Tag Archives: post menopausal cramps

Post Menopausal Cramps

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What causes one to have a period 10 days apart?
    I had my normal period and 10 days later was bleeding again, with massive cramps, nausea, fatigue and heavier flow. I went to E.R just to be told it was hormonal. It has me worried and frustrated when I think I'm done I am bleeding again. Any thoughts anyone? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.

      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.

      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is anyone familiar with the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer?
    I have been experiencing pelvic pain, pressure, and cramping in addtion to lower back pain for the past few weeks. It feels similar to the uncomfort I feel during menstruation. I am only 29 years old but seem to be experiencing several of the symptoms listed for this particular cancer. I would appreciate any information you may have on the subject. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. I am an OB/GYN. It is rare to have Ovarian Cancer at your age, but possible. Some of the symptoms associated with Ovarian Cancer can be a lot of things. What I strongly suggest is a visit to your Gynecologist. He/She will be able to order blood tests, and if needed an Ultra-Sound. I would not worry too much, but it is always better to be safe. Ovarian Cancer is usually Post-Menopausal, and does not show symptoms until later. Get checked. Good Luck.

  3. QUESTION:
    What should i do because i got my period 2times this month?
    I got my period on September 2-16 and then it was gone. But now today in the morning i got it again, its very heavy, and i have very painful cramps!!!!!! Please help!!)':

    • ANSWER:
      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.

      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.

      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.

      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.

      •Weight loss or weight gain.

      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.

      •Excessive smoking and drinking.

      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.

      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.

      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.

      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.

      •If you had given birth to a child recently.

      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.

      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.

      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

  4. QUESTION:
    Anyone have a post menopausal Hysterosonogram?
    I recently had a sonogram, and transvaginal sonogram, for a family history of ovarian and uterian cancer. I got a call to have a hysterosonogram,not too sure why, (I was half asleep when they called). I asked if there was a problem and was told no problem, but to get a clearer view. I know when I went for the sonograms, first they asked how much water I drank and if I ate, because my bladder was not totally full. And they did not say anything during the transvaginal part. Just wanted to know if the lack of water is a good reason for having this done. Or do they just do it for clearer view, as they said, or do you think they suspect someting? They were supposed to mail prep paper but so far they haven't ,so I may call Monday and ask then, but just want others opinion. thanks, I hate to be a worry wart!! PS I am post memopausal, and had tubes ties years ago, so it isn't for a fertility check.
    I had forgotten that about 3 years ago when I had my Pap, it came back as Atypical glandular cells, which is worse than Squamous cell. I went for a cervical biopsy and it came back normal, like the first was a mistake. So should I be more nervous or not?
    Just got the paper today it is a Hysterosalpinogram, saline is inserted and a biopsy will be taked. So now I have to wait until Monday to call.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had two sonohystograms/hystosonograms done. The bladder is to be empty during this sort of ultrasound. The uterus will slowly be filled with saline during the sonohystogram, it just gives a more detailed image than the regular ultrasound. Don't be too concerned. I wish you all the best. I had these to check on fibroids and polyps in my uterus.

      ... I just reread your question. Sorry, I'm not post-menopausal...

      Okay, you're having an HSG (hysterosalpingogram) done... I've had one done myself. It's a procedure in which a dye is injected via catheter into the cervix while an x-ray is done to check the fallopian tubes. For this, the bladder is definitely empty. I'm thinking that they are just wanting to get a good view of everything since you have the family hx. Try not to worry. I wish you all the best.

      Since you are having an HSG done, ask about taking some ibuprofen beforehand. Youmay feel some minor cramping during the procedure. Mine was minor, I had forgotten to take anything beforehand. About a half hour after it was done, I was in a lot more pain.

      Good luck to you, I hope that the findings are benign. :)

  5. QUESTION:
    will norethindrone increase my chances of a blood clots if I have a stent?
    I have been perscribed norethindrone for severe menstal bleeding and pain. However,I am also taking plavix and aspirin because I have a medicated stent.

    • ANSWER:
      Connie - You ask a great question. As you know, the results of the Women's Health Initiative in 2003 suggested that there could be an increase in heart attacks in women using combination estrogen-progestin pills. More striking, however, was the finding that women taking estrogen-progestin had a significantly higher risk of developing blood clots in the legs that could come loose and lodge in the lungs. It was based on these findings that doctors stopped recommending hormone replacement for post-menopausal women (which many had thought could protect AGAINST heart attacks).

      Norethindrone is a progestogen that is used in progestin-only pills (pills without estrogen). At this time, the best studies we have show that progestin-only pills DO NOT increase a woman's risk for heart attack, stroke or blood clots. Therefore, based on this, it is reasonable to take norethindrone even with your medicated stent. It is important to keep taking the Plavix and aspirin, however, until your cardiologist tells you to stop! It is also important to avoid smoking, if you do so, since this will increase your risk of blood clots as well!

      If you are still worried about the risks of blood clots, you may want to ask your gynecologist about Mirena, a medicated IUD containing progestin. This can control severe menstrual bleeding and cramping with fewer side effects because less of the progestin enters your bloodstream. It is not associated with increased risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (pelvic infections) and is an effective contraceptive.

      I hope that helps! Good luck to you!

  6. QUESTION:
    Can you still get period symptoms even when you don't menstruate?
    ....for a long time? Say, if you're on menopause, or you stop getting your period due to stress or an eating disorder. Do you still get the symptoms of mood swings, weight gain, cramps, cravings, etc? Why or why not?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm rewriting my whole entire post because it was just plain too confusing before. The answer is YES. I'll sum it up this time-

      1]post menopausal women- Symptoms of PMS are mimicked and due to hormone replacement therapy or drops in estrogen and progesterone.[progesterone deficiency can cause sore boobs,bloating,carb. cravings,weight gain.]

      2]eating disorders-symptoms of PMS may actually be exacerbated[worsened] due to vitamin and mineral depletion.Especially when it comes to symptoms of depression.

      3]ACTUAL PMS only happens with ovulation, with natural fluctuations of hormones every month.

      OK. That was a lot simpler. Sorry if you read the long version and hope this helps!

  7. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to start your period 12 days after your last period?
    So my period ended 12 days ago, and i started again, with really bad cramps? I also feel dizzy and week :( Should i call my doctor? I am suppose to go get an ultrasound soon maybe i shld speed that up.. btw im 18
    My period has always been irregular, lasting from 12-16 days with a really heavy flow

    • ANSWER:
      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.

      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.

      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can menopause really make a woman's muscles ache?
    I guess I'm post menopausal....2 years no cycle.....went through the hot flashes....the whole bit...still having hot flashes.......I'm taking Cymbalta 60 mg for depression and pain but my back hurts and is stiff.

    Any suggestions???

    Can this be from menopause or is it more likely the depression?

    Thanks

    I am 46 almost 47

    • ANSWER:
      My sister whom is 49 is currently going through menopause and is having nightsweats, hot flashes, severe mood swings and yes, muscle cramps in her back, legs and arms. She has also gone through 2 years with no cycle but she has not taken anything for depression. I do believe that depression will cause muscle cramping...

      There is a fantastic book that I recently purchased for her titled: What your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause by John R. Lee, MD with Virginia Hopkins. It's a great book that tells you EVERYTHING that you need to know about Menopause and hormones.

  9. QUESTION:
    My period last for like 2 weeks, how do I make it stop?
    when it happens, it spews like realy far almost like a hose?

    • ANSWER:
      Polymenorrhea is the medical term used to describe prolonged menstrual bleeding. The rise and fall of hormonal levels during the month control the menstrual cycle. The cycle is general between 21 and 35 days long and begins on the first day of the period, ending on the first day of the next period. Periods generally last between two and seven days. Doctors recommend that any woman over the age of 21 who is sexually active has yearly pelvic exams and Pap smears. Women who experience prolonged periods or bleeding after menopause should seek medical help.

      Fibroids
      According to the United States National Library of Medicine, fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that develop inside the uterus. They are rare in women under 20 and often disappear in post-menopausal women. They can be so small that a microscope is required to see them or so large that they take up the entire uterus. The most common symptoms of fibroids are heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding that sometimes includes the passage of large blood clots.

      A form of birth control that is inserted into the uterus by a physician, the intrauterine device is designed to cause irritation to the uterine wall so implantation of a fertilized egg is not possible. According to Dr. Mary Bovo, MD, board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, this device can cause so much irritation that the uterus cannot stop bleeding after the normal period has stopped. The woman may also experience cramping and heavy clotting.

      Bleeding Disorder
      According to Dr. Bovo, blood clotting disorders, such as Von Willebrand disease, factor abnormalities or hemophilia can also cause prolonged menstrual bleeding each month. Periods may be heavy and last longer than 10 days. Doctors may use family history, examination and blood testing to diagnose these issues.

      Hormonal Imbalance
      Hormonal balance between progesterone and estrogen will regulate the buildup of the uterine lining. This lining is shed during menstruation. According to Mayo Clinic physicians, when imbalances occur, they can prolong the length of the menstrual period and increase the amount of bleeding. Lack of ovulation can be one cause of hormonal imbalances that result in prolonged periods or heavy flow.

      Uterine Polyps
      Uterine polyps are small, benign growths in the lining of the uterus. According to physicians at Mayo Clinic, these growths can cause heavy or prolonged bleeding. The polyps commonly occur in younger women of reproductive age as a result of high hormone levels.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/125451-causes-long-menstrual-periods/#ixzz1uwL1rkwQ

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it ok for women during menopause to eat Estrogen Inhibiting Foods such as berries, broccoli, etc?

    • ANSWER:
      Women who are experienceing premenopausal or post-menopausal sypmtoms may have low levels of estrogen in the body. Estrogen is a female sex steriod hormone and is essential to the reproductive process. Healthy estrogen levels help regulate the menstrual cycle and maintain healthy cholesterol levels.

