Menopause Facial Hair

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do I approach my wife about her facial hair brought on by early menopause?
    Although I wouldn't consider myself to be a shallow person, my wife's increasingly evident facial hair problem is driving me to distraction

    • ANSWER:
      She is your wife. You should be able to talk about anything

  2. QUESTION:
    Can hair loss treatment such as Rogaine be used to help facial hair growth?
    I am a 22 year old man and my facial hair is still fine and patchy. I only have to shave about once or twice a week. Could rubbing a hair loss treatment for baldness onto the face every day cause my facial grow to grow out thicker and faster? If so, how long until the effect is noticeable? Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Like menopause, the story of unwanted facial hair is often all about estrogen, or to be more precise, the relationship between levels of estrogen and testosterone. Since rogaine will take over on the hormonal imbalance that it happening on your body it will likely cause some unwanted hair to grow. But typically, any rubbing treatment that was originally made for scalp care won't be effective if it will be use on some facial purposes.

  3. QUESTION:
    What does knuckle and chin hair on a woman mean?
    I read somewhere about stress and facial hair on women. If a woman is between the ages 20-35 and suffers from or is subjected to chronic stress and then suddenly starts growing hair on their knuckles and chin region. Is this change due to changes in the woman's hormone levels and regulation of cortisone levels as a result of stress? What if the woman also suffers from conditions like very dry skin which improves slightly when she is on her menses and weight gain?

    What do these symptoms indicate about what's occurring to the woman's health internally?Is she likely to go into menopause sooner than the age for it?

    • ANSWER:
      depends

  4. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of acne and facial hair on women?
    Hi, I am 32 years old and still fighting symptoms of black corse facial hair on my chin and throat and upper lip. I also get acne however it's not as bad as it used to be. I had the clearest skin, everyone used to comment on my complexion and when I turned 26 I broke out in server cyst like acne, it was terrible.. I seen doctors, specialist, naturopaths, more doctors, beauty therapist ect ect... Than the hair started... It grew thicker and thicker. I was told I had a hormonal imbalance so was sent to do tests and the results came back normal, I did more hormone tests resulting normal.. Ultrasounds to determine polycyclic ovaries, but that also was good. The only thing they found was a small fibroid on my uterus wall, which wouldn't have a bad effect... Apparently.. I've tried different contraceptive pills, medication, anacor, retin-a, benzoyle peroxide and heaps more, I've tried all types of skin care, pro active, thalgo, cosmedix, doctor skin care prescriptions, micro microdermabrasion, Aesop, dermalogica. I've taken health food supplements.. Naturopath to detox me from the inside out.. Last year I seen a hormone specialist who did test after test and said everything was normal, she couldn't figure it out... Her exact words were, you seem to be getting menopause symptoms but everything's normal.. Even she was clueless... It got to the point where it was effecting my life, I wouldn't leave the house. I literally have days where I would want to get a knife and skin my face. Hair growths is also a problem and not sure what to do... I'm not overweight, nothing adds up
    I've bought a no no hair remover.... I've used it religiously for 12 months but hasn't done a great deal. I have had laser from a clinic which also has not helped but worked amazingly on my legs, it's not menopause and I'm also currently 8 month pregnant.. But symptoms still the same

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    How to remove unwanted facial hair with out shaving?
    I can't afford the waxing thing I don't like shaving it grows in thicker I have a rather large beard on my chin. I look like a breaded dragon lizard and the dr says it is due to menopause. if i shave it grows back the next morning if I pluck there is too many like 100's is wax the only answer?

    • ANSWER:
      You don't need to wax it, pluck it, shave it, or bleach it anymore. It will damage your skin & cause a lot of pain. There are lot more easy ways to remove your facial hair!
      Have you used "MySpring It" - Facial Hair Remover?
      It is a spring bar which removes your hair from its roots without damaging your skin in two easy steps!
      It is cheap, reusable, portable and natural.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is there any kind of birth control with loads and loads of estrogen?
    I think I'm lacking in estrogen, a lot. Or I have a hormonal imbalance. I have annoying facial hair that takes me hours to pluck, plus I have to shave daily. I wish my daily routine could be effortless. I never wear my hair up due to my gross sideburns. I am on birth control right now, but its not helping me any way (only preventing pregnancy, lol). Is there any kind of herb I can take that will make my hormonal levels be normal. I'm only 18 years old, so its not menopause..and my mother doesn't think this is a problem at all..so I can't go to the doctors. Should I talk to my gyno or my normal doctor? Ugh, I don't know what to do. I don't want to get expensive laser treatments because I'm scared they won't work. I just want to be less hairy. I shave everything and it takes forever!
    *I meant shave my BODY daily..I don't shave my face..yuck.
    Ok I looked up hirutism and I'm not THAT bad. Just light annoying hairs that piss me off..mainly my sideburn and chin areas. Sometimes I'll get a loooong black strand of hair growing out of my neck area. My boyfriend noticed it one day and was like 'Wtf?' It's embarrasing.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your Gyn. She can give you medication for the hair growth (Spironolactone).

  7. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have female pattern hair loss with new growth?
    I've started losing my hair (breakage) due to a bad perm. On the sides of my head and in top. At first I thought it was female pattern hair loss, but then I have lots of new growth. Can you have female pattern hair loss and new growth at the same time? Oh and by the way, I'm also thinking of trying aphogee hair products. If anyone has heard of it, let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      A hair grows from its follicle at an average rate of about 1/2 inch per month. Each hair grows for 2 to 6 years, then rests, and then falls out. A new hair soon begins growing in its place. At any time, about 85% of the hair is growing and 15% is resting.

      Baldness occurs when hair falls out but new hair does not grow in its place. The cause of the failure to grow new hair in female pattern baldness is not well understood, but it is associated with genetic predisposition, aging, and levels of endocrine hormones (particularly androgens, the male sex hormones).

      Changes in the levels of androgens can affect hair production. For example, after the hormonal changes of menopause, many women find that the hair on the head is thinned, while facial hair is coarser. Although new hair is not produced, follicles remain alive, suggesting the possibility of new hair growth.

      Female pattern baldness is usually different from that of male pattern baldness. The hair thins all over the head, but the frontal hairline is maintained. There may be a moderate loss of hair on the crown, but this rarely progresses to total or near baldness as it may in men.

      Hair loss can occur in women for reasons other than female pattern baldness, including the following:

      Temporary shedding of hair (telogen effluvium)
      Breaking of hair (from such things as styling treatments and twisting or pulling of hair)
      Patchy areas of total hair loss (alopecia areata -- an immune disorder causing temporary hair loss)
      Medications
      Certain skin diseases
      Hormonal abnormalities
      Iron deficiency
      Underactive thyroid
      Vitamin deficiency
      Symptoms Return to top

      Thinning of hair over the entire head
      Hair loss at the crown or hairline, mild to moderate
      Exams and Tests Return to top

      Female pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the appearance and pattern of hair loss and by ruling out other causes of hair loss.

      A skin biopsy or other procedures may be used to diagnose medical disorders that cause loss of hair.

      Analysis of the hair itself is not accurate for diagnosing nutritional or similar causes of hair loss, although it may reveal substances such as arsenic or lead.

      Treatment Return to top

      The hair loss of female pattern baldness is permanent. In most cases, it is mild to moderate. No treatment is required if the person is comfortable with her appearance.

      The only drug or medication approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat female pattern baldness is minoxidil, used on the scalp. For women, the 2% concentration is recommended. Minoxidil may help hair to grow in 20% to 25% of the female population, and in the majority it may slow or stop the loss of hair. Treatment is expensive, however, and hair loss starts again when minoxidil use is stopped.

