exercise, such as walking, jogging, swimming, horse riding, or cycling, is imperative to postpone menopause. Other helpful measures in this direction are avoiding mental and emotional stress and worries, especially worry about growing old, sufficient sleep, and relaxation and following all general rules of maintaining a high level of health. The healthier a woman is, the fewer menopausal symptoms she will experience.

      The menopause can be made a pleasant affair by building bodily health and a sane mental outlook. From puberty to menopause, a woman has been somewhat of a slave to her female glands. At specified intervals she was inconvenienced by her menstrual periods. She bore children, enduring the pain and discomfort of pregnancy. Menopause relieves her of this bondage to her femininity. She can now experience some of the happiest days of a woman’s life. A whole new life is given to her, if she is wise enough to prepare for it and accept it as such.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  23. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with women going thru menopause?
    I'm pretty sure my mom is going through menopause right now because she is really irritable and moody and she's giving my dad the silent treatment because he got mad at her. Today was her birthday but she didn't even want to eat the cake we got her. I'm really pis$ed off about this and I want my family back. Anything I can do or do I just have to wait it out?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is the period marked by the natural and permanent cessation of menstruation. A woman begins to see changes in her menstrual cycles usually between the ages of 45 and 55. It's the time in a woman's life that the function of her ovaries begins to cease. Most people recognize this as the "turning point".

      Some women may have few or no first signs of menopause, while others experience multiple psychological and physical symptoms. The symptoms and severity of them varies significantly from woman to woman.

      Every woman's experience will be different but some of the common first signs of menopause are:

      -Irregular Periods -Hot Flashes -Problems with the Vagina and Bladder -Loss of Sex Drive -Fatigue -Mood Changes -Headaches -Sleep Problems -Water Retention

      Can you imagine having to deal with all that and nobody understands what you’re going through?

      Spend some time and talk to her about your concerns (Your Mom’s Health and Well Being). Show empathy for her. The more you can learn on your own about this change, the more your mom will open up to you about it.

      This could help tremendously.

  24. QUESTION:
    What do you do if your mom is going through menopause?
    Okay im a teenager with a mom who i think is going through menopause. seriously its hell. she picks on me all the time and doesnt give a break. she has weird moments which i never saw b4. how do you deal with this?

    • ANSWER:
      What you can do is to communicate openly with her about her physical and emotional condition. You may suggest her to talk about her symptoms and how they affect her mood with other women who experience menopause before. Try to establish some mutual rules for resolving family issues and avoiding unnecessary conflicts.

      You also can suggest her to take some herbal menopause treatment like the one mention in our website which will help her to relief menopause symptom.

  25. QUESTION:
    My wife will be going through menopause soon what should I expect?
    Because of Cancer treatment and a hysterectomy after that my wife will be going through menopause, pretty soon. The cancer treatment gave me a preview but the hysterectomy will be the full on thing. What should I expect? How can I be supportive?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause typically occurs in women between the ages of 45 and 55 year old. Symptoms include irregular periods, heavy bleeding, hot flashes, disrupted sleep, headaches, dry eyes, vaginal changes (dryness), hair loss, weight gain and a loss of interest in sex. Someone women may also experience extreme emotional distress. Some women also have short term memory loss, lack of focus and irritability. Some women describe feelings of “fuzzy thinking” and the inability to multi-task. Some also experience increased feelings of anxiety, fatigue and depression. Also, women should be cautious of extreme or drastic mood swings.

  26. QUESTION:
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in th?
    Do you think that medicalization of women’s bodies was an intentional act to control women and keep them in the subordinate group? Or did physicians simply see women as an easy target for success? Also, what may have been some of the unintended consequences that came out of this widespread medicalization? And by "medicalization" I mean, the process by which human conditions and problems come to be defined and treated as medical conditions, and thus become the subject of medical study, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. Thanks for any thoughts or ideas!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Female bodies are overmedicalized. Menarche is not a medical issue, yet menopause is.

      Pregnancy can become life-threatening. But in general, we approach this natural passage as if some crisis were imminent.

      Men's bodies could use a bit more medical attention. Rather than look at erectile dysfunction as a symbol of waning masculinity and prescribing a pill, they should consider it as a symptom of perhaps a larger systemic problem.

      Not a doctor but still ... I do see what you are saying.

      No I do not think that there is some conspiracy to keep women down. I think it is the opposite. I think that too many women died in the past of childbirth, and they are over cautious.

      Yes, there is also a massive industry surrounding women's bodies and women's health products. Absolutely there is. From Insurance policies, to publishers, to baby accessories, to bras, tampax ... you bet!

