Premature Menopause Age

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a test to determine if someone is going through premature menopause?
    I have found lists of symptoms for premature menopause, but am looking for something more definitive. Is there such a thing as a test for this condition? If so, how readily available is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. YOu get your FSH tested. This is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland that is very low when your ovaries are working normally, and very high when they're not working. The only reason it would get high in someone who is not of menopausal age is if her ovaries have stopped working due to premature menopause. The doc will also test you estradiol level.

  2. QUESTION:
    Extreme hot flashes during menstrual period?
    I am having extreme hot flashes during my menstrual period. I feel like I'm in an oven. I've searched online, but not much is coming up other than early menopause, but I'm only 23, even though the average age for premature menopause is 27. Does anyone else experience this?

    • ANSWER:
      ive been having the same thing for years im 18. im going to the doc. next week. you should go to.

  3. QUESTION:
    could night sweats around the time of my period be premature menopause?
    I've been having night sweats a few days before my period and now during, and I don't know why, so I have assumed it has something to do with this. People associate it with menopause. I haven't been on any pills ever. I'm 17. I wake up in cold sweat wet.

    • ANSWER:
      This is quite common in women of all ages due to falling oestrogen pre period. If you do not have any other symptoms it is normal but uncomfortable and not a sign of premature menopause.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the youngest age a woman can go through menopause?
    I'm only 25 but I've been having symptoms of menopause, is this even possible? I've had problems with my period ever since I got it, so I wouldn't be surpised! Thanks.
    I won't be able to go to a doctor for about 2 weeks, we're in the middle of moving and pretty much all of our time is used up packing and working. I'm kinda embarrassed to even ask a Doc about it. It seems kinda ridiculous.
    I'll give you some history real quick.
    I've always missed periods, from 6 weeks in between to 4 months (been since Sept this time). Bad cramps all the time. Went on the pill for about 7 years on and off to control it. Didn't have insurance for the last 2 years and went off it. In the last year, had major issues, longer gaps and longer lasting (3 weeks one time), had hair grow on my face and breasts (never did before) and had a higher temp then normal.
    I guess it is pretty dumb that I'm embarassed to ask my doc, I had a bad experinace when I asked one about something I thought I had. I was mocked and laughed at. I stopped going to see him.

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a link on Premature Ovarian Failure aka Premature Menopause:
      http://www.4woman.gov/menopause/stages/premature.cfm
      and
      http://www.medicinenet.com/premature_menopause/article.htm

      You more likely have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.
      Here's a link for that:
      http://www.4woman.gov/faq/pcos.htm

      Don't be affraid to talk to your gynecologist about this. You've got something going on hormonally. It needs checked out.

      If you had symptoms for diabetes would you feel silly for seeing a doctor? Well, this is the same type of thing. Your body isn't giving you what it needs.

  5. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for periods to stop with premature ovarian failure?
    My periods last a day and a half to two days now, just wondering when they will stop completely. I have almost all symptoms of menopause from hot flashes to anxiety to cold sweats to the embarrassing parts, and I am 24. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      There's no clear guide--everyone is different. Complicating matters is that women with premature ovarian failure are advised to take hormone replacement to avoid the numerous body-damaging problems inherent in ovarian failure at a young age. Hormone replacement causes a bleed that is like a period, so they can't tell what their body is doing on its own. If you have premature ovarian failure, then you should be taking hormones. And check out www.ipofa.org, which is a support group.

  6. QUESTION:
    How does a doctor diagnose premature ovarian failure?
    POF means you are going through menopause early (like before the age of 40). Just curious as to how a doctor would diagnose that.

    • ANSWER:
      They probably do multiple tests . . . but I am sure that one of them would be the CD3 FSH blood test - this indicates the egg reserve and potentially quality.

      http://www.advancedfertility.com/day3fsh.htm

  7. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to adjust to lower hrt levels?
    I am 35yrs old and went into early menopause 5yrs ago. I have been taking oral contraceptives for hormone replacement for 3years. My doctor had me on a very high dose for two years of these years. Less than three months ago I lowered my dose. I was wondering how long does it take for my body to adjust to this change or has it already?

    • ANSWER:
      It might not adjust. When you go through early menopause, you could very well experience menopausal side effects until you reach the normal age of menopause--so like for 20 years. The National Institute of Health recommends that women with premature menopause be on higher dosages of hormones because their younger bodies need it. It's not the same as an older, naturally menopausal woman. The risks are greater by NOT taking hormones than by taking hormones.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can I plan a new baby in the age of 45 while my wife is 48 years?
    As i mentioned above I want to plan a new baby. It it safe pregnancy in this age. My age age is 45 while my wife's age is 48. Will my new baby be Ok and fit with good mental health.? Please answer me according to medical views.

    • ANSWER:
      I would honestly consult your doctor.
      For a male it doesnt really matter at what age you decided to want to have a child simply because men are always producing sperm
      while females which a point where they can release any more eggs which is known as menopause.
      Honestly, its a really high risk for your wife to have a baby at such an age. Like from an article "Any woman over the age of 40 constitutes a high-risk pregnancy — the medical risks rise rapidly for mothers older than 40 and for their babies"
      Risk include the baby being premature, the baby can be lost, it could be a stillborn baby (where the baby is born dead)
      the other concern is that the baby is having a chromosomal problem and it goes up every year "For example, the risk of having a baby with Down syndrome rises from about 1 in 759 at age 30 to 1 in 302 at age 35, 1 in 82 at age 40"
      But life works miracles, i say talk to your doctor :)

  9. QUESTION:
    What age is normal for the menopause?
    I am 20 and I thought menopause occurred in your late 40s but then I became confused when watching Im a celeb last night. Apparently Gillian Mckeith - 51 - still has periods. Is this possible and did anyone else think it was strange?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause normally begins in the late 40's through the early 50's. But menopause can also start in your 20's and 30's, in which case it is called premature menopause. Premature menopause can be triggered by many things including living at high altitudes and smoking.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why is it bad to go into early menopause?
    I'm 40 and I think I've been having hot flashes. Alot of people tell me it's bad to go into early menopause. Why?

    • ANSWER:
      Basically, if you are done having kids, then you're like millions of other women going through menopause.

      I was 21 when I was diagnosed with POF - Premature Ovarian Failure (ran out of eggs). I remember at the age of 15 my periods started to get irregular (2 times a month or skip 2-3 months) and I was always hot (hot flashes).

      My sex drive has been low. I feel anxious all the time and we do use more lubrication when making love. I am 37 now and my ob/gyn still thinks I need Estrogen and I've been taking BC pill - Ortho Tri-cyclen for awhile now and probably will until I reach 45-50 years old.

      Not everyone has the same symptoms and you should discuss this with your ob/gyn.

  11. QUESTION:
    Turner Syndrome, What happens when they reach the age of 25?
    I have a 17 year old sister that have turner syndrome. She went through hormone therapy for about 4 years. When she reached her teenage years , she started having problems with her kidneys and she is now prone to diabetes. What happens to girls to have TS when they reach the age of 25? Is it true that they will also experience pre-mature aging?

    • ANSWER:
      No, I'm not aware of any correlation between premature aging as such and Turner's. There are medical issues she needs to be aware of, though, like cardiac issues and the propensity to diabetes you mentioned. When you say she "went through hormone therapy," do you mean estrogen or growth hormone? If she's 17, she's probably old enough that she's stopped growth hormone, but she still needs to be on estrogen/progesterone replacement therapy. Adequate HRT throughout adulthood is *very important* in women with TS, and the current thinking is that women with TS should remain on HRT until 50 or so, the age at which menopause would naturally be beginning. It will do a lot to combat osteoporosis and other issues. I don't know why you picked 25, but there's nothing in particular that "happens" to women with TS at that age or any age, they just need to be aware throughout their adulthood of the medical issues that can arise with TS and be sure they are getting good medical care from a doctor who is knowledgeable about the condition. The Turner's Syndrome Society of the United States is a great resource for keeping up with the latest medical research on TS - http://www.turnersyndrome.org.

  12. QUESTION:
    is it possible to have menopause at the age of 18?
    i have been having abit of mood swings & minor bladder leaks lately, i have search on the internet and found that some symptons do apply to me for menopause, but im only 18, is it possible ?
    my periods hasnt come yet this month. so could i possibly really be pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      They don't call it menopause, its called POF - Premature Ovarian Failure. I was diagnosed at age 21.

      Here's more info on POF: http://pofsupport.org

      Good Luck!