      Hair transplants consist of removal of tiny plugs of hair from areas where the hair is continuing to grow and placing them in areas that are balding. This can cause minor scarring in the donor areas and carries a modest risk for skin infection. The procedure usually requires multiple transplantation sessions and may be expensive. Results, however, are often excellent and permanent.

      The use of hair implants made of artificial fibers was banned by the FDA because of the high rate of infection.

      Stitching (suturing) hair pieces to the scalp is not recommended. It can result in scars, infections, and abscess of the scalp.

      Hair weaving, hairpieces, or change of hairstyle may disguise hair loss and improve cosmetic appearance. This is often the least expensive and safest method of dealing with female pattern baldness.

      Outlook (Prognosis) Return to top

      Female pattern baldness is of cosmetic importance only and does not indicate a medical disorder, but it may affect self-esteem or cause anxiety. The hair loss is usually permanent.

      Possible Complications Return to top

      Complications are psychological stress and a loss of self-esteem due to change in appearance.

      When to Contact a Medical Professional Return to top

      Call your health care provider if hair loss occurs and persists, especially if there is itching, skin irritation, or other symptoms. There might be a treatable medical cause for the loss of hair.

      Prevention Return to top

      There is no known prevention for female pattern baldness.

  8. QUESTION:
    Will birth control help lower testosterone levels?
    I have a lot of facial hair: on chin, side burns, and even coming out my nose. I have to "cream" off this hair every week. I'm a bit tired of it. I'm pretty sure the cause of this is high testosterone levels. Is there something I can take to balance my hormones... maybe take an estrogen supplement or something? I'm only 20, so it won't be for menopause or something like that.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, BC will increase estrogen and probably decrease the hair growth. Ask/tell your doctor you want to go on the pill and mention the hair.

  9. QUESTION:
    Is it true that women with a short temper tend to have a lot of body and facial hair?
    I have quite a few, and have been told this. Now, I'm wondering whether it is true.

    And, do women develop more body hair during pregnancy and menapause?

    • ANSWER:
      Er, what? Temper and body hair? Surely not! Your character doesn't depend on genetical traits only, but on your experiences and upbringing.
      ...
      The thing with the hair in pregnancy and menopause...well, if they have more testosterone that they had usually, it can happen. That's because the oestrogene production is lowered and the amount of testosterone, which is its counterpart, has more weight, this can lead to more body hair growth and sexual appetite. (Isn't oestrogene, testosterone's counterpart, mean?

  10. QUESTION:
    Why did this girl have so much facial hair?
    I was at the laundry mat yesterday with my mom because our dryers broke and I saw a young woman, about 20.. who had really thick facial hair all over her cheeks and chin. She basically had a 5 o'clock shadow. I didn't stare but it was really disgusting. What causes that?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a few reasons for female
      Hirsutism
      The female anatomy runs a delicate balance of hormones. Androgens, male hormones that include testosterone, are found in both men and women. If there are too many androgens, women will begin to grow excessive coarse, dark facial hair. Other symptoms of hirsutism include decreased breast size, irregular menstruation, a deepening voice and other areas of male-pattern hair growth throughout the body.

      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
      Excessive facial hair on women might be caused by cysts on the ovaries. Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome also suffer from high levels of androgens and irregular menstruation. Other symptoms include acne, weight gain, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and infertility. Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome are usually treated through birth control pills, anti-androgen hormones and surgery.

      Cushing's syndrome, a condition caused by having too much cortisol in the bloodstream, also causes excessive facial hair. Cushing's syndrome may also be caused by a tumor in the body, which would be treated through surgery and radiation. This condition might also be a side effect of corticosteroid medications. Other symptoms of this condition are headaches, bruising, weight gain and fatigue.

      Obesity and Genetics
      Women who are overweight may also see an increase in facial hair. Fat traps androgens, creating a hormonal imbalance. Because weight gain and facial hair are a sign of other conditions and disorders, women should be thoroughly examined by a doctor to make certain that there are no other underlying medical issues. Along with other physical characteristics, ancestry and genetics plays a role in whether women have facial hair. If your grandmother and mother had to pluck their chins, chances are you will, too.

      Menopause and Perimenopause
      Menopausal and perimenopausal hormonal imbalances can also increase facial hair. Loss of estrogen and an increase in testosterone can also create hot flashes. Women in their late 30s to their mid-50s might also experience depression, irregular periods, mood swings and night sweats.

      Read more: What Causes Facial Hair on Women? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5052624_causes-facial-hair-women.html#ixzz1t3y6NHOO

  11. QUESTION:
    Will birth control help lower testosterone levels?
    I have a lot of facial hair: on chin, side burns, and even coming out my nose. I have to "cream" off this hair every week. I'm a bit tired of it. I'm pretty sure the cause of this is high testosterone levels. Is there something I can take to balance my hormones... maybe take an estrogen supplement or something? I'm only 20, so it won't be for menopause or something like that.

    • ANSWER:
      please be careful messing with hormones as I just heard about a medical report on how ladies who take extra estrogen have a higher risk for cancer, please be careful you are not to young to get cancer, its called HRT for ladies. and no extra estrogen will not lower testosterone, please see a medical Doctor concerning this issue

  12. QUESTION:
    Can I reduce the chance of hair loss like how women reduce the chance of wrinkles?
    I read about a year ago women can reduce their chances of facial wrinkles by applying cream early before the wrinkles starts to develop.
    Can this apply to men too in terms of hair loss?
    Would any damage be done if I used products from Hair Club for Men right now to reduce the chances of hair loss later on?
    Does the Hair Club for Men work and is it obvious that a person is using their products?

    • ANSWER:
      You can! Find out what, when, why and HOW and your hair will improve by eliminating the 'cause'.

      Reasons why that might have happened, below is a short form of why.

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs even HAIR LOSS). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here's an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Even birth control pills can cause hair loss. The medication most often prescribed for thyroid disorders can actually cause hair loss. Another 10% why you have hair falls.
      Eliminate the cause and your hair will improve.

      5. Google "Boise teen goes on Today Show to talk about losing her hair." She's got Alopecia 100% why you have hair loss.

      Dove hairfall facts:
      1. Humidity makes hair dry and brittle, leading to hairfall
      2. Colouring the hair damages the hair strands leading to breakage
      3. Pollution is also an unseen killer of healthy hair
      4. Tangled hair is the most common reason for hair fall
      5. While shampooing cleanses your hair, regular conditioning is required for adequate moisturization. Regular use of conditioner post shampoo also solves the problem of entangling which is the major cause of hairfall.

      Eliminate cause and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      If you think they're from your beauty or hair products:
      Take it back to where you bought it.
      Stop using it ASAP.
      You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs & cosmetics to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

      Google: Glossary of Hair Loss Terms. There are 179 entries in this glossary. Stress is just one of the 179 listed.
      Again, a simple rule of thumb: Look for the American Hair Loss Association seal when considering purchasing any product or service to treat your hair loss.

      > > > ONE treatment called DNCB -- applying an ointment that burns the scalp in hopes of stimulating hair growth. It was a treatment so painful that her head was at times left feeling raw.

  13. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these hairs on my chin?
    I have hair on my chin! I have tryed plucking them and facial remover but within a few days they are back. My gyno told me I had started early menopause, could this be the cause? Any ideas on how to get rid of them or at least slow the growth?