      Increasing the consumption of estrogen-enhancing foods can have several effects on the hormones and the emotions. Estrogen-enhancing foods have been linked to reducing pre-menopausal and post-menopausal symptoms, increasing energy, improving memory problems and increasing bone density.

      Too much estrogen in the body can be harmful to your health, so it's important to be evaluated by a physician before making any drastic changes to the diet. Symptoms of too much estrogen in the body include irregular periods, craving for sweets, loss of sex drive, water retention, fatigue, swollen or painful breasts, endometriosis, severe menstrual cramps and weight gain. Foods that increase estrogen may need to be reduced or removed from the diet until estrogen levels are restored to a healthy level.

  11. QUESTION:
    Post-menopausal ladies: Shaving mustache and trimming nose hairs: Same or alternating days?

    • ANSWER:
      Hot flash for you...I don't have either of those things, but if I did, I would gladly trim away in exchange for periods and cramps!

  12. QUESTION:
    I have been on my period for 12 days. what is going on?
    I started my period on April 7th and I'm still on it. Its not heavy bleeding, sometimes its just light pink spotting when I wipe after urinating other times its between a light and medium flow. I'm not pregnant and no STDs that I an aware of.
    I am 33 years old and not on any birth control pills. Does anyone know what this is? Could it possibly be normal? My period is often irregular, I only have my period like every other month.

    • ANSWER:
      Polymenorrhea is the medical term used to describe prolonged menstrual bleeding. The rise and fall of hormonal levels during the month control the menstrual cycle. The cycle is general between 21 and 35 days long and begins on the first day of the period, ending on the first day of the next period. Periods generally last between two and seven days. Doctors recommend that any woman over the age of 21 who is sexually active has yearly pelvic exams and Pap smears. Women who experience prolonged periods or bleeding after menopause should seek medical help.

      Fibroids
      According to the United States National Library of Medicine, fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that develop inside the uterus. They are rare in women under 20 and often disappear in post-menopausal women. They can be so small that a microscope is required to see them or so large that they take up the entire uterus. The most common symptoms of fibroids are heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding that sometimes includes the passage of large blood clots.

      A form of birth control that is inserted into the uterus by a physician, the intrauterine device is designed to cause irritation to the uterine wall so implantation of a fertilized egg is not possible. According to Dr. Mary Bovo, MD, board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, this device can cause so much irritation that the uterus cannot stop bleeding after the normal period has stopped. The woman may also experience cramping and heavy clotting.

      Bleeding Disorder
      According to Dr. Bovo, blood clotting disorders, such as Von Willebrand disease, factor abnormalities or hemophilia can also cause prolonged menstrual bleeding each month. Periods may be heavy and last longer than 10 days. Doctors may use family history, examination and blood testing to diagnose these issues.

      Hormonal Imbalance
      Hormonal balance between progesterone and estrogen will regulate the buildup of the uterine lining. This lining is shed during menstruation. According to Mayo Clinic physicians, when imbalances occur, they can prolong the length of the menstrual period and increase the amount of bleeding. Lack of ovulation can be one cause of hormonal imbalances that result in prolonged periods or heavy flow.

      Uterine Polyps
      Uterine polyps are small, benign growths in the lining of the uterus. According to physicians at Mayo Clinic, these growths can cause heavy or prolonged bleeding. The polyps commonly occur in younger women of reproductive age as a result of high hormone levels.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/125451-causes-long-menstrual-periods/#ixzz1sUx5ZE5W

  13. QUESTION:
    Am I dealing with Uterine prolapse?
    During my period I had trouble putting in my tampon. Like I hit a wall. I inspected and I felt what seems to be my uterus extending down into my vaginal canal about 1/1 1/2 inches. I know that isn't normal. I know I am swollen, but I have never had that happen before. I have been told I have endometriosis and my periods get worse with age. The cramps are unbearable. What could be going on?

    • ANSWER:
      it is seen in women who have many children or post menopausal women usually....

      nulliparous no children woman seen but about 2% only.......

      is it getting increasing size by coughing/straining
      and decreased when lying down?feel a lack of support there?

      has any backache in evening?
      any discharge from vagina?is there any urinating problems?frequent urination?or incomplete urination like feeling?

      sexual difficulties?orgasm lacking?

      if u have any of these consult a gynec doc these are the symptoms of prolapse...plus a mass coming down the vagina....

      hope this helps

  14. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto's disease how is it treated?
    i know its an autoimmune disease but will it take continual blood testing to ensure I am being given the right amount of medication?

    • ANSWER:
      Usually I think you are started on thyroxine, and a review date is planned for a few months down the track, which might include a blood test.

      Depends how low functioning your thyroid is at the moment, what kinds of symptoms you have, whether you are pre- or post-menopausal. Sometimes the thyroid gland seems like it has a mind of its own.
      Your doctor will probably start you off on a small to moderate dose of thyroxine. It can take weeks to months for thyroid function to get back up to normal, if you are low to start with, so don't panic if nothing happens at first.

      But you should start feeling better within days.
      While you are on the thyroxine, monitor your symptoms (muscle cramps? feeling the cold? feeling tired? putting on weight despite eating little? etc) and use them as your guide, as to when you might need a blood test.

      I asked my doctor to give me a pre-signed blood test form, so that if my symptoms did not improve enough within a few weeks to months on my current dosage of thyroxine, I could go directly to get the blood test and then make an appointment to see him.

      Turned out I needed to increase my daily dose of thyroxine from 50mcg to 75, and I'm doing fine now on 75. Everything seems stable.

  15. QUESTION:
    Post-Menopause and Estriol Cream - help!?
    A friend of mine asks: she is post-menopausal and taking Estriol cream (Ovestin) for dryness and related issues, and wanted to know if anyone out there had any mild cramping (like you might feel at the beginning of your period) associated with use? She's been on the cream daily for about 10 days, and gets cramping from the morning until the early evening. She takes it at night, and then the whole thing starts again. Any advice?

    She's rather not go on any stronger estrogen replacement than necessary, due to the increased risk of cancer, etc.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP!

    • ANSWER:

  16. QUESTION:
    WebMD freaked me out. Is it serious?
    So my mom had some post-menopausal bleeding that lasted for a week and a half, was very heavy, and came with cramps. She hasn't been in menopause very long, maybe 1.5 years. Web-MD is telling me that it might be cancer? Does anyone have experience with this? She's going to get it checked next week, but still.

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer is only one of many possibilities. Please do not let the internet get you worried. WebMD is giving a worst case scenario. I know its hard, but try and relax and wait for the appointment.

  17. QUESTION:
    Painful Cysts on Ovaries?
    I get cysts on my ovaries that rupture!! It is one of the most painful feelings other than giving birth. They are fine while taking Birth Control but my hubby and I are planning to stop having kids. He can get a vasectomy but I will still have the cyst on my ovary problem. I do NOT want to take Birth control forever!!! IUDs don't work for me and pills make me crazy! Any suggestions on a solution?

    • ANSWER:
      You may want to see if your doctor can do something to remove the cyst, or you may be able to get your ovaries removed (Which is called an Oophorectomy, or a Bilateral Oophorectomy if you get both removed)

      And I just looked this part up on Wikipedia.com for you:
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      ***** Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:
      pain relievers, including acetaminophen (Tylenol), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain. NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain. a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

      Most of the patients that have the ovarian cysts that come into our office don't have much pain, so I haven't witnessed someone getting any of these treatments, but I hope this helps, feel better!

  18. QUESTION:
    does spotting or bleeding between periods means you are pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      Your period was over just last week and now it's back. Maybe this has been happening regularly the last few months. Maybe it's the first time it has happened to you. Whether it's the first time you have experienced irregular bleeding between periods, or just another month of spotting, metrorrhagia (the medical term for irregular bleeding or spotting between periods) is frustrating and can lead to a lot of worry thinking something is seriously wrong.

      What is normal menstruation?
      Normal menstrual bleeding lasts about five days, and although it may seem like you are losing a lot more blood, the amount of blood lost during your period is only about two to eight tablespoons. Menstruation occurs on average every 28 days; but, anywhere from 25 to 31 days between periods is considered a normal menstrual cycle

      If you are post-menopausal, or younger than 11 and vaginal bleeding occurs you should consult your physician. It's important to be sure that bleeding is coming from your vagina and not from your rectum or urine. The best time for your doctor to determine the cause of menstrual problems is when bleeding is not active.

      What causes bleeding between periods?
      Although the cause of irregular bleeding can vary according to individual health situations, some of the more common causes include:

      Abortion
      Hormonal fluctuations
      Beginning or stopping oral contraceptives or estrogens
      Low thyroid levels
      Stress
      IUDs occasionally cause slight spotting
      Injury to the vagina from insertion of objects, from malignant cancers, or from vaginal infections
      Certain drugs such as anticoagulants
      Vaginal dryness
      GYN procedures such as CONE biopsy or cervical cauterization
      If bleeding is heavy, bed rest may be recommended. Keep a record of the number of pads or tampons that you use so that your physician can determine whether bleeding is abnormally heavy. It's best to avoid taking aspirin because it can prolong bleeding. Whenever you experience irregular bleeding from unknown causes it is wise to call your physician for an appointment, as well as when bleeding occurs after menopause or when other symptoms are present.

      Because bleeding during all phases of pregnancy may be dangerous, you should call your health care provider if you have any signs of vaginal bleeding during your pregnancy.

      Vaginal bleeding is any blood coming from your vagina (the canal leading from the uterus to the external genitals). This usually refers to abnormal bleeding not associated with a regular menstrual period.