  13. QUESTION:
    Is soy bean milk really good for our body?
    can it really substitute the regular cow milk? what's the benefit of it? is it true that soy bean able to postpone menopause? and can prevent premature-aging?

    • ANSWER:
      some babies like me when small need it cuz theyre allergic to cows milk

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I am going through Early Onset Menopause?
    The only real symptom I have is a screwed up menstrual cycle. I work with menopausal women that say I am about to go through the change. I am only 42. No night sweats, in fact I am always cold.

    • ANSWER:
      You should talk to your doctor but here's some information.
      http://www.epigee.org/menopause/early.html

      Early and Premature Menopause

      When we hear the word menopause, we usually think of older women above the age of 60. Very rarely do we ever think of ourselves. However, menopause is not a stage necessarily relegated to elderly women. Early or premature menopause is more common than most women realize - it affects about 1% of women between the ages of 15 and 45. Early or premature menopause can occur for a variety of reasons, but in the end it leaves an imprint on the lives of all of the women it affects.

      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      Because doctors are finally beginning to recognize the symptoms of menopause in younger women, more and more women are being diagnosed with early or premature menopause. As a result, women who are experiencing infertility or are dealing with menopause symptoms at a young age no longer have to wonder why.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that aren’t functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers’ footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Surgical Menopause
      Surgical menopause involves the conscious decision of forcing women into menopause for specific health reasons. Women who suffer from endometriosis, polyps, or ovarian cancer may have to undergo an oopherectomy (removal of the ovaries) or a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and sometimes ovaries). These surgeries dramatically cut off ovarian function causing estrogen levels to drop suddenly and forcing the woman into menopause.

      Menopause Caused by Cancer Treatment
      Menopause can be caused by chemotherapy or radiation cancer treatments. Chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells but, unfortunately, they also kills healthy cells. Hair cells, digestive cells, and ovarian cells are particularly at risk. Some women who have undergone cancer treatment temporarily enter menopause, while others permanently enter menopause.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the body’s functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen (known as "estrogen crash") in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isn’t so bad – in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest that women starts to go through the?
    change of life. I am 36. I think I might be going through it. I guess other people call it menopause.

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  16. QUESTION:
    If anyone did IVF using donor eggs instead of your own, how did you reconcile not being the biological mother?
    I am almost 44 and am thinking of having one last child before it's too late, but at my age using your own eggs is almost impossible. Can anyone help me out here? How did you approach this and get over the feeling of it wanting to be your own child biologically?

    • ANSWER:
      Please allow me to address the other answer you've received first, then I will continue. For the other person's response with a blanket statement of "Most have overcome that need for biological by that point when they make that decision." is absolutely ridiculous and ignorant. I know of PLENTY of women who are in their 40s who still are resolved in their attempts to use their own eggs during their IVF cycles. And for those women in that age group that could not afford IVF, they have reported to feel some sort of emptiness for not having had the experience of pregnancy and birthing. This of course does not apply to ALL women, but to some. Which is my point exactly in calling you out on your statement. I can only assume that you are not in your 40s, and therefore cannot possibly make such a statement.

      With that being said, here is my personal experience:

      I am 39, and had been ttc for 15 years. After a failed IVF cycle, I was found to have Premature Ovarian Failure (early menopause). My husband and I felt devastated initially. We were told that our only options left on the table were to either pursue another IVF cycle using an egg donor, adoption, or remain childless. We knew we wanted to be parents desperately, so remaining childless was out of the question. We also knew that we were not ready to adopt an older, special needs child. And if we wanted to adopt an infant, we knew that the waiting lists were on average to be about 2 years, and we would spend tens of thousands of dollars with no guarantee of a baby to call our own. Furthermore, we also felt that we would not qualify for infant adoption, as most agencies are Christian-based and my husband is atheist. Also, I have been previously married, which would preclude us from qualifying with many an agency. So that option was out. Besides that, I desired greatly to experience pregnancy and breastfeeding. It was an extremely strong maternal drive I had within. So my husband and I decided that we needed to allow ourselves some proper time to grieve the loss of me ever having children that would be genetically mine. We went on a holiday to escape any and all fertility treatment talk, get grounded with just us two, and upon our return, we wept together and talked at great lengths about what felt right for us. After a few months, we both felt ready to move forward with using an egg donor. And let me clear something up here that you've misstated in your question (which is a very common mistake)....these children ARE mine biologically. They share my blood, my air, my everything while they grow within my womb. If you use an egg donor, the same would be true for you. There is a difference between BIOLOGICAL and GENETICS. Biological means same blood source. Genetically means different DNA make up. With that being said, it is an extremely personal decision for a woman to make. You must first grieve what will never be. You must have your heart and your mind in the "right" spot before moving forward, otherwise the resentment and/or bitterness will drive you mad. But let me say this: I know that for myself, as well as the other women I know that used an egg donor, the first time you see your baby's face on an ultrasound, you completely fall in love. Your ideas that this child is different than you completely melt away. And I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that whenever I feel my twin boys kicking and moving around inside of me that I am their mother. They are my sons. We are forever connected in a way that is special between child and mother. And I cannot hardly wait until they arrive, I hold them in my arms, and I look into their eyes. They are a part of me, no matter what our DNA says.

      I wish you the very best of luck on your journey, no matter what you choose. I do recommend highly that you either begin to attend a support group for infertility, or perhaps invest in seeing a therapist that specializes in infertility. It will help you to gain even more clarity, and for you to decide whatever is best for YOU.

      I welcome you to read my very personal online blog, which details my journey for the past year and half; especially about choosing to use an egg donor, how we found the "perfect" match of a donor for us, and what the process was like. I hope it not only helps to guide you, but also gives you some personal insight. http://wwww.roxysivfjourney.blogspot.com

  17. QUESTION:
    I am 33 years married woman with symptoms of premature menopause?
    My GP has told me last month that i can be hanving premature menopause as my symptoms are saying so.
    She has adviced me Menopace tablet and general calcium tablets. For last whole month i was taking this tablet and my symptoms were undercontrolled but now next week my period is due and yesterday i forgot to take that menopace tablet and today i am feeling lot of tiredness alongwith hypertension and fatigue , artheritic pain , and lost of temper problem what does these symptoms mean because it can be PMS or premature menopause can somebody help me in telling which are the blood tests to rule out menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause is a stage in life when a woman stops having her monthly period.It is a normal part of aging, marking the end of a woman's reproductive years.Get enough calcium. A woman going through menopause needs 1000 mg to 1500 mg of calcium a day. Avoid excessive amounts of salt to reduce bloating associated with hormonal changes. More information and remedies at http://useinfo4.blogspot.com/

  18. QUESTION:
    Isit possible to get alzheimers at age 18?
    I was diagnosed with premature ovarian failure(aka menopause at age 17) about a year and a half ago, i did more research and found that memory loss and alzheimers are related to it also, i am suffering from memory loss and am just wondering if it's possible to be in the early stages of alzheimers at age 18? i looked up the stages and what im experiencing is almost exactly the same as the mild stage of alzheimers.

    • ANSWER:
      I personally know plenty of people who have cured a number of different sickness with just nutrition!!! A deficiency in zinc, the essential fatty acids, and the B-vitamins can cause premature ovarian failure! google for more info. Google these superfoods for information about VERY nutrient-dense foods: maca powder, royal jelly, spirulina, chlorella, bee pollen, cocoa powder, etc... (if you have allergies, you shouldn't take bee pollen).

  19. QUESTION:
    What happens if a womans period stops once in for all at a young age.. Like late teens or early twenties?
    Now I am just a bit curious.
    And she is not sexually active in he first place.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the cause behind it. It can, and does, happen to many, many young girls, and some causes are reversable, whilst others are permanent.

      Bulimia, anorexia and rapid weight loss can cause interruptions in the menstruation cycle. Bulimia and anorexia, however, can cause so much damage to a young girl's body that her reproductive system is affected, and she becomes infertile(irreversable).

      Strenuous physical activity can cause interruptions in the menstruation cycle, but usually once the young girl stops the activity, her cycle should come back to normal.

      Drugs can affect the menstruation cycle, enough to render (g)you infertile. Accidents that happen to (g)your lower abdomin can leave (g)you infertile.

      Early menopause(happens before the age of 40, *not* premature menopause, where menopause happens before the age of 45) renders the woman infertile. It can happen to women between the ages of 15-45, and, unfortunatly, the cause isn't always easy to find.