    • ANSWER:
      you could try bleaching them and trimming them really short or just keep plucking them. i wouldn't recommend shaving because that will make them thick and stubbly :(

      if you have the money, you could get them removed with a laser treatment

  14. QUESTION:
    What are some hairstyles that does not damage or need the use of heating products?
    I have medium hair and I don't like using straighteners, hairspray, or curlers and such. What are some websites that have hair styles that do not damage your hair?

    • ANSWER:
      3 Styles Most Damaging to Your Hair

      1. Tight pony tail
      2. Using curlers
      3. Braiding
      Causes of Hair Loss

      * Poor nutrition - inadequate protein and iron can cause hair loss
      * Medications - certain drugs, like those used to treat gout, arthritis and heart problems can cause hair loss
      * Diseases - like diabetes and lupus
      * Hormonal changes - pregnancy, childbirth, the discontinuation of birth control pills and menopause can all trigger some hair loss

      Best Products to Protect from Heat Damage

      * Got2Be Dazzling Shine Spray
      * Citre Shine Color Prism Anti Frizz Serum
      * Cosmedicone MegaDose PM Skin Fortifying Serum
      * Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair Concentrate Recovery Boosting Treatment or Re-Nutrive Intensive Lifting Serum
      * MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Hydra-Pure Antioxidant Firming Serum (
      * Z. Bigatti Re-Storation Deep Repair Facial Serum

      Best Shampoos for Dry, Damaged Hair

      * AVEDA Damage Remedy Restructuring Shampoo
      * Neutrogena Triple moisture cream lather shampoo
      * Pantene relaxed and natural Intensive Moisturizing Shampoo

      Best Conditioners for Dry, Damaged Hair

      * Pantene Relaxed & Natural Breakage Defense Conditioner
      * Bumble + bumble Creme de Coco Masque
      * Nexxus Humectress Luxe Ultra-Moisturizing Leave-In Spray
      * Chanel Age Delay Rejuvenation Serum

  15. QUESTION:
    where are all these facial hairs coming from?
    I never remember my face being so hairy, but over the past few years (I just turned 52) it seems my face is accumulating a light carpet of tiny white hair. What is it? What can I do? If I shave or use hair removal kit will it come back darker or thicker?

    • ANSWER:
      It's menopause, and your hormones are changing! Try bleaching or waxing, and no, it will probably not come back darker or thicker.

  16. QUESTION:
    What causes a girl to be hairier than other girls?
    my whole family is somewhat hairy but for some reason. i have more body hair than all of the girls in my family which makes no sense because im not hispanic or italian, im irish and according to my endocrinologist my testosterone level is on the low end of normal. so what im asking is are there any other causes for this???

    • ANSWER:
      Many factors can contribute to the growth of unwanted excess hair, such as:

      Stress
      Heredity
      Normal physiological changes
      Medication
      Malfunction of the endocrine system
      Topical Influences
      Heredity, as a cause of excess hair, must be approached from three different levels: race, nationality, and family. People belonging to the Caucasian race tend to be the most hairy; those of the Negroid race follow, and the Mongolian race is the least hairy. If your ancestors lived along the Mediterranean Sea (Italians, Greeks, Spaniards, etc.) your chances of having excess hair are greater. Also, it is a known factor that if your mother and grandmother had facial hair, your chances of having the same condition are greater.

      Puberty, pregnancy, and menopause can also cause excess hair growth. During the normal systemic changes in a woman's life, hormone production varies. It is not uncommon for hormones during these times to be unbalanced. Increased male hormones called androgens can be present, which may result in unwanted hair growth.

      Malfunctions of the endocrine glands trigger the appearance of excess hair, also. Some diseases of the thyroid gland, ovaries, pituitary gland and adrenal gland are known to simulate hair growth. Cushings disease, polycystic ovaries, and thyroid conditions are just a few of them. These pathological disorders must be treated by a physician in order for electrolysis to be effective.

      Medications are another known factor that promotes unwanted hair. Some common medications include cortisone,certain birth control pills, some seizure drugs and high blood pressure medication.

      Topical influences also play a part in hair growth. Topical influences are external influences on the body that cause an increase in the blood supply to the skin and hair follicles. This includes sunburn, scars, prolonged tweezing, depilatories, and waxing, and the abrasive action of casts.

      And last but not least is stress, both emotional and physical. Stress can stimulate the adrenal glands to initiate a hormonal reaction that can cause fine, soft hair to become more coarse and noticeable. In addition, it also has been proven that emotional disturbences can cause menstrual irregularities that can also affect excess hair growth. Regardless of your specific hair problem, electrolysis can safely and permanently eliminate it for you.

  17. QUESTION:
    What are some of the signs of early menopause?
    I had a hysterectomy when I was 22 and I'm 35 now. I've been having hot flashes, moodiness and excess hair on my face....should I see my doctor about this?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms include irregular periods, heavy bleeding, hot flashes, disrupted sleep, headaches, dry eyes, vaginal changes (dryness), hair loss, weight gain and a loss of interest in sex. Someone women may also experience extreme emotional distress. Other common physical signs of menopause are infertility, bladder control issues, heart palpitations, increase in facial hair, changes in body odor and dry mouth or other oral symptoms. You should seek the advice and attention of a medical professional if you are experiencing symptoms which are difficult to deal with.

  18. QUESTION:
    My periods lately are much lighter than I usually experience. Is this perimenopause?
    I have noticed that the past few months my periods are a little bit irregular as they sometimes start a few days earlier than anticipated, they are lighter, and last shorter than what I usually have. I also have been noticing more irritable moods and some brief blurry vision from out of nowhere. I'm wondering if I'm starting the transition into menopause...I'm 41 in case you're wondering.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.
      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  19. QUESTION:
    Now I need to find out numerous symptoms on menopause. So what are 10 symptoms of menopause?
    I need 10 symtoms of menopause and what they do to the body.

    Thanks Lori

    • ANSWER:
      There is a site with 35 (!!!) symptoms of menopause:

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling (see note)
      2. Irregular heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido (see note)
      8. Dry vagina (see note)
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      15. Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression (see note)
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain (see note)
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odor
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      30. Tingling in the extremities (see note)
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, change in breath odor
      33. Osteoporosis (after several years)
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing,' buzzing etc.

      Do I get extra credit LOL?

  20. QUESTION:
    What causes hair growth around nipples?
    I'm not pregnant (just finished my period) but i've had hair growth around nipples out of seemingly nowhere lately. the glands around them seem to be more swollen lately too... is something wrong with me? What's going on :(
    I'm 20 years old (almost 21) I do not think breast growth is likely.

    • ANSWER:
      It is due to HIRSUTISM -

      The most common cause of excessive facial hair in women is hirsutism a medical condition in which the body begins to produce more male hormones which leads to excessive hair growth all over the body and on the face. The symptoms of hirsutism include: thick, dark hairs on chin, on the upper lips, around the nipples, on the cheeks and on the abdomen. Hirsutism often runs in families and shows itself during puberty and menopause. The symptoms of hirsutism often get worse gradually with age if not treated properly.

      Some medicines can cause hirsutism. These medicines include birth control pills, hormones and anabolic steroids.

      Hirsutism also seems to run in families. If you have hirsutism, your family doctor may want to do some tests to find out what is causing it.

      Your doctor may prescribe a medicine called an anti-androgen to help control the male hormones that cause hirsutism. Anti-androgens usually take at least 3 to 6 months to work. They can decrease the amount of new hair growth, but they are less likely to change the amount of hair you already have.

      There is also a medicine made specifically to slow down the growth of facial hair. It is a prescription cream that you apply to the affected skin on your face and chin. This medicine may start to work as soon as 4 to 8 weeks after you begin treatment.--

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between perimenopause, menopause, and post menopause?
    What are the differences between these and what are some symptoms of them?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.