      First trimester bleeding is any vaginal bleeding during the first 3 months of pregnancy. Vaginal bleeding may vary from light spotting to severe bleeding with clots. Vaginal bleeding is a common problem in early pregnancy, complicating 20-30% of all pregnancies

      Pregnancy symptoms differ from woman to woman and pregnancy to pregnancy; however, one of the most significant pregnancy symptoms is a delayed or missed menstrual cycle. Understanding pregnancy symptoms is important because each symptom may be related to something other than pregnancy. Some women experience pregnancy symptoms within a week of conception. For other women, symptoms may develop over a few weeks or may not be present at all. Below is a listing of some of the most common pregnancy symptoms.

      Implantation Bleeding:
      Implantation bleeding can be one of the earliest pregnancy symptoms. About 6-12 days after conception, the embryo implants itself into the uterine wall. Some women will experience spotting as well as some cramping.

      Other Explanations: Actual menstruation, altered menstruation, changes in birth control pill, infection, or abrasion from intercourse.

      Delay/Difference in Menstruation:
      A delayed or missed menstruation is the most common pregnancy symptom leading a woman to test for pregnancy. When you become pregnant, your next period should be missed. Many women can bleed while they are pregnant, but typically the bleeding will be shorter or lighter than a normal period. This symptom is commonly explained by other reasons. If you have been sexually active and have missed a period, it is recommended that you take a test: Order my pregnancy test

      Other Explanations: Excessive weight gain/loss, fatigue, hormonal problems, tension, stress, ceasing to take the birth control pill, or breast-feeding.

      Swollen/Tender Breasts:
      Swollen or tender breasts is a pregnancy symptom which may begin as early as 1-2 weeks after conception. Women may notice changes in their breasts; they may be tender to the touch, sore, or swollen.

      Other Explanations: Hormonal imbalance, birth control pills, impending menstruation (PMS) can also cause your breasts to be swollen or tender.

      Fatigue/Tiredness:
      Feeling fatigued or more tired is a pregnancy symptom which can also start as early as the first week after conception.

      Other Explanations: Stress, exhaustion, depression, common cold or flu, or other illnesses can also leave you feeling tired or fatigued.

      Nausea/Morning Sickness:
      This well-known pregnancy symptom will often show up between 2-8 weeks after conception. Some women are fortunate to not deal with morning sickness at all, while others will feel nauseous throughout most of their pregnancy.

      Other Explanations: Food poisoning, stress, or other stomach disorders can also cause you to feel queasy.

      Backaches:
      Lower backaches may be a symptom that occurs early in pregnancy; however, it is common to experience a dull backache throughout an entire pregnancy.

      Other Explanations: Impending menstruation, stress, other back problems, and physical or mental strains.

      Headaches:
      The sudden rise of hormones in your body can cause you to have headaches early in pregnancy.

      Other Explanations: Dehydration, caffeine withdrawal, impending menstruation, eye strain, or other ailments can be the source of frequent or chronic headaches.

      Frequent Urination:
      Around 6-8 weeks after conception, you may find yourself making a few extra trips to the bathroom.

      Other Explanations: Urinary tract infection, diabetes, increasing liquid intake, or taking excessive diuretics.

      Darkening of Areolas:
      If you are pregnant, the skin around your nipples may get darker.

      Other Explanations: Hormonal imbalance unrelated to pregnancy or may be a leftover effect from a previous pregnancy.

      Food Cravings:
      While you may not have a strong desire to eat pickles and ice cream, many women will feel cravings for certain foods when they are pregnant. This can last throughout your entire pregnancy.

      Other Explanations: Poor diet, lack of a certain nutrient, stress, depression, or impending menstruation.

      Good Luck

  19. QUESTION:
    I have two concerns about my period cramps?
    I read a lot (and I do mean a lot) of articles that suggest placing heating pads, or applying some form of heat to your abdomen if you are having period cramps. I'll admit, that helps me sometimes, but the more effective thing, to me, is the cold.

    For example, a cold shower during my period does a lot more good than a hot one. It doesn't really make sense, and I'm not sure if there might be something wrong with that, or if it's just part of being different?

    My other concern is that I tend to have severe cramping during my period. But the thing is that most of this cramping seems to happen in my rectum and the pain spreads throughout my lower back and in that general area. When I focus on the pain, I find that only about 5% of the pain is actually in the area in and closely surrounding my uterus, and the rest of it is in the back.

    I did some research on it, and found that a possibility might be endometriosis (a condition that comes from endometrial tissue (normally found in the uterus) being found outside the uterus causing the cramps to appear in various parts of your body where that endometrial tissue has formed).

    Now while this, to me, is seeming like a good possibility, I also found that endometriosis commonly occurs during the menopause or immediate post-menopausal years. Testing for the condition is usually done between 20-25 years. I'm still 15 though, and I know that everyone is different, and everyone's body is different and acts in it's own unique way. But is there another possibility? Another reason why the cramps are this bad, and how it can be helped?

    (Sorry for the lengthiness. I'm just seriously fed up of curling into a ball and drowning in my tears because of my period cramps and worrying if I'm going into early menopause. Please help if you can.)

    • ANSWER:
      I know EXACTLY how you feel. I am 31 years old and have suffered from extremely heavy periods since the age of 17. I am currently on for 5 weeks at a time with just a 3 day break inbetween and am in constant pain. I have been undergoing tests over the last 8 months and am now waiting to see whether I will be having endometrial ablation or a hysterectomy.
      With regards to the cramping, I do get a lot of pain in my abdomen but I also get a lot of pain in my lower back and my bottom. Sometimes it can be so severe that I cannot even sit down. Endometriosis can actually occur at any age and the only way to tell if you have it is to have a laporoscopy (a camera is inserted into your stomach area through a small inscision in your belly button). Another possibility is that you have menorraghia (I think thats how its spelt) which is basically very heavy periods and pain associated with that. My advise to you would be to go see your doctor and tell him/her your symptoms. They might recommend that you try going on the pill to see if that helps (a lot of contraceptive pills can lighten periods and make them more regular and less painful) or see if you can get some Mefanemic Acid - this is a drug that you take for the first 2-3 days of your period and it eases the pain and lightens the flow. This normally helps a lot of women. They will probably also take a blood sample and check your hormone levels just to see if there is anything else that is causing your problems.
      With regards to cold water easing your pain rather than hot, I'd say there is nothing wrong with that. Just do whatever works best for you. Good luck x

  20. QUESTION:
    What is PMS?
    What are the symptoms of Post Menopausal Syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      PMS stands for Pre-Menstrual Syndrome. It is a term used to described the symptoms you experience just prior to having your period each month. They can include mood swings, hot flashes, weight gain, water retention, headaches and abdominal cramping to name a few. The 2 links below will give you all the information you ever wanted to know about PMS.

      Good Luck

  21. QUESTION:
    what could be causing very low Left abdominal pain?
    I am 52 and post menopausal . a few days ago I got a cramping stabbing pain on my left side right next to my hip bone , at first I though it was just gas but it has not gone away in 3 days . if I am sitting still I do not feel it. I only feel this pain when I press on the area, do my exercises or bend over . something feels wrong. I had tubal ligation at 28 they were clamped not severed . I have not ever had any problems like this before and have been postmenopausal for 18months. I have been diagnosed with gallstones but that's the other side and I know that kind of pain well .
    This almost feels like the kind of pain you get when you get a stitch in your side from running or swimming but very low and left but this one never leaves . please help if you can .I have no insurance or money right now to go to the doc - do I need to worry and start saving for it .
    Thank you for all your answers- because I'm only a level one I cant vote for you Im sorry but wanted to thank you .
    here are some things I would say in response to some of the answers
    First I am defiantly not constipated LOL
    also we live in Florida we do not have things like free clinics or departments of health ,
    when I lived in Michigan I would be able to go to these places but only huge cities in Florida have anything like this. I do not have a car and their is no public transportation in Florida as is in other states . we do not pay a state tax here so state funded places simple do not exists , the state closed off all our free clinics with in 100 miles from my home last year. the only choice I have is going to emergency and having them send me a bill I cant pay that is my reluctance to doing that unless extremely necessary . Florida is not a good state to live in unless you have gobs of money.
    There is no Public transportation here , no dental health places , no urgent car

    • ANSWER:
      Lower left by the hip bone is just your large gut - there's an arch there in the gut where it goes around a corner. That will often hurt. At your age you can have some diverticulitis - maybe.

      Something to try for that is 5 to 10 grams a glutamine a day - get it in powdered form from Puritan Pride - that's the cheapest. And you'd take 3 to 6 big pills of fish oil with some vitamin E. This is a good treatment for anything in the gut.

      If you want to read about this stuff, get a used copy of "Vita-Nutrient Solution" off of Amazon - this was Atkins' book about how he used supplements instead of prescription drugs. Very interesting read - and you can get it cheap.

  22. QUESTION:
    What can I do to limber up?
    I an a post-menopausal woman who will turn 60 next month, I retired form my job 18 months ago and put on 20 pounds over this winter. My BMI is now 38. I cut way back on my diet, but still continue to gain weight - averaging a pound a week. On recent visit to my doctor, she advised I start to get more physical activity. I tried, but can't really do much moving - it causes my muscles to ache and sometimes cramp. I can't even hold a telephone receiver up for more than about a minute and my arm starts to go into a palsy and hurt. Walking is out of the question because my lower back and hips hurt so much when I walk more than 100 feet. If I lay on my side and bed and twist just the right way, I can crack my spine like some people crack their knuckles. I tried to find exercises on the Internet, but I can't do them - I don't have the flexibility to even put my left ankle on my right knee (which one exercise showed). It's getting to the point that even sitting up for more than an hour exhausts me. The doctor says all my routine blood tests are normal except my Vitamin D and HDL levels are very low), but my total cholesterol is within normal limits. What can I do?
    P.S. I am on two prescription meds for blood pressure and I also take several OTC supplements (calcium with Vit D, vitamin B complex, low dose aspirin, vitamin C, a calcium/magnesium/zinc compound and something called Complete Ultimate for Women 50+ (a complete nutrient support formulated for women's health - promotes bone and breast health).