  27. QUESTION:
    Are there any OTC treatments that help ease the symptoms of menopause?
    hot flashes, irritability, mood swings, you name it... i hate this so much. :( i'm not myself anymore, my husband won't even sleep in the same bed as me because i'm up all night. my kids think i'm going crazy. i've tried several home remedies already. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      have you heard of menoclear? it's the only thing that helped me get through menopause. it's basically an all-natural supplement that does exactly that, eases the symptoms of menopause, and just makes it much easier to handle for both yourself and those around you. menopause was horrible until i discovered it, after that i was back to my old self. :) good luck! menoclear.com

  28. QUESTION:
    Why would my feet hurt and feel stiff without having an injury and continue to feel worse over the last month?
    My feet started feeling stiff going down stairs in the mornings some months ago. My right foot now feels like it's been injured - it hasn't and is painful to bend and hurts in the arch area. My toes are stiff to bend and my feet ache even when they are resting and not weight bearing. I am a relatively fit woman of 50, going through menopause and am about 10 kilos overweight. I like walking and am continuing to do so as I can't bear not to!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Helen,

      Arch pain is the term used to describe symptoms that occur under the arch of the foot. When a patient has arch pain they usually have inflammation of the tissues within the midfoot. The arch of the foot is formed by a tight band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes.
      This band of tissue is important in proper foot mechanics and transfer of weight from the heel to the toes. When the tissue of the arch of the foot becomes irritated and inflamed, even simple movements can be quite painful.

      Plantar Fasciitis
      The most common cause of arch pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is the name that describes inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain early in the morning and pain with long walks or prolonged standing.
      Arch pain early in the morning is due to the plantar fascia becoming contracted and tight as you sleep through the night. When awakening and walking in the morning, the fascia is still tight and prone to irritation when stretched. When walking or standing for long periods, the plantar fascia becomes inflamed and painful.

      Treatment of plantar fasciitis is best accomplished with some simple stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications, and inserts for your shoes.
      ___________________________________________________________________________________
      Ankle pain is an extremely common complaint with many causes. It is important to accurately diagnose the cause of your symptoms so you can get appropriate treatment. If you have ankle pain, some common causes include:

      •Arthritis
      Arthritis causing ankle pain is much less common than degenerative changes in other joints. However, ankle cartilage can wear away and is often quite painful. Ankle arthritis is most common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or in patients with a previous injury to the ankle joint.

      •Sprains
      Ankle sprains cause an injury to the ligaments around the ankle. Sprains can cause significant ankle pain, as well as swelling and a feeling as though the joint may 'give-out.'
      •High Ankle Sprain A high ankle sprain is a specific type of ligament injury to the ankle. In a high ankle sprain, the ligaments on top of the joint are injured. The treatment and rehabilitation from a high ankle sprain is different from a usual sprain.

      •Tendonitis
      Tendonitis can occur in any of the tendons around the joint and cause ankle pain. Tendonitis occurs when the tendons, the attachments of muscles to the bone, become irritated and inflamed.
      •Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
      Posterior tibial tendonitis cause ankle pain on the inside part of the joint. If left untreated, posterior tibial tendonitis can lead to significant walking problems.

      •Achilles Tendonitis
      Achilles tendonitis causes ankle pain in the back of the joint. Achilles tendonitis is the most common type of tendonitis around the ankle joint.

      •Fractures
      Ankle fractures are a common type of broken bone. However, there any many different types of ankle fractures and each of these must be treated individually. Some ankle fractures can be treated like sprains, and others require surgery.

      •Cartilage Damage
      The cartilage of the ankle joint is susceptible to injury if you sustain an ankle sprain, fracture, or other traumatic injury. Cartilage injuries can run the spectrum from a limited area of damage to more widespread ankle arthritis.

      •Gout
      Gout is an uncommon cause of ankle pain. However, in patients who have a diagnosis of gout, it must be considered as a cause for new ankle pain.

      YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO CHECK INTO THE POSSIBILITY OF THIS BEING SIGNS OF DIABETES.

      Take care! Mama Bear

  29. QUESTION:
    How can I make my hair look better before my wedding?
    I have quite thin hair that is brittle and always has split ends. I really, really want to improve its condition before my wedding in August 2011. Does anyone have any advice? It seems to fall out a lot, which I don't help because it feels so coarse that I continually run my hands through it in an attempt to smooth it out, and I end up pulling more hair out.

    Can anyone recommend a product/home treatment that will make my hair softer/shinier/thicker?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you say you have thin hair and it's brittle, has split ends? Treat your hair like that of a baby's hair, LOTS OF TLCs. I know you're an adult now with adult hair, but there are symptoms for bleaching, hair straightening, relaxing, crimping hair even to normal hair types. Imagine that happening to your hair, I mean as you've experienced already no product can improve your style. That's another reason why the hair industry is a billion dollar business, but they do not give money back guarantee for damaged hair or hair loss due to 'abuse', and hair loss happen more to people with thin or coarse hair.