      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  22. QUESTION:
    How does a person know when there going through menopause?
    What exactly are the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      35 Possible Symptoms Of Premenopause

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling
      2. Bouts of rapid heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido (see note)
      8. Dry vagina, a general drying out that can include eyes, mouth, joints and skin. (see note)
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      15. Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression (see note)
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain (see note)
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odor
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      30. Tingling in the extremities, (see note)
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, dry mouth, change in breath odor
      33. Osteoporosis (after several years)
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing' buzzing etc.

  23. QUESTION:
    What would the symptoms be if i had a lack of the hormone estrogen?
    ive always been very underweight, and never developed breasts.
    Been for LOTS of medical tests, have a good diet and have normal periods etc! Just waiting to see a hormone specialist, any help before that would be great

    • ANSWER:
      lack of estrogen would give you symptoms of menopause, things like excess facial hair, hot flashes, night sweats, irritability and so forth.

  24. QUESTION:
    This is excluding men, women in menopause, or a overgrowth hair disease thingy? Facial Hair?
    Besides the above listed, why is the only facial hair on our face is eyebrows?
    I mean, whats the point and purpose of eyebrows??

    • ANSWER:
      it's meant to keep sweat out of our eyes

  25. QUESTION:
    How to tell when a woman is going through menopause?
    what are signs of menapause?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of perimenopause, menopause signs symptoms associated with it is menstrual irregularity and spotting during the monthly cycle. Frequent periods for too long and heavy bleeding or light bleeding occur during peri menopause. While osteoporosis has now become common among women whose calcium intake is less, it also happens to women prior to entering this state.

      As women grow older they tend to lack in calcium that weakens the bones and osteoporosis settles in. Taking 1500 mg calcium daily can prevent this from happening. Elevated cholesterol levels are also one of the symptoms. With age, the good cholesterol decreases and bad cholesterol will increases leading to coronary disease.
      A rigid dietary control is essential during this period. The transition varies for each woman. Some experience it according to a mother’s or elder sister’s transition and changes at that time. With the decrease in the Estrogen hormone, some physical changes like hair loss, facial hair and weight gain are some problems that upset a woman.

      A good diet and regular exercises will help in maintaining a balanced metabolism. This includes flushing out the system by drinking water which should be at least 8 glasses a day. Natural herbs can be taken after consulting a doctor.
      Menopause Signs Symptoms:

      * Endometriosis
      * Bloating
      * Aching joints and muscles
      * Unexplained weight gain, especially in hips, waist and stomach
      * Cold or tingling hands or feet
      * Spotting, light bleeding
      * Hair loss, thinning hair
      * Depression, anxiety and mood swings
      * Craving sweets,
      * Craving for caffeine
      * Hot flashes
      * Facial hair growth
      * Unstable blood sugar levels
      * Allergy symptoms
      * Chronic fatigue
      * Sluggishness
      * Breast tenderness
      * Dizziness,
      * Lightheadedness
      * Dry wrinkly skin
      * Fibrocystic breasts
      * Headaches
      * Migraines
      * Heart palpitations
      * Heavy periods
      * Irregular periods
      * Uterine fibroids
      * Incontinence
      * Inability to handle stress
      * Irritability
      * Urinary tract and yeast infections
      * Lack of concentration
      * Memory lapses
      * Ringing or buzzing in ears (tinnitus)
      * Night sweats
      * Leg cramps
      * Low metabolism
      * Lower sex drive
      * Loss of sex drive
      * PMS and menstrual cramping
      * Sleep disturbances
      * Insomnia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal T3 and T4 levels

  26. QUESTION:
    What happens if a woman has low or high level of oestrogen and progesterone?
    does it only affect period or does it have other affects?
    does low levels cause weight gain?

    • ANSWER:
      Low estrogen and progesterone are components of peri-menopause or menopause. It can cause dramatic (or subtle) mood swings, facial hair, weight gain, very irregular periods varying from no timing (coming and going as they please) and varying heaviness to spotting. Low estrogen and progesterone can also be a factor in cardiac health.

  27. QUESTION:
    My elderly grandmother is starting to grow a mustache - is this normal?
    So my frail elderly grandmother is starting to grow a mustache. She's suffered 2 strokes in the past 3 years and has had a brain tumor as well. She has a ton of other health problems as a result. He diet consists of ice cream and sandwiches.

    She has a doctors appt next month but in the meantime we are a little worried about this little symptom.

    • ANSWER:
      yeah women develop facial hair after menopause my grandma has a lot of hair on her face too, she is like 85 and OLDDDDDDDDDD

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it normal for menopause symptoms to increase immediately when periods stop?

    • ANSWER:
      35 Possible Symptoms Of Premenopause

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling
      2. Bouts of rapid heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido (see note)
      8. Dry vagina, a general drying out that can include eyes, mouth, joints and skin. (see note)
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      15. Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression (see note)
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain (see note)
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odor
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      30. Tingling in the extremities, (see note)
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, dry mouth, change in breath odor
      33. Osteoporosis (after several years)
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing' buzzing etc.

      NOTES:
      Symptom 1 (hot flashes)
      Hot flashes are due to the hypothalamic response to declining ovarian estrogen production. The declining estrogen state induces hypophysiotropic neurons in the arcuate nucleas of the hypothalamus to release gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in a pulsatile fashion, which in turn stimulates release of luteinizing hormone (LH). Extremely high pulses of LH occur during the period of declining estrogen production. The LH has vasodilatory effects, which leads to flushing.

      Symptom 7 (loss of libido)
      For some women the loss is so great that they actually find sex repulsive, in much the same way as they felt before puberty. What hormones give, loss of hormones can take away.

      Symptom 8 (dry vagina)
      results in painful intercourse

      Symptom 11 (doom thoughts)
      includes thoughts of death, picturing one's own death

      Symptom 14 (incontinence)
      reflects a general loss of smooth muscle tone

      Symptom 15 (itchy, crawly skin)
      feeling of ants crawling under the skin, not just dry itchy skin

      Symptom 16 (aching sore joints)
      may include such problems as carpal tunnel syndrome

      Symptom 22 (depression)
      different from other depression, the inability to cope is overwhelming. There is a feeling of loss of self. Hormone therapy ameliorates the depression dramatically.

      Symptom 25 (weight gain)
      often around the waist and thighs, resulting in the disappearing waistline

      Symptom 29 (shock sensation)
      "the feeling of a rubber band snapping in the layer of tissue between skin and muscle. It is a precursor to a hot flash"

      Symptom 30 (tingling in extremities)
      can also be a symptom of B-12 deficiency, diabetes, alterations in the flexibility of blood vessels, or a depletion of potassium or calcium

      Some of the 34 signs may also be symptoms of one of the following:
      * hypothyroidism
      * diabetes
      * depression with another etiology
      * Multiple Sclerosis
      * other medical conditions
      If you have reason to believe you may have one of these conditions, please see your doctor for treatment.
      Need more info?
      E-mail me!
      Blessings~
      Michelle Jones

  29. QUESTION:
    The best way to get rid of facial hair?
    I don't want lasik, can't afford it, any other way?

    • ANSWER:
      I had lasik in California but it was not useful. I am looking for better way too . However some information may be it be useful for you.
      Good Luck

      Not a lot of women like to talk about it, but it’s something many deal with on a daily basis. For these women, facial hair is an embarrassing problem that won’t go away.

      There are many options available to correct this problem, but some can be costly and painful. Some treatments work better than others, but aren’t always one hundred percent effective. We all want soft, hair-free, and unblemished skin. What’s a girl to do?