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    ladies I am burning up and feel hot now. and sweaty help?
    I will be 40 in two weeks, and according to my hromone blood tests last weekend I am approaching menopause now. YUK. I get no more periods, and according to my hormones I am ot producing any eostrogen anymore. and it said I was post menopausal. my mother was only 34 when she went through this horrible thing. I am heating up and sweating bad now, what can I do now? I can try a cool shower but after i get out I will heat up again. I never drink warm milk drinks before bed now like I used to as I burn up. this sucks. and the rotten stomach cramps too I have been getting everyday for weeks and weeks non stop. I get inured so fast when I exerise. but the good thing is that I have very low Iron and if I was still having periods I would be needing Iron Inections so not getting periods now is a blessing. anyway ladies what can I do now? it is after4 am in the morning and cannot sleep.
    rasberrys YUM I love them. did you say this will help with some of my symptoms
    why do you get unforgetful with a lot of things with this. like not remebering what day it is to almost losing your hand bags and I have noticed I have become more anxious why is this?
    Amber yes the joys of menopause NOT. I am glad I do not bleed anymore as I am already low in Iron so it came at the right time phew

    • ANSWER:
      take lots of raspberry juice, black licorice,and ginger ale.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there anyone out there familiar with Progesterone levels in women TTC?
    This is my 3rd month on Clomid and my bloodwork to check the progesterone levels is usually done within 5-10 days from cycle days 15-17. My first result was 21, my second result was 16. This month, my results read as follows:

    PROGESTERONE 42.5 (this is my result)

    REFERENCE RANGES
    FEMALE:
    FOLLICULAR PHASE: < 1.4
    LUTEAL PHASE: 3.3- 26.0
    MID-LUTEAL PHASE: 4.4- 28.0
    POST MENOPAUSAL: < 0.7
    PREGNANCY:
    1ST TRIMESTER: 11.0- 45.0
    2ND TRIMESTER: 26.0- 89.0
    3RD TRIMESTER: 46.0-423.0

    Looking at the reference on the results, does this mean I am pregnant?I am due for AuntFlo on the 22nd (next Tuesday) and this test was done on the 15th. Symptoms I have, include my uterus cramping as though it has gone through a meat grinder. I have been craving chocolate so badly, I ate a 1/2 lb box 2 nights ago.

    Any help is appreciated. TIA!

    • ANSWER:
      The progesterone level is great (need minimum of 10 to sustain pregnancy) and indicates stronger ovulation with perhaps more follicles than last couple times. When follicles rupture (with dominant one releasing an egg) in process called corpeus luteum, that is what starts the production of progesterone hormone post ovulation (so more follicles ruptures usually means higher progesterone).

      It doesn't however mean that you are pregnant yet as implantation happens around that time. But you certainly have a very good shot at it this cycle.

      Good luck.

  25. QUESTION:
    Which is more healthful - Apples or Asparagus?
    And why?
    Will give 10pts

    • ANSWER:
      here are the health benifits for asparargus... Great for your heart
      Helps w*Helps menstrual cramps with fertility problems
      Great for your gastrointestinal tract and your colon
      Helps menstrual cramps
      Great food to help treat depression
      Has been known to increase the success rate of chemo therapy
      Is considered a diuretic which means it is a good anti-inflammatory - best for arthritis, asthma rheumatism, and even water retention…PMS
      Help get rid of warts
      Helps detoxify your body
      Add more asparagus to your diet to lover cholesterol
      Great for nursing mothers stimulating milk production
      Has antioxidant agents - prevents the effects of aging
      Has antifungal and antiviral qualities
      Great for your kidneys - cleansing your body by stimulating urination and preventing kidney stones
      Helps prevent bladder and urinary tract infections
      Use to be used as an a aphrodisiac - increase sexual and comforting feelings
      Helps with treating HIV
      Helps prevent multiple sclerosis
      Helps prevent scurvy
      Asparagus has anti-cancer agents - especially lung cancer
      Helps fight chronic fatigue syndrome
      Helps fight off high blood pressure
      If you bruise easily - eat more asparagus
      Is considered a laxative - eat an asparagus if you have diarrhea and constipation
      Great for your capillaries - eat more asparagus to avoid varicose veins
      Great for your eyes preventing cataracts
      If you are experiencing hair loss- eat more asparagus
      Helps treat toothaches

      now apples....
      Bone Protection
      French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones.

      Asthma Help
      One recent study shows that children with asthma who drank apple juice on a daily basis suffered from less wheezing than children who drank apple juice only once per month. Another study showed that children born to women who eat a lot of apples during pregnancy have lower rates of asthma than children whose mothers ate few apples.

      Alzheimer's Prevention
      A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer's disease.

      Lower Cholesterol
      The pectin in apples lowers LDL ("bad") cholesterol. People who eat two apples per day may lower their cholesterol by as much as 16 percent.

      Lung Cancer Prevention
      According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples.

      Breast Cancer Prevention
      A Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17 percent. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39 percent and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44 percent.

      Colon Cancer Prevention
      One study found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 43 percent lower risk of colon cancer. Other research shows that the pectin in apples reduces the risk of colon cancer and helps maintain a healthy digestive tract.

      Liver Cancer Prevention
      Research found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 57 percent lower risk of liver cancer.

      Diabetes Management
      The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body's need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes.

      Weight Loss
      A Brazilian study found that women who ate three apples or pears per day lost more weight while dieting than women who did not eat fruit while dieting

  26. QUESTION:
    Having a really long period and sometimes pain. Help!?
    I'm a teenager, just started my period a few years ago. But I've noticed that I've been having a really long period lately, and it hasn't stopped yet. I know that I'm not post-menopausal as I'm a teenager and I've just started. I also know that I'm not pregnant, as I'm a virgin. I have been having pains in my lower abdomen once in a while.

    I want to know what's going on, and what I can do to stop either the pains, if possible, or to make my periods shorter!

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      FIRST, birth control pills can regulate your periods (read below)
      SECOND, read below about heavy menstrual flow and menstrual cramps

  27. QUESTION:
    Never had spotting before until now?
    I had my period two weeks ago it was really heavy then almost nothing at all in about two days. I have never had spotting before, when today I noticed I was bleeding. At twenty years old I thought I would of figured out by now if I would be one to have spotting at all but this has never ever ever happened to me, before, between or after a period. Could this be a late sign of pregnancy or a first time for spotting and if it is a first time for spotting what could be the cause?

    • ANSWER:
      OK, hopefully this will sort you out ? ( read below ) but you may need the doctors
      i hope not though, and it sorts it`s self out soon so good luck and try to relax,
      and yes i know, easier said than done some day`s !, -

      Bleeding or spotting between periods can be a frightening experience.
      You never know when bleeding between periods may occur. Maybe your
      period was over last week and then you notice that you're bleeding again.
      Maybe this isn't the first month you've experienced bleeding or spotting
      between periods. Or it could be the first time you've had bleeding between
      periods. Whether it's the first time you've experienced bleeding between
      periods, or just another month of spotting, bleeding between periods is a
      frustrating and stressful experience.

      What Is Normal Menstruation?
      Normal menstrual bleeding lasts about four to five days, and although it may
      seem like you are losing a lot more blood, the amount of blood lost during your
      period is only about two to eight tablespoons. While normal menstruation occurs
      on average every 28 days, anywhere from 21 to 35 days between periods is
      considered normal.

      When Should You Worry About Menstrual Bleeding?
      If you are post-menopausal or younger than 11 and bleeding you should
      consult your physician immediately. Also do so if you are experiencing vaginal
      bleeding between periods. Try to determine where the bleeding is coming from:
      Are you sure you are bleeding from your vagina? Or is it your rectum?
      Is there blood in your urine?

      What Causes Bleeding Between Periods?
      Although the cause of irregular bleeding can vary according to individual
      health situations, some of the more common causes include:
      •Implantation Bleeding/Pregnancy
      •Miscarriage
      •Hormonal fluctuations
      •Starting, stopping, or missing oral contraceptives or estrogens
      •Low thyroid levels
      •Stress
      •IUDs occasionally cause slight spotting
      •Injury to the vagina from insertion of objects
      •Malignant cancers
      •Undiagnosed vaginal infections
      •Certain drugs, particularly anticoagulants Vaginal dryness
      •GYN procedures
      •Some women have spotting during ovulation, which is normal

      Bed rest may be recommended if between period bleeding is heavy.
      Use your menstrual cycle calendar to record the number of tampons or
      pads you use. This information helps your doctor determine whether you
      are bleeding excessively.

      Unless your doctor specifically advises otherwise, never take aspirin while
      you are menstruating. Aspirin can cause bleeding to occur longer and heavier.

      Of course, you should inform your doctor about any bleeding or spotting between
      periods that you experience.

      You should expect to give your full medical history when you visit the doctor for
      diagnosis of bleeding or spotting between periods. Also expect to have a pelvic
      exam, including a Pap smear if you haven't had one recently. If you've kept a
      menstrual cycle calendar, you'll be ready to answer your doctors questions.

      These questions may include:
      •How long have you experienced bleeding between periods?
      •Does it happen every month or is this the first time?
      •What day during your menstrual cycle does the bleeding begin?
      •How long does it last?
      •Do you experience menstrual cramps when bleeding between periods occurs?
      •Does anything make bleeding worse?
      •Does anything make it better?
      •Is bleeding worse with increased physical activity?
      •Are you experiencing an increase in stress?
      •Do you have any other symptoms such as pelvic pain, increased bruising,
      difficulty swallowing, pain or burning during urination?
      •Is there blood in your bowel movements or urine?
      It's also important to advise your physician if you are pregnant or have had a
      recent miscarriage or abortion. If you have had a D&C, your physician should
      know this as well.