      You have several problems with your hair here, let's go each one:

      1. Split Ends: Even healthy hair like mine get split ends, due to normal hair brushing & styling. Hair protectant doesn't protect hair 100%. Like sunscreen, you still get sunburned. Same with hair, as you've already experienced. Spend 5-10 mins. trimming your hair strand per strand, section by section when the sun is shinning so you'll understand how the hair is split in several places, and not always at the end, even somewhere in the middle. Do it yourself trim, is the best. Use a 2" folding shears for trimming. Allowing healthier hair to take over. Then 2x a year, get a good trim.
      It may grow very slowly or none at all if you've straightened your hair in the past.

      2. Thin hair comes from your good genes, You can set your hair in plastic curlers, after you towel dry, then curlers, briefly dry, take the curlers out & style as usual, or finger comb. Shampoos that says it makes your hair more volume, it's all marketing gimmicks to get your attention, it is a billion dollar business. Plastic curlers have been used for over 5 decades in the fashion & hair business. They're still being used today

      3. You hair fall out a lot: touching your hair has nothing to do WHY your hair falls out. Reasons why hair falls out easily: Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs), steroids, hereditary, hair dyes, perming/relaxers, straightening (have read many on YA HAIR, and have responded to them since 2009), diet, having babies (yes I read once it happened to her), stress, medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne, and too much of everything. Add to that the 7,000 + toxic found in your home, plus pollution found outdoors. Your hair is crying for help!
      Ex. of relaxed hair. http://monicabtheorganicstylist.wordpress.com/tag/hair-relaxers/
      When your hair is crying for help, that's when it's too late to do anything about it, and hair products can not reverse the problem.

      4. To get healthier, softer, shinier hair: Eliminate the chemicals and heating tools to style your hair. You get all your vitamins & minerals & proteins FREE from the good foods you eat from Mother Nature, not made by man, and no shampoo can help grow hair, not even those made for horses. Horses don't abuse their hair, using heating tools, and they eat better than people, but it won't add more hair & make their hair longer faster.Shampoo intended for animals may contain insecticides or other medications for treatment of skin conditions or parasite infestations such as fleas or mange. These must never be used on humans.

      Prenatal vitamins don't make your hair grow. Pregnant women have to start taking care of their bodies when they're pregnant, meaning stop smoking, drinking, dyeing or perming their hair SO OF COURSE their hair start growing again. But it has nothing to do with their hair, it has something to do to help the development of their unborn child.
      Google: "Foods for Healthy Hair" - the website had moved, type it in. Two others also:
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-beauty/features/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair
      http://www.menshealth.com/spotlight/hair/best-food-for-healthy-hair.php

      Any OTC Shampoo and conditioner formulated for your hair texture. None is better than the other, and salon is not better than OTC. Shampoos are meant to clean and conditioners are meant to condition curly/wavy, chemically treated & damaged hair.

  30. QUESTION:
    Could someone go with untreated undetected breast cancer for 10 years?
    What are the symptoms besides lumps and how big are the lumps usually? Do they grow fast? What do people with cancer feel like?

    • ANSWER:
      In early stages when the Grade of the disease (multiplication of cells and spreading) low and slow it may take time to get detected. These days most of the women are aware about the harms of this disease and they have ultrasound and mammogram and other tests done every year. This will definetely show the exsistance of the disease. Ultrasound can often show abnormalities which might go undetected on mammography due to extremely dense breast tissue.

      But it will not prolong to such a long period of 10 years without showing up or undetected. As the time elapse the speed of multiplication of cancerous cells also will increase and definetely it is bound to show up in about 1 or 2 years.

      The symptoms of Breast cancer including lumps are -

      Knowing the signs and symptoms of breast cancer may help save your life. When the disease is discovered early, you have more treatment options and a better chance for a cure.

      Most breast lumps aren't cancerous. Yet the most common sign of breast cancer for both men and women is a lump or thickening in the breast. Often, the lump is painless. Other potential signs of breast cancer include:

      * A spontaneous clear or bloody discharge from your nipple, often associated with a breast lump
      * Retraction or indentation of your nipple
      * A change in the size or contours of your breast
      * Any flattening or indentation of the skin over your breast
      * Redness or pitting of the skin over your breast, like the skin of an orange

      A number of conditions other than breast cancer can cause your breasts to change in size or feel. Breast tissue changes naturally during pregnancy and your menstrual cycle. Other possible causes of noncancerous (benign) breast changes include fibrocystic changes, cysts, fibroadenomas, infection or injury.

      If you find a lump or other change in your breast — even if a recent mammogram was normal — see your doctor for evaluation. If you haven't yet gone through menopause, you may want to wait through one menstrual cycle before seeing your doctor. If the change hasn't gone away after a month, have it evaluated promptly.

      Finally when people come to know of cancer they get shattered as it is the most fearsome disease in the word. -

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to treat Menopause?
    Is there any medical patch that will take away the horrible symptoms of sweating, mood swings etc WITHOUT PUTTING ON WEIGHT from too much of one hormone.