      Why

      The reasons why women get hair growth on their facial area varies. Many times it is simply a matter of genetics. Does your grandmother or even your mother have a mustache? If so, you may one day have the same problem.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome affects up to 10% of all women of reproductive age. One annoying symptom of PCOS is excessive hair growth. While this is not true of all PCOS patients, up to 75% of them will see this in one form or another. This hair will not always appear on the face, but quite often it shows up on the upper lip or on the chin.

      Some women just have darker hair than others. We all have a fine layer of hair on our faces, but some women’s just grows thicker and darker than others.

      Some women will develop facial hair once they reach menopause. It’s quite common, and comes in relation to the hormonal changes that are taking place inside your body.

      Options

      Bleaching: I have a friend who, due to her ancestry, has a very faint mustache. She buys a bleaching kit at her local supermarket and bleaches the hair on her upper lip. If she hadn’t told me about it, I never would have noticed. If you have fine hair on your face that is just a bit too dark for your liking, this is a great option for you. This process is quick and painless, though you should never bleach when your skin is irritated.

      Shaving: I’ve heard all my life that shaving will cause hair to grow back thicker and darker. This really isn’t true. The hairs will not get thicker or darker, but the razor will cut off the fine tip of the hair. When this happens the hair appears to be thicker and darker, but in reality it’s just got a flat tip on it. This gives it a thicker, fuller appearance.

  30. QUESTION:
    i have facial hair and have been dealing with it for years now i am going thru menopause?
    i have been waxing for years electrolosis did no good and i have strawberry blonde hair and i cannot have laser as my hair is too light.does anyone know of any other miracles or a fantasitic wax that works great on stubble.i have tried many waxes and still have to pluck afterwards.

    • ANSWER:
      I just saw an ad on TV for a new type of prescription medical cream that reduces facial hair by attacking the hair follicle root. I wish I could remember the name...Something like Vaniqua??? Ask your dermatologist. I often use OTC cream on my upper lip but was excited when I saw this ad. I think I might try it.

  31. QUESTION:
    what products can you use on your breasts to help give them a lift?
    is there any creams you can use to improve the skin or stop the skin from stretching?? or can you use wrinkle cream on your breasts to improve the skin?

    • ANSWER:
      NO topical (on the skin surface) product exists which will reverse the damage caused by gravity, breast-feeding, and dieting, to breast skin. The appearance of stretch-marks will minimise on its own, over time, but there is NO way to remove stretch-marks, short of surgery.

      All such advertising is charlatanry, and if you read the fine print, you'll see the words 'individual results will vary', which mean: 'you may have no results at all, and we are not responsible'.

      Really good moisturiser, used regularly, will keep skin smoother and softer (all over your body). It is especially important to moisturise while dieting, while lactating, or when you gain a substantial amount of weight, to PREVENT as much skin-damage as possible.

      If you are going through menopause, see your GP about the appropriateness of Hormone Replacement Therapy in your particular case. Bear in mind that human beings are not MEANT to have those hormones after a certain age, and they ARE KNOWN to increase the risk of breast-cancer. This may be offset by the decrease in risk of osteoporosis, changes to vocal range, growth of body and facial hair, hot-flashes, night-sweats (ugh...) and a host of psychological effects.

      Vitamin E oil, vitamin C, and 'the chemical of the day' all have various merits. The truth is, smaller-breasted women, and women whose weight does not fluctuate significantly are going to have less skin damage on their breasts, over time, than those of us who have breasts like zeppelins, and who have (in my case medical) struggles with weight.

      Mothers should teach their daughters to sleep while standing on their heads, to reverse gravity-damage... but somehow, I doubt that is practicable.

      Remember, you are beautiful FOR YOURSELF, not for your breasts! Your whole body reflects your life-experiences (childbearing, lactating, kidney disease, anorexia, menopause, whatever...) and, if you don't make your living off your breasts, (and are not suffering ill effects from menopause), just try pampering yourself, and be satisfied with the changes which reflect the wonderful woman you are, and have been.

      It's not easy, but we live in a culture which has become obsessed with 'anti-aging' products. Considering the alternative, I prefer to continue aging, thanks. My grey hairs are testament to the trials of my life.

      My breasts can be hoisted up with a good quality bra, when I dress up. Sure, Lycra Spandex (TM) and make-up are our friends... but when all is said and done, being at peace with our bodies is more important than anything else.

      That said, I want to win a total body make-over... ROFL!

  32. QUESTION:
    Can taking the contraception pill make you less hairy?
    obviously i wouldn't take it just for this reason. But I know it can regulate your periods and help your homanal balance, so, seeing I'm considered hairy for a female, would taking the pill make this go away even just a bit? I'm eighteen.

    • ANSWER:
      producing a lot of hair means your producing a lot of testosterone. dont worry every women produces testosterone and every man produces oestrogen its normal. having a pill with a lot of oestrogen in can make an imbalance of you hormones producing more oestrogen than testosterone. this will result in less hair growth. so yes it can! :-) go and see you practice nurse or doctor for more information about this but it will help you.
      its like elderly women. after menopause they produce less of the female hormone oestrogen and so testosterone becomes dominant and thats why they can get facial hair. some people take hormone tablets to stop this,

  33. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how to lose facial fat?
    The normal thumper cheeks and double chin is what I want to get rid of.

    • ANSWER:
      Here are all the ways that I am aware of for helping to get rid of a fat face, or at least diminish its plump appearance.

      1. Exercise and diet to lose overall body fat.

      When we lose weight we tend to lose fat from over our whole bodies. If you are overweight, then sensible dieting along with a regular cardiovascular workout will burn fat from all areas, including your face. For some people the difference will be dramatic, for others less so, but all should enjoy some improvement in facial appearance. Remember: Spot fat loss through exercise isn't possible, but fat loss is.

      2. Drink more water.

      Drinking eight big glasses of water a day has been proven to aid in weight loss. Sometimes when we think we're hungry, our body is actually just thirsty. Drinking lots of water can take the edge off our "hunger" and keep us from overeating, thus helping us to lose fat.

      There's another reason to drink water, though. Sometimes a fat looking (or puffy) face is caused by bloating, the body's retention of fluid as a response to being water deprived. If you're a woman--especially if you've just come through a pregnancy or are experiencing menopause--this could be part of the problem. So drink up! Good ol' H20, that is.

      3. Firm up your face.

      Some people swear by facial exercise; others consider it silly and question it effectiveness. It won't hurt to try it for a few weeks or a couple of months to see if it works for you. Remember, your aim here is to tighten and firm your skin, not to try to spot-reduce the underlying fat (since that's impossible anyhow).

      Here's an old one for firming up a double chin: Using the back (top) of your hand, slap/tap the bottom of your chin rapidly yet firmly. Do this often, whenever you think of it.

      For cheeks: Sit. Relax. Smile, keeping your lips closed. Now suck in your cheeks and hold them in while you count 8 seconds. Relax and repeat at least ten times. This is a good one to do while driving, as it requires no hands to perform. Another exercise for your cheeks is simply to smile as wide as you can (lips closed) as you imagine you are trying to touch your ears with the corners of your mouth.

      4. Get older.

      This is the easiest way of all to lose fat from the face -- it only requires patience!

      If you're in your teens, twenties or even thirties, your roundish face might be caused by baby fat that has yet to melt. Give it some time, and meanwhile be sure to work on reducing your overall body fat if need be. As people age they tend to lose a lot of their facial fat. The drawback to this natural process is that by their fifties, some people end up with excessively gaunt looking faces. That's a problem to tackle another day, though.