      Remember to inform your physician about any prescription or over-the-counter
      medications (including herbal supplements) that you are taking.

      Your physician will also ask you how old your were when you started having
      periods, if you are sexually active, and whether you have experienced bleeding
      between periods in the past. If you have experienced any injuries, or had medical
      or surgical treatments, this is also important to tell your physician.

      If you are currently using oral contraceptives your physician should be aware of
      this: bleeding between periods can sometimes be caused by something as
      simple as not taking birth control pills at the exact same time each day.

      The management of uterine bleeding depends, to a large extent, on your
      answers to your physician's questions, as well as the findings of your pelvic
      exam. Based on the initial evaluation there may be additional tests and/or treatment.

  28. QUESTION:
    Period stopped then started again?
    I got my period on the 15th today is the 20th. They usually last 4-5 days sometimes 6 but it completely stopped last night and then just started again kinda heavy. Ugh this is so annoying. I feel a little cramps coming on. Why does this happen? I started bc pills the day my period started so could it be that? I also been stressed too

    • ANSWER:
      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.
      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.
      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

  29. QUESTION:
    Brahmi and vitex intract with each other?
    does brahmi and vitex agnus interact wih each other when taken simoltaniously

    • ANSWER:
      I think it would interact as both are herbs
      What is Vitex?

      Vitex is a plant found in Asia and in Mediterranean countries. The part used medicinally is the dried fruit. Other names for it include Vitex agnus castus, Agnus castus, chaste tree, and monk's pepper.

      Why People Use Vitex

      Vitex was used as a traditional folk remedy for a range of female conditions, such as post-partum hemorrhage and to help with the "passing of afterbirth". One of its alternate names, "chaste tree", comes from the historical belief that it can suppress libido.

      Vitex does not actually contain hormones. It appears to increase progesterone by stimulating the release of a hormone called luteinizing hormone from the pituitary gland. Vitex is also thought to normalize excessive prolactin levels and promote fertility.

      Female infertility
      PMS, especially breast tenderness, cramping, and headaches
      Acne, especially if it is related to the menstrual cycle
      Fibrocystic breast disease
      Heavy menstruation
      Menopausal symptoms
      Side Effects and Safety Concerns

      More common side effects include mild digestive upset or skin rash. Other side effects may include rapid heartbeat, hair loss, headache, dry mouth, nausea, rash, itching and bleeding between periods.

      Vitex is not recommended during pregnancy. It shouldn't be used by nursing women unless under the guidance of a qualified health professional.

      People with hormone dependent conditions such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and cancers of the breast, ovaries, uterus or prostate shouldn't take vitex.

      Small amounts of vitex could increase the production of breast milk in post-partum women. High doses may have the opposite effect and decrease the production of breast milk.

      Vitex may affect levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. People with Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, or any other condition in which dopamine levels are affected should avoid vitex unless under the supervision of a qualified health professional.
      Possible Interactions

      Vitex may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives or female hormone replacement. It could also theoretically increase the risk of side effects.

      Vitex could interfere with the effectiveness of drugs that increase dopamine, such as bromocriptine, cabergoline, carbidopa-levodopa, Mirapex or Requip, or decrease dopamine, such as chlorpromazine, clozapine (Clozaril), haloperidol (Haldol), metoclopramide (Reglan), Risperdal, Seroquel, thioridazine, trifluoperazine or Zyprexa.
      Good luck and God bless you

  30. QUESTION:
    Brahmi and vitex intract with each other?
    does brahmi and vitex agnus interact wih each other when taken simoltaniously

    • ANSWER:
      I think it would interact as both are herbs
      What is Vitex?

      Vitex is a plant found in Asia and in Mediterranean countries. The part used medicinally is the dried fruit. Other names for it include Vitex agnus castus, Agnus castus, chaste tree, and monk's pepper.

      Why People Use Vitex

      Vitex was used as a traditional folk remedy for a range of female conditions, such as post-partum hemorrhage and to help with the "passing of afterbirth". One of its alternate names, "chaste tree", comes from the historical belief that it can suppress libido.

      Vitex does not actually contain hormones. It appears to increase progesterone by stimulating the release of a hormone called luteinizing hormone from the pituitary gland. Vitex is also thought to normalize excessive prolactin levels and promote fertility.

      Female infertility
      PMS, especially breast tenderness, cramping, and headaches
      Acne, especially if it is related to the menstrual cycle
      Fibrocystic breast disease
      Heavy menstruation
      Menopausal symptoms
      Side Effects and Safety Concerns

      More common side effects include mild digestive upset or skin rash. Other side effects may include rapid heartbeat, hair loss, headache, dry mouth, nausea, rash, itching and bleeding between periods.

      Vitex is not recommended during pregnancy. It shouldn't be used by nursing women unless under the guidance of a qualified health professional.

      People with hormone dependent conditions such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and cancers of the breast, ovaries, uterus or prostate shouldn't take vitex.

      Small amounts of vitex could increase the production of breast milk in post-partum women. High doses may have the opposite effect and decrease the production of breast milk.

      Vitex may affect levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. People with Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, or any other condition in which dopamine levels are affected should avoid vitex unless under the supervision of a qualified health professional.
      Possible Interactions

      Vitex may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives or female hormone replacement. It could also theoretically increase the risk of side effects.

      Vitex could interfere with the effectiveness of drugs that increase dopamine, such as bromocriptine, cabergoline, carbidopa-levodopa, Mirapex or Requip, or decrease dopamine, such as chlorpromazine, clozapine (Clozaril), haloperidol (Haldol), metoclopramide (Reglan), Risperdal, Seroquel, thioridazine, trifluoperazine or Zyprexa.
      Good luck and God bless you

  31. QUESTION:
    Post-menopausal period like cramps anyone else had this?
    I haven't had a period for over two years now but for the past two months I have been getting what feels like period pains in the left side of my pelvis.

    Have been to the doctor but am still waiting for the blood and wee test results.

    Anyone else experienced this and what caused it?

    Many thanks
    Hi I Have Krabs, isn't it time for afternoon lesson? and MrDJ never had a boot in the balls?
    No discharge, just feels like it used to when I was about to get a period, but it's gone for about 2 months now.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I have also had the same pains , for a year ,Like you I had blood and wee test and they came back negative , but when I got the results the pains subsided . Recently they have come back coupled with a pain in the sternum (only when I bend over ). So it makes me think its an alergy or lack of digestive acid . Good luck .

  32. QUESTION:
    Cramps no period...help?
    I had my period twice last month...the first time was 9-12&then I got it again but it really wasn't my period it was like a spotting it started 30-1 it was like a light bleeding spots when I wiped so I put a pad on&it wasn't heavy at all&now its the 7th&I'm getting cramps....I have no idea what's wrong....also getting my period twice in one month is weird I think could someone help me

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Claudia,

      Two periods in a month:

      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.
      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.
      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

      Take care.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/two-perio…

  33. QUESTION:
    Ovary Fallopian tube removal?
    I had my right ovary and Fallopian tube removed like 6 months ago due to a very large ovarian cyst and a smaller cyst lanced on my left side. I was told I have Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. I am on metformin to help with the PCOS and birth control to help regulate my hormones. My period haven't been very regular since the surgery. Some months a had severe cramps and didn't bleed at all or very little. Other months I'll still have severe cramps and have very heavy bleeding with large blood clots. I never really cramped before surgery but now my cramps are so bad I basically have to lay in bed all day. Is this normal and will it get better with time or should I schedule and appointment with my gynecologist?

    • ANSWER:
      very sorry for this pain would not hurt to see your dr

      Four days ago,(Friday the 8th) I had a tumor removed (5-6 cm) from my right ovary and also my right ovary and right fallopian tube were removed. This was done through ...
      www.medhelp.org/posts/Womens-Health/Ovary-and-Fallopian... - Cached.
      More results from medhelp.org »
      Why Remove Fallopian Tubes? - eHow | How to Videos, Articles ...
      The fallopian tubes are the ducts that carry eggs from a female's ovaries to her uterus. A salpingectomy is a surgical procedure during which one or both of the ...
      www.ehow.com/facts_5577356_remove-fallopian-tubes.html - Cached
      More results from ehow.com »
      Fallopian tube - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      After removal of an ovary, the remaining one produces an egg every month. ... The surgical removal of a Fallopian tube is called a salpingectomy.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallopian_tube - Cached

      Removal of ovary and fallopian tube - Medical Questions ...
      My daughter is 19 and has to have her right ovary and fallopian tube removed because of various adhesions and cysts. What are her chances of having a successful ...
      www.steadyhealth.com/Removal_of_ovary_and_fallopian_tube... - Cached
      More results from steadyhealth.com »
      Removal of Ovaries & Fallopian Tubes | Women's Cancer Network
      WCN; Sexuality Issues; Surgery; When Cancer Treatment Requires Removal of the Ovaries and Fallopian Tubes Taking out both ovaries causes menopause.
      www.wcn.org/.../sexuality/surgery/ovaries_fallopian.html - Cached

      Does Removal of Fallopian Tubes Cause Menopause? | eHow.com
      Once the fallopian tubes are removed, you will still continue to have a menstrual period on your regular cycle. ... fallopian tubes and ovaries.
      www.ehow.com/way_5579796_removal-fallopian-tubes-cause... - Cached