    • ANSWER:
      As with most medical answers, a good diet and exercise is the best treatment. Also, if you smoke, quit. Eliminate caffeine. Check out these sites.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can partial seizures occur once a month regularly and last for the whole day recurring about every hour?
    My friend has been having them since her menopause started. Her EEG and MRI were normal and her doctor says it is depression.

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the Ontario Epilepsy website
      http://www.epilepsyontario.org/client/EO/EOWeb.nsf/web/
      which describes as many seizure types as there are(a lot!). I looked up both partial seizures simple and complex. Then I looked at this types. The key here is that these are rooted in emotional issues, there is no EEG abnormality and that medication for epilepsy is ineffective. Since she only gets the seizures once a month, it could well be tied into some kind of menstrual issue surrounding menopause. I hope this helps you out.

      Psychogenic Seizures

      (Pseudo-seizures)

      Psychogenic seizures are not classified as a form of epilepsy. They affect between 5 and 20 percent of people thought to have epilepsy. Psychogenic seizures can occur at any age, but are more common in people under the age of 55. They occur 3 times more frequently in women than men. They may arise from various psychological factors, may be prompted by stress, and may occur in response to suggestion. It has also been found that such disorders may be self-induced. They may be used to get attention, to be excused from work, to collect financial compensation, or merely to escape an intolerable social situation. They seldom occur in the absence of others. Trauma related to physical illness has been found to trigger these seizures in elderly individuals. People with early-onset psychogenic seizures often have a history of sexual abuse.

      Psychogenic seizures can be characterized by features common with epilepsy like writhing and thrashing movements, quivering, screaming or talking sounds, and falling to the floor. Psychogenic attacks differ from epileptic seizures in that out-of-phase movements of the upper and lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, and side-to-side head movements are evident. However, psychogenic seizures vary from one occurrence to another and are not readily stereotyped. Indicators like pupillary dilation, depressed corneal reflexes, the presence of Babinski responses, autonomic cardiorespiratory changes, tongue biting and urinary/fecal incontinence are more probable with epilepsy and are not usually manifested in psychogenic seizures.

      Psychogenic seizures may last a couple of minutes or hours, ending as abruptly as they began. Anxiety may be experienced prior to an attack, followed by relief and relaxation afterwards, leading some to postulate that psychogenic seizures may occur as a direct response to stress in order to relieve tension. Afterwards, patients usually have a vague recollection of the seizure, without the usual postictal symptoms of drowsiness and depression.

      It is difficult to differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures. However, one highly reliable indicator of a psychogenic seizure is eye closure during the seizure; when people with epilepsy have seizures the eyes tend to remain open. Still, statistics indicate that, in 20-30% of cases, epileptologists are incorrect in attempting to distinguish one from the other. Although psychogenic seizures are not caused by electrical discharges in the brain and thus do not register any EEG abnormalities, they are often mistaken for epileptic disorders. It is also possible to have both psychogenic seizures and epilepsy. Most patients with psychogenic seizures are misdiagnosed and consequently treated with epilepsy drugs or other epilepsy therapies, sometimes with severe and fatal side effects.

      Medications are ineffective in the treatment of psychogenic disorders. Patients who are diagnosed with psychogenic seizures are usually referred to a therapist, to learn to control stress and become familiar with coping techniques. Since the vast majority of psychogenic seizures operate on a psychological level, behavioral manipulation methods may be used.

  33. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever been prescribed to get a shot called Lupron Depot?
    I have been recently diagnosed with endometriosis and my treatment is to get a Lupron Depot shot, every 3 months for 9 months and I am very weary about medications especially injections. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      The injection throws you into menopause without removing your ovaries. Its supposed to get rid of your pain. Get ready for menopause symptoms. Dont worry about the injection. Thats the easy part. If your having heavy bleeding. It will stop that too.
      Also, its only a temporary fix. You will return to normal after you stop taking the shots and be back in pain again and have to have an alternative treatment.
      Sorry.

  34. QUESTION:
    What kind of treatments are you on for your menopause symptoms?
    I want to know whether to use over the counter or go on the drugs the doctors have that cause cancer.

    • ANSWER:
      My mam takes Udos Oil which she thinks is really good. There are alot of them so ask in the chemist

  35. QUESTION:
    Why does going through the menopause make you put weight on your tummy?
    Im going through the menopause, and coping mostly! But im finding i put on weight so easily around my middle and tummy. Why is this and is there anything I can do? Im not taking any medicines to help with my menopause symptoms, so far. Has anyone found any usual treatments or supplements to take? thanks xx

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know if this the one that my auntie is taking right now. But tried to research about the health supplement MX Menopause Factor. I've read good reviews about this supplement. They said it's the best supplementation that offers relief from night sweats and hot flashes; Balanced moods and sleep support; Support for other body systems and conditions and more. Might you researched for that to know more. Hope this helps you :)

  36. QUESTION:
    Can a teenage girl develop breast cancer?
    I understand that this question has been asked many times, but I am not asking because I am concerned for my health. I am simply curious. Also, I apologize in advance if this question evokes memories of loved ones lost to this awful disease.
    So, could a teenage girl develop breast cancer? And if she could, would treating it be easier/harder than treating an older woman for the same disease at the same stage? Lastly, what are some treatments that the girl may receive to try and rid her of the cancer?
    Thank you all in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      I am glad to see that you are curious about breast cancer and the actions you can take to help reduce your risks.