      In all of these conditions, obviously the biggest factor is infertility. Then there are the mental effects, and the hormonal effects. Estrogen and progesterone are the hormones responsible for our(women's) sexual and reproductional function, so without them, there may be less of a desire to have sexual intercourse.

      They will also experience things such as hot flashes, headaches and mood swings.

      Amenorrhoea is a fancy word for ''abscence of menstrual period'' or ''no bleed at that time of the month''. This term can be used to decribe what happens during pregnancy, or during lactation(breast feeding). It is also used to describe what could happen when using birth control. It's also used when (g)your period has stopped due to the reasons mentioned above, except for early menopause.

      Best of luck, if I have missed anything, just let me know through additional details :- )

      This explains amenorrhoea >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenorrhoea <<.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there something a woman can do to get menopause, delayed?
    Like so women can get it at around age 50, instead of age 35.

    • ANSWER:
      The average age of menopause for American women is 51. Some a few years before, some a few years after. Menopause can occur earlier due to surgical removal of ovaries, radiation, chemotheraphy, treatment for childhood cancer.

      When early menopause or Premature Ovarian Function occurs there is some kind of anomally. See your GYN as there are hormone replacement options.

      Also visit http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide/premature-menopause

      http://www.earlymenopause.com/

  21. QUESTION:
    At what age can I expect to stop having hot flushes?
    I used HRT for 15 years but have been off for 5 and still having hot flushes. Any helpful advice out there?
    Incidentally I am 70

    • ANSWER:
      I am assuming that you had a premature menopause, either naturally or as a result of surgery. Unfortunately you don't give any details of what went on. Also very importantly you haven't given your current age. Please add this information and I will try and help.

      Thanks for adding your age, this coupled with the fact that you have been off HRT for 5 years is to say the least puzzling! It might be worth your GP investigating you for other causes of flushing such as an Phaeochromocytoma (adrenal adenoma,) hyperthyroidism, diabetes, Polycythemia vera and many more. I don't think it would be unreasonable to ask him to exclude these, though I know they are rare.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can you have kids if you hit menopause at 13?
    Ny friend went through menopause at 13, can that stop you from having kids?

    • ANSWER:
      Although it is *extremely rare* girls barely into puberty can experience "premature ovarian failure" - i.e. their ovaries fail to develop and this, in effect, leads to menopause at an extremely early age.

      I'll bet almost anything that your friend did not go through this. While it's theoretically possible, it's a one-in-several million occurrence. Unless your friend has gone through a HUGE battery of medical follow-up, it's virtually certain this did not happen.

      In the unlikely event that it DID happen, yes this would render her unable to have children. But, this would be the least of her problems. She will have a (shortened) lifetime of bone and joint problems, as well as a slew of other hormone-related problems.

  23. QUESTION:
    How long should I wait after cancer to have a baby?
    This really sucks cause my husband and I were planning to have our next baby about now when I got diagnosed with cancer. I am currently going for chemotherapy right now. After my chemo is done, how long is it recommended that I wait?
    Ya they told me that this chemo treatment I was getting can cause infertility after the IV was already in my vein. It upset me so much that they didn't tell me before it was too late to save any eggs. I'll just have to take my chances as soon as I am safely able

    • ANSWER:
      Chemotherapy can cause infertility in women by damaging the ovaries and affecting the levels of hormones produced by the ovaries. This can lead to irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea or even premature menopause. The menopause may be temporary or permanent.

      The risk of infertility from chemotherapy is generally dose-dependent. Among women, age may also be a risk factor for chemotherapy-induced infertility.

      Cancer survivors may need to wait six months to a year after the end of treatment before trying to conceive, to give enough time for fertility to recover and for any residual chemotherapy to reach subtherapeutic levels.

      There isn't a correct answer that anyone can give you here. This is something that ONLY your oncologist and gynecologist can answer for you. There are too many variables involved and without knowing type of cancer, length of treatment, dosage, gynecological history, etc. We couldn't even guess. It's a shame this wasn't brought up before treatment started.

      Good luck, wishing you a successful treatment and recovery. There are some options for future children so please discuss them with your doctors.

  24. QUESTION:
    What is the earliest people start goin threw menapause?
    I am 26 yrs old and I have 24 out of 36 symptoms already. I am having a lot of female problems and the doctor can't figure out why. I have talked to a lot of family members and they believe I am going threw the change already.

    • ANSWER:
      All the studies I have read state 45 is the average age but, they say there is a marked increase in women in their 20's showing peri-menopause signs. Smoking is an external factor that can cause some women to experience early menopause.

      Another big possiblity might be an autoimmune disorder. In this case the body’s own antibodies and immune system, normally employed to fight off diseases, to suddenly attack and destroy healthy tissues within the system. While a common trigger for premature menopause, the category of autoimmune disorders is a wide one and covers a variety of conditions, ranging from thyroid disease to lupus or Graves’ disease. Of all of these, hypothyroidism is perhaps the most common; a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone to keep the body’s metabolism running. It is believed that over 5 million Americans suffer from this condition and at least 10% of all women in the United States suffer from some degree of thyroid hormone deficiency. In many cases, people with hypothyroidism don’t even realize they have it until a condition, such as a premature menopause, draws attention to its presence.

      Genetics and defects in the chromosomes can also cause premature menopause. If a woman’s mother or sister has experienced menopause on or before the age of 40, there is a greater risk that she will also experience this condition. Chromosome defects can also cause problems, as in the case of women who are born without a second X chromosome (Turner’s syndrome). This causes the ovaries to form abnormally and prevents them from working properly, thereby triggering a premature menopause.

      In your specific case, it sounds like all has been normal until now so, I would bet it is auto-immune related. Has your Dr. done the auto-immune antibody titer blood test, looking for signs of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis? If you feel that you have hit a wall with your Dr. you might ask to be referred to an Endocrinologist. In my opinion they are so specialized in their field that they might get you to an answer quicker, especially if your problem is auto-immune related Hope this helps and you are able to find out & treat what the cause is for this hormone disruption.

  25. QUESTION:
    What is the youngest age a male could know that he has hypogonadism?

    • ANSWER:
      congenital, it can be seen at birth. upon develepmental stages it can be diagnosed later and up to age two. any concern of lack of dropping of testicles would be observed over period of time durring the first year.

      Deficiency of sex hormones can result in defective primary or secondary sexual development, or withdrawal effects (e.g., premature menopause) in adults.

      There are many possible types of hypogonadism and several ways to categorize them.

      [edit] by Congenital vs. acquired
      An example of congenital hypogonadism (present at birth) is Turner syndrome.
      An example of acquired hypogonadism (develops in childhood or adult life) is castration.

      [edit] by Hormones vs. fertility
      Hypogonadism can involve just hormone production or just fertility, but most commonly involves both.

      Examples of hypogonadism that affect hormone production more than fertility are hypopituitarism and Kallmann syndrome; in both cases, fertility is reduced until hormones are replaced but can be achieved solely with hormone replacement.
      Examples of hypogonadism that affect fertility more than hormone production are Klinefelter syndrome and Kartagener syndrome.

      [edit] by Affected system
      Hypogonadism is also categorized by endocrinologists by the level of the reproductive system that is defective.

      Hypogonadism resulting from defects of the gonads is traditionally referred to as primary hypogonadism. Examples include Klinefelter syndrome and Turner syndrome.
      Hypogonadism resulting from hypothalamic or pituitary defects are termed secondary hypogonadism or central hypogonadism (referring to the central nervous system).
      Examples of Hypothalamic defects include Kallmann syndrome.
      Examples of Pituitary defects include hypopituitarism.
      An example of a hypogonadism resulting from hormone response is androgen insensitivity syndrome.

      Low Testosterone can be identified through a simple blood test performed by a physician. Normal testosterone levels range from 298 - 1098 ng/dl.

      go get tested =)

  26. QUESTION:
    At what age do women stop getting their period?
    They can't have their period when they're 80-90 right? So at what age does it stop?

    • ANSWER:
      The average age of menopause is 51, but it really varies and usually occurs after age 40. There are people who have premature ovarian failure who could stop having periods in their 30s.

      On the other hand, vaginal bleeding (which might seem like a period) can occur even after menopause and would be reason for concern. Any vaginal bleeding that occurs > 6 months after menopause is abnormal and might be endometrial cancer.