      Fallopian Tube Removal May Lower Risk of Deadly Ovarian Cancer
      And post-menopausal women in this group should consider having both their ovaries and tubes removed, ... that she have her fallopian tubes removed during the operation.
      www.myhealthnewsdaily.com/2555-fallopian-tube-removal... - Cached

      What Happens During Prophylactic Ovary Removal
      Abdominal ovary removal requires making a larger incision to remove the ovaries and fallopian tubes. Typically, the surgeon will use a bikini incision, ...
      www.breastcancer.org/...ovary/what_to_expect/during - Cached

      Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy: Fallopian Tube & Ovary Removal
      Bilateral Salpingo Oophorectomy is a type of surgery performed by removing the fallopian tubes and ovaries. This surgery is indicated to treat cancer of the fallopian ...
      www.unitedhealthdirectory.com/surgery/bilateral-salpingo... - Cached

  34. QUESTION:
    Period 2 x in the space of a month.... Now getting cramps again? What could be going on?
    I'm a 19 year old woman, & I've had my period twice in the last 4/5 weeks plus currently having cramps indicating my next period is just around the corner. My periods are normally very regular; everything normally runs like clockwork & something such as this is very unusual. I have also noticed a different odor (not fishy, but noticeable, moreso than usual), and more frequent discharge. I have good personal hygiene & am in committed monogamous relationship so an STD -seems- out of the question. Any idea of what could be going on, anyone? Any help would be greatly appreciated as I am a little skeptical about going to the doctor just yet. Thanks so much in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.
      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.
      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/two-perio…

  35. QUESTION:
    girls only female quistion?
    is it normal to get sweet cravings i week after your period?
    i have a urinary track infection and i just found out because i was having really bad stomic cramps .....could that be why my last 2 periods have been horribal?

    • ANSWER:
      It is normal to get sweet cravings on your period, off your period, when you're pregnant, when you're not pregnant, pre-menopausal, menopausal, post-menopausal, sleeping, in a coma, alive, dead, etc etc. Sweets are awesome. If you're not craving them, you have something wrong with you. XD

      A UTI would probably make a period less pleasant, yes. I don't think you have anything to worry about. Seek treatment for your UTI if you haven't already, and you're good to go.

      Good luck! :)

  36. QUESTION:
    Period 10 days early, feeling really sick, but no cramps?
    My cycle has been 34 days long for the past 5 years, now for the very first time my period is 10 days early. I have no cramps at all and I'm on day 3 of my period now. It is really light, normally I have to use super tampons and change those about every 2 hours. With this I can just wear pads and only go through about 3-4 a day.
    The other thing is that I feel really sick, all of my muscles are sore (luckily I have a wonderful husband who gives amazing massages), I am constantly nauseous and sometimes feel faint when standing. The sick feeling in my stomach makes it rather hard to sleep at night.
    Also, I never felt bloated before this period started.
    My husband and I have been having unprotected sex for the past 2 years.
    What's going on? Is this just some kind of freak period?

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like you are not necessarily having an early period but rather two periods in a month. I hope this information helps you. Take care.

      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.
      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.
      If you think that the bleeding during the second period is pretty heavy or if you have it quite frequently, then visit the doctor immediately and follow what he says. Do not worry, and follow a healthy diet to stay fit.

      Source(s):
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/two-perio…

  37. QUESTION:
    I've had my period for 25 days?
    I stopped getting my period for about 5 months, then got it on Apil 10th, and have had it nonstop for 25 days. I am not on birth control. What could be the problem?

    • ANSWER:
      Polymenorrhea is the medical term used to describe prolonged menstrual bleeding. The rise and fall of hormonal levels during the month control the menstrual cycle. The cycle is general between 21 and 35 days long and begins on the first day of the period, ending on the first day of the next period. Periods generally last between two and seven days. Doctors recommend that any woman over the age of 21 who is sexually active has yearly pelvic exams and Pap smears. Women who experience prolonged periods or bleeding after menopause should seek medical help.

      Fibroids
      According to the United States National Library of Medicine, fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that develop inside the uterus. They are rare in women under 20 and often disappear in post-menopausal women. They can be so small that a microscope is required to see them or so large that they take up the entire uterus. The most common symptoms of fibroids are heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding that sometimes includes the passage of large blood clots.

      A form of birth control that is inserted into the uterus by a physician, the intrauterine device is designed to cause irritation to the uterine wall so implantation of a fertilized egg is not possible. According to Dr. Mary Bovo, MD, board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, this device can cause so much irritation that the uterus cannot stop bleeding after the normal period has stopped. The woman may also experience cramping and heavy clotting.

      Bleeding Disorder
      According to Dr. Bovo, blood clotting disorders, such as Von Willebrand disease, factor abnormalities or hemophilia can also cause prolonged menstrual bleeding each month. Periods may be heavy and last longer than 10 days. Doctors may use family history, examination and blood testing to diagnose these issues.

      Hormonal Imbalance
      Hormonal balance between progesterone and estrogen will regulate the buildup of the uterine lining. This lining is shed during menstruation. According to Mayo Clinic physicians, when imbalances occur, they can prolong the length of the menstrual period and increase the amount of bleeding. Lack of ovulation can be one cause of hormonal imbalances that result in prolonged periods or heavy flow.

      Uterine Polyps
      Uterine polyps are small, benign growths in the lining of the uterus. According to physicians at Mayo Clinic, these growths can cause heavy or prolonged bleeding. The polyps commonly occur in younger women of reproductive age as a result of high hormone levels.

      Cancer
      Although a rare occurrence, uterine, cervical or ovarian cancer can cause excessive menstrual bleeding. Menstrual periods may also be prolonged and occur between periods or after intercourse. Physicians will use examination and biopsy to determine the specific type of cancer and recommend appropriate treatment protocols.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/125451-causes-long-menstrual-periods/#ixzz1uTD9wkDM

  38. QUESTION:
    Question bout me mum! Shes 56! Period?
    Hiya. So basically my mum is 56, her periods stopped a couple years ago. But this morning she woke up and a few hours later she was bleeding heavily, and got stomach cramps. But doesnt know what it is. Could she just of re-started her period by some weird reason ?

    Thanks
    Emma
    Thnx 'S.' ;]

    • ANSWER:
      If she had no period for two years prior to this and all of sudden she is bleeding, this will need to be evaluated. She needs to take an appointment to see her GP on Tuesday. He will likely want to do an examination, a smear test and send her for a trans-vaginal ultrasound. She will also be referred to a gynaecologist.

      When a women is going through the menopause, it's common to have the odd bleeding here and there at first, until it stops completely, but post menopausal bleeding that occurs after two years amenorrhoea (having no period) must always be investigated. It could be fibroids (benign growths) in the uterus, but other more serious complications need to be ruled out.

  39. QUESTION:
    I get SEVERE.........!!!?
    cramping on the first day of my menstrual cycle. im 19. what kind of birth control pills can i take that dont have such a high rate of heart attacks and strokes. (strokes and heart attacks run in the family) so thats why i've always been scared to take them. i know, i need to go to my doctor, but before i do, i just want some opinions...thanx God Bless♥

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately all birth control pills and patches because they are hormones have the additional risk of heart attack/strokes. If you are looking for information on how or what you can take to minimize the cramps here is a suggestion.
      Use Evening Primrose Oil to help counteract the effects of Post Menopausal Syndrome (PMS)

      Research has shown that Evening Primrose Oil may help alleviate breast pain, headaches, bloating, depression, and cramps for women suffering from Post Menopausal Syndrome. Numerous instances show that women have seen these symptoms lessen or disappear altogether after they started using Evening Primrose Oil.

      Add Evening Primrose Oil to your health routine.

      Suggested Usage: Take 1 to 2 Softgels each day.

      Of course before taking anything I also suggest you consult your doctor.

  40. QUESTION:
    Why all my life I had normal periods up until 2 years ago, now i am always bleeding?
    All of my life I have had normal periods...
    i had a 30 day cycle every month.
    it would last 3 to 5 days & I would have BAD cramps.

    2 years ago, all of a sudden I was due for my period
    but it never came?
    I waited 2 weeks and still nothing....
    almost 3 weeks into being "late" i had very light bleeding, then it stopped...
    I thought I was pregnant, but all the test were negative.
    I went to the OBGYN and she said I wasnt pregnant, and maybe it was due to me being a "big" girl.
    But I was ALWAYS the same weight and I got my period on time, every month.
    She told me not to worry about it.
    About a month later , I started bleeding like I was having my period , but the ODD thing was I had NO Cramps AT ALL....
    I have always had BAD cramps all my life when I got my period....
    Yet, i was bleeding but no cramps what-so-ever.
    The bleeding continued for weeks!
    never stopped , it was VERY heavy but it was enough to have to use a tampon or a pad.
    when it went on 2 months every day bleeding,
    I went back to the OBGYN.
    they found a fibroid, ajacent to my uterous.
    I had a D & C and they removed it.
    after the D & C, I didnt bleed for over a month.
    Then after 2 months it started AGAIN.
    and now I am still bleeding every damn day alittle.
    some days i dont bleed at all but Most days i am atleast alittle.....
    Its been over 2 years and this goes on and off and the WEIRD thing is I have NEVER had ONE Cramp ever since.....
    Could the Fibroid have come back so soon after a D & C???
    What else could be wrong with me???
    Any other girls with similar issues????
    Any other women who always had cramps and now get NONE???
    Any help would be appreciated !
    Thank you!!
    I am 25 years old-
    and wanting to have a baby with my husband for the past 5 years with no luck :(

    • ANSWER:
      How old are you? I am almost 45 and have similar problems due to being post menopausal. I thought menopause meant STOP bleeding. but it seems like I never do. (Apparently I have menoGO *joke.) No cramps--just muddy-looking spotting, then bright red blood for weeks or a month on end. It will be like that for several months in a row and then goes back to normal for one or two months and then back to always some amount of bleeding for several months. It is worse with stress. The only thing that helped was a few cycles of birth control pills to regulate the menstruation.