      First off, yes, teenagers can get breast cancer. The likelihood of developing breast cancer under the age of 30 is low, accounting for only 0.5% of cancers but it is possible.

      Treating breast cancer for a teenager, man, or women is the same, the best course of action would be discussed between you and your doctor but may include chemotherapy, radiation, mastectomy, etc. This all depends on what stage you are in among other things.

      The good news is that there are things you can do now to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer in the future. This includes eating a healthy diet, getting 30 minutes of exercise per day, limiting your alcohol intake, and not smoking. Another very important thing is early detection, early detection is key to saving lives because the sooner you can catch the disease the less invasive the the treatments will be. There is not right or wrong way to do this, do whatever feels comfortable for you, I like to use my fingertips and feel in a circular motion around my breasts, armpit and collarbone area for lumps. Keep in mind that not all lumps mean breast cancer, they should be checked by your health care professional.

      Here is a complete list of things to look for: Lumps either in the breast, along the chest bone, and in the armpit area (these lumps do not come and go, but remain and may grow over time), unusual change in breast shape or size, changes in the skin of the breast (dimpling or puckering, thickening and discolouration – “orange peel” effect, redness, swelling and increased warmth), nipple changes (crusting, ulcers or scaling, inverted nipples – if it is sudden and not your norm, nipple discharge, itching of the nipple or breast)
      While these signs and symptoms may be due to other breast conditions, they should be checked by a trained health care professional. Talk to your doctor if you notice any of the above!

      For some women these are not changes but rather they are how they breast normally are, this is important to note, you should become familiar with how your breasts normally are. Breasts will develop and change over time during various stages of life – puberty, menstruation (monthly period), pregnancy and menopause. As a teenager going through puberty, they may notice the following: hair around the nipples, inverted nipples, nipple discharge, sensitivity or discomfort, swelling, tenderness, increased lumpiness, stretch marks, Montgomery bumps, and/or different sized breasts
      Some of these will disappear over time but some remain. What is “normal” for one person may not be normal for someone else.
      Everyone should know what is “normal” for them, and know what changes are normal over the course of the month. If something changes which is unexpected, talk to a health care professional.

      I hope this information helps.

  37. QUESTION:
    Has any woman experienced an enlarged uterus due to menopause?
    My mother has been "sick" for about a year now. She finally went to a Dr and had multiple tests run including a pap. It was during the pap that she learned her uterus was the same size as an expecting mother 20 weeks along! Of course a preg test was done--negative(she 56 so very relieved). She had an ultrasound and the results revealed nothing. She had pollups removed and tested but they to revealed nothing as to why she has been so ill. Her symptoms are a fever every evening and she is extremely achy. Her doctor told her that the enlarged uterus was most likely caused from Menopause. Has anyone else ever heard or experienced this? If so, what course of treatment or remedies helped? I would like her to get a second opinion just incase. Any information you have regarding her situation would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I am 37 and have started the hot flashes ect..absolutely miserable! About 3 years ago I was told that I had an enlarged uterus as well but fear has kept me away from the Drs office..I know thats a bad thing to do. I use a lot of homeopathic and herbal remedies for other things which have really worked when some of the prescribed medications didnt. You might have a look on this site. http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/7776/MENOPAUS.HTM#rem%20for%20menop I was just looking at this yesterday funny enough.

  38. QUESTION:
    How does menopause work?
    Hello, I am 44 years old and I think I might be menopausal. I have been getting my periods between 45-53 days instead of the normal 28 days. Does anyone know how menopause works? Some details on this would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Natural menopause is the permanent ending of menstruation that is not brought on by any type of medical treatment. For women undergoing natural menopause, the process is gradual and is described in three stages:

      Perimenopause . Perimenopause begins several years before menopause, when the ovaries gradually produce less estrogen. Perimenopause lasts up until menopause, the point when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. In the last one to two years of perimenopause, the decrease in estrogen accelerates. At this stage, many women experience menopause symptoms (see below).
      Menopause. Menopause is the point when a woman has her last menstrual period. At this stage, the ovaries have stopped releasing eggs and producing most of their estrogen. Menopause is diagnosed when a woman has gone without a period for 12 consecutive months.
      Postmenopause. These are the years after menopause. During this stage, menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, ease for most women. However, health risks related to the loss of estrogen increase as the woman ages.