  27. QUESTION:
    What kind procedures are done to stop having period at over age 50?
    I have heard that some people who are over age 50 and still having a heavy period can get some kind of "thing" in their uterus. So that would stop the period until they get their menopause..do you all know what that is exactly? and how does it work? any link regarding this would be a help too..thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a list of what can be done.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/menorrhagia/DS00394/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs
      Dilation and curettage (D and C). In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats menorrhagia successfully, you may need additional D and C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.
      Operative hysteroscopy. This procedure uses a tiny tube with a light (hysteroscope) to view your uterine cavity and can aid in the surgical removal of a polyp that may be causing excessive menstrual bleeding.
      Endometrial ablation. Using a variety of techniques, your doctor permanently destroys the entire lining of your uterus (endometrium). After endometrial ablation, most women have little or no menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Endometrial resection. This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Like endometrial ablation, this procedure reduces your ability to become pregnant.
      Hysterectomy. Surgical removal of the uterus and cervix is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and cessation of menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed under anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause in younger women.

      A hysterectomy can be done but it doesn't mean the ovaries have to be removed with it and it should be the last resort because a hysterectomy is major surgery that involves major cutting and stitching. A woman who has a vaginal hysterectomy can have over 200 internal stitches and the minimum recovery is six weeks. The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus. If the ovaries are taken it's called a bilateral salpingo oopherectomy. When the entire uterus is taken it includes the cervix which is the neck or bottom of the uterus and is termed a total hysterectomy. It's possible to have a total hysterectomy and keep both ovaries. I had a TVH and kept both ovaries. There's also another procedure that may be able to be done in an outpatient setting but I think it's similar to ablation usually with all of them it's recommended that women don't have kids after them. While some may not be a guarantee it's also important to know the causes of heavy bleeding. Some cases may not respond to the other things and a hysterectomy would be the only choice which could work. If there's endometriosis or adenomyosis (endometriosis inside the uterine muscle) a hysterectomy is the only cure.

      Edited: About what the previous responder Mike said about a hysterectomy not intended to stop periods...When the uterus and cervix are removed there shouldn't be any bleeding at all even if both ovaries are present. It's the linning of the uterus and sometimes the linning left in the cervix that builds up every month which causes bleeding. Women who have a tubal ligation simply don't pass the eggs into their uterus and they still have periods because of the uterine linning that builds up from hormones and such. Because I kept my ovaries with my total hysterectomy (see note at bottom for definition of total hysterctomy) my doctor said the eggs would just disinigrate into my body but because I don't have a uterus or cervix anymore I don't get anymore periods. I don't need any hormone replacement therapy because my ovaries are still providing enough hormones until I go into menopause. There have been women who have had both ovaries removed and still have the uterus although it's not as common to leave the uterus in when both ovaries are out and they still get periods or messed up cycles because of the unbalanced amount of hormones. It's the linning from the uterus that sheds every month.

      Here is a list of the different types of hysterectomies and please do not confuse the term partial and total hysterectomy.
      Note: The term hysterectomy refers to the removal of the uterus not the ovaries. A total hysterectomy is when the cervix is removed with the uterus which is the bottom part or neck of the uterus and is about the size of a coat button. It can still contain a linning and shed every month for women who opt to keep their cervix. Some women have had to go back in and have the cervix removed because it bled so much. One can have a total hysterectomy while keeping both ovaries and tubes.

      http://www.hystersisters.com/vb2/view_hysterectomy_defined.htm
      Total Hysterectomy
      A total hysterectomy is removal of the entire uterus which includes the cervix. A radical hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, the tissue on both sides of the cervix (parametrium), and the upper part of the vagina.

      Partial Hysterectomy
      A partial (or supracervical) hysterectomy is removal of just the upper portion of the uterus, leaving the cervix intact
      Removal of the ovaries and the fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo oopherectomy) may also be done at the same time.

      Hysterectomy Types
      A hysterectomy may be done through an abdominal incision - Abdominal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done through a vaginal incision - Vaginal Hysterectomy

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through laparoscopic incisions (small incisions on the abdomen -- Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

      A hysterectomy may be done completely through the use of a robotic surgical device through small incisions in the abdomen - da Vinci® Hysterectomy.

      Your physician will help you decide which type of hysterectomy is most appropriate for you, depending on your medical history and the reason for your surgery.

  28. QUESTION:
    when does medipos start, at what age? What are the signs that you are entering that stage in ones life?

    • ANSWER:
      Menopause

      * What is menopause?
      * What is ‘perimenopause’?
      * What are the signs of menopause?
      * Do all women experience menopause in the same way?
      * What is ‘induced’ menopause?
      * How should I prepare for menopause?
      * Where can I go for more information?

      What is menopause?

      Menopause is the end of menstruation. The word comes from the Greek mens, meaning monthly, and pausis, meaning cessation. Menopause is part of a woman's natural aging process when her ovaries produce lower levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone and when she is no longer able to become pregnant.

      Unlike a woman’s first menstruation, which starts on a single day, the changes leading up to menopause happen over several years. The average age for menopause is 52. But menopause commonly happens anytime between the ages of 42 and 56.

      A woman can say she has begun her menopause when she has not had a period for a full year.
      What is ‘perimenopause’?

      ‘Perimenopause’ refers to the several years before menopause when a woman may begin experiencing the first signs of her menopausal transition. But many people use the term ‘menopause’ for both the perimenopausal years as well as the few years following menopause.
      What are the signs of menopause?

      Menopause is a natural process that happens to every woman as she grows older, and is not a medical problem, disease or illness. Still, some women may have a hard time because of the changes in hormone levels during menopause.

      There are many possible signs of menopause and each woman feels them differently. Most women have no or few menopausal symptoms while some women have many moderate or severe symptoms.

      The clearest signs of the start of menopause are irregular periods (when periods come closer together or further apart), and when blood flow becomes lighter or heavier.

      Other signs may include some of the following:

      * weight gain;
      * hot flashes;
      * insomnia;
      * night sweats;
      * vaginal dryness;
      * joint pain;
      * fatigue;
      * short-term memory problems;
      * bowel upset;
      * dry eyes;
      * itchy skin;
      * mood swings; and
      * urinary tract infections.

      Most of the time, these symptoms will lessen or go away after a woman has finished menopause.
      Do all women experience menopause in the same way?

      Menopause experiences are different among individual women, and also among women in different cultures and in different parts of the world.

      Research has shown that women’s experience of menopause can be related to many things, including genetics, diet, lifestyle and social and cultural attitudes toward older women.

      For example:

      * Japanese women report fewer hot flashes and other symptoms.
      * Thai women record a high incidence of headaches.
      * Scottish women record fewer severe symptoms.
      * Greek women report a high rate of hot flashes.
      * Mayan women report no symptoms.

      Some scholars wonder if the North American emphasis on youth and lack of respect for older people contributes to a more difficult menopausal transition here.

      The typical North American diet, high in saturated fats and sugars, along with our in-active lifestyle and low childbirth rate, may also contribute to the physical complaints common to many North American women at menopause.
      What is "induced" menopause?

      "Induced", "sudden" or "surgical" menopause happens when a woman goes through an immediate and premature menopause. This occurs when her ovaries no longer produce the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

      This may be caused by:

      * surgery to remove your ovaries;
      * chemotherapy;
      * radiation treatment; or
      * ovarian malfunction.

      Women going through induced menopause may have more severe menopausal symptoms, and are usually treated with hormone therapy.
      How should I prepare for menopause?

      Menopause is one of women’s many important natural life-stages. For some, it is a challenging period of difficult physical and emotional changes. For others, it is a time of personal growth and renewal. And for many women, it is both at the same time. They don't call it "Menopausal Zest" for nothing!

      Here are some suggestions to help you enjoy your menopausal years to their fullest:

      * Learn about menopause through recent books, articles and other reading materials.
      * Talk to friends and relatives who have already gone through menopause.
      * Join a menopause or midlife support-group in your area.
      * Have a nutritious diet and enjoy regular exercise.
      * Manage your stress by balancing your work and social life.
      * Talk with your health care practitioner about your personal health concerns.
      * Know that you have choices and can take charge of your health.
      http://www.cwhn.ca/resources/faq/menopause.html

      Frequently Asked Questions About Menopause

      Print out these questions and answers to discuss with your doctor.

      1. Can Menopause Cause a Woman's Voice to Change?

      The majority of women do not experience a voice change during menopause. Rarely, some women may lose the upper register of voice.