      Maybe after having the fibroid removed your uterus doesnt cramp because it isnt trying to expel the fibroid. I would guess that would be a good thing. I dont think you will miss the cramps.

  41. QUESTION:
    Two period in a month one extremely painful?
    Hello im 22 I had several cramps and a medium flow at the first of this month. It was during one of my classes and my cramps were so bad I couldn't walk straight, felt very weak, couldn't stay still, and had vommited all my dinner up. This was all in an hour or so. I was excused from class but I could barely drive home. I was so tired I had to pull over twice to nap. When I got home I took a Midol and feel asleep right away. I had intentions of consulting my doctors office about it but when I called in the next day, they didnt answer the phone. I tried a bunch of times. It wasn't a holiday or anything. I felt much better the next day anyway so I thought, " oh well if it happens again next month I'll go see the doctor then."
    Just yesterday I started my period again! That's just twelve days in between periods (from the end of the last one to the beginning of this one). Ive never had that happen before. It was very unexpected especially because of the timing but also because I have absolutely no menstrual pain. I always have cramps and joint/back pain the first day of my period.
    I have been fairly stressed lately so I've heard that could be a reason. I'm also sexual active. We use protection (condoms). I read somewhere on the Internet that sever cramps followed by an irregular flow could mean I had a miscarriage. Is that true? I'm on a three week road trip celebrating my college graduation but when I get back home I think I'll see my doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      Is It Normal?

      What doctors usually mean by irregular periods are missed periods (when you miss out a period one month) or when the girl or woman has two periods within a gap of two weeks or spotting between periods. Is it normal to have two periods in one month? Well, sometimes this is not a cause of worry, but it could be a cause of worry if one woman is bleeding post menopausal or if that girl is younger than 12 years old. Then, in that case you have to visit the gynecologist. Having it once is normal, but if you have irregular menstruation cycle quite frequently, then it might be a cause of worry.

      What's the Reason?

      The causes given below will answer your question as to why it happens. The most common causes of this problem has been listed below.
      •Hormonal imbalance is one cause for this irregular menstruation. Sometimes when women undergoes emotional problems, the hormones usually goes bonkers and this results in two periods.
      •A fall in the thyroid level is also another cause for irregular periods or two periods.
      •Thickening of the uterine wall which often occurs due to hormonal imbalance, can also lead to excess bleeding.
      •Weight loss or weight gain.
      •Lack of proper diet or diet without any nutrition.
      •Excessive smoking and drinking.
      •Women might also suffer while on birth control, and this might be one of the side effects of birth control pills.
      •Certain medications and drugs can also lead to this problem.
      •Stress or excessive intake of caffeine is another cause.
      •Chemotherapy can also be a cause.
      •If you had given birth to a child recently.
      •Two periods after stopping birth control pills are due to the decrease in the number of hormones that have occurred due to the pills.
      •A miscarriage can also lead to this issue.

  42. QUESTION:
    women only. I am 40 and going into menopause. I now only get?
    my period every so often. at the moment I am getting cramps like you feel before you get a period. and it is very anoying. I am not getting a period and the cramps feel very similar to what you get just before you get your period. any advice on what to do? I need these cramps to go. I have been having them for a few days now. do I need to get checked out by a doctor?
    thaks freya that means put up with it and if this continues I will see a doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Atrophic vaginitis, but that usually occurs in post menopausal women.

      More than likely it is because even though you are no longer ovulating, you are still going through a monthly hormonal cycle. You should talk to your doctor about it but in the mean time all you can do is treat it as you would normal period cramps.

      EDIT: Essentially yes. But it could be a sign of complications, so make an appointment just in case. As for getting rid of it, hot water bottles and chocolate. The chocolate will also help to improve your mood, but only if you get good chocolate with a high % of cocoa.

  43. QUESTION:
    Do You Think I Have Ovarian Cancer?
    I been feeling very tired lately,having cramps/abdominal pains (where im guessing my ovaries are) mostly in the right side sometimes in the left or middle,i been real hungry some days and then others im not hungry at all,my period was late and then when it came it only lasted 3 days and was very light. I did have unprotected sex,but i took a test and it was neg so idk i checked out the symptoms of it and i have most but idk im confused. Im gonna call the doctor in the morning but i wanted to see if anyone has/had ovarian cancer and could help me out like with what they were feeling and how they found out and all im really worried.......

    • ANSWER:
      The fact that you are still young enough to have periods and consider the possibility of pregnancy means that your risk of ovarian cancer is low.

      Most cases of ovarian cancer occur in post-menopausal women.

      I think you have frightened yourself by reading up on symptoms of ovarian cancer; many of the things you describe could be caused by other much less serious conditions.

      Make that appointment with your doctor and set your mind at rest

  44. QUESTION:
    Are these symptoms signs that I have Endometriosis?a?
    So, these are my symptoms ;
    Very painful stomach cramps(Gotten worse over time)
    Pains in lower back and Abdomen(Sharp)
    Constant upset stomachs
    Heavy and Irregular periods
    Spotting between periods
    Extremely painful pelvis cramps
    Tiredness
    Headaches
    Anxiety
    I am 12 , and i started my period a year ago. I am about to turn 13 if that helps any./
    @ Q , i meant Period cramps. and Tiredness, Headaches, and Anxiety can also be symptoms of Endo. I have done hours of research on the subject.

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis has been reported only in the reproductive ages, which means right after the start of the menstrual cycle until menopause or immediate post-menopausal years.
      Ovarian function is necessary for the development and maintenance of these endometrial implants. The disease is normally not seen before age 15 or after menopause.

      It's more likely that after only starting 12 months ago your system is still trying to regulate itself. Anxiety has nothing to do with the condition, I realize periods are painful, speak to your Mum she'll know better than anyone how to help you and ask her to make an appointment for you with a doctor if it continues or worsens.
      Mail me direct if you need anything else, I've a young daughter and would hate to think she'd ask on Y/A rather than come to me. x

  45. QUESTION:
    What could be wrong, vaginal bleeding?
    I am turning 17 August 11. The past couple months, my period has been coming a week later every month, before my period which ended a week or two ago, I had small bits of blood in my discharge, a small bright red streak. Then a black/brown/purple thing came out, and it resembled the tissue released during a period. I also had a sharp pain in my abdomen around the time it came out, it caused me to double over. My cramps during my period were also unusually strong and prolonged, so I ended up sleeping to get through them. My abdomen was still slightly sore/funny feeling and bloated after the pain ceased. Yesterday the bleeding occured very lightly, giving my discharge a slightly red/orange color.. then today.. I'm having more bleeding in my discharge, kind of like the flow of a minor period, and it's a bit browner than before. I have also had other symptoms over the past year or two, but the bleeding is new. I've also have severe symptoms resembling manic depression or bipolar disorder, and headaches off and on. I talked to my mom about the bleeding and she is taking me to the doctor after tomorrow, but she slightly suspects it to be endrometriosis, because she had it and it runs on her side and my dad's side a little. She also had all of her reproductive organs removed because of unusual cells found resembling pre-cancerous cells. I just want your opinion, obviously I'm going to a doctor soon, but I want to get your impression on what it may be.
    Also, I am a virgin.

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal vaginal bleeding could be from any part of the genital tract and it can occur at any age. Whenever a person presents with abnormal vaginal bleeding, it is essential to get a proper history about the type of bleeding, cycles, amount of blood loss etc. The age of a patient is also important as the causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding varies in different age group. We must proceed to investigate a patient systematically avoiding unnecessary investigations. From the type of bleeding we could form an idea about the probable cause of bleeding.

      Menorrhagia - Increased flow with normal cycles _ fibroids, polypi,PID.

      Polymenorrhoea -Shortened Cycles _ HPO axis dysfunction, PID.

      Metrorrhoea -Intermenstrual bleeding _ Uterine polypi, erosion cervix, cancer cervix, cancer body.

      Continuous bleeding -Abortion, ectopic, cancer cervix, polypi, metropathia, haemorrhagica.

      Post menopausal bleeding -Bleeding from genital tract in a woman of post menopausal age whohas not had a period during the past six months _ 50-60% due to malignancy.

      While investigating and managing a patient who presents with abnormal vaginal bleeding the following protocol may be followed:

      Only as the last resort.

      Caution : Think of bleeding disorders and investigate if necessary.

      Avoid unnecessary investigations (T4, TSH, FSH, LH) unless strongly suspect.

  46. QUESTION:
    What illness or condition could these symtoms mean?
    -Daily headaches
    -Feeling constantly tired and run down
    -Hot flushes that feel like the flu (not menopause age)
    -Feeling full and bloated even after tiny amounts of food
    -Trapped wind
    -Needing to urinate frequently
    -Feeling very thirsty
    -Stomach cramps
    -Dizzy spells (previous episodes of fainting when going to the loo in the night were investigated and found to be combination of low BP and tachicardia).
    -Varicose veins in the legs that ache after standing all day
    -Mood swings, feelings of depression and anxiety

    These symptoms are in a woman of 22 years old, not previously diagnosed with any specific condition other than depression and taking only the oral contraceptive pill. Any suggestions as to what could be wrong?

    • ANSWER:
      There can be MANY things wrong here and the ONLY way to know for sure is to see a doctor. That being said, some of those symptoms are also what I suffered through when I found out I was going through Menopasue (at age 21). I found this for you:

      PREMATURE OVARIAN FAILURE- Premature ovarian failure (POF) used to be commonly referred to as premature menopause -- as it is a condition in which your periods stop before the age of 40. In this case, you usually have menopausal symptoms -- including a stop in your periods. Most importantly, when you get a hormone test (a test of your follicle stimulating hormone, or FSH, and estradiol, the main circulating estrogen), you will test at post-menopausal levels.