  39. QUESTION:
    How do women get through the change of life without HRT?
    Saw my doctor last night to discuss the menopause (which has been confirmed by blood tests). He is reluctant to prescribe Hormone Replacement Treatment as I have high blood pressure which he prescribed medication for instead. I get the sweats during the day which is really embarrassing cause I work in an office and have to keep having a quick blast of my desk fan. Has anyone got any real suggestions how I can combat this. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      If you are symptomatic, and many very fortunate women do sail though the menopause with few symptoms, then HRT has never been bettered as a method of relieving symptoms. Only yesterday I read a journal article critical of its current under-use due to a failure to balance risk with benefit. Both patients and doctors are almost as guilty in this respect.

      If your blood pressure is controlled and of course it should be, you can still be prescribed HRT. If as it seems your GP is very unsure of his ground, ask him to refer you to a Specialist Menopausal Clinic. Here you will get all the information as to both the risks and the benefits for you as an individual.

  40. QUESTION:
    What were some of the earlier treatments for the mentally ill?
    There was some kind of wheel that a person was forced to sit in while it spun and an iron chamber they had to lay in for hours and days. What things were used to "treat" the mentally ill?

    I am writing a research paper on this, so any information would be much appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Many lobotomy's were performed on some patients thinking it would help help stimulate their brain but most of the time it did more harm than good. Electric shock treatments were also performed. Until the mind and brain was really studied and understood, treatment for the mentally ill was very primitive. Many people were in institutionalized for things Dr's could not explain, like when a woman had symptoms from menopause and she was put away. Or even if a child stuttered or had a delay in speaking properly, simple things like that.

  41. QUESTION:
    what is safe treatment for menopause after endometroid cancer?
    HRT isn't an option as it is oestrogen based and I have had aTotal Abdominal Hysterectomy and Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy .

    • ANSWER:
      If you aren't having any symptoms of hot flashes, night sweats, etc. I wouldn't worry. My doctor told me I would experience problems right after my total hysterectomy and I got a shot of estrogen in recovery and he put me on premarin. I stopped taking it because it gave me headaches and have not had any problems.

      You might talk to your doctor about non estrogen supplements that might help if you are having problems. Most of the "natural" supplements I am aware of contain estrogen. (black cohash, soy...)

  42. QUESTION:
    why can't women be given estrogen and progesteron to prevent menopause?
    is it possible to give women suffering from menopause estrogen and progesteron in order to stop bad effects of menopause on them?
    if so,then why there'r still women suffering from it?

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing you can take to prevent menopause. Hormones are given to women to ease the symptoms they are having while they go through menopause. Many women choose HRT or alternative treatments to stop all of the side effects. You don't have to suffer because there is lots of things that you can do to ease the side effects.

  43. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?
    I had a smear test booked for this Tuesday, but I had to cancel it as I came on. I'm bleeding very heavily every two weeks, plus I have all the risk factors for cervical cancer. Please help as I am very concerned.

    • ANSWER:
      | health information | health factsheets

      Print-friendly version

      Cervical cancer
      Published by Bupa's health information team, February 2009.

      This factsheet is for women who have cervical cancer, or who would like information about it.

      Cervical cancer develops if the cells of the cervix (the neck of the womb) become abnormal and grow out of control.

      Animation - How cancer develops
      About cervical cancer
      Types of cervical cancer
      Symptoms of cervical cancer
      Causes of cervical cancer
      Diagnosis of cervical cancer
      Treatment of cervical cancer
      Prevention of cervical cancer
      Help and support
      Questions and answers
      Related topics
      Related Bupa products and services
      Further information
      Sources
      How cancer develops
      A Flash plug-in is required to view this animation.

      Legal notices

      About cervical cancer
      In 2005, around 2,800 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in the UK.

      Deaths from cervical cancer in the UK have fallen over the last 20 years. This reduction is mainly because of the NHS cervical screening programme which may detect changes in the cells of the cervix at a pre-cancerous stage. If abnormal cells are caught early, cancer can be prevented or treated.

      The changes can be detected by a laboratory test on a small sample of cells. The cells are taken from an area called the transformation zone on the surface of your cervix, and preserved using a procedure called liquid-based cytology.

      The cervix and transformation zone

      Types of cervical cancer
      There are two main types of cervical cancer - squamous cell cancer (the most common) and adenocarcinoma, although they are often mixed. They are named after the types of cell that become cancerous. Squamous cells are flat cells covering your cervix; adenomatous cells are found in the passageway from your cervix to your womb. Other rarer cancers of the cervix include small cell cancer.

      Symptoms of cervical cancer
      Abnormal cells found on the cervix during a cervical screening test are usually at an early pre-cancer stage, and don't cause any symptoms. Treating the abnormal cells prevents cancer developing.