      2. What Can I Do About the Facial Hair I've Developed as a Result of Menopause?

      Although many women do not experience any additional facial hair growth, it can be a problem for some. There are a number of hair removal options available to you, including waxing, depilatories (liquids or creams that remove body hair) and laser hair removal. Check with your doctor or a medical aesthetician to determine the right hair removal method for you and to ensure that it will not harm your skin.

      3. Now That I've Begun Menopause, Do I Still Have to be Concerned About Birth Control?

      You will know for sure that you have experienced menopause when you have not had your period for an entire year. Until you have gone one year without a period, you should still use birth control if you do not want to become pregnant. You should continue to practice safe sex techniques with use of latex condoms to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection.

      4. My Hot Flashes Aren't As Intense As the Ones My Friends Describe. They're Actually More "Warm" Than "Hot." Is This Normal?

      While hot flashes (or flushes) are very common in perimenopause, not all women experience them, and not all flashes are of the same intensity. Hot flashes can be as mild as a light blush or severe enough to wake you from a sound sleep (called night sweats). Most hot flashes last 30 seconds to 5 minutes. They usually disappear within a few years after menopause. However, up to 10-15% of women experience hot flashes for years.

      5. I'm Perimenopausal And Have Been Told That I Should be Taking Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills. Why?

      Compared to regular birth control pills, the lower dose of estrogen in very-low-dose pills may be safer for perimenopausal women. (Perimenopause begins about 3 to 5 years before your final period.) While regular birth control pills contain 30 to 50 micrograms of estrogen, these low dose pills contain only 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol.

      6. What Are Some Other Benefits of Very-Low-Dose Birth Control Pills?

      In addition to preventing pregnancy, the pills can regulate heavy or irregular menstrual periods and may provide protection from ovarian and uterine cancer. The pills may also prevent bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis . However, women with a history of breast cancer, blood clots, or heart disease, or women who smoke, should not take these pills.

      7. How are hot flashes treated?

      While menopausal hormone therapy (HRT) relieves hot flashes for many women, there are other drug treatments that may offer relief. These include both over-the-counter and prescription therapies. Over-the-counter therapies you may want to try include Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E, Ibuprofen and soy protein found in foods.

      Prescription treatments include:

      * Bellergal-S, a combination medicine used to treat some symptoms of menopause. However, based on side effects and the butalbital-an additive substance in Belergal-S-it is not recommended by the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) www.menopause.org .
      * Catapres, Catapres-TTS and Aldomet blood pressure medications. However, based on the side effects, these drugs are not recommended unless a woman has hypertension.
      * Antidepressants Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor (Note: Paxil has been shown to reduce tamoxifen levels)
      * Other hormones, such as Provera and Megace

      8. Is Menopausal HT Safe?

      As with all medicines, there are risks and benefits. Scientists continue to study the long-term effects of HT. The most recent study found that Prempro, a type of menopausal HT, increased a woman's risk of blood clot and stroke, and slightly increased the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Estrogen alone has not been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you are concerned about taking menopausal HT, talk to your doctor; there are other options.

      9. What Alternative Treatments Are Available?

      Botanical products containing or acting like estrogens may provide some of the benefits of estrogen in relieving menopausal symptoms, but are not as well studied. Other botanicals, including black cohosh, have also shown promise for reducing menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to define the benefits and risks of these alternative treatments, and you should always check with your doctor before using them.

      10. Sex Has Become Painful. What Can I Do to Make It More Enjoyable?

      The pain you are experiencing during sex is likely due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels. There are a number of lubricants you can try. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are local estrogen treatments-cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring-for women desiring treatment of vaginal atrophy.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=42719

  29. QUESTION:
    What causes women to be infertile or have fertility problems?
    What makes a lot of women not able to conceive? What are the main reasons for infertility? I'm just curious, I just had a daughter last week who I got pregnant with really fast, but my twin sister is having a hard time having a baby.

    • ANSWER:
      I am dealing with same problem and I think main reasons are No Ovulation,short leuteal phase,Blocked tubes or hormonal problem might make a woman infertile.

      Causes of female infertility

      The most common causes of female infertility include fallopian tube damage or blockage, endometriosis, ovulation disorders, elevated prolactin, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), early menopause, benign uterine fibroids and pelvic adhesions.

      ■Fallopian tube damage or blockage. Fallopian tube damage usually results from inflammation of the fallopian tube (salpingitis). Chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, is the most frequent cause. Tubal inflammation may go unnoticed or cause pain and fever. Tubal damage is the major risk factor of a pregnancy in which the fertilized egg is unable to make its way through the fallopian tube to implant in the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). One episode of tubal infection may cause fertility difficulties. The risk of ectopic pregnancy increases with each occurrence of tubal infection.
      ■Endometriosis. Endometriosis occurs when the uterine tissue implants and grows outside of the uterus — often affecting the function of the ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes. These implants respond to the hormonal cycle and grow, shed and bleed in sync with the lining of the uterus each month, which can lead to scarring and inflammation. Pelvic pain and infertility are common in women with endometriosis.
      ■Ovulation disorders. Some cases of female infertility are caused by ovulation disorders. Disruption in the part of the brain that regulates ovulation can cause low levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Even slight irregularities in the hormone system can affect ovulation. Specific causes of hypothalamic-pituitary disorders include injury, tumors, excessive exercise and starvation.
      ■Elevated prolactin (hyperprolactinemia). The hormone prolactin stimulates breast milk production. High levels in women who aren't pregnant or nursing may affect ovulation. An elevation in prolactin levels may also indicate the presence of a pituitary tumor. In addition, some drugs can elevate levels of prolactin. Milk flow not related to pregnancy or nursing can be a sign of high prolactin.
      ■Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In PCOS, your body produces too much androgen hormone, which affects ovulation. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and obesity.
      ■Early menopause (premature ovarian failure). Early menopause is the absence of menstruation and the early depletion of ovarian follicles before age 35. Although the cause is often unknown, certain conditions are associated with early menopause, including immune system diseases, radiation or chemotherapy treatment, and smoking.
      ■Benign uterine fibroids. Fibroids are benign tumors in the wall of the uterus and are common in women in their 30s. Occasionally they may cause infertility by blocking the fallopian tubes.
      ■Pelvic adhesions. Pelvic adhesions are bands of scar tissue that bind organs after pelvic infection, appendicitis, or abdominal or pelvic surgery. This scar tissue formation may impair fertility.
      Other causes. A number of other causes can lead to infertility in women:

      ■Medications. Temporary infertility may occur with the use of certain medications. In most cases, fertility is restored when the medication is stopped.
      ■Thyroid problems. Disorders of the thyroid gland, either too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism), can interrupt the menstrual cycle and cause infertility.
      ■Cancer and its treatment. Certain cancers — particularly female reproductive cancers — often severely impair female fertility. Both radiation and chemotherapy may affect a woman's ability to reproduce. Chemotherapy may impair reproductive function and fertility in men and women.
      ■Other medical conditions. Medical conditions associated with delayed puberty or amenorrhea, such as Cushing's disease, sickle cell disease, HIV/AIDS, kidney disease and diabetes, can affect a woman's fertility.
      ■Caffeine intake. Excessive caffeine consumption reduces fertility in the female.

  30. QUESTION:
    What symptoms would lead to fragile x testing?
    I just recently started reading information on Fragile X. Does anyone know what type of symptoms would lead to genetic testing?
    Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few excellent resources on the web I would suggest you visit. Fragile X, like autism, is a spectrum disorder, it could result in no symptoms, mild learning disability to severe learning disability.

      There MAY be a family history of autism or learning disabilities or there MAY NOT be a history, fragile X could silently lurk for generations before being diagnosed.

      According to the American College of Medical Genetics Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis of Fragile X all children with developmental delays, autism or cognitive impairment of an unknown origin should be tested for fragile X.

      Individuals with premature ovarian failure, early menopause, should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXPOI.

      Individuals who develop parkinson like symptoms, balance/gait problems, over the age of 50 should be tested for fragile X, they may have FXTAS.

  31. QUESTION:
    Can menopause start happening at the age of 36?

    • ANSWER:
      When menopause occurs prematurely, it isn't referred to as menopause. It is POF - premature ovarian failure.

      Please see your gynecologist for a workup to be sure you don't have an underlying health issue. For more info:
      http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/premature_menopause.jsp

  32. QUESTION:
    I want to start using a tanning bed this year?
    What do you do to prep your skin and what do you do after to keep the nicest looking tan?

    I assume you would want to bathe and exfoliate before.. then go straight to the salon and use tanning lotion?

    And should I go home a shower directly after?

    And does regular body lotion make my tan fade faster?

    • ANSWER:
      If I were you I wouldn't go tanning. It causes cancer. Skin cancer kills more women than breast cancer. Not only that, but it causes premature aging. Yea everyone looks great with a tan, but you will not reep the benefits once you hit menopause. Once women hit menopause, all your pigmentation problems from the sun and tanning and other radicals will start to show on the skin. Hyperpigmentation (dark spots) and hypopigmentation (white spots) are a few of the problems.

      I would seriously think twice about that if I were you -this is what leads to aging rapidly. If you want to tan, do a spray tan. Natural looking and better.

  33. QUESTION:
    Why do us females run out of eggs at middle age?
    Why do we run out of eggs when we are middle aged? Also is it possible to run out of eggs earlier than middle age? And if so what are the chances?

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Women do not "run out" of eggs. Even after menopause, most women still have thousands of left-over eggs.

      Some women do go through premature menopause, usually do to ovarian failure.

  34. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been diagnosed with ovarian failure?
    I am 40 years old and got diagnosed with premature ovarian failure. My FSH test came back at 79.4, which is totally out of range and my prolactin at 13 which in within normal rage.
    Ever since i stopped taking birth control pills, i have not gotten my period. Does this mean i have menopause and my ovaries have stopped completely ? has anyone taken any meds to lower their FSH?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through POF at the age of 21. There is no meds for lowering your FSH. I've been on birth control because the doctor told me I'm still young and need the estrogen. I'm 37 now. I'm sorry for the bad news. I know exactly how you feel.

      I do have 2 children through donor egg and invitro fertilization. Good Luck and God Bless!

  35. QUESTION:
    What health complications can develop as a result of having Turner syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      This is what I found...

      What are the primary characteristics of Turner syndrome?
      Short stature

      The most common feature of Turner syndrome is short stature. The average height of an adult TS woman who has received human growth hormone treatment is 4’8”. Individuals tend to be a little shorter at birth, averaging 18.5” compared to an average of 20” for all girls. Growth failure continues after birth, and most girls with TS fall below the normal female growth curve for height during early childhood. TS girls who are not treated with hormone replacement usually do not have a pubertal growth spurt; many will continue to grow at a slow rate until they are in their twenties. Many girls who undergo growth hormone treatment have been able to achieve adult height within the lower range of normal.

      Premature ovarian failure

      Most (90%) TS individuals will experience early ovarian failure. The ovaries produce eggs and hormones necessary for the development of secondary sexual characteristics. Estrogen replacement therapy is necessary for breast development, feminine body contours, menstruation and proper bone development. About a third of TS individuals will show some signs of breast development without estrogen treatment; however, many will not complete puberty, and those that do often have premature ovarian failure. Therefore, the majority of individuals will require estrogen from puberty until the normal age of menopause. Fertility without assisted reproduction therapy is rare (less than 1%).

      Physical features

      Many characteristic features are associated with Turner syndrome. Their presence and severity vary greatly from individual to individual.

      Narrow, high-arched palate (roof of the mouth)
      Retrognathia (receding lower jaw)
      Low-set ears
      Low hairline
      Webbed neck
      Slight droop to eyes
      Strabismus (lazy eye)
      Broad chest
      Cubitus valgus (arms that turn out slightly at the elbows)
      Scoliosis (curvature of the spine)
      Flat feet
      Small, narrow fingernails and toenails that turn up
      Short fourth metacarpals (the ends of these bones form the knuckles)
      Edema of hands and feet, especially at birth
      Intelligence - TS individuals are on average of normal overall intelligence with the same variance as the general population. They do, however, often have difficulty with spatial-temporal processing (imagining objects in relation to each other), nonverbal memory and attention. This may cause problems with math, sense of direction, manual dexterity and social skills. New and better ways to compensate for these problems, which fall under the general category of nonverbal learning disabilities, are being researched.
      What are the associated risks with Turner Syndrome?
      Several medical problems occur more frequently in individuals with Turner syndrome than in the general population. It is important that TS individuals are screened regularly to see if any of these problems exist. Most of these conditions can be managed successfully with good medical care.

      Heart

      Some form of cardiac abnormality occurs in approximately one-third of TS patients. Problems are primarily left-sided and may include coarctation (narrowing) of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve (a valve with two leaflets instead of the usual three). TS individuals are also at higher risk for hypertensionor high blood pressure. TS patients should receive an echocardiogram or MRI to evaluate the heart at the time of diagnosis regardless of age and have their heart re-evaluated periodically for aortic root enlargement. All individuals with TS should be aware of the symptoms of dissection of the aorta, an uncommon but life-threatening complication. These include sudden, severe, sharp, stabbing, tearing, or ripping chest pain, intense anxiety, rapid pulse, profuse sweating, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, fainting or shortness of breath.

      Kidney

      Thirty percent of TS individuals will have kidney abnormalities. Many of the abnormalities do not cause any medical problems; however, some may result in urinary tract infections and an increased risk of hypertension. It is recommended that TS individuals receive a renal ultrasound examination at the time of diagnosis.

      Thyroid

      Hypothyroidism (low level of thyroid hormone) caused by autoimmune thyroiditis (inflammation of thyroid gland) occurs frequently in individuals with TS. It can be diagnosed with a blood test and is easily treated with thyroid hormone.

      Ears

      Otitis media (ear infection) is extremely common in TS girls particularly in infancy and early childhood. Aggressive treatment of infections is appropriate. The majority (50-90%) of TS women will also develop early sensorineural (nerve) hearing loss and may require hearing aids earlier than the general population.

  36. QUESTION:
    has anyone gone through premature menopause or early menopause?
    My question is has anyone gone through premature natural menopause before the age of 40. Or early menopause, early 40's? I'm really afraid because I'm 39 and since the age of 33 I've on and off had hot flashes, light periods and then sometimes heavier. If you did go through this did this age you a lot? I'm really worried because I've read this produces less collagen in the skin and thins your hair. Especially when you go through menopause prematurely or early. If anyone has gone through menopause in this way, do you feel it has aged you a lot? And what do you do when you reach menopause that's healthy. Do you take anything or just do nothing?
    Please tell me your age or the age of someone you know that has gone through it young. Do they look really old?

    • ANSWER:
      My mom went through early menopause and she looks great for her age. It was rough for her at the time, but she made it through and you will too, but it didn't age her any more than normal.

  37. QUESTION:
    what is the reason for the women having bleeding at the age of 56years, after menopause ,?
    My wife is having slight bleeding at the age of 56 years , but after menopause she don't having any bleeding for more than 10 years, is it possible and normal, or any other reason ?

    • ANSWER:
      Bleeding After Menopause

      Menopause is the transition phase in the life of a woman in which her ovaries stop producing eggs, body produces less progesterone, and estrogen, menstrual cycle becomes less frequent, and her period stopping altogether. Early Menopause symptoms also known as Premature menopause symptoms, may include irregular menstrual cycles, hot flashes, irritability, night sweats, and sleep deprivation. There are treatments for Menopause which includes hormone replace therapy, and herbal remedies. Herbal remedies may include natural supplements and foods made from soy.

      If you have bleeding after menopause, make sure to call your Doctor!
      A woman will be fully menopausal if she has gone at least 1 year or 365 days without having her period. If bleeding continues after being fully menopausal, it may be only confined to spotting, this is also known as post menopausal bleeding. It is not considered unusual for this to happen. There are situations when post menopausal bleeding maybe a sign of a more serious condition.
      Spotting may occur if you are undergoing therapy for hormone replacement HRT but it can also occur if you aren’t. Generally, spotting occurs due to the hormonal balances persisting after menopause. Breast tenderness in addition to spotting can be a sign that you’re experiencing an actual menstrual period. If this occurs, you will need to wait 1 full year from your last menstrual cycle to be fully menopausal.

      Estrogen levels need to remain stable or it can cause spotting. Having low estrogen levels can cause irregular spotting and high estrogen levels may cause a heavy menstrual cycle. Progesterone levels may also rise because the endometrial lining is atrophying.

      There are women who may develop Type II diabetes after experiencing menopause. Women who are insulin resistant have higher estrogen levels than women who aren’t diabetic. A woman who is insulin resistant can experience progesterone converting into estrogen, which can result in post menopausal bleeding that is unusual.

      Rapid weight loss can cause you to spot or bleed after experiencing menopause. Estrogen is stored in fat tissue in a woman’s body so when rapid weight loss occurs, the estrogen goes into her bloodstream, her hormones are disrupted, and she may spot or bleed.