      Unlike "normal" menopause, however, premature ovarian failure (POF) doesn't necessarily mean that your ovaries are out of eggs. Yes, sometimes this is the case -- and then it is, perhaps rightly, referred to as premature menopause. But sometimes you stop having periods not because you no longer have eggs, but because your body isn't responding to the signals to ovulate.

      Tell this person to go to a doctor. Thats a lot of symptoms to have to live with.

      Good Luck!

  47. QUESTION:
    Pregnant or Crazy?
    My cycle is now 9 days late...Had faint tests over weekend...had to tilt to see the lines.I had a blood test on monday that came back with an hcg of 2...I was in such disbelief I went right to the drugstore and bought another hpt and ironically it had a faint +immediately...I would also liketo mention i used different brands as well.......how can this be possible? I have had frequent urination, headaches all week last week,loss of appetite which is improving this week,3-4am wake ups to pee,my breasts are huge,had nips on fire on and off for a few days, menstral like cramping in ab area followed by leg cramping, walked into my home the other day and asked my son what is that smell...it was the glade airfreshner i bought over a month ago. I'm 5 weeks right now and so confused!!! Has anyone ever experienced this? I feel crazy....crying for no reason..

    • ANSWER:
      Overall, blood tests are more accurate than urine tests because your blood cannot be too diluted (like urine) and does not require that your body metabolize hCG into your urine (which some women do slowly or, rarely, not at all.) But, in some circumstances, yes, you can be pregnant without a positive blood test.

      There are two different kinds of blood pregnancy tests, known as qualitative and quantitative. A qualitative test measures the quality of your blood: either pregnant or not. The test is much like an HPT, except it uses your blood rather than your urine. It means the laboratory has a pre-set cutoff point for determining "pregnant." In some labs, a level of 5+ will come back as a positive test; in other labs, your blood must have 25+ mIU/mL of hCG. Usually the lab will not tell you what their cutoff point is; they will simply tell you yes or no, just like peeing on a stick. You may be pregnant, but just "a little" pregnant, and the blood test was not sensitive enough to detect it.

      A quantitative blood test is much more specific; it measures the exact quantity of hCG in your bloodstream. Non-pregnant women of childbearing age have anywhere from 0-2 mIU/mL† of hCG in their blood (average is about 0.5†.) Generally anything over 5 is considered pregnant, though 3-4 is a "gray zone" (a little too much for normal non-pregnant, but not quite high enough to pass muster at the lab.) Peri- and post-menopausal women may have up to 9.5 mIU/mL† of hCG. If you have this type of blood test performed, there is little doubt that the results are correct (barring lab error.) Exception: prior to implantation, the embryo does not secrete hCG and cannot be detected. Therefore, it is possible to be in the very early stages of pregnancy and still get a negative blood test.

      I would call and find out which test they used and make an appt for another one. If you are pregnant your hcg levels should double every 48 hours. So by the next appt it should be a for sure yes or no. Good Luck

  48. QUESTION:
    i am 2 months late on my period and and i had my tubes tied 17 years ago. took pregency test was neg.?
    have cramping ,swelling in the stomach , dizziness

    • ANSWER:
      Well I am going to tll you the story of a very close friend of mine.
      She had a her tubes cut, and she was feeling like you, she felt she was prego; she told her husband as he was a doctor.
      He told her she was crazy, what she was saying was medically impossible; they went to the doctor and yes she was pregnant.
      Her falopian tube grew again, go figure!
      So I would say no you´re very unlikely pregnant, but I know it can happen.
      I´d say that if you are not post menopausal or menopausal, you should take a test, you can be very well pregnant.
      Also my friend feels so blessed, caused she has very big boys, but she has a partner her little child :)

      Good luck! ;D

  49. QUESTION:
    is it normal to be having bleeding between periods?
    im 14, almost 15, and i just started my period about 5 months ago, and have been fairly normal since. then just 2 weeks ago, while in between periods, i went to the bathroom and i whiped up a little blood, but when i whiped again, there was none (sorry for the tmi). after a few days there was still none, so i just ignored it and suspected that it was normal. then about 2 weeks later, i was starting to feel a few cramps so i went to the bathroom and the same thing happened to me again! after another few days, nothing happened, just like the first time. this is the first time that anything like this has ever happened to me, and im starting to worry that this is not normal. should i be concerned???

    oh! btw, i havent been under very much stress lately. at first i had thought that that could have something to do with it, but life has been strangely less stressful lately..... so that rules out that reason.

    Ok thanks for everything, and PLEASE try to help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of in between period bleeding:

      •Uterine fibroids or cervical or uterine polyps
      •Changes in hormone levels
      •Inflammation or infection of the cervix (cervicitis)
      •Injury or disease of the vaginal opening (caused by intercourse, infection, polyp, genital warts, ulcer, or varicose veins)
      •IUD use (may cause occasional spotting)
      •Ectopic pregnancy
      •Miscarriage
      •Other pregnancy complications
      •Vaginal dryness due to lack of estrogen after menopause
      •Stress
      •Stopping and starting birth control pills or estrogens
      •Underactive thyroid (low thyroid function)
      •Use of blood thinners (anticoagulants)
      •Cancer or precancer of the cervix, uterus, or (very rarely) fallopian tube
      •Cervical or endometrial biopsy or other procedures

      Vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods — what most of us call spotting — is a common problem. Almost every woman will experience it at some point in her life.

      In most cases, spotting before your period is no cause for concern. However, in some situations, it could signal a reproductive health problem or even a life-threatening disease

      If you experience spot bleeding before your period or in the middle of your cycle, there’s no reason to be overly worried. “A little bit of bleeding between menstrual periods or occasional spotting is fairly normal,” says Autry. Do make sure the bleeding is coming from the vagina and not from the rectum or from your urine — use a tampon to find out.

      About 10 percent of menstruating women regularly spot at the time of ovulation due to a temporary drop in estrogen at the time the ovary releases an egg.

      Often, women will get vaginal discharge tinged with a little blood. You may also feel a slight pain or cramp. The clue to this harmless kind of spotting is that it happens every month about 10 to 14 days after your menstrual period ends — or as early as two weeks before your period. A little spotting may also be a sign of getting your period (you know your body best, so you know whether this is true).

      What to Do About Spotting Between Periods

      Even if your vaginal blood spotting doesn’t signal a health problem, there’s no reason to put up with the inconvenience of spotting before your period. Spotting during one cycle isn’t really a cause for alarm, but “if the spotting becomes the ‘new you,’ I recommend you see your medical provider,” says Weiss.

      With your doctor’s help, you can prevent vaginal bleeding between your menstrual periods or reduce the risk of spotting by:
      Taking birth control pills as prescribed. Skipping pills is a common cause of spotting. Stopping and restarting the pill may also cause bleeding between your menstrual periods. Try to take your pill at around the same time every day to reduce the chance of spotting, recommends Autry.
      Limiting your intake of aspirin. Because aspirin can cause bleeding, it should be avoided if spotting is a problem. “Aspirin is a blood thinner, which could exacerbate bleeding between menstrual periods,” says Autry.
      Getting regular pap smears. This screening for cervical cancer can catch the disease before you get symptomatic bleeding. Cervical cancer is 100 percent curable if caught in its early stages. An annual pap smear can detect any abnormal cells in the cancer’s earliest, treatable stage.
      Maintaining a healthy weight. This will reduce your risk of uterine cancer. “Obesity is a strong risk factor for uterine cancer,” says Autry. Because uterine cancer is most common in post-menopausal women, contact your doctor immediately if you have any spotting after menopause.
      Switching birth control methods. Spotting is common in women who use intrauterine devices (IUDs). Usually, the bleeding isn’t harmful, but switching to a different form of birth control can end the inconvenience of spotting.
      Managing stress. Emotional stress can cause a woman’s menstrual cycle to get out of whack, which can cause spotting or irregular periods. Try to keep stress under control with relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, deep breathing, visualization, and aerobic exercise.

  50. QUESTION:
    Menopause ... coming and going?
    Exactly 2 years ago I had my last period. It had been spotty and irregular for about a year previous. I began with the hot flashes and unrelenting night sweats that have lasted for two years. Just as they seemed to easing up a bit, a couple of weeks ago I experienced symptoms of ovulation, than a week or so later, pre period breast tenderness, then cramps and now, an actual period! I had to search around for 'those supplies" I had gladly given up 2 years ago! Is this long time span a not an uncommon occurance, I wonder??? I thought I was actully all through!!!!!!! I am 55 years old and do not take anything for treatment. Thanks for your input.

    • ANSWER:
      Considering the majority of the questions here, it is so nice to see someone who is actually in tune with her bodily functions.

      I went all over the internet trying to find out how long into menopause you can be and still have a period. I couldn't find anything scientific, and I can even read medicalese. What I did find were lots of posts by women at health sites who reported them at two years and at 18 months. One woman said her gynecologist reassured her by telling her she had a patient who had a period at age 78.

      I recently had a friend who complained that she thought she was menopausal, but doctors define menopause as no periods for one year, and she had one after 51 weeks.

      The time between your last period and the time the hot flashes stop can be ten years. During that time, your hormones are erratic, which is what causes the hot flashes. No reason to believe they couldn't synch themselves up again.

      Your best bet is to phone your gynecologist. If s/he is one of those who doesn't give advice over the phone, there is probably a nurse there who knows how common this is.

      One thing I did find out is that a major cause of postmenopausal bleeding is endometrial cancer, and if you go to the doctor, they will probably check you for it. But YOU know you had a period, so don't worry about that.


post menopausal cramps