      If abnormal cells do develop into cervical cancer, you may have the following symptoms:

      abnormal vaginal bleeding, for example between periods or after sex
      smelly vaginal discharge
      discomfort during sex
      vaginal bleeding after the menopause

      These symptoms aren't always due to cervical cancer, but if you have them, you should visit your GP.

  44. QUESTION:
    What are the reckonable symptoms for a psyzoferenic patient ?
    She is otherwise normal . Her close relatives however thinks that's the trouble . Her outburst is limited within her home . She despise visiting doctor . Is it posible ?

    • ANSWER:
      sometimes women are psychologically in a disturbed mood during menses or when approaching menopause.
      take her to a gynecologist or endocrinologist, if he/she rules out gynecologic problem, then take her to a neurologist.
      i think you meant schizophrenia. most of the people who have schizoid personality are "normal" to other people .
      whether she should be given treatment from a psychiatrist depends upon the symptoms and a thorough analysis of her mind.
      another thing is there is social stigma attached to visiting a head shrinker in India. we are not ashamed of having cancer, TB but ashamed to tell others that we have psychological and neurological problems.
      better take her to a neurologist first, he will guide properly.
      why i am suggesting neurologist instead of neuropsychiatrist? because visiting neurologists does not create feelings in our mind that we are crazy.

  45. QUESTION:
    how long does the withdrawal side effects from Prozac last?
    I was taking 20 mg of Prozac to help with menopause/hormone disorder and am now stopping it, taking it every other day and weaning off (doctor's orders). How long does it take for headache and dizziness and tiredness t ogo away?
    Thanks. I go back Monday to get all that treated. I think yo uare right.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, first the headache/dizziness tiredness, depression, and probably insomnia, etc... are ALL symptoms of menopause... and psychiatry isnt what you need... they cant help, basically....
      So I dont think it will take more than two weeks to come off it...
      Oprah and others are doing a lot about menopause , so let me give you some people / books to look up..... and also recommend that you have a complete hormone profile done when you settle on the right doc..... also include your FSH and TSH(thyroid).... the nine major ones to be tested (a simple blood test) are thyroid;, cortisol , DHEA, estradiol, progesterone, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin
      Now ddr. christiane northrup has written a good book on menopause
      So has Susanne Somers....
      Dr. Phils wife goes to the www.hallcenter.com (i think that is it, look for it) in sandiego.... and recommends women go there or somewhere and have their hormones tested , then some are going onto bioidentical hormone replacement...
      research it all because there is a lot about it, at oprah.com , also...
      Your symptoms are not going away unless you treat the cause,
      I use traditional chinese medicine which I prefer, and you can research their treatment of menopause also, www.ITMonline.org take care

  46. QUESTION:
    can you get cold sweats from dehydration and constipation?
    so my mom has a problem with her uterus and possibly her colon but right now she keeps getting cold sweats. She has bad abdominal cramps. She sweats, shivers, and has goose bumps all at the same time. She has a very slight fever of only 2-3 degrees. Could these be symptoms of dehydration and/or constipation?

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like her body is sick and trying to fight off something and thus can't managr her temp....

      it's also common with menopause to have night sweats and issues like that....
      I hope she is going to the doctor to get treatment....

      thirstiness, dry skin, edema, muscle cramps are all signs of dehydration...

      the cold sweats, cramps, temp and stuff could be due to bowel issues eesp if she has an autoimmune disease like chrons disease or lupus or something as that can cause low grade fevers.

      Actually a whlole lot of things can cause these symptoms but I know i have a autoimmune disease and I get chills a lot as well as night sweats.

      Anyways i hope they figure out how to help her soon

  47. QUESTION:
    Are there any options for fibroid treatment?
    I am working on my research on fibroid; how does it effect women and what are the sign/symptoms. But the question is: what type of treatment that can be much safer and curable for women when recover from a fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroids can be treated with medication or surgery.

      Treating fibroids with medication

      GnRHA

      GnRHA (gonadotropin released hormone agonist), administered by injection. GnRHAs make the woman's body produce much lower quantities of estrogen, which makes the fibroids shrink. GnRHA stops the woman's menstrual cycle. It is important to remember that GNRHAs are not contraceptives, and they do not affect a woman's fertility when she stops treatment.

      GNRHAs are also very helpful for women who have heavy periods and discomfort in their abdomen. GNRHAs may have menopause-like symptoms as their main side-effect, this might include hot flashes (UK: flushes), a tendency to sweat more, and vaginal dryness. Although thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) is also a possible side-effect, it is rare.

      GnRHAs may be administered to the patient before surgery in order to shrink the fibroids. GNRHAs are for short-term, not long-term use.

      GNRHAs combined with HRT (hormone replacement therapy) are sometimes prescribed to prevent menopause-like symptoms.