      Although it maybe a benign condition, post menopausal bleeding should not be ignored. Make sure to bring this to your Physician’s attention due to the fact that it maybe a serious health issue. Post menopause bleeding may originate from the vagina which may have dried up and atrophied from lack of estrogen. May also come from lesions and cracks on the vulva, and can also occur from intercourse. Upper reproductive system bleeding can come from endometrial cancer, hormone replacement, cervical cancer or lesions, endometrial polyps, ovarian cancer, uterine tumors or from tumors that secret estrogen. Most common reason for post menopause bleeding is hormone replacement therapy also known as HRT.
      There are good remedies in Homeopathy too.

  38. QUESTION:
    Why have i not gotten my period in 4 months?
    I havent gotten my period in about 4 months, i have taken and pregnancy test and it comes up negative. Does anyone know what could be going wrong?
    my biggest problem is i have no health insurance. I also have not started any new excersice routines, or dieting. I have actually gained some weight.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amennorhea definition: You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row. You need to see a dr.

      Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      Pregnancy. Your tests may have been incorrect.

      Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera or Implanon, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.

      Breast-feeding.

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy, uterine bleeding; acne; and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but on rare occasions, it requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), cesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.
      Primary ovarian insufficiency. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. In some women, the ovarian supply of eggs diminishes before age 40, a condition known as primary ovarian insufficiency. The lack of ovarian function associated with this condition decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also referred to as premature menopause, may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      Go see your dr. to be sure.

  39. QUESTION:
    How to keep our heart healthy from diseases ?
    Suggest some vegetables, fruits which are good for heart. Also other ways

    • ANSWER:
      Myocardial infarction results from atherosclerosis. Risk factors for myocardial infarction include:
      * Age.
      * Gender: At any given age men are more at risk than women, particularly before the menopause, but because in general women live longer than men ischemic heart disease causes slightly more total deaths in women.
      * Diabetes mellitus type 1 or Diabetes mellitus type 2
      * High blood pressure.
      * Dyslipidemia/hypercholesterolemia (abnormal levels of lipoproteins in the blood), particularly high low-density lipoprotein, low high-density lipoprotein and high triglycerides.
      * Tobacco smoking, including secondhand smoke.
      * Short term exposure to air pollution including: carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide but not ozone.
      * Family history of ischaemic heart disease or myocardial infarction particularly if one has a first-degree relative (father, brother, mother, sister) who suffered a 'premature' myocardial infarction (defined as occurring at or younger than age 55 years (men) or 65 (women).
      * Obesity (defined by a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m², or alternatively by waist circumference or waist-hip ratio).
      * Lack of physical activity.
      * Psychosocial factors including, low socio-economic status, social isolation, negative emotions and stress increase the risk of myocardial infarction and are associated with worse outcomes after myocardial infarction. Socioeconomic factors such as a shorter education and lower income (particularly in women), and unmarried cohabitation are also correlated with a higher risk of MI.
      * Alcohol — Studies show that prolonged exposure to high quantities of alcohol can increase the risk of heart attack.
      * Oral contraceptive pill - women who use combined oral contraceptive pills have a modestly increased risk of myocardial infarction, especially in the presence of other risk factors, such as smoking.[39]
      * Hyperhomocysteinemia (high homocysteine)in homocysteinuria is associated with premature atherosclerosis, whether elevated homocysteine in the normal range is causal is contentious.

  40. QUESTION:
    I am just wondering if I have reached the menopause. My periods stopped completely when I was 40.?
    Apart from my periods stopping completely. I have had no further symptoms, like hot flushes etc. I am now 47. I thought it was normal to reach the menopause in your 50's. Am I too young, if so, will I be vunerable to any health problems later.

    Thank you so much.

    • ANSWER:
      My periods started to go wonky at the age of 39 and stopped completely when I was 42. Now, 18 months later, I have had the necessary hormone tests which confirmed that I have gone through the menopause. Like you I have had no symptoms other than cessation of periods. If indeed you have gone through the menopause, it will be classed as a premature menopause. You should talk with your doctor about possible treatments to prevent osteoporosis. There is HRT, which you would have to take for life, or if you prefer, as I do, you can get strong calcium supplements on prescription, together with alendronic acid, which helps to prevent bone loss. The alendronic acid is taken once weekly, and the calcium twice daily. Hope this helps.

  41. QUESTION:
    Why am I get my period 2 or 3 times a month?
    All times very light and they don't really seem like a period.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amenorrhea is much more common than primary amenorrhea. Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      * Pregnancy. In women of reproductive age, pregnancy is the most common cause of amenorrhea. When a fertilized egg is implanted in the lining of your uterus, the lining remains to nourish the fetus and isn't shed as menstruation.
      * Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.
      * Breast-feeding. Mothers who breast-feed often experience amenorrhea. Although ovulation may occur, menstruation may not. Pregnancy can result despite the lack of menstruation.
      * Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.
      * Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      * Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.
      * Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.
      * Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.
      * Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.
      * Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.
      * Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.
      * Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean sections, etc.
      * Premature menopause. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      When to seek medical advice

      Consult your doctor if:

      * You've never had a menstrual period, and you're age 16 or older
      * You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row

  42. QUESTION:
    Why does menstrual cycle has stopped all of a sudden?
    This question is regarding my wife, her menstrual cycle has stopped from last 3 months and she is 20 years old. We checked for the pregnancy using self test kit and it appears negative. i am going to take her to the doctor tomorrow in the morning, i just thought of posting this question to get and idea of what sort of things could cause these type of changes other than pregnancy?. or is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of reasons it could happen and the doctor will be able to determine the cause. Some are:

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs, and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      # Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating condition seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.

      Premature menopause. Menopause occurs at an average age of 51. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found..

  43. QUESTION:
    What could make me unable to conceive when I'm older?
    When I'm older I want to have kids but I've been wondering what things might make me unable to conceive. Like I know abortions can make you unable to conceive and that but is there anything else? Like skipping your period too much if you're on birth control as a teenager. Anything like that or at all?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of things that could make you unable to conceive.

      Some of them, like polycystic ovarian syndrome, premature menopause, hormonal or genetic problems, etc, you can't do anything about.

      As far as abortions go, they can cause infertility if something goes wrong. Uncomplicated abortions do not cause infertility. Also, IUDs can cause infertility if something goes wrong, but again, only if something goes wrong. If you use an IUD uneventfully, then your chances of conceiving are not reduced.

      And obviously, getting your tubes tied will cause infertility, but you wouldn't be considering that.

      Otherwise, the only other thing is STDs or bacterial vaginosis. If an STD or bacterial vaginosis is left untreated, the infection can spread deep into your reproductive organs, causing pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease can cause severe scarring of your reproductive organs, which can make it difficult or impossible to get and stay pregnant.

      Skipping your period while on the pill is safe and will not cause infertility. However, if you are using the pill to skip periods, you should be taking a low dose monophasic pill like Alesse. Low dose in order to reduce your risk of developing a blood clot and monophasic to reduce your risk of side effects. You will probably also have breakthrough bleeding, no matter what birth control pill you take, if you continually skip the period week.

      If you want to have children, the main thing you have to remember is not to wait too long. A lot of women spend time focusing on careers, thinking that they have until menopause (around age 50) to conceive. That isn't really the case. Despite the proliferation of women having children in their forties, many women will start having trouble conceiving naturally around age 35. Many women having children at ages older than that are using in vitro fertilization, which costs a fortune and doesn't always work. And pregnancy is riskier to the mother after age 35.

  44. QUESTION:
    What's the youngest age for an early premenopausal or early perimenopausal woman? Can stress cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      I go with the previous answer that it is premature before 35, although most people will say 40.

      Stress can foul up your hormones or your cycles big time. So if you are missing periods and you think you are too young for menopause, it could be stress affecting your cycle, and it might come back when the stress goes away.

      One thing that is known to cause early menopause is smoking.

      If you are wondering if it is menopause or stress, you can get your hormones checked.

  45. QUESTION:
    I had a sudden Hot flash, sweating, dizzy and shaking, What is it?
    I was at Wal-Mart yesterday and I suddenly felt very hot from the inside out, I started sweating, felt dizzy & shaking. I felt like I was gonna pass out, my heart was racing. It lasted for about 15 to 20 minutes, but it scared me. I've never felt like that before. I don't believe I'm diabetic, but I do have Endometriosis & Premature heart contractions. What is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be a few things, like menopause, anxiety, thyroid disorder, allergic reaction or even a pheochromocytoma.

      All depends on age, sex, other symptoms etc etc.

      Best to visit the doctor if it happens again and try to note if there was anything that triggered it.

      Best wishes.

  46. QUESTION:
    What is the average age for women to start menopause?

    • ANSWER:
      In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 52, although women can experience the menopause in their 30s or 40s. In other countries, it is still around 50 years of age on average.
      If a woman experiences the menopause when she is under 45 years of age, it is known as a premature menopause. 

  47. QUESTION:
    what r the symptoms of menopause and how young can you be to start.?
    i am having irregular monthly periods and when they finally come, they come with a very heavy flow. I get it for 7 days and it will come back after week, but the flow is less. During this period i have a bad temper which i cant control, i also suffer from panic attacks.

    • ANSWER:
      bad temper is "normal PMT"

      some irregularity with heavier flows is quite common in your late 30's for some reason then they go normal again, menopause usually starts around 40 - 45 and takes 5 to 10 years before it all completely stops....it should be irregularity, not heavy, until after a while there is nothing. A few women get premature menopausae as young as 25 but it is rare.

      heavy for 7 days and more after a week is not right and not menopause, whatever your age. go see a doctor or a women's health clinic, as it could be thyroid problem or growths in the womb(benign ones)

  48. QUESTION:
    How do I stop my period forever?
    I'm gay, so, you know, I can't produce a baby regardless of how many times I have sex with my partner. Nor, do I have any desire to have kids, even with a sperm donor. NO DESIRE.

    So, how can I stop my period forever?

    If I get my ovaries removed or a hysterectomy or something, would I still produce the necessary hormones I need?

    I'm 18.

    • ANSWER:
      If you get your ovaries removed, you won't produce any hormones and you'll go into surgical menopause and stop having periods. You'll shorten your lifespan by about 10 years by doing so, and seriously negatively impact your health, risking certain osteoporosis, early dementia, perhaps frequent migraine headaches, complete loss of sex drive or ability to orgasm, premature aging, dry skin, hair, and eyes, depression related to neurotransmitter deficiencies, and many more problems, since the ovarian hormones perform over 200 functions in the body. So no, that wouldn't be a good idea.

      If you had a hysterectomy, you might see your ovaries fail shortly thereafter, putting you risk of all the problems I named above. But even if you didn't have that problem, you'd risk sexual dysfunction, vaginal dryness, incontinence, and abdominal weakness. You'd stop having your monthly bleeding but your ovaries would continue to produce a monthly cycle of hormones that would affect other things. So that's not good, either.

      If you want to stop your period, then I suggest you go on continuous birth control pills (Lybrel), or try the Mirena IUD.

  49. QUESTION:
    how do i find someone to buy me cigarettes?
    Im not actually old enough to smoke but i do. The person who ust to suppy for me moved so now idk who to ask. How do i find a way to get some?

    • ANSWER:
      Wake up kid, take control of your health. You may feel like you're invincible because you're young, but I'm here to tell you that you're not. It WILL catch up to you, and you have to be a moron to smoke cigarettes.

      Here's just a few of the problems they cause:

      Hair:

      Smell and staining

      Brain and Mental Effects:

      Stroke
      Addiction/nicotine withdrawal
      Altered brain chemistry
      Anxiety about harm caused by smoking

      Eyes:

      Eyes that sting, water and blink more
      Macular degeneration
      Cataracts

      Nose:

      Less sense of smell

      Thyroid

      Graves Disease
      Thyroid Disease

      Skin:

      Wrinkles
      Premature aging

      Teeth:

      Discoloration and stains
      Plaque
      Loose teeth
      Gum disease (gingivitis)

      Mouth and Throat:

      Cancers of the lips, mouth, throat and larynx
      Cancer of the esophagus
      Sore throat
      Reduced sense of taste
      Breath smells of smoke

      Hands:

      Poor circulation(cold fingers)
      Peripheral vascular disease
      Tar stained fingers

      Respiration and Lungs:

      Lung Cancer
      COPD (includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema)
      Cough and sputum
      Shortness of breath
      Colds and flu
      Pneumonia
      Asthma
      Complicates Tuberculosis

      Heart:

      Harms, blocks and weakens arteries of the heart
      Heart attack

      Liver:

      Cancer

      Abdomen:

      Stomach and duodenal ulcers
      Cancer of stomach, pancreas and colon
      Aortic aneurysm

      Kidneys and bladder:

      Kidney cancer
      Bladder cancer

      Bones:

      Osteoporosis
      Spine and hip fractures

      Spine:

      Degenerative Disc Disease

      Male reproduction:

      Sperm: deformity, loss of motility, reduced number
      Infertility
      Impotence

      Female reproduction:

      Period pains
      Earlier menopause
      Cancer of cervix
      Infertility and delay in conception

      Blood:

      Leukemia

      Legs and Feet:

      Gangrene
      Peripheral vascular disease
      Beurger Disease

      Immune System:

      Weakened immune system

  50. QUESTION:
    Anyone have or know about POF? (premature menopause) Also, Addison's disease?
    I'm experiencing premature menopause and i'm in my early 20's. I would like to know more about it or hear people's experiences. From the hormonal imbalance i also have Addison's disease and i'd like to hear about that too if possible.

    • ANSWER:
      What are Early and Premature Menopause? Early onset menopause is often confused with premature menopause, but actually the two are different things. These terms hinge on the age of the woman involved; if menopause occurs before the age of 45, it is considered early menopause; if menopause occurs before the age of 40 it is considered premature menopause.

      What Causes Early and Premature Menopause
      More often than not, doctors are unable to determine a cause for menopause in younger women. This can be very frustrating for women as it makes it difficult to accept and deal with this new stage of life. Sometimes though, there are very obvious causes of premature or early menopause.

      Premature Ovarian Failure (POV): Premature ovarian failure is another name for naturally-occurring premature menopause. Women with POV have ovaries that arent functioning properly. Either they stop producing eggs or no longer produce the hormones needed to ovulate. POV can occur for a variety of reasons. Autoimmune disorders are responsible for more than 65% of POV cases. With these disorders, the body sees itself as an invader and develops antibodies to its own products, including ovum and menses. Genetic factors may also be involved in POV. Five per cent of women seem to follow in their mothers footsteps, entering into menopause early. Some women are born with irregularities in their X chromosomes, interfering with egg production before menopause should begin. Other women are just born with very few eggs, causing menopause to occur years before it should.

      Infection
      Infection is also linked with premature menopause. Infections such as the mumps and tuberculosis can infect the ovaries, affecting your hormonal balance. This is extremely rare, however.

      Early Menopause Symptoms
      Premature menopause symptoms are essentially the same as those of natural menopause. Women commonly suffer from night sweats, hot flashes, insomnia, headaches, and joint or muscle pain. Body shape changes are also common, causing you to put on weight around the abdomen. Additionally, water retention and menopause commonly go together.

      Menopausal women can experience emotional ups and downs, including anxiety, depression, cravings, and forgetfulness. All of these symptoms are triggered by the fluctuation of hormones in the body during menopause. In particular, estrogen levels reduce dramatically during the onset of menopause, causing a variety of changes in the bodys functions.

      Early and premature menopause tends to be associated with more severe symptoms than menopause occurring after the age of 45. Because early menopause is often due to illness, surgery, or genetic issues, there is a rapid decline in the amount of estrogen in your body. This causes you to enter menopause more quickly than other women. Estrogen crash can cause extreme hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, and depression in some women. In a survey of early menopausal women, 100% of women who experienced surgical menopause experienced a number of menopause symptoms in quick succession. 90% of these women complained that their symptoms were severe and lasted more than 8 years.

      Treatment Options
      Unfortunately, there are no menopause cures. Menopause treatment has progressed by leaps and bounds over the years, though. It is suggested that most women who have undergone early or premature menopause seek out hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Menopause symptoms will be very sudden and severe, especially after surgery, and can be lessoned by taking appropriate doses of estrogen. If oral medication is too difficult to take directly after surgery, estrogen patches that release hormones through the skin can be used to help lessen symptoms.

      A good support network is also recommended to help you through the difficult times. You may be unprepared for such an immediate entry into menopause and friends, family, and other menopausal women can really help you see the light at the end of the tunnel. Living life after menopause isnt so bad in fact, it can be a very rewarding time when you have the right support.

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premature menopause age