      5. Lose face fat the magician's way.

      Magicians use misdirection to deceive. You can "lose" the fat in your face the same way -- by misdirecting the viewer's attention and by disguising the roundness.

      Sorry, guys -- these are women-only subterfuges ... unless you are into makeup or have long hair. And so, ladies ...

      If you have a double chin you want to camouflage, I'm told that adding some blush along your jaw line will do the trick. Start from just below your ears and brush it all the way to your chin, making sure to blend. If you also put a spot of white powder on the tip of the chin for a highlight, the overall effect will be dramatically slimming.

      Similarly, to make your face look thinner, just brush bronzer over your cheekbones and temples, as well as under your chin. Boost the effect with white-powder highlights on chin tip, cheeks, forehead and the bridge or your nose.

      Finally, ask your hairdresser for a style that will either hide or draw attention away from a round face. Hairdressers are experts in knowing which styles are best for which face shapes.

      6. One word: Ultrasound.

      Ultrasound is increasingly being used for cosmetic purposes. A special ultrasound machine can be employed to send energy deep beneath the skin, where it liquifies underlying fat cells without harming tissue or nerve cells. The liquified fat is then expelled naturally by the body--or at least that's what proponents and practitioners of ultrasound therapy claim.

      7. One other word: Liposuction.

      Liposuction is more invasive than ultrasound therapy by itself. It can also be combined with ultrasound. As you probably know, liposuction involves making one or more small incisions in the skin, inserting tiny "vacuum hoses" and suctioning out the fat. It works particularly well on double chins and jowls, and can be used to "deflate" fat cheeks, too.

      8. Two words: Cosmetic surgery.

      Celebs do it. Average people do it. For some, results are stupendous. For a few, they're a nightmare. Botched jobs do happen. And in any case, facelifts and similar cosmetic procedures are expensive.

      This article on ways to lose fat from the face wouldn't have been complete without mentioning ultrasound, liposuction and cosmetic surgery. I deliberately did not go into detail about them.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a female to have the same hormonal characteristics of a man?

    Then why do I know some girls who act just like men, in attitude, intellect, and competiteveness? And no they're not "dykes".

    • ANSWER:
      Not without supplements.

      The female produces estrogen and progesterone from the ovaries. The male produces androgens, which includes testosterone, from the testes.

      Women do produce small amounts of testosterone, but not much compared to a male's output.

      Because a man does not have ovaries and a woman does not have testes, outside sources would have to be introduced into the body. This should only be done under the supervision of a qualified doctor and really, only for health reasons.

      EDIT: In answer to your second question, some women are more assertive or "manly" due to 1) learned behavior and 2) higher testosterone levels.

      Some of us were raised by parents who taught us that it's okay for a woman to be assertive and strong. If you compared women now to 100 years ago, you'd notice a huge difference in today's "strong" women, due largely to the women's liberation movement--this is all learned behavior.

      Women do produce some testosterone and it is possible that some women produce more than "normal." Some women are simply born with more testosterone, while others begin producing higher levels due to certain drugs, like steroids, and even more women are simply post-menopausal.

      When women go through menopause, estrogen and progesterone levels drop--the body is no longer producing as much because it no longer has the need for them in maintaining the uterus for childbirth.

      Many post-menopausal women develop lower voices and even a bit of facial hair. This is because the testosterone in a woman's body is suddenly more prevalent due to the drop in the "female" hormones.

      Hope that helps!

  35. QUESTION:
    What besides pregnancy causes loss of menstruation?
    I’m 20 years old, not pregnant, not stressed, and I don’t have an eating disorder, neither a change in weigh… yet I have NOT menstruated for the past 2 months.

    (I’m thought very irregular, I have been without my period for 5 months before, a few years ago, but I was going thru personal problems that triggered stress an depression which is not the case now)

    Pregnancy is very unlikely as I had "safe sex", have no symptoms, and have two negative tests done at different dates.

    • ANSWER:
      There could be many causes ranging from stress or hormone imbalance to excessive exercise, dietary changes, excessive weight loss... on up to disease/disorder. You say you have no other symptoms. Check over the information below and the link at the bottom. It may be that you are just having irregular menstrual cycle. I'd wait till next scheduled cycle and if no if you don't get your period, make an appointment with a gynecologist who can make a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

      Best wishes.
      ______________

      What are the signs of amenorrhea?
      The main sign of amenorrhea is missing a menstrual period.

      Regular periods are a sign of overall good health. Missing a period may mean that you are pregnant or that something is going wrong (see What are the causes of amenorrhea?). It’s important to tell your health care provider if you miss a period so he or she can begin to find out what is happening in your body.

      Amenorrhea itself is not a disease, but is usually a symptom of another condition. Depending on that condition, a woman might experience other symptoms, such as headache, vision changes, hair loss, or excess facial hair.
      What are the causes of amenorrhea?
      Amenorrhea is a symptom of a variety of conditions, ranging from not serious to serious.

      * Primary Amenorrhea
      o Chromosomal or genetic abnormalities can cause the eggs and follicles involved in menstruation to deplete too early in life.
      o Hypothalamic or pituitary diseases and physical problems, such as problems with reproductive organs, can prevent periods from starting.
      o Moderate or excessive exercise, eating disorders (such as anorexia nervosa), extreme physical or psychological stress, or a combination of these can disrupt the normal menstrual cycle.
      * Secondary amenorrhea
      o This problem is much more common than primary amenorrhea.
      o Common causes include many of those listed for primary amenorrhea, as well as pregnancy, certain contraceptives, breastfeeding, mental stress, and certain medications.
      o Hormonal problems involving the hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, ovary, or adrenal glands can also cause amenorrhea.
      o Women who have very low body weight sometimes stop getting their periods as well.
      o Women with premature ovarian failure stop getting regular their periods before natural menopause.

      x

  36. QUESTION:
    Why have i not gotten my period in 4 months?
    I havent gotten my period in about 4 months, i have taken and pregnancy test and it comes up negative. Does anyone know what could be going wrong?
    my biggest problem is i have no health insurance. I also have not started any new excersice routines, or dieting. I have actually gained some weight.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amennorhea definition: You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row. You need to see a dr.

      Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      Pregnancy. Your tests may have been incorrect.

      Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera or Implanon, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.

      Breast-feeding.

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy, uterine bleeding; acne; and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but on rare occasions, it requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), cesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.
      Primary ovarian insufficiency. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. In some women, the ovarian supply of eggs diminishes before age 40, a condition known as primary ovarian insufficiency. The lack of ovarian function associated with this condition decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also referred to as premature menopause, may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      Go see your dr. to be sure.

  37. QUESTION:
    Why do men have facial hair and not women?
    Is this an evolutionary thing?

    • ANSWER:
      It's because testosterone levels are obviously higher in men (although despite popular beliefs men do have some oestrogen and women have some testosterone), which is why when women go through the menopause they get hairier, because oestrogen levels drop and testosterone becomes more prevelant.

      Lol @stomper, coming from someone with a misplaced capital letter and a grammer mistake? seriously? It's too, dude.

  38. QUESTION:
    Why does menstrual cycle has stopped all of a sudden?
    This question is regarding my wife, her menstrual cycle has stopped from last 3 months and she is 20 years old. We checked for the pregnancy using self test kit and it appears negative. i am going to take her to the doctor tomorrow in the morning, i just thought of posting this question to get and idea of what sort of things could cause these type of changes other than pregnancy?. or is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of reasons it could happen and the doctor will be able to determine the cause. Some are:

      Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

      Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs, and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      # Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.

      Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating condition seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.

      Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

      Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

      Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

      Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.

      Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.

      Premature menopause. Menopause occurs at an average age of 51. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found..

  39. QUESTION:
    Why am I get my period 2 or 3 times a month?
    All times very light and they don't really seem like a period.

    • ANSWER:
      Secondary amenorrhea is much more common than primary amenorrhea. Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:

      * Pregnancy. In women of reproductive age, pregnancy is the most common cause of amenorrhea. When a fertilized egg is implanted in the lining of your uterus, the lining remains to nourish the fetus and isn't shed as menstruation.
      * Contraceptives. Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, such as Depo-Provera, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices, such as Mirena.
      * Breast-feeding. Mothers who breast-feed often experience amenorrhea. Although ovulation may occur, menstruation may not. Pregnancy can result despite the lack of menstruation.
      * Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.
      * Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
      * Illness. Chronic illness may postpone menstrual periods. As you recover, menstruation typically resumes.
      * Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy uterine bleeding; acne and sometimes excess facial hair.
      * Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.
      * Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.
      * Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.
      * Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but it sometimes requires surgery.
      * Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), Caesarean sections, etc.
      * Premature menopause. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. If you experience menopause before age 40, it's considered premature. The lack of ovarian function associated with menopause decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Premature menopause may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

      When to seek medical advice

      Consult your doctor if:

      * You've never had a menstrual period, and you're age 16 or older
      * You've previously menstruated, but have missed three or more periods in a row

  40. QUESTION:
    natural approach to female facial and body hair removal?
    i have an elevated level of dheas and i am in the process of going through tests for the underlying cause of that. i am 19 years old so there is no way it's menopause or pre-menopause. it could be pcos though.
    either way, i want to know about dietary or lifestyle changes i could make to deal with this issue. i have tried virtually every hair removal method (but i don't have the money for electrolysis or laser hair removal yet...so i've tried every temporary method), but it hurts a lot and the results last about 24 hours. i'm not exaggerating. this is where i have excess hair:
    -face (particularly jaw line, lower cheeks, mustache, and lower chin)
    -abdomen (very heavy on stomach right below belly button but stretches all the way up to between my boobs (it's very light colored up there, though, so actually barely noticeable)
    -pubic mound (picture tan lines from a bikini...the hair goes outside of the white part)
    -my bikini line stretches down most of my tight
    -arms (very heavy on forearms but also goes to upper arms)
    -fingers/hands
    -toes/feet

    are there any supplements i could take to help this? what about certain foods that help? and certain foods that make it worse? the same goes for drinks. also, as far as my facial hair, is there any ingredients in makeup i could be using that could make it worse? or ingredients in lotion or body wash that could be making my body hair worse?

    • ANSWER:
      THREE MOST COMMON MYTHS about pubic hair removal:
      1.The rate of hair regrowth will not change because of hair removal.
      2.Hair coverage will not change in density; your body has a set number of hair follicles.
      3.Ingrown hairs are common but not impossible to avoid; everyone has different susceptibility to ingrown hairs. Meaning: it's in your DNA. Supplements have side effects, like medications, anti-acne products, birth control pills - that can do MORE HARM than good. and in order to list the side effects, one could be hair growing elsewhere, or HAIR LOSS.

      -face (particularly jaw line, lower cheeks, mustache, and lower chin) use a pair of tweezers by plucking. Take seconds & you're done!

      -abdomen (very heavy on stomach right below belly button but stretches all the way up to between my boobs (it's very light colored up there, though, so actually barely noticeable). Everyone has body hairs. Unless you're a model or actor and are getting paid to take them off, they still get them airbrushed, but normal people don't.

      -pubic mound (picture tan lines from a bikini...the hair goes outside of the white part). From a public health standpoint, pubic hair doesn’t have any advantages, but the negative health effects associated with hair removal processes are of some concern. And despite recent attacks against hair removal, keeping pubic hair isn’t right for everyone. As long as you’re careful with the removal process, you can be just as healthy (or even more healthy!) with little or no pubic hair.

      -my bikini line stretches down most of my tight. Females: "Going Brazilian increase your odds of an external infection where the hair grows. Shaving and waxing can make the skin angry and irritated the more hair you take off the greater your risks. A bad cellulitis infection on her labia a patient went to ER, they were swollen the size of a golf ball. A little lawn maintenance is fine". ~ Glamour 2-13

      -arms (very heavy on forearms but also goes to upper arms). For females, NEVER use shaving for your facials or your arms. Again, hair anywhere else on your body: -fingers/hands, -toes/feet ARE ALL NORMAL. JLo, Penelope Cruz, Demi Moore have them, if you've watched earlier videos!

  41. QUESTION:
    How come the hair on our heads can grow long but the ones on our arms only grow to a certain length then stop?
    My hairdresser never has to "take a little off the sides" on my arms...

    • ANSWER:
      Hormones and receptors. Yes, there is a genetic component, but there is expression of genes also. Your body releases hormones which tell hair to grow (growth hormone, thyroid hormone, androgens). There are two different types of hair on your body - vellus hairs which are short, fine and colorless and terminal hairs which are long, coarse, colored and, in certain areas of the body, responsive to hormonal influence (androgens).

      When you are a baby, you are bald. This is before the body starts producing significant amounts of androgens. The baby might be covered with a soft, fine down on arms and legs that disappears later. Once androgen production kicks in around age 2 (and gender-based personality differences begin to emerge), hair begins to grow on the head, due to specialized scalp cells responding. After puberty, boys also grow hair on their faces and in other places due to increased production of androgens.

      Women don't produce significant amounts of these androgens, so you don't see facial hair on women unless they are producing abnormal amounts of these hormones. (This happens to some women during menopause.)

  42. QUESTION:
    Is acne just alottt of pimples all clustered together or is it completely different?

    • ANSWER:
      A pimple is an infectious pore in your skin.
      Oil, dirt, makeup all get into our skin. Without proper cleaning bacteria will cause a "pimple" or sores.
      Some people are more prone to acne than others. People with oily skin or oily hair that hangs in the face. Some to the point where medications has to be used to combat it.
      Usually a good cleaning with an astringent like Sea Breeze or one of the newer products available will help. If you have dry skin you might use caution with the astringent.
      Of course the teen years are and hormone changes cause problems as will menopause.
      If your problem is sever check with you Dr.
      Go get a facial at a reputable spa. They can help you identify what your skin needs are and what problems you may have

  43. QUESTION:
    Why do men have facial hair, does it have a function?

    • ANSWER:
      It is secondary sex characteristic in human males. Most men develop facial hair in puberty. Many women also have some facial hair, especially after menopause, though typically much less than men. Eyebrows and eyelashes are also grown by both sexes of all ages.

      Male pogonotrophy (the growing of facial hair; beardedness) is often culturally associated with wisdom and virility. Many men style their facial hair into beards, moustaches, goatees or sideburns. However, many others completely shave their facial hair. A man's facial hair, especially short hairs that were missed in shaving, is often referred to as whiskers, although only certain nonhuman mammals have true sensory whiskers.

      Women typically have little hair on their faces, apart from eyebrows and the fine fuzz nearly all people have covering most of their bodies. However, a few women have noticeable facial hair growth. Excessive hairiness (especially facially) is known as hirsutism, and is usually an indication of abnormal hormonal variation, or even abnormality. In contemporary western culture, almost all women shave, tweeze or otherwise depilate facial hair which does appear, as there is considerable social stigma associated with facial hair in women. Freak shows and circuses once displayed (usually fake) bearded women.
      Abraham Lincoln was said to have grown a beard because a little girl wrote him that he would look better with one.
      Enlarge
      Abraham Lincoln was said to have grown a beard because a little girl wrote him that he would look better with one.

      The amount of facial hair on a man's face varies from individual to individual, and also between ethnic groups. For example, men from many East Asian, West African or Native American backgrounds typically have much less facial hair than those of European, Middle Eastern or South Asian descent, with Native Americans typically having little to none at all. Middle Easterners, northern East Asians, and Eastern Africans can grow copious amounts of facial hair.

  44. QUESTION:
    After menopause facial hair growing on my upper lip and Chick.?
    After menopause im suffering from facial hair please give me perfect solution
    Hormonal treatment is not recommended by doctors, electrolysis is vary costly

    • ANSWER:
      My dermatologist says to shave IN the direction of hair growth. Just wet your face & gently shave downward. Follow with good moisturizer.

      Worked great for me :)

  45. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about fibroid tumors?
    I was wondering if surgery is the only way to get rid of them?
    and can they cause death?

    • ANSWER:
      Fibroid tumors are NOT necessarily cancerous; and certainly NOT deadly. But they CAN grow very large and become painful. After menopause they can SHRINK. Prior to that, however, you doctor COULD give you medication to shrink them. . . .but it COULD ALSO cause you to grow facial hair. A myomectomy would help to get rid of them while STILL preserving your uterus.

  46. QUESTION:
    do i have a skin condition of some kind?
    For a long time my face and ears have become very flushed at random no apparent reason, and always at the end of the day, and recently my face and neck have been itching constantly

    i'm not using any new facial products or washes and i don't have any other skin conditions, excluding occasional acne, but of course that's normal

    is this anything at all i should be concerned about or should i just wait it out?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have any other symptoms and how long has this been going on!! Can you trace it back t a specific time when something may have changed physically in your life such as pregnancy, menopause, new job, new house, Etc.?? Does it go away by itself every night??? Are you using any products to try to help it?? You say that it has been going on for a long time - how long?? - anything longer than 2 weeks merits a doctor visit!!

      There are many things that could cause this!! The simple causes could be - are you getting too hot or overheated just prior to this breakout?, are you under any emotional stress?, have you also eliminated the use of any new shampoos, hair sprays, new make up brand(or make up that is old and should be thrown away), New clothes that have not been washed, new sheets or pillow cases, new hand soap at work, etc.??? And have you checked to see that none of your regular products have changed their ingredients?? All of those are the most obvious and the easiest for you to rule out on your own!!

      The less obvious - people with high blood pressure sometimes have the sensation of the blood rushing to their face and head which can cause itching, if you suspect this you need to get a doctor to check it out; Is it possible that your age and menopause may be a factor, when I started going through this the blood would rush to my face and especially my ears making me look all red and blotchy, itchy and flushed but not necessarily sweaty; are you out in the sun a lot - people can sometimes develop sun poisoning; are you taking any medications at all because you can build up a tolerance to medicines you have taken a while and then have a reaction to them; it is possible you are having episodes of hives that could be caused by something as simple as stress; and if none of this sounds plausible to you then - There are many skin conditions such as ezcema, psoriasis, roscea that this could be!! If you have been able to rule out everything else then go see a dermatologist to get a proper diagnosis!! You can also do some on line research using any search engine such as google, yahoo, etc. on skin deseases!! Just type it a condition and a wealth of informative sites will appear!! Many will have pictures and that may help you to figure out what it is!! At the very least it will arm you with knowledge before you go see a doctor!! I wish you well and hope you will seek out the right help!! I hope that some of my suggestions may be helpful to start your hunt for clues as to what it is, but I caution you to be careful of advise on YA because all we can do is offer our opinion!! You really need to do research and then see a doctor! Good Luck!!

  47. QUESTION:
    Does upper lip hair actually grow if you haven't done anything to it?
    For example, if you haven't waxed, plucked, shaves, bleached, etc...does the tiny hairs above the lip actaully grow.

    I've never understood the process, people say they won't remove their upper lip hair because they don't want it to grow back thicker (which is a myth), but wouldn't it still be growing even if they didn't do anything to it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hair grows differently on different parts of your body, it gets only so long the exception is hair on your head & men's faces. Hormones can cause more facial hair on women especially as you get towards menopause.

  48. QUESTION:
    Could these be symptoms of perimenopause?
    Is this normal right before period?
    What does it mean to wake up and your feet are hot?
    Woke up early in the morning today with burning in my feet. Also had some accompanying anxiety, discomfort in chest, nausea, impending doom. I have been taking Lorazepam intermittently for anxiety. Anybody else experience this? Going to see doc and I may just go off this medicine if it might be causing me problems. Also, experiencing some stomach pain and chills. I am 48 and may be perimenopausal on top of everything.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be that you are beginning menopause. Signs and symptoms of menopause begin to manifest in women within the age of 45 to early 50's. Estrogen levels decline when a woman is going through menopause and it triggers a lot of physical changes. Missed or irregular periods, hot flashes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, mood swings, depression, tingling extremities, facial hair growth, unexplained weight gain are just some of the signs and symptoms of menopause. You should get yourself checked by your doctor to find out whether what you are going through right now is related to perimenopause or just the side effects of the medicine you are taking. If you want to learn more about the signs and symptoms of menopause and how to find relief here's some help...

  49. QUESTION:
    I have Endometreosis and it has become life crippling. Has anyone heard of a treatment options?
    I have had a laperoscopy already and that did not help. I want to avoid a hysterectomy but i'm open to it is that's what it takes to make this stop. HELPPPPP PLEASEEEE :]]]

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to hear about your pain.

      There are several medications that affect the estrogen stimulating hormones that lead to the growth of endometriosis.
      There are birth control pills;
      Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone agonists & antagonists that create an artificial menopause & stop pain. It can even force endometriosis into remission. It can cause side effects like hot flashes & vaginal dryness. However, a low dose of estrogen can lessen those side effects.
      Danazol is another ovarian stimulating hormone which suppresses menstruation & the growth of the endometrium. However, it can cause acne & facial hair.
      Aromatase inhibitors prevents estrogen from forming & halts growth of endometrium.
      There are new preventive surgical treatments in which the uterus is washed in solutions that create a coating that prevent new adhesions from forming & dissolves when it is no longer needed.

      Then there is a choice of laproscopic removal. However, if it did not help you at all, it's a moot suggestion.

      I would suggest speaking to your GYN & even getting a 2nd opinion with an expert in treating endometriosis because MDs are often too quick to use hysterectomy as a solution.

      Google: mayo clinic>>diseases>>endometriosis
      medlineplus>>health topics>>endometriosis

      Good luck to you.

  50. QUESTION:
    At what age do women go through menopause? What are the signs your approacing?
    I don't think I am any where near menopause,and my mom had no recollect....so tell me?
    edit: approaching.....

    • ANSWER:
      between ages 45-55

      • Hot flashes and night sweats
      • Fat, menapause weight gain around the hips, thighs and abdomen and water retention
      • Vaginal dryness and atrophy
      • Body aches and pains
      • Headaches, migraines and fatigue
      • Mood swings, depression, oversensitivity and irritability
      • Low sex drive
      • Dry, thin and wrinkly skin
      • Hair thinning, brittle hair, hair loss and facial hair growth
      • Incontinence
      • Sleeping problems - insomnia
      • Bone loss or osteoporosis
      • Memory lapses, foggy thinking and difficulty concentrating
      • Heart disease, heart palpitations and high blood pressure

      signs of menapause can begin as early as 10 to 20 years before natural menapause.


menopause facial hair