      Other drugs may be used to treat fibroids; however, they are less effective for larger fibroids. These include:

      Tranexamic acid - they are presented in tablet form and are taken by the patient from the day pre menstrual period starts for up to 4 days. This is done each month. If symptoms do not improve within three months the patient should stop taking this medication. Tranexamic acid helps blood in the uterus clot, which reduces bleeding. A woman's fertility will not be affected by this treatment as soon as it is over.

      Anti-inflammatory drugs - these medications are taken for a few days during the patient's menstrual period. They may include such drugs as mefanamic and ibuprofen. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce the amount of prostaglandins the body produces. Prostaglandins are hormones which are associated with heavy periods. These drugs are also painkillers. They do not affect a woman's fertility.

      The contraceptive pill - these are used to stop menstruation from occurring.

      LNG-IUS (Levonorgestrel intrauterine system) - this is a plastic device which is placed inside the uterus. LNH-IUS releases levonorgestrel (progestogen hormone). This hormone stops the lining of the uterus from growing too fast, which effectively reduces bleeding. One of the side-effects of this treatment is irregular bleeding for up to six months, headaches, breast tenderness, and acne. In very rare cases it can stop the woman's periods.

      Surgery to treat fibroids

      When medications have not worked, the patient may have to undergo surgery to cure the Fibroids. The following surgical procedures may be considered:

      Hysterectomy - removing the uterus. This is only ever considered if the fibroids are very large, or if the patient is bleeding too much. Hysterectomies are sometimes considered as an option to stop recurrences of fibroids (stop them coming back). Hysterectomies have two possible side-effects: 1. Reduced libido. 2. Early menopause.

      Myomectomy - the fibroids are surgically removed from the wall of the uterus. This option is more popular for women who want to get pregnant (as opposed to a hysterectomy). Women with large fibroids, as well as those whose fibroids are located in particular parts of the uterus may not be able to benefit from this procedure.

      Endometrial ablation - this involves removing the lining of the uterus. This procedure may be used if the patient's fibroids are near the inner surface of the uterus. This procedure is considered as an effective alternative to a hysterectomy.

      UAE (Uterine Artery Embolization) - this treatment stops the fibroid from getting its blood supply. UAE is generally used for women with large fibroids. UAEs effectively shrink the fibroid. A chemical is injected through a catheter into a blood vessel in the leg - it is guided by X-ray scans.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation - an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan is used to locate the fibroids. Then very fine needles are inserted through the patient's skin and pushed until they reach the targeted fibroids. A fiber-optic cable is inserted through the needles. A laser light goes through the fiber-optic cable, hits the fibroids and shrinks them.

      Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery -" an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan locates the fibroids, and then sound waves are aimed at them. This procedure also shrinks the fibroids.

      Most experts say Magnetic-resonance-guided percutaneous laser ablation and Magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery are both effective - however, there is some uncertainty regarding their benefits vs. risks.

  48. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest that women starts to go through the?
    change of life. I am 36. I think I might be going through it. I guess other people call it menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  49. QUESTION:
    What's the best thing for menopause symptoms, that you can buy over the counter?
    There are so many things on the shelf loaded with vitamins and herbs. What really works? Does anyone have any experience with these. I'm over 40 and had a total hysterectomy at 37. I'm on the patch, but my GYN doesn't want to raise it. I still get hot flashes, and I'd like to go natural. I also take a progesterone pill at night.

    • ANSWER:
      I would like to suggest Menozac which is one of the best menopause symptom relief product on the market. Why?

      First, because it is made to meet pharmaceutical standards. Second, it uses only the finest, most bio-available natural nutrients. Third, every production batch is tested in a lab to ensure its purity and potency.

      Even some herbal experts also highly recommend using this type of herbal, safe and natural menopause treatment. By taking this natural alternative you will avoid the side effects and health risks, and help treat your symptoms naturally.

  50. QUESTION:
    Could Hashimoto Thyroiditis cause similar symptoms to premenopause?
    I'm 21 years old, and I am going to be tested in the next week or so for Hashimoto's.

    Because I am showing all symptoms of this disease, I also got thinking if one of my other problems could be connected to this: hot flashes, and no periods.

    For about three years, I had my period without a break in between cycles (yes, three years of constant bleeding) and doctors were unable to figure out why. For about two years now, I have been suffering from very long breaks during my periods along with very intense hot flashes. My mother, who is going to menopause, has similar symptoms.

    Has anyone with Hashimoto's ever had menopause-like hot flashes?

    In case this helps, I am adopted but do know that my biological mother had ovarian cancer in her late 20's. Could this be a sign of that?

    • ANSWER:
      It is odd for someone to skip over HypOthyroidism & go straight to Hashi's. It is, however, the main cause of HypO. Yes, there can be hot flashes. Likely to be cancer? NO!

      Thyroid disease is missed more than found. Three reasons: 1) not checking for antibodies; 2) going by wrong TSH 'normal' range; and, 3) not listening to symptoms.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning [different antibodies]).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb for Hashi’s] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you


treatment for symptoms of